Doug Lord

Steve and Dave Clarks Unidentified Foiling Object

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9 minutes ago, koolkat505 said:

A general question from #58-- How or where are you insuring your UFO??  There was some discussion last July on the thread about it, TT (#4) said he used Boat US, but when I just got off the phone with them 15 minutes ago, they said NO UFO due to the foils.  DH had suggest Gowrie Group, whom I had contacted last week.  They have a "one design program", but the only foiler they currently cover are "Moth " brands, which we aren't, so they will not cover the UFO either!  I had been thinking about going to the Ottawa regatta in June, but they are looking for 1.5 million dollar (Canadian) liability coverage.  Fortunately, Wickford has NO insurance coverage requirement.  Any ideas would be greatly appreciated- Thanks #58

Myself and Mierde2 are covered by  Skippers' Plan (http://skippersplan.com/) you could perhaps ask if they will cover your boat for the Skiff Regatta. There's https://www.allstate.com/ in the US of A. If not, take your boat to the Ottawa Regatta, I suspect the officials will come up with a creative solution which would you ensure you could race with peace of mind.

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2 hours ago, koolkat505 said:

A general question from #58-- How or where are you insuring your UFO??  There was some discussion last July on the thread about it, TT (#4) said he used Boat US, but when I just got off the phone with them 15 minutes ago, they said NO UFO due to the foils.  DH had suggest Gowrie Group, whom I had contacted last week.  They have a "one design program", but the only foiler they currently cover are "Moth " brands, which we aren't, so they will not cover the UFO either!  I had been thinking about going to the Ottawa regatta in June, but they are looking for 1.5 million dollar (Canadian) liability coverage.  Fortunately, Wickford has NO insurance coverage requirement.  Any ideas would be greatly appreciated- Thanks #58

I'll make a note to talk to gowrie. They insure Fulcrum on a number of fronts so they totally have a dog in this fight: us!

DRC

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2 hours ago, wsailor said:

Myself and Mierde2 are covered by  Skippers' Plan (http://skippersplan.com/) you could perhaps ask if they will cover your boat for the Skiff Regatta. There's https://www.allstate.com/ in the US of A. If not, take your boat to the Ottawa Regatta, I suspect the officials will come up with a creative solution which would you ensure you could race with peace of mind.

I got insurance from Geico Marine online for some regatta last September, there were no questions about foils.  It only covers covers a up to $300k for injury and property damage, but maybe the OA will accept the mandatory $939,800 Fuel Spill Liability.

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Hull # 88 arrived safe and sound and will soon be flopping around Whiskeytown Lake. Be my first hiking, first dinghy etc so I foresee lots of MOB drills of the unplanned sort.

Big thanks to Dave and Kirk for all the help and patience.

And one quick question I haven't seen addressed. Is there anything I need to know about the bungie that attaches to the wand. I'm really thinking about putting some heat shrink tubing on the end of the wand so it can't fall out of its holder. That bungie comes adrift and my wand would fall right out.  

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Randy, I wrap duct tape around the top of the wand to prevent having the wand fall out unintentionally.  Two wraps max, and easy off at end of day if you leave a tag on it.

 

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Moth 0093 just arrived on Lake Champlain last weekend.  My first sail on it was yesterday after work.  The comments, videos, and google docs that early adopters have posted were really helpful in allowing me to rig and sail it successfully.  Thanks to everyone for sharing!   I have some bugs to work out, but can't wait to log more time on the UFO.  My first sail conditions were not ideal, 8-10 knots (good) with frequent 16-18 gusts.  But the UFO handled it very well.  One capsize in an hour of sailing, not bad.  With 41 degree water temps, staying on top of the boat was a real bonus!  My previous foiling experience was about a dozen sessions over the past four years on a friend's Mach 2.   Love the Moth, but the UFO is so much more user-friendly.  I agree with several of the posters that a solution needs to be found to 'soft lock' the struts in place so that you have a low-draft mode to get off the beach and return to it.  I'm thinking a cam-actuated rubber pad, but will  ponder and try to fabricate something for it over the next month or two.  

Doug

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7 hours ago, Champlain Sailor said:

Moth 0093 just arrived on Lake Champlain last weekend.  My first sail on it was yesterday after work.  The comments, videos, and google docs that early adopters have posted were really helpful in allowing me to rig and sail it successfully.  Thanks to everyone for sharing!   I have some bugs to work out, but can't wait to log more time on the UFO.  My first sail conditions were not ideal, 8-10 knots (good) with frequent 16-18 gusts.  But the UFO handled it very well.  One capsize in an hour of sailing, not bad.  With 41 degree water temps, staying on top of the boat was a real bonus!  My previous foiling experience was about a dozen sessions over the past four years on a friend's Mach 2.   Love the Moth, but the UFO is so much more user-friendly.  I agree with several of the posters that a solution needs to be found to 'soft lock' the struts in place so that you have a low-draft mode to get off the beach and return to it.  I'm thinking a cam-actuated rubber pad, but will  ponder and try to fabricate something for it over the next month or two.  

Doug

Or, spend $4 at a HomeDepot for a nylon spring clamp. If possible and not too inconvenient, it's a good idea to take rear foil assembly to store to test lifting/holding strength of clamp. A small piece of rubber (inner tube, wet suit patch) Gorilla glued onto plastic jaws improves grip. Works well to lower foil during launch, not yet tested to determine whether or not it helps with landing.

IMG_20171017_145932_clamp.jpg

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We just started integrating nylon thumb screws threaded into the cheek plate of the rudderhead. I'm still not in love with it, but it does improve things. I took forever trying to find the perfect nylon wingbolt and just spun my wheels for about a year on it. Gave up and went for a knurled head. It does work, though.

 

DRC

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One trick I use with my Whisper rudders is to have a bungee with a hook that pulls the top forward. Very modest pressure forward angles the rudder and prevents it from sliding up or down.

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I tested the spring clamp , in and out g , worked nicely , during navigation I attached it on the boom .

Only issu : main sail sheet get caught around it and it went overboard when I was adjusting the UFO on the Dolly ..

Ced

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Small video of our last sailing .

Kid , 16yrs old , 65 kg  , wind 20 knts first time sailing the UFO or any foiler ...

This "hard landing" occurred many times to all of us.Most of the time ended wit MOB or/and capsize ...

On previous post I read that we should adjust the ruder foil angle and main foil angle we will work on this.

Zooming on Hi res we can even see the cavitation around the foil.

Any comments from the most experienced one

ced

 

 

 

UFO quick landing.mov

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Two turns more to the right on rudder. Though if you're on anything aft of the center on the mainfoil, returning the mainfoil to center would be the best first step.

DRC

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On 5/3/2018 at 12:43 PM, Champlain Sailor said:

Moth 0093 just arrived on Lake Champlain last weekend.  My first sail on it was yesterday after work.  The comments, videos, and google docs that early adopters have posted were really helpful in allowing me to rig and sail it successfully.  Thanks to everyone for sharing!   I have some bugs to work out, but can't wait to log more time on the UFO.  My first sail conditions were not ideal, 8-10 knots (good) with frequent 16-18 gusts.  But the UFO handled it very well.  One capsize in an hour of sailing, not bad.  With 41 degree water temps, staying on top of the boat was a real bonus!  My previous foiling experience was about a dozen sessions over the past four years on a friend's Mach 2.   Love the Moth, but the UFO is so much more user-friendly.  I agree with several of the posters that a solution needs to be found to 'soft lock' the struts in place so that you have a low-draft mode to get off the beach and return to it.  I'm thinking a cam-actuated rubber pad, but will  ponder and try to fabricate something for it over the next month or two.  

Doug

Hi,  I use bungees wrapped around the vertical foils.

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I like the bungees and spring clamp ideas.  Super simple, and simple is good.  They just need to hold the blade for a few minutes, with minimal load.   I'll try them this weekend.  In time, I'm sure Dave will have a more elegant solution.   I have a question into Fulcrum and have not heard back yet on the proper use of the main foil hold down pin and retention bracket.  I was surprised to see that the upper plates of the pin bracket are slotted on one end, so they can swing out when not under load.  I thought that once the strut was lowered, the pin would slide through one bracket, through the hold in the strut, then through the bracket on the other side.  I could only get the pin through the bracket, the strut, and just start on the 2nd bracket.  It was not a particularly secure hold down.  I've seen some internet traffic recommending that the hold in the strut be enlarged.  I'd rather not drill it out unless I have to (can't undrill it).   Since I'm not sure why the top part of the brackets are 'gated', I suspect there is more to this assembly than I am seeing.  Any experienced UFO pilots have some advice?

 

Doug

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On 4/30/2018 at 5:36 PM, koolkat505 said:

A general question from #58-- How or where are you insuring your UFO??  There was some discussion last July on the thread about it, TT (#4) said he used Boat US, but when I just got off the phone with them 15 minutes ago, they said NO UFO due to the foils.  DH had suggest Gowrie Group, whom I had contacted last week.  They have a "one design program", but the only foiler they currently cover are "Moth " brands, which we aren't, so they will not cover the UFO either!  I had been thinking about going to the Ottawa regatta in June, but they are looking for 1.5 million dollar (Canadian) liability coverage.  Fortunately, Wickford has NO insurance coverage requirement.  Any ideas would be greatly appreciated- Thanks #58

I have Amica for all my other insurance and they were happy to insure the UFO. Liability is the standard $300k, but I’m sure they’d be happy to give you a quote for whatever you need. 

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13 hours ago, Champlain Sailor said:

I like the bungees and spring clamp ideas.  Super simple, and simple is good.  They just need to hold the blade for a few minutes, with minimal load.   I'll try them this weekend.  In time, I'm sure Dave will have a more elegant solution.   I have a question into Fulcrum and have not heard back yet on the proper use of the main foil hold down pin and retention bracket.  I was surprised to see that the upper plates of the pin bracket are slotted on one end, so they can swing out when not under load.  I thought that once the strut was lowered, the pin would slide through one bracket, through the hold in the strut, then through the bracket on the other side.  I could only get the pin through the bracket, the strut, and just start on the 2nd bracket.  It was not a particularly secure hold down.  I've seen some internet traffic recommending that the hold in the strut be enlarged.  I'd rather not drill it out unless I have to (can't undrill it).   Since I'm not sure why the top part of the brackets are 'gated', I suspect there is more to this assembly than I am seeing.  Any experienced UFO pilots have some advice?

 

Doug

Leave the pin in the main vertical and open/close the gates to raise/lower the foil.

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On 04/05/2018 at 1:43 AM, Champlain Sailor said:

Moth 0093 just arrived on Lake Champlain last weekend.  My first sail on it was yesterday after work.  The comments, videos, and google docs that early adopters have posted were really helpful in allowing me to rig and sail it successfully.  Thanks to everyone for sharing!   I have some bugs to work out, but can't wait to log more time on the UFO.  My first sail conditions were not ideal, 8-10 knots (good) with frequent 16-18 gusts.  But the UFO handled it very well.  One capsize in an hour of sailing, not bad.  With 41 degree water temps, staying on top of the boat was a real bonus!  My previous foiling experience was about a dozen sessions over the past four years on a friend's Mach 2.   Love the Moth, but the UFO is so much more user-friendly.  I agree with several of the posters that a solution needs to be found to 'soft lock' the struts in place so that you have a low-draft mode to get off the beach and return to it.  I'm thinking a cam-actuated rubber pad, but will  ponder and try to fabricate something for it over the next month or two.  

Doug

i drilled a small hole in my rudder and stock

when i want it to stay up, i have a piece of wire that i stick through the hole in the stock. i then move the rudder up and down to get it to align into the rudder hole while pushing in pretty hard with the wire.

so fast and easy, the wire just goes back into my lifejacket pocket

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We now use a nylon thunbscew threaded into the cheek plate on the rudderhead. Email us if you want one in the mail. That bug should have been squashed a year ago.

DRC

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Has anyone had the experience of taking off, then having the boat seem to de-power (esp. on 90-degree reach or upwind take offs)?  It seems like as soon as I get airborne the rig loses power and my weather heel soon becomes my butt (or whole person) in the water (to the windward side of the boat).  I am sheeting in like crazy and even heading up but it doesn't seem to help.  This seems to happen in 90-degree reach or higher takeoffs.  

After thinking about it a bit, perhaps I need to bear off after I get airborne because the apparent-wind shift causes the boat to go from 90 degrees or slightly higher to 'into the wind' / into irons.  Does anyone experience having to bear off as speed is gathering on up-wind / 90-degree reach take offs?   

My other thought is simply puffy or shifty wind.  As in as soon as I am airborne, the wind dies/shifts and puts me in the water.  But the effect seems consistent across two different days in two slightly different locations.  Any thoughts forum?

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26 minutes ago, DerekF said:

After thinking about it a bit, perhaps I need to bear off after I get airborne because the apparent-wind shift causes the boat to go from 90 degrees or slightly higher to 'into the wind' / into irons.  Does anyone experience having to bear off as speed is gathering on up-wind / 90-degree reach take offs?   

My other thought is simply puffy or shifty wind.  As in as soon as I am airborne, the wind dies/shifts and puts me in the water.  But the effect seems consistent across two different days in two slightly different locations.  Any thoughts forum?

I often bear off a tiny bit until I'm situated. Sailing out of your puff can do it as well. Over-sheeting can also do it. There's a difference between pumping hard and stalling out the rig, which can be learned iteratively. Additionally, trying to dial in too much weather heel can do it. There can easily be too much of a good thing and in moderate puffy breeze I still on occasion succumb to too much roll on the takeoff, where I find my self scrambling into the boat and reaching for the shroud as the boat skitters along with the weather hull in the water, heeled 45 degrees to weather. If you can get a goro on your wand sprit facing aft, I bet myself and a lot of people on this forum can help.

DRC

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On 03/05/2018 at 12:43 PM, Champlain Sailor said:

Moth 0093 just arrived on Lake Champlain last weekend.  My first sail on it was yesterday after work.  The comments, videos, and google docs that early adopters have posted were really helpful in allowing me to rig and sail it successfully.  Thanks to everyone for sharing!   I have some bugs to work out, but can't wait to log more time on the UFO.  My first sail conditions were not ideal, 8-10 knots (good) with frequent 16-18 gusts.  But the UFO handled it very well.  One capsize in an hour of sailing, not bad.  With 41 degree water temps, staying on top of the boat was a real bonus!  My previous foiling experience was about a dozen sessions over the past four years on a friend's Mach 2.   Love the Moth, but the UFO is so much more user-friendly.  I agree with several of the posters that a solution needs to be found to 'soft lock' the struts in place so that you have a low-draft mode to get off the beach and return to it.  I'm thinking a cam-actuated rubber pad, but will  ponder and try to fabricate something for it over the next month or two.  

Doug

I missed the UFO clinic in Rhode Island this past weekend, so I decided to drag the boat out of storage and try to imitate what I saw on the various YouTube videos. I did not manage to foil, BUT I did launch from the beach without incident and after flailing around in 'irons', I managed a successful beach landing (Hobie 16 style) which might be a first for the UFO class.

 

sm_IMG_20180506_162854.jpg

sm_IMG_20180506_141415.jpg

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Hi everyone, hull nr. 49 here from Holland.

I tried the spring clamp idea and it works great. The one I used was a small one, but I gave it a couple of turns with some shock cord to get a stronger clamping action.

Also some turns of self vulcanizing tape around the beaks to get more gliding resistance. Worked like a champ of course lost it after one time sailing.

Another thing about the resistance of the wand. After sailing just 2 times the push rod that actuates the flap on the foil punched a hole right to the carbon layer.

This takes away a lot of the max. foil camber I solved it by glueing in a ss screw ( grinded the groove off ) and it lies flush with the foil shape. 

I cleaned up  the groove in the flap and it is nice and clean, I even took out some of the sikaflex at the tips, but the counter balance is still enormous and it needs a lot of force to achieve max. camber.  If there is so much resistance could it be possible that this holds back early foiling , because the wand is just ploughing the water  ?

Anyone having idea's about this ?

Tjibbe

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To anyone using the spring clamp; I drilled (actually enlarged) a tiny hole in the handle, through which I tied a short piece of 2mm line. I tied the other end to the split ring on the tiller pin and clamped the jaws to the fairlead at the top of the rudder when I had lowered the foil into the water.

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3 hours ago, TJV said:

Another thing about the resistance of the wand. After sailing just 2 times the push rod that actuates the flap on the foil punched a hole right to the carbon layer.

This takes away a lot of the max. foil camber I solved it by glueing in a ss screw ( grinded the groove off ) and it lies flush with the foil shape. 

I cleaned up  the groove in the flap and it is nice and clean, I even took out some of the sikaflex at the tips, but the counter balance is still enormous and it needs a lot of force to achieve max. camber.  If there is so much resistance could it be possible that this holds back early foiling , because the wand is just ploughing the water  ?

Anyone having idea's about this ?

Tjibbe

That's definitely stray g-flex in the flap. Upgrading to a vacuum bagged hinge glueing process had some unintended side effects which we didn't instantly catch. We now have pieces of molded silicone which arrest unintended glue travel. Sanding out any stray yellow glue will restore it to normal function. I strongly advise against pulling out any of the sika in the hinge. The foil is driven by and benefits from twist. Requiring firm pressure to actuate it keeps the noise out of the system and firm downward response keeps the boat safe in chop and gusts. Reducing the foils capacity to pull down in tough spots will make the boat a dicier ride. You won't notice it in ideal conditions, but you will in tough stuff. Pulling the wand out entirely yields a tiny marginal improvement in speed in light air, so I doubt leaving the wand in but reducing the force requirements of the system will make the boat foil sooner.

I'll shoot a video on launching and landing technique today or tomorrow. To everyone out there, please PLEASE don't go drilling holes in your boats. Holes cannot be undrilled and the answer has far more to do with technique than technology.

DRC

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Thanks Dave,  that was very informative.

Tjibbe

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UFO 093 made its second flight yesterday.  Breezes were much more appropriate for learning (8-10) and I had the benefit of feedback from this forum and Dave and Kirk to solve some of the mistakes I made previously.  The sailing was very smooth, launching and retrieving much easier.  The $3 clamp on the rudder worked like a charm.  I did clean the pin hole in the main foil with a 0.25" drill bit.  A tiny burr came out, and now the pin is much easier to get through the foil, but still very secure (no wobble).  McLube on the pin and on the main sail luff made everything easier too.  

My son and I traded out, and both managed to fly for a bit, but the breeze was dying and dropped to low-riding velocities pretty soon.  I was surprised how fast the UFO is when off the foils, I'd say it is as fast off the wind as our Laser in 5-6 knots of breeze.  Upwind, not quite so much.  The techniques of bearing off and hooking back to windward with a strong pump worked well in these marginal conditions.  It is obvious that lots of time in the boat will yield big gains in the skipper's ability to foil in sub-10 knot winds.  

The only problem we observed is that even with the main sail at full hoist at the start, with enough downhall tension, the top of the sail dropped about 3" or so.  I don't know if this was due to stretch in the short section running from the cleat to the head of the sail, if the halyard cleat slipped, or if this is just how the sail sets.   We had enough stretch that the slug at the bottom of the main dropped out of the slot at the bottom of the mast.

Lots of fun, can't wait for more opportunities to sail, preferrably in a bit more wind.  I'm also trying to be at the upcoming clinic at the end of the month, I'm sure I'll gain a month's worth of experience with a weekend of coached clinic.

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18 hours ago, Dave Clark said:

I often bear off a tiny bit until I'm situated. Sailing out of your puff can do it as well. Over-sheeting can also do it. There's a difference between pumping hard and stalling out the rig, which can be learned iteratively. Additionally, trying to dial in too much weather heel can do it. There can easily be too much of a good thing and in moderate puffy breeze I still on occasion succumb to too much roll on the takeoff, where I find my self scrambling into the boat and reaching for the shroud as the boat skitters along with the weather hull in the water, heeled 45 degrees to weather. If you can get a goro on your wand sprit facing aft, I bet myself and a lot of people on this forum can help.

DRC

Dave, thanks for the tips.  Perhaps I need to get better at scrambling to the centerline when my puff dies.  I will get the camera mounted on the wand sprit for my Friday sail and post up some video.  

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25 minutes ago, DerekF said:

Dave, thanks for the tips.  Perhaps I need to get better at scrambling to the centerline when my puff dies.  I will get the camera mounted on the wand sprit for my Friday sail and post up some video.  

Focus on knowing the lull is coming and doing everything to glide through it. Moving your bodyweight will often be too little too late. I find that sheeting in, bearing up or off to a dead even reach and even pumping are the three tools to get through a nasty lull. If you're out of it and rolling into weather, I actually deliberately jam my lifejacket into the water to arrest the roll.

DRC

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21 hours ago, DerekF said:

Has anyone had the experience of taking off, then having the boat seem to de-power (esp. on 90-degree reach or upwind take offs)?  It seems like as soon as I get airborne the rig loses power and my weather heel soon becomes my butt (or whole person) in the water (to the windward side of the boat).  I am sheeting in like crazy and even heading up but it doesn't seem to help.  This seems to happen in 90-degree reach or higher takeoffs.  

After thinking about it a bit, perhaps I need to bear off after I get airborne because the apparent-wind shift causes the boat to go from 90 degrees or slightly higher to 'into the wind' / into irons.  Does anyone experience having to bear off as speed is gathering on up-wind / 90-degree reach take offs?   

My other thought is simply puffy or shifty wind.  As in as soon as I am airborne, the wind dies/shifts and puts me in the water.  But the effect seems consistent across two different days in two slightly different locations.  Any thoughts forum?

I don't know if it is relevant for your issues, but when I started mothing I had precisely the same situation and the main cause for it was not enough tension on the leech of the sail.

 

 

 

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Hi all, this thread is filled with awesome people that seem very helpful. I’ll be down at Lakewood yacht club this weekend for high school doublehand nationals. Flying down Friday from Minnesota and hope to see some UFOs down there. I’d love to see some foiling as foilers are scarce in Minnesota lakes due to the weeds. 

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Sailed my 3rd session on UFO 093 yesterday on Lake Champlain.  Great learning conditions, with winds of 6-8 and puffs of 8-10.  The tweaks we made after the first two sessions helped a lot, and I would now estimate I can get the cover off, sail up, and boat in the water in 15 minutes, with another 5 to launch and get the foils in place.  Not bad, pretty similar to my prep time with the Laser.  I continue to be surprised how well the UFO sails in low riding mode.  Several have mentioned that in light air to sit well forward, that is good advice.  It points quite well.   I found a slot in the bay that seemed to funnel the wind and stayed close to it to find the 8-10 knot puffs.  It wasn't long before I was flying.  Unlike my first two sessions, this was sustained, controlled flight.  I had the wand fully extended and in the strongest, longest puff managed to climb to full height for 20-30 seconds before I sailed out of it.  Very nice!    I had the boat set up per Dave's light air instructions with significant shroud tension, minimal outhaul and moderate downhaul.  The sail felt quite powerful.   No problem this time with the main halyard coming down, we must have simply not gotten it securely in the cleat on session 2.

The question I get most is 'How does it compare to the Moth?'   I'm sure my thoughts will evolve as I get more experience on the UFO.  As of now, the UFO is behaving as I thought it would.  It needs more wind to fly.   The Moth needed 7-8 knots to fly my 180lbs with my novice ability.  8-10 was needed for sustained, non-dramatic flying.  10-14 was ideal for exploring my limits and fun, exciting sailing.  If it was blowing more than 15, the Moth felt like too much for me (at my ability level).

The UFO seems to need about 2 knots more wind to foil continuously.  I expect to be able to milk more power out of less wind as I gain experience, but at this time I think I need 10 knots to fly well.  Based on my initial outing with 18 knot gusts, I think my comfort level will be much higher in the UFO when the winds are in the 15-20 knot range.  

Low riding, there is no contest.   The UFO is a piece of cake.  You can sail fast or slow, and you can stop and take a break.    I'm told you can even enjoy a slice of pizza.  On the Moth, you are always balancing, trying to keep the boat upright when not flying.   Sailing slow isn't too bad, once you have some time in the boat, but stopping to relax (while upright) is pretty much impossible.  The only maneuver that feels really awkward in the UFO is tacking.  As with all cats, coming through the wind is not their strong suit.  I'm sure I'll get better, but for now I find I almost always end up backing the sail with my shoulder, reversing the tiller, and backing up a half a boat length to get the boat to bear off.   

This morning we had 10-12 knots of breeze with gusts in the mid teens.   Perfect conditions but for the fact I had to go to work.

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We've got two demo boats and a RIB down at sail newport from now till the end of the VOR stopover.

Book a demo on https://ufodemo.com/

You'll be able to see us anywhere. We have https://ufodemo.com/ printed in giant black letters on the sails. From there you can book a demo from your phone on https://ufodemo.com/ and we'll be able to get you on the boat easily.

If you can't tell, I'm kinda excited about https://ufodemo.com/! It puts you automatically into a booking spreadsheet on our phones! #automation!

DRC

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On 5/8/2018 at 9:29 AM, Dave Clark said:

Focus on knowing the lull is coming and doing everything to glide through it. Moving your bodyweight will often be too little too late. I find that sheeting in, bearing up or off to a dead even reach and even pumping are the three tools to get through a nasty lull. If you're out of it and rolling into weather, I actually deliberately jam my lifejacket into the water to arrest the roll.

DRC

Got out yesterday again and finally had everything going right (except broke my new waterproof camera mount before even getting on the boat =\  ).  I was able to sustain foiling for 30-60 seconds and finally felt in control of the boat.  Most of the 'fall off the foils moments' were to leward rather than windward which will just require more practice and comfort with windward heel angle.  What helped me 'turn the corner' was realizing that sheeting in/out is not necessarily a subtle act.  Often I found myself pulling in 2-3 arm-lengths of main sheet especially in puffy breeze to arrest a windward roll.  Taking off windward hull first helps create that windward heel angle as Dave mentions in the video. 

Another realization is that a catamaran is very forgiving with misplaced starboard/port weight distribution; monohulls are not.  As the UFO transitions from catamaran displacement mode to foil mode the starboard/port pivot point changes from the windward hull to the foil strut essentially transitioning the boat from catamaran to monohull.  I find myself needing to make a quick starboard/port body weight adjustment as I am taking off.  Typically I hike a bit harder before take off then pull myself in just as I am taking off.  

Ok one more, if you are sheeting in hard to save yourself from going in the water to windward, don't give up.  Even if my body has made contact with the water, if I keep sheeting in the boat will pull me back out of the water.  It's not enough to pull one arm length of main sheet and give up.  Keep sheeting in and stay with it and most of the time you'll get things back together!

Last, thank you @17mika for the rigging tip.  I watched Dave's rigging video again and made sure I had the leach tension higher.  I'm not sure if that's what made the difference but I had success.  Also, upon watching the video again I realized that I had been neglecting to insert the extra baton at the bottom of the sail this whole time.  That probably wasn't helping.

Thank you to @Dave Clark and @17mika for the tips and helping me begin to get more out of the boat!

 

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Wow!  another amazing UFO foiling clinic for the record books.  Thank you Dave, Kirk, Andrew, and the rest of Team Fulcrum Speedworks!

Friday it was sunny and windy with a bunch of new faces, it was good to be foiling again.

Saturday was warmer, we practiced some more boat handling skills, and early in the afternoon the southerly filled in — by the end of the day there were a lot of tired sailors.  

Sunday we traded sunny skies for a cloudy, gusty, whitecappy, drizzly, 18 kt ENE wind.  Our launch site was from the WSW corner of Mt Hope Bay, so we had a good 4 miles of fetch to deal with just getting to open water.  It seemed a bit daunting at first, but once we got out there it was like finding a higher gear for fun:  just ease, hike, foil.

I really leaned a lot this weekend;  not only what works, but why it works, and how to make it happen again, ... and I could benefit with a bit of exercise.  

Next weekend is the Ottowa Skiff and Cat Grand Prix Regatta (OSCGP 2018) in Ottowa.  June 9-10 is the Wicklford Regatta 2018, 7 signed up, and 2 more committed.  Everyone is really helpful and every time we get together I learn a lot from the class.

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Great clinic this past weekend. Lots of improvements from the first one for everyone.

Early registration ends Wednesday it seems for the OSGP.
https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/14th-ottawa-skiff-and-cat-grand-prix-registration-45633481973
45$ USD / 60$ CAD gets you 6 races/day and 20$ to spend at the bar for drinks/food.
Camping on site is tradition. 

Anyone signed up?
Any boats from Toronto making the trip up?

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19 hours ago, Bill's Sock Puppet said:

Wow!  another amazing UFO foiling clinic for the record books.  Thank you Dave, Kirk, Andrew, and the rest of Team Fulcrum Speedworks!

Friday it was sunny and windy with a bunch of new faces, it was good to be foiling again.

Saturday was warmer, we practiced some more boat handling skills, and early in the afternoon the southerly filled in — by the end of the day there were a lot of tired sailors.  

Sunday we traded sunny skies for a cloudy, gusty, whitecappy, drizzly, 18 kt ENE wind.  Our launch site was from the WSW corner of Mt Hope Bay, so we had a good 4 miles of fetch to deal with just getting to open water.  It seemed a bit daunting at first, but once we got out there it was like finding a higher gear for fun:  just ease, hike, foil.

I really leaned a lot this weekend;  not only what works, but why it works, and how to make it happen again, ... and I could benefit with a bit of exercise.  

Next weekend is the Ottowa Skiff and Cat Grand Prix Regatta (OSCGP 2018) in Ottowa.  June 9-10 is the Wicklford Regatta 2018, 7 signed up, and 2 more committed.  Everyone is really helpful and every time we get together I learn a lot from the class.

Thanks for coming everybody! It's been a pleasure to get to teach and share these last two weekends. Catch me next weekend up in Ottowa. We'll be running the standard demo circus (ufodemo.com) after racing on Saturday. Before that, I'm on my own time working on boatspeed and tuning. I am AMPED for wickford. The whole fleet is getting really fast. What a blast!

Attached is the supercut of what Kirk, Andrew and I could record. Often times I hold back on picking up a camera and just try to focus on teaching in the moment rather than jumping to make a moment relivable. The social media professional in me gets mad about it, but the coach in me is certain it's the right choice.

What a great group of people!

DRC
 

 

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On ‎5‎/‎29‎/‎2018 at 3:00 PM, Dave Clark said:

Thanks for coming everybody! It's been a pleasure to get to teach and share these last two weekends. Catch me next weekend up in Ottowa. We'll be running the standard demo circus (ufodemo.com) after racing on Saturday. Before that, I'm on my own time working on boatspeed and tuning. I am AMPED for wickford. The whole fleet is getting really fast. What a blast!

Attached is the supercut of what Kirk, Andrew and I could record. Often times I hold back on picking up a camera and just try to focus on teaching in the moment rather than jumping to make a moment relivable. The social media professional in me gets mad about it, but the coach in me is certain it's the right choice.

What a great group of people!

DRC
 

 

I am so stoked to try one of these bad boys out!  I should mount a gopro to make a good lowlight video of me eating $hit my first time out.  :p

 

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On 5/4/2018 at 4:35 PM, Champlain Sailor said:

I like the bungees and spring clamp ideas.  Super simple, and simple is good.  They just need to hold the blade for a few minutes, with minimal load.   I'll try them this weekend.  In time, I'm sure Dave will have a more elegant solution.   I have a question into Fulcrum and have not heard back yet on the proper use of the main foil hold down pin and retention bracket.  I was surprised to see that the upper plates of the pin bracket are slotted on one end, so they can swing out when not under load.  I thought that once the strut was lowered, the pin would slide through one bracket, through the hold in the strut, then through the bracket on the other side.  I could only get the pin through the bracket, the strut, and just start on the 2nd bracket.  It was not a particularly secure hold down.  I've seen some internet traffic recommending that the hold in the strut be enlarged.  I'd rather not drill it out unless I have to (can't undrill it).   Since I'm not sure why the top part of the brackets are 'gated', I suspect there is more to this assembly than I am seeing.  Any experienced UFO pilots have some advice?

 

Doug

Can you sharpen your pin? Smaller diameter- get it in, then push it in to the correct diameter.. 

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On 6/2/2018 at 2:44 PM, dacarls said:

Can you sharpen your pin? Smaller diameter- get it in, then push it in to the correct diameter.. 

I've found that I can insert the pin into the strut easily, lower the strut with the gates open onto the pin locator, then swing the gates closed over the pin.  This is actually quite easy once you get the hang of it, it takes 10-15 seconds.  My concern now is that the gates can swing open in a sailing session, particularly after a capsize.  I'm thinking of gluing some velcro to them so that I can wrap a velcro strap around the front once the gates are closed to keep them securely in place.

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3 minutes ago, Champlain Sailor said:

I've found that I can insert the pin into the strut easily, lower the strut with the gates open onto the pin locator, then swing the gates closed over the pin.  This is actually quite easy once you get the hang of it, it takes 10-15 seconds.  My concern now is that the gates can swing open in a sailing session, particularly after a capsize.  I'm thinking of gluing some velcro to them so that I can wrap a velcro strap around the front once the gates are closed to keep them securely in place.

I figured out the fix to this up in Ottowa after it busted my balls a out eight times in one race. Run a loop of string over from the ring-ding over the top of the sprit. The loop should be too short to reach the other end of the pin. Intersect your loop (preferably spectra) with a shorter loop of 5/16ths bungee which runs around the pin end. I don't know categorically why this works so well, but this tight elastic strop proved highly effective for the remainder of racing. I'll take a picture when I get a chance.

Also big thanks to Napean Sailing Club for running the OSGP and giving us flying machines a start. What a blast!

DRC

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Big thanks to Dave for coming to Ottawa and letting a few of us try the UFO.  His coaching with the headset was awesome.  This is making me seriously reconsider my sailing priorities.

You UFOers have yourselves a pretty sweet ride!

 

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7 hours ago, Champlain Sailor said:

I've found that I can insert the pin into the strut easily, lower the strut with the gates open onto the pin locator, then swing the gates closed over the pin.  This is actually quite easy once you get the hang of it, it takes 10-15 seconds.  My concern now is that the gates can swing open in a sailing session, particularly after a capsize.  I'm thinking of gluing some velcro to them so that I can wrap a velcro strap around the front once the gates are closed to keep them securely in place.

Per Dave's recommendation, I actually tightened the Phillips head bolts / lock nuts that hold the gates to the hull.  They now only move with decent pressure applied.  I'm heading out Wed afternoon to try it out, but I'm 90% sure it'll fix the 'gates opening up on a capsize' issue.  

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I thought this might happen:  I just don't have enough time to play with all my boats, so one of them has to go.  

The UFO has been a ton of fun, great support from Dave (thank you Dave), but I think the wind here at the lake is just a little too spotty and light for the boat.

Anyway, the boat is set up on the dock and ready for inspection or demos.  $4,000 including cover and beach wheels.  Central Texas.

Yes, I bought an ad.

Charlie

 

 

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Friends, I got out on San Diego bay recently and finally got some great 360 Video footage.  You can click and drag the video as it plays to get a 'look around'.  Wind was a bit light and this was the only good ride I got but now that I have the new camera rig working I hope there is more to come!  Enjoy and I'd love feedback,

 

Derek

 

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It looks like seven UFO's raced in Wickford last weekend.   Great turnout!  I'm regretting that I didn't get my act together and get down there.  Would any of the attendees be willing to post an account of the event?   What's it like to race a UFO?  Did you have your own start?  What course was used?   Was everyone foiling?   Please share!

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Wickford was a blast. Great regatta, food and venue. Free air show included.
Course was a closehaul/reach.
The conditions on saturday were marginal. Dave was able to fly upwind consistently since he's got the technique to take off in those conditions. Huge advantage if you're flying vs VMG sailing. There were a few downwind gusts where everyone got up on their foils. 
Sunday was drifting in sub 3 knots, glassy water. Even with a big split in the fleet at the bottom, everyone converged at the top mark. Close racing with results hinging on the last 'race'. 

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In case anyone was wondering what happens when your rudder halyard comes lose while foiling... (video below is shot in 360, so click and drag the video while playing to see different angles).  The boat makes a hard but stable landing and is an easy platform to readjust the rigging.  BUT, the boat is still way more fun with both foils in the water...

 

 

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On 6/8/2018 at 9:24 AM, Charlie P Mayer said:

I thought this might happen:  I just don't have enough time to play with all my boats, so one of them has to go.  

The UFO has been a ton of fun, great support from Dave (thank you Dave), but I think the wind here at the lake is just a little too spotty and light for the boat.

Anyway, the boat is set up on the dock and ready for inspection or demos.  $4,000 including cover and beach wheels.  Central Texas.

Yes, I bought an ad.

Charlie

 

 

So wish I didn't have 22 more weeks of rotator cuff PT rehabs ahead of me.  PM me if you still have it in the Fall.

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On 6/13/2018 at 2:36 PM, Wess said:

So wish I didn't have 22 more weeks of rotator cuff PT rehabs ahead of me.  PM me if you still have it in the Fall.

So you can't write a check until the PT is done?

In other news, for those who generally stay away from facebook, here's another great in-boat video of great technique. This one is from Otto in Charleston. Watch the hands. The sheeting is great.


DRC

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15 hours ago, Dave Clark said:

So you can't write a check until the PT is done?

 

DRC

LOL it really does hurt to write or type anything.  But seriously if I had to buy now it would be another Laser simply because there are no Aeros or UFOs living and racing in Naps.  With the Laser I can race ~52 weeks a year in my own back yard and multiple days a week all summer.  I do love the UFO and still might jump just to have it as a toy but for local racing the Laser is king.  Waiting to see if anything changes by Fall when my PT is done. 

Good luck to you Dave.  You sure designed and build a cool boat there with the UFO.

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One more lesson learned for everyone.  Beware of seaweed!  I have found that even small pieces of kelp trapped on the foil strut add enough drag to keep you from getting airborne.  If you find yourself with your foil settings correct but you are actually seeing your bows dive into the water as you speed up, you probably have kelp wrapped around the foil.  Get a piece of kelp wrapped around a foil or wand while foiling and you're going down.  

If you sail somewhere with crystal clear water, it's probably easy to see kelp hanging off of your foils / struts.  If you sail somewhere with murky water, and you can't figure out why you're not getting airborne, you might want to check for kelp.  

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34 minutes ago, DerekF said:

One more lesson learned for everyone.  Beware of seaweed!  I have found that even small pieces of kelp trapped on the foil strut add enough drag to keep you from getting airborne.  If you find yourself with your foil settings correct but you are actually seeing your bows dive into the water as you speed up, you probably have kelp wrapped around the foil.  Get a piece of kelp wrapped around a foil or wand while foiling and you're going down.  

If you sail somewhere with crystal clear water, it's probably easy to see kelp hanging off of your foils / struts.  If you sail somewhere with murky water, and you can't figure out why you're not getting airborne, you might want to check for kelp.  

Hot tip for how to de-weed really quickly: reverse.

I was sailing up in toronto where you can basically ground the foil package on a thicket of weeds if you go into any corner of the harbor to close. You pick up several pounds of big ropey weeds. Backing out for a couple feet usually cleared them off the foils entirely. So basically a tack with a big stall and reverse in it. 

DRC

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12 minutes ago, Dave Clark said:

Hot tip for how to de-weed really quickly: reverse.

I was sailing up in toronto where you can basically ground the foil package on a thicket of weeds if you go into any corner of the harbor to close. You pick up several pounds of big ropey weeds. Backing out for a couple feet usually cleared them off the foils entirely. So basically a tack with a big stall and reverse in it. 

DRC

See, I knew there was a good reason I taught my Opti kids back in the mid 80s how to sail backwards!

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4 hours ago, Dave Clark said:

Hot tip for how to de-weed really quickly: reverse.

What DRC says. Perhaps because I am a contrarian, I got myself a long-handed hard-bristled brush for my Whisper cat - - https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00ABMHDD4/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o03_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1 -- I'll get a chance to use and report on it next week. 

Everyone here in SA thinks it's stupid and dorky, but we are often foiling just slower (the cat has four legs, after all), and we're two on board. So if crew can clear the weeds on-the-go with the brush, seems like a win to me.

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unfortunately, due to my travels with my job, and im in the process of moving overseas, Im selling my ufo.  its boat #006...   ive only sailed it 4 times.   it has been stored inside a garage its entire life...comes with a galvanized trailer   boat is located in Gulfport ms..   email me for details    tewtops1@gmail.com      Terry Richardson

 

 

20170616_174948.jpg

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WHAT A BOAT!!!  Been sailing time for many weeks now and today was the first time I went out in enough wind to foil.  It was flat, 10-15.  WHAT A BOAT!! Had so much fun playing around on the foils!  The acceleration "off the line" is like nothing I've ever experienced!!  Realized just how much lift the rear foil provides sailing downwind to beach with main foil up!  There is so much to learn!  This boat is just flat out FUN!

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UFO owners, wanted to let everyone know there will be a free UFO and Waszp Clinic September 22-23 at Cedar Point Yacht Club in Westport, CT.

The clinic is free and open to everyone, you just have to bring your own UFO or Waszp. Housing will be provided where available on a first come first serve basis. Full details on the event via this link and the flyer attached. 

Hope to see a lot of UFOs there in September. I attended the two UFO clinics Fulcrum ran in Bristol this spring. Both events were tons of fun and great learning experiences. The event also sits nicely between Roton Point Multihull Regatta, September 14-16, and HPR at American Yacht Club, October 6-7, if you’re looking to do a trip to Western Long Island Sound for some fall sailing.

 

Nick, UFO 92

dHQy4D3aaB_misc_1521129954213.pdf

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^I'm provisionally committed to coaching at that clinic.

On another note, Otto from the above facebook video is agitating for a UFO line in the Carolina Yacht Club Regatta, July 28th-29th. http://www.regattanetwork.com/event/16961 There's two local kids with UFOs down there and I know that Otto's got really fast quite quickly, so there's a local favorite to beat. At present the Fulcrum calendar is actually empty that week and we could probably send a trailer. With full turnout in SC, we'd be able to to get a line with probably just three more boats.

Just an idea. Arguably best for people closer to the venue, like NJ and MD, but hey, it's an option. 


DRC

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