Doug Lord

Steve and Dave Clarks Unidentified Foiling Object

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And our rudder head pulled out. We just stuck it back in. No glue. Seems fine. The rope holds it down. Don’t pull it up from the hole/rope on top. That’s what we did. 

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Convinced my wife to enjoy the beautiful Newport waterfront for an hour last weekend while Dave let me take a spin on his boat. Extremely cool setup and a very smoothly run program. I've known Dave from Canoe sailing for a long time now, and I really believe he's the man to import this alien technology to the masses. If you're on the fence--get off and just buy the thing. 

I've been foiling once before, on a Moth a few years back on a breezy day in Annapolis. It was an intense experience, physically very aggressive, and after about an hour it ended when I returned the boat to the owner with a crestfallen look on my face as the boat was a puddle of carbon shards. Last Saturday in Newport was a sales pitch for Dave's boat. The breeze was a not-very-exciting 5-7 knots, with some lump from traffic on the Bay. Can you imagine sailing a Moth out of the harbor in those conditions? Ugh. Anyway, it wasn't quite enough to get my fat ass up on foils, though Dave popped it up early on for a bit. But it was so...comfortable... for a small boat. 

Dave got me really excited when he mentioned the kiddie sail/foil package under development. I have a 3 and a 4 year old, and am already dreading optis. Apparently the theory is to put a non-hydrofoiling package under the water and a tiny little rig above. Boom, world's most stable kid's boat! This is really gonna help me sell this program to my wife! 

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The Millenium Falcon hull#42 entered the 2018 Around shelter island race yesterday. A grueling 30+ mile race in 0 to 15 knots of wind and every type of chop, boat wake and smooth water sailing. I sailed along with Dave and a personal safety boat from the team, props to Andrew for the amazing job with the rib. I was on the boat for over 6 hours. I'm sore today but still smiling. Only my 6th time on the boat and can now, hands down, say this boat is amazing to sail and bulletproof. I had some really great foiling runs and moments and only 1 capsize. This boat can go upwind and down foiling. If you really need to pinch for a mark you can easily just sail it in displacement mode and pinch. I completely shredded my sailing gloves which I've never done before in a single sail. It was such a great event I know Dave is already thinking of next years event and getting a large group of us entered so we can be our own class in the event and throw out the Portsmouth rating against the other cats. 

Millennium Falcon-1.jpg

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Todd, the results appear to be confusing. They show the UFOs as taking twice as long as a Prindle 19, Hobie 16s etc and even longer than the Sunfishes and C420s. What boats sailed what course, and what happened to the UFOs compared to the other cats?  If you're not competitive on 69, what sort of Portsmouth rating do you need to be competitive?

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I'm sure Dave could answer this better. The course was simple keep the island to your left. It was not a bouy course. If your not foiling your slower than all those other boats. It was only foiling conditions for half the race if that. 2 other classes started an hour earlier when there was more favorable wind. Catamarans were a separate class. In light wind a hobie and other cats just sail away from you. Dave did have a go at some of the H16's. Even when there was just enough wind to foil, I couldn't get going because of the ridiculous amount of boat wake from every direction possible. I sailed this on my H17 several yeas ago and had completely different results because I could sail right through all that. I can't answer your question as to ratings because that's all new to me. It may be the reason the a-cats didn't show up this year. On this type of course and conditions a foiling boat with its theoretical rating will kill you. I assume the super fast rating is under the assumption your almost always foiling which is completely unreasonable in such a race. Personally I do the race for the experience. I probably wouldn't wake up and say hey lets sail around shelter island (its not easy. 2 ferry terminals, sandbars, ripping currents, super light wind on leeward side. Etc). I'd rather be blasting around the protected bay just screaming across the water. That being said and my 6th time on the boat. I am officially in training for the 2019 race, its a damn marathon.

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Elapsed time seems not to have been documented at all in the results. Notice how the corrected time and the elapsed are exactly the same but there is a handicap involved in the fleet. Fun race and I learned a lot. I appear to have stumbled into yet more upwind technique for pointing on the foils which was a lot of fun coming back to overtake half of the hobie 16s in the second segment of upwind climb on the south side of the island. Portsmouth ratings are based on polars, essentially on an open course, and don't ever account for times when there's a no-go zone on footing to take off on the foils etc etc which happens constantly in near shore distance races. Immensely broadening experience. I also need to get a lot more literate in flying downwind through multiple intersecting motor yacht wakes in a the mixing swirl of two tidal funnels.

DRC

 

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11 hours ago, Dave Clark said:

I appear to have stumbled into yet more upwind technique for pointing on the foils which was a lot of fun coming back to overtake half of the hobie 16s in the second segment of upwind climb on the south side of the island. 


DRC

Any chance you'd be interested in sharing this new upwind technique?   Or is it locked in Area 51 :-)   

FYI, on Lake Champlain the Regatta For Lake Champlain was sailed this weekend.  This is a 13 mile long race around three marks in the broad part of Lake Champlain, starting and finishing from Burlington.  It is a pursuit race, and is a benefit for lake focused organizations.  The entered boats are always a mishmash of local race boats (usual J/Boats, a Farr 400, etc.) and a fleet of cruising boats, and the start times are calculated using the boats PHRF ratings, plus some proprietary factors the RC uses to keep it fun. 

This year, a Whisper foiling catamaran was entered.  I'm sure the PHRF team was scratching their heads to rate it, and they somehow settled on 60.  Winds were 10-15, and the first two legs were a beam reach followed by a close reach.  The Whisper, which started pretty far back as one of the faster boats, seemed to be doing pretty well.   It had almost caught  our J/110 (PHRF 96) by the 2nd mark, and was reaching along on its foils really nicely.  The 3rd leg was a 3 mile beat, and the Whisper began to drop back.  It was on the foils most of the time, but it was pointing really low.  It had fallen way back at the 3rd mark.  The final run was a tight broad reach in 12-16 knots of breeze.  The Whisper seemed to make up some ground here.  We observed it coming into the finish, and the boat had decent speed but seemed to be struggling to control its pitch on a broad reach with a chute up.

I'm making no judgement on the Whisper or the skill of its skipper, positive or negative.   He finished a 2.5 hour race, and seemed to be enjoying himself just fine.  Just an observation that foiling boats are different animals than displacement or planing boats, and if your goal is to win open water races, they may not be the ideal platform.  Or maybe they are if your skills are developed enough!  If you want to win drag races in select conditions, they will almost certainly fulfill that wish!  And if you want to add a new skill to your normal sailing experience, they are great for that too.   

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1 hour ago, Champlain Sailor said:

Any chance you'd be interested in sharing this new upwind technique?   Or is it locked in Area 51 :-)   

FYI, on Lake Champlain the Regatta For Lake Champlain was sailed this weekend.  This is a 13 mile long race around three marks in the broad part of Lake Champlain, starting and finishing from Burlington.  It is a pursuit race, and is a benefit for lake focused organizations.  The entered boats are always a mishmash of local race boats (usual J/Boats, a Farr 400, etc.) and a fleet of cruising boats, and the start times are calculated using the boats PHRF ratings, plus some proprietary factors the RC uses to keep it fun. 

This year, a Whisper foiling catamaran was entered.  I'm sure the PHRF team was scratching their heads to rate it, and they somehow settled on 60.  Winds were 10-15, and the first two legs were a beam reach followed by a close reach.  The Whisper, which started pretty far back as one of the faster boats, seemed to be doing pretty well.   It had almost caught  our J/110 (PHRF 96) by the 2nd mark, and was reaching along on its foils really nicely.  The 3rd leg was a 3 mile beat, and the Whisper began to drop back.  It was on the foils most of the time, but it was pointing really low.  It had fallen way back at the 3rd mark.  The final run was a tight broad reach in 12-16 knots of breeze.  The Whisper seemed to make up some ground here.  We observed it coming into the finish, and the boat had decent speed but seemed to be struggling to control its pitch on a broad reach with a chute up.

I'm making no judgement on the Whisper or the skill of its skipper, positive or negative.   He finished a 2.5 hour race, and seemed to be enjoying himself just fine.  Just an observation that foiling boats are different animals than displacement or planing boats, and if your goal is to win open water races, they may not be the ideal platform.  Or maybe they are if your skills are developed enough!  If you want to win drag races in select conditions, they will almost certainly fulfill that wish!  And if you want to add a new skill to your normal sailing experience, they are great for that too.   

That´s what happens with fast boats, top speed in ideal conditions is VERY different from VMG. I usually sail a 5 NM triangle and try to set my own "record". Even in beautiful days with 15 kt winds, with a reaching leg screaming (for a Weta) at 12-13 kt averages, I´m always dissapointed to find the total VMG around the triangle, after tacking, jibing, windholes, WAVES, fuckups and what not, is 6kt or less :-(

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In my opinion, if your desire is to have a Portsmouth slaying beast, move on from the UFO.  It's a dog when I sail it in non-foiling conditions (likely operator error), but when it foils, it's magic, especially for those who are beginners like myself.

I'd love to hear the techniques to improve upwind performance, too.

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16 minutes ago, True North said:

In my opinion, if your desire is to have a Portsmouth slaying beast, move on from the UFO.  It's a dog when I sail it in non-foiling conditions (likely operator error), but when it foils, it's magic, especially for those who are beginners like myself.

I'd love to hear the techniques to improve upwind performance, too.

Nope, it's pretty canine in non-foiling conditions. However, I will say if you sail it upwind like a 12meter in light air you do seem to cut your losses a lot more. I didn't lose any more trees on the 16's once I figured that out. It's not moving fast but you can feel in the rudder that the induced drag on the foils is WAY down. Where I got killed on the first leg upwind was when the breeze climbed to 6 gusting 8 in the rollimng swells. I blew a whole bunch off ground bearing off and trying to fly, flying for a bit, coming down and trying to do it again. During that period my progress to weather was dwarfed by the 16's holding the same angle and simply seeing higher speeds. Once I was consistently foiling I was doing far better and seemed to be gaining ground quite steadily. However, what's got me very interested is a technique I started using that kept me on the foils (so going no slower than 8/8.5) but got my net angle even higher. Sit aft so that the control system is actually unstable. As opposed to sitting forward enough so the wand can dial back the lift and stop the boat from coming out of the surface, make it so that if you get up to enough speed, you're guaranteed to crash. Now point it upwind and build speed. Whenever the wand breaks free of the surface, pinch and lose speed but gain height. The bow will come back down and the wand will regain contact, bear back off to your true foiling angle and repeat. Skiffies call a trick like this "squirts", but I started calling it "climbing stairs". I'm not sure if it's always a good idea and I've only ever done it for one leg in specific conditions, but it sure did seem to yield some fearsome upwind VMG. Off the wind in waves, I learned to be a lot less fearful about pointing it deep downwind once my speed was up. Grow up and bear off and let your speed take you to the mark. What a huge learning experience! Thank you, southold yacht club!

DRC

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On 7/10/2018 at 6:44 AM, Claire1000 said:

And our rudder head pulled out. We just stuck it back in. No glue. Seems fine. The rope holds it down. Don’t pull it up from the hole/rope on top. That’s what we did. 

I had the same rudder head issue this weekend.  My rudder head issue happened because I mis-rigged the rudder halyard by skipping the bullseye on the tiller--oops.  So make sure you rig your rudder halyard correctly or you may have issues. 

I was not able to get the rudder head back in on the water.  I had to beach the boat and really work the head back in the rudder, but after that everything worked fine.  

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Another worthwhile note from nearly a full week on the water as much as 12 hours a day: The bungee/spectra strop over the top of the mainfoil adjusters is a way too variable answer for keeping the gates closed. What you want is a horizontal strap rather than a vertical one. I put a whole new replacement gate system on 73 for the trip down to Baltimore and it was jumping out on day 1. GRRRRRRR. Day 2, I tried wrapping the outside with electrical tape. 100% better. It hasn't popped open or slid forward since. The pin itself has slid out of one side, which did facilitate a slide forward a couple times on the bouncy side of shelter, but in general, it constituted a huge improvement. I'm now on the hunt for the right velcro to glue to the gates on future production boats, so the wrapping strap can be built in.

DRC

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6 hours ago, Champlain Sailor said:

Any chance you'd be interested in sharing this new upwind technique?   Or is it locked in Area 51 :-)

I wanna know too!

6 hours ago, Champlain Sailor said:

The Whisper seemed to make up some ground here.  We observed it coming into the finish, and the boat had decent speed but seemed to be struggling to control its pitch on a broad reach with a chute up.

Was it the light blue Whisper? If so that's Taylor Congleton of WhisperBoatsUSA. If he was running the chute solo... it's a handful. The chute has a very high CoE, it's hard to find a good balance, and even harder if conditions are gusty and/or choppy. I'm working on my technique for it, two handed. Solo I still fly it, but struggle would be very appropriate :-)

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34 minutes ago, martin.langhoff said:

 

Was it the light blue Whisper? If so that's Taylor Congleton of WhisperBoatsUSA. If he was running the chute solo... it's a handful. The chute has a very high CoE, it's hard to find a good balance, and even harder if conditions are gusty and/or choppy. I'm working on my technique for it, two handed. Solo I still fly it, but struggle would be very appropriate :-)

Yes, I'm pretty sure it was Taylor, and he was sailing single handed.  He looked pretty relaxed and smooth on the close reach.  And yes, it looked like a handful on the broad reach with the chute.  In fairness,  we only were able to see the last minute or so of his progress on this leg and he did not look like he was on the verge of a capsize or wipeout, his heading was pretty steady and he was making good progress.   But he was climbing and stalling on the foils a fair bit, as many of us on the UFO have experienced ourselves!   

I've sailed foiling boats.  I've sailed double handed dual trap asymmetric skiffs.  Both are challenging in a fun way.  The thought  of combining foiling with a trapeze flown spinnaker single handed makes my head hurt.   Kudos to anyone that can pull that off!   

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Thanks for the info, guys. 

60 for a Whisper seems incredibly favourable - in SF boats like the Hobie 20 are -25 or so.

 

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4 hours ago, Curious said:

Thanks for the info, guys. 

60 for a Whisper seems incredibly favourable - in SF boats like the Hobie 20 are -25 or so.

SCHRS on the other hand has it at 0.947, which seems optimistic -- ie: lower than the Nacra 17 full foiler.

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21 hours ago, Dave Clark said:

(...) in non-foiling conditions (...) if you sail it upwind like a 12meter in light air you do seem to cut your losses a lot more. I didn't lose any more trees on the 16's once I figured that out. It's not moving fast but you can feel in the rudder that the induced drag on the foils is WAY down.

Am I reading this "sail it like a 12 meter" too literally? Is there something specific to sailing 12s upwind?

21 hours ago, Dave Clark said:

However, what's got me very interested is a technique I started using that kept me on the foils (so going no slower than 8/8.5) but got my net angle even higher. Sit aft so that the control system is actually unstable. As opposed to sitting forward enough so the wand can dial back the lift and stop the boat from coming out of the surface, make it so that if you get up to enough speed, you're guaranteed to crash. Now point it upwind and build speed. Whenever the wand breaks free of the surface, pinch and lose speed but gain height. The bow will come back down and the wand will regain contact, bear back off to your true foiling angle and repeat. Skiffies call a trick like this "squirts", but I started calling it "climbing stairs". I'm not sure if it's always a good idea and I've only ever done it for one leg in specific conditions, but it sure did seem to yield some fearsome upwind VMG.

Trying to boil this down:

  •  sit aft to increase AoA on the foil and "shorten" the wand by having it sit higher
  • get foiling, head upwind, build speed
  • when foiling high, pinch briefly, bear away as soon as the boat loses height

it'd be a more active version of the gentle snaking that most people work to windward. Instead of trying gently find the point where you lose some speed, actively (aggressively?) pinch, trading speed for "steps" to windward.

 

21 hours ago, Dave Clark said:

Off the wind in waves, I learned to be a lot less fearful about pointing it deep downwind once my speed was up. Grow up and bear off and let your speed take you to the mark. What a huge learning experience! Thank you, southold yacht club!

Yay! I wanna see the pitchpole videos ;-)

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11 minutes ago, martin.langhoff said:

Am I reading this "sail it like a 12 meter" too literally? Is there something specific to sailing 12s upwind?

Trying to boil this down:

  •  sit aft to increase AoA on the foil and "shorten" the wand by having it sit higher
  • get foiling, head upwind, build speed
  • when foiling high, pinch briefly, bear away as soon as the boat loses height

it'd be a more active version of the gentle snaking that most people work to windward. Instead of trying gently find the point where you lose some speed, actively (aggressively?) pinch, trading speed for "steps" to windward.

 

Yay! I wanna see the pitchpole videos ;-)

Re: "sail like a 12meter" this means adopt a yachtsmanlike mentality and focus almost exclusively on pointing as high as the boat will go. Forget about speed altogether and just point 30 degrees higher. 

Re: "climbing the stairs". I'm almost certain you can't do this on the whisper, the F101 or the glide free foil package because the wand is aft of the foil and is apparently decoupled from pitch.

DRC

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37 minutes ago, Dave Clark said:

Re: "sail like a 12meter" this means adopt a yachtsmanlike mentality and focus almost exclusively on pointing as high as the boat will go. Forget about speed altogether and just point 30 degrees higher. 

Thanks, that's straightforward. I was clearly overthinking it.

Quote

Re: "climbing the stairs". I'm almost certain you can't do this on the whisper, the F101 or the glide free foil package because the wand is aft of the foil and is apparently decoupled from pitch.

Agreed. Somewhat surprised the pitch part is key, not sure I fully understand it. I'll be trying to figure it out. I can set the ride height control to fly high & increase foil rake, not sure if that'll help.

In any case, I'm still planning to get my hands on a UFO ;-)

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6 minutes ago, martin.langhoff said:

Thanks, that's straightforward. I was clearly overthinking it.

Agreed. Somewhat surprised the pitch part is key, not sure I fully understand it. I'll be trying to figure it out. I can set the ride height control to fly high & increase foil rake, not sure if that'll help.

In any case, I'm still planning to get my hands on a UFO ;-)

Essentially since the system is decoupled from pitch almost entirely, there is very limited control over overall flightpath. You're driving an oscillator. As a result you can't really play any sort of rhythm where you consistently gain altitude and cash it in as gain to weather. That's always been my experience with the foil following wands. They're gentler but their sense of where they are relative to the water and where the boat is going next is far duller. If you were blind, you would want to put your walking stick out in front of you, not behind you. Now I must get back to digging my turnips.

DRC

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Fellow UFO pilots,  Any particular advice for foiling in lower winds?  I am particularly interested in any body position or point of sail advice.  I get a lot of 8-12 knot days around here and I am getting up on the foils fairly consistently but finding myself behind-in-the-water to windward often.  Watching Dave's videos I see him droop hiking during much of the footage.  I find myself with my behind solidly on pad 1 (as opposed to hiking off the windward side) and often trying to get even further to the center of the boat to avoid rolling to windward.  I can arrest the roll to windward by sheeting in but often times I am pulling arm lengths of main sheet to try to get back level.  Any tips?

 

Also wrt terminology...

15 hours ago, Dex Sawash said:

I'm too thick to follow this 100%. We need specific terms for 3 axes plus elevation now. We should never have used "height" to mean heading relative to wind direction.

 

http://youtu.be/rYFQZFL0yoo

 

Yaw, pitch, roll, altitude and heading from the aerospace world?  I agree there is new physics, techniques, and vocabulary with foiling boats.  We're entering a brave new world!

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On 7/16/2018 at 1:32 PM, Dave Clark said:

<...>What you want is a horizontal strap rather than a vertical one. I put a whole new replacement gate system on 73 for the trip down to Baltimore and it was jumping out on day 1. GRRRRRRR. Day 2, I tried wrapping the outside with electrical tape. 100% better. It hasn't popped open or slid forward since. <...> I'm now on the hunt for the right velcro to glue to the gates on future production boats, so the wrapping strap can be built in.

DRC

Do you mean the new system where you slide the gates over the top to lock the pin down? I was also wondering how to keep them shut (I just received my new parts). What about another gate on top, perpendicular to the two gates? Or a snap-buckle like the one used on an Opti mastlock? As for the pin sliding out, isn't the solution a pin with a split ring on both ends?

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On 4/30/2018 at 5:36 PM, koolkat505 said:

A general question from #58-- How or where are you insuring your UFO??  There was some discussion last July on the thread about it, TT (#4) said he used Boat US, but when I just got off the phone with them 15 minutes ago, they said NO UFO due to the foils.  DH had suggest Gowrie Group, whom I had contacted last week.  They have a "one design program", but the only foiler they currently cover are "Moth " brands, which we aren't, so they will not cover the UFO either!  I had been thinking about going to the Ottawa regatta in June, but they are looking for 1.5 million dollar (Canadian) liability coverage.  Fortunately, Wickford has NO insurance coverage requirement.  Any ideas would be greatly appreciated- Thanks #58

I had no issue insuring mine. I insured it with Skippers' Plan (covered by Aviva) in Canada. $180/yr with $1M of liability. $2M was an extra $20.

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51 minutes ago, barthrh said:

Do you mean the new system where you slide the gates over the top to lock the pin down? I was also wondering how to keep them shut (I just received my new parts). What about another gate on top, perpendicular to the two gates? Or a snap-buckle like the one used on an Opti mastlock? As for the pin sliding out, isn't the solution a pin with a split ring on both ends?

I have had great luck simply tightening the lock nuts under the gates on the inside of the hull.  Tightening these nuts adds friction to the gates and now they only move when I put a decent amount of force to them.  Give it a shot, it worked for me.....and sometimes the simplest solution is the best one.

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47 minutes ago, barthrh said:

I had no issue insuring mine. I insured it with Skippers' Plan (covered by Aviva) in Canada. $180/yr with $1M of liability. $2M was an extra $20.

Aviva won't provide coverage for our US friends.

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I have #35, purchased recently (it was in stock at Shoreline). We're getting used to the boat and have right now 1 retro fit to do for the new gated pin lock on the centerboard vs. the pin-through-the-hole method.

1. What other retrofits have happened since #35? It would be good to get a list of "release notes".

2. I consistently get water in the Port hull. I'd say almost 2 liters dumped out on the weekend. I think the issue is in the back of the boat as I'll get water in the hull no matter the conditions (i.e. the mast hole rarely / never getting wet). Any ideas on where to look? I plan to soap-test it.

 

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13 hours ago, barthrh said:

I have #35, purchased recently (it was in stock at Shoreline). We're getting used to the boat and have right now 1 retro fit to do for the new gated pin lock on the centerboard vs. the pin-through-the-hole method.

1. What other retrofits have happened since #35? It would be good to get a list of "release notes".

2. I consistently get water in the Port hull. I'd say almost 2 liters dumped out on the weekend. I think the issue is in the back of the boat as I'll get water in the hull no matter the conditions (i.e. the mast hole rarely / never getting wet). Any ideas on where to look? I plan to soap-test it.

 

I don't have a full list, but I know that the spreader attachment fitting on the mast was changed from a stamped metal fitting to a carbon fiber fabrication on builds around the 110-120 range.  I have Hull #93 and the metal fitting failed.  Dave delivered one of the newly designed carbon fiber replacement fittings to me and I've been good to go since then.

I know on early boats there were holes drilled into the hand holds that are molded into the deck of the boat so that they would drain.  They were determined to be leak points, so the holes were eliminated.   I think this occurred early,  around boat 10, so you shouldn't have that problem.  If you do, I'd fill those holes. 

As for water in the hulls, that is a problem that several owners have reported and no one has solved yet.  I think it is driving Dave nuts because the factory rigorously leak tests each boat.  I don't get much water in, but I do get some, but not all the time.  And it doesn't follow any logical pattern that I have found so far, ie I don't seem to get a lot more on windy days when I spend time burying the bows or upside down.  So I don't know myself.   When I'm moving it on the dolly if I hear water sloshing, I drain it.   Not a big deal, just an irritant.

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We've tried to keep all changes to a bare minimum for the sake of preserving the strict one design nature of the boat. However, some parts wore down or were found to fail and have needed to change. Usually this is a matter of "more glue here/add some carbon or a bolt there" to keep these things budget neutral we have worked hard to reduce wasted process materials (peel ply, tape, vacuum bag, wasted resin). To keep it weight neutral, we've worked to match any beefing up with minor weight savings in obvious places. Besides replacing the metal brackets which flatly didn't last (we're still getting those handed out to people in the field. We can only make so many), the most profound change has been the addition of a more potent righting handle system. This doesn't sound like a big deal, as the other system worked, but being able to right the boat from a turtle five times faster is the difference between taking big risks on foil gybes and playing things conservatively. See attached picture.

DRC
 

Righting handles.jpg

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On 7/18/2018 at 2:01 PM, DerekF said:

I have had great luck simply tightening the lock nuts under the gates on the inside of the hull.  Tightening these nuts adds friction to the gates and now they only move when I put a decent amount of force to them.  Give it a shot, it worked for me.....and sometimes the simplest solution is the best one.

Motivated by Derek's post, I set out this morning to tighten the screws and nuts on gates my boat.   The only complication is that you can't see the lock nuts.  But, with the mast removed, I found that you can feel them and access them a with a wrench from the mast step hole, and don't need to pull the main foil strut out of the boat.   The nuts need a 3/8"  wrench.  The aft nuts are pretty easy to tighten.  The forward ones take some wriggling of fingers, but it isn't too bad. As Derek first reported, it made a world of difference.  Best 5 minutes of maintenance I've spent on the boat so far!   I also sourced some hook and loop strapping that Intend to bond to the sides of the gates and wrap around the front.  

Nice day of foiling today on Champlain.   Lightish breeze, but good foiling in the puffs.  I finally got my wife out on the boat and coached her along to some nice short flights.  I think she's catching the bug.   Wish I had Dave's helmet mic/speaker arrangement!

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...any experiences or suggestions how to ship this nice UFO to Europe?

..any experiences about the shipping costs?

 

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Two days of two boat testing in moderate wind in the bank with two relatively even testers (myself and Burritoughs). There's lots of data to unpack, but there's one basic deliverable that can be handed off right now.

Moderate wind "pretty optimal" sail setup:

This requires a spinlock rigsense http://www.apsltd.com/spinlock-rig-sense-tension-gauge-for-2-5mm-wire.html?fee=5&amp;fep=40304&amp;utm_source=Google+Shopping&amp;utm_medium=cpc&amp;utm_campaign=Product&amp;gclid=EAIaIQobChMI-cLrna213AIVlMBkCh2czgLdEAQYASABEgJtO_D_BwE to calibrate it, but it's a good tool to have.

Add about 15 turns to the gaff batten, 10 to the next batten down and 5 to the next batten down to add shape at the head.

Hoist the sail to full hoist, attach no other lines.

Haul on the rig tension until both stays read 40kg of tension. If you're getting uneven tensions by more than 5kg (batten loading will always make it slightly uneven), release the rig tension and move the final bowline hitch on the loose shroud at the black low friction ring. Repeat until you've got an even 40kg on each stay.

Pull the cunningham on (yes it's hard. Yes it's possible. Yes, I sail a 100% stock boat my lines are also short) until  have 5.5 inches of separation between the bottom of the bolt rope (not the car, the actual bolt rope) and the top surface of the mast collar. 

Pull on the outhaul until you read between 85kg and 100kg of tension in the shrouds. You can't attach the gauge to the outhaul (no room) so you need to deduce it from the rig tension. 

This should yield a full, but not entirely ugly sail that takes off faster in puffs and keeps you flying through lulls. Flatter sails, while technically more efficient in wind are outright disadvantaged in course-racing both upwind and down, in 8 to 12 knots at least as far as we can tell.  Essentially it's better to suck it up in puffs with a full sail than to fall out of the sky in lulls with a flat sail. 

There does appear to be another option that works somewhat well, also, wich is a flat but more twisted sail. The twist seems to counteract the downside of a flat sail with a straight leech when you're pumping. If you have an outright flat and straight sail and you're pumping you have pretty high odds of stalling the sail, which sucks. If you twist it, you'll keep a bubble of attached flow on the sail somewhere which can be used to reattach flow elsewhere. We have a lot less hard data on this.

Additionally in these conditions, we've pretty solidly concluded that the middle hole on the foils and enough rudder to keep the wand in contact with the water at nearly all times (just aft of the midpoint in the rudder gudgeon) is the way to go in these conditions. Setting up for equilibrium around the second mainfoil hole from the front (less lift, less drag) is cleaner but can't muscle it's way through deviations in windspeed as well. It's probably around a baseline windspeed of 15 knots where that starts to really pay on a course. 

More to come once I get a minute to go through both day's velocitek tracks.

DRC
 

2 boat testing.png

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Thought some of you might get a kick out of a good foil ventilation and superman launch video.  I had my rudder foil lift set a bit too low.  Despite trying to scoot forward as I saw the end of the wand far above the water, it was too late.  If you watch the main foil in the video you can see the point at which it breaks the plane of the water!  Good thing it's warm summer water and the UFO is super easy to right!

 

 

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What footage we managed to get this weekend. Weather station on the course was reading six gusting nine for all of this footage.



DRC

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Looks great! How fast are you guys going?

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I think top 10 second average speed was 14.6 knots by Dave. I came in a tenth of knot behind.

VMG sailing on a W/L we’re probably doing 9 knots boatspeed. Cashing in speed for angle as long as you stay above 8 knots and keep foiling works until you’re pointing with keelboats upwind.  

 

 

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On 7/22/2018 at 11:02 PM, acaschroe said:

...any experiences or suggestions how to ship this nice UFO to Europe?

..any experiences about the shipping costs?

 

It depends on dollar parity

for mine approximately ;

UFO 7000 euros

Maritime freight 565 euros

Custom taxes and VAT 2200 euros

Other transports 275 euros

 

 

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I need some help; I gave myself some extensive swimming lessons this Sunday.

After dialing in a lot of rudder lift (3/4 of the range) I fixed my stairway to nowhere issue. Is there such a thing as too much rudder lift, if you are still able to achieve lift off?

 

But my reoccurring problem is capsizing to windward when on the foils; I feel the boat rolling over slowly but do not know how to counter the movement efficiently.

What should I do?

  • pulling the mainsheet stalls the sail making it worse;
  • I can't move inboard quick enough. (I'm not hiking much with my petite 2.0 m and 90kg body)
  • pointing upwind quickly solves the capsize problem but stops the boat.

I think I have the problem mainly in beam / pointing headings. any tips?

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On 7/30/2018 at 2:09 PM, Jedel said:

I need some help; I gave myself some extensive swimming lessons this Sunday.

After dialing in a lot of rudder lift (3/4 of the range) I fixed my stairway to nowhere issue. Is there such a thing as too much rudder lift, if you are still able to achieve lift off?

 

But my reoccurring problem is capsizing to windward when on the foils; I feel the boat rolling over slowly but do not know how to counter the movement efficiently.

What should I do?

  • pulling the mainsheet stalls the sail making it worse;
  • I can't move inboard quick enough. (I'm not hiking much with my petite 2.0 m and 90kg body)
  • pointing upwind quickly solves the capsize problem but stops the boat.

I think I have the problem mainly in beam / pointing headings. any tips?

It ends up being a nuanced game based on feel for what's working and what isn't. There are points where you simply have held too much weather heel out of the puff and you're doomed to get dunked. In these situations I often lean back hard to push my life jacket into the water and arrest a capsize. Sure, I'll stop. But I'll come up upright and start up again.
Anything beyond 3/4 of the rudder range has a brutal effect on boatspeed. It's definitely lifty, as is combining it with even more mainfoil, but you'll notice that in this orientation it's not the wand keeping the boat from climbing too high, it's the outright limit on your boatspeed potential. The boat literally can't go fast enough to over-elevate. Embarrassing. Far better to go fast and challenge the demon (See The Right Stuff, act 1 scene 1 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2hC-tgGQbrc) . 


On another note, I've cracked the formula for foil gybes. Nothing particularly different from the moth really. Try not to oversteer, get across before the sail attaches on the new side. Three big critical items: 1. Absolutely be the thing that pushes the sail across. Controlling the sail through the gybe and dictating that moment is critical. 2. Absolutely be heeled into the new gybe before the sail crosses. It's WAY better to touch the new hull down a little bit than to be wobbling along with the boat wondering which side it would prefer to heel onto. You need the power on. Let the training wheel help you and take some of the risk out of decisively dipping the new side into fresh weather heel. 3. Trust the nonskid. You just have to.



DRC

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Phil Johnson Regatta - 18th August - Oz

 

I've heard there are some (one?) UFO on the East Coast of Oz.  Here's a place to try it out - nice and safe - won't get washed out to sea at this place and it's apparently 9m deep.

You'll certainly get a lot of interest.

 

Some will know Phil, he's been a stalwart of the 14ft Maricat class for many years.

 

This is from the Facebook page of Tanilba Bay SC

From the commentary there'll be a bunch of different boats - Moth's, H18's F18's plus a gaggle of 14's.

Apparently the reservoir is 9m deep so plenty of room for the foilers.

 

2018 PHILS BENEFIT SAILING DAY
18TH AUGUST 2018
A Benefit Day is being organised to raise funds to help our member Phil Johnston who is dying of brain cancer and has a loving wife and two teenage daughters. We want to support this family going through this rough journey.

The venue is Grahamstown Dam Sailing Club (6 Grahamstown Road, Medowie NSW 2318)
Entry is open to all off the beach catamarans and mono hulls (including Trailer sailers).
Four races are scheduled for the Regatta.
Registration 900 to 1100
Competitor Briefing 1130
First Warning Signal not before 1230
DIVISIONS
-Catamarans 4.3m and under
-Catamarans 4.4m and over
-Mono hulls
-Trailer Sailors

Barbecue lunch will be available and maybe an after sailing BBQ. BYOG
We look forward to welcoming you on the day.
For further information contact
Mick Colecliffe, Racing Secretary, Tanilba Bay Sailing Club 0419 999 785

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All, went for a fun sail yesterday but I noticed some 'squeaking' sounds coming from the wand-linkage.  Any recommendations on lubricating the wand-linkage?  McLube, WD-40, whale oil (synthetic of course)?

Also, had a bonded piece come off of the boom where the pins insert through the stays and spreaders.  Any recommendations on adhesive to reattach?

Thanks all!

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5 hours ago, DerekF said:

 

Also, had a bonded piece come off of the boom where the pins insert through the stays and spreaders.  Any recommendations on adhesive to reattach?

 

I had one of these bonded pieces come loose as well.   I re-attached it with some West Epoxy, mainly because that is what I had handy.  It has stayed put in the 6 weeks since then.

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On 8/1/2018 at 11:56 AM, knobblyoldjimbo said:

Phil Johnson Regatta - 18th August - Oz

 

I've heard there are some (one?) UFO on the East Coast of Oz.  Here's a place to try it out - nice and safe - won't get washed out to sea at this place and it's apparently 9m deep.

You'll certainly get a lot of interest.

 

Some will know Phil, he's been a stalwart of the 14ft Maricat class for many years.

 

This is from the Facebook page of Tanilba Bay SC

From the commentary there'll be a bunch of different boats - Moth's, H18's F18's plus a gaggle of 14's.

Apparently the reservoir is 9m deep so plenty of room for the foilers.

 

2018 PHILS BENEFIT SAILING DAY
18TH AUGUST 2018
A Benefit Day is being organised to raise funds to help our member Phil Johnston who is dying of brain cancer and has a loving wife and two teenage daughters. We want to support this family going through this rough journey.

The venue is Grahamstown Dam Sailing Club (6 Grahamstown Road, Medowie NSW 2318)
Entry is open to all off the beach catamarans and mono hulls (including Trailer sailers).
Four races are scheduled for the Regatta.
Registration 900 to 1100
Competitor Briefing 1130
First Warning Signal not before 1230
DIVISIONS
-Catamarans 4.3m and under
-Catamarans 4.4m and over
-Mono hulls
-Trailer Sailors

Barbecue lunch will be available and maybe an after sailing BBQ. BYOG
We look forward to welcoming you on the day.
For further information contact
Mick Colecliffe, Racing Secretary, Tanilba Bay Sailing Club 0419 999 785

Thanks Jimbo!!! Will check out the young bloke's schedule and see if we can't get him UFO'ing in what looks a great day's sailing and an even better cause!

Cheers

Stanno

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I've tried car topping my UFO but felt a trailer was a better option as it seemed possible to load/ unload myself. After some searching I found the Trailex SUT 250- S aluminum trailer. It comes knocked down by FED EX ground and goes together relatively easily. I had to modify the bunk supports slightly to get the appropriate width. Lightweight. Seems like a good solution. Also, I can move the boat slightly aft and attach the beach dolly while on the trailer. Enables me to move it right to the beach.

IMG_7178.thumb.jpg.2a60bc5774ef226f69b02e98d3b2ebc7.jpg

IMG_7180.thumb.jpg.80cac61df395cab7849ad79fba7f50ae.jpg

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When launching today the eye for the halyard pulled right out of the mast. Turns out it is just held in by two screws. Going to modify so it is thru bolted through the mast.

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Nice trailer setup Upnatum, that looks nice and light!  On the subject of moving our boats around, lets talk  about dollys.   We live on a lea shore on Lake Champlain and our 'beach' is really more of a rock garden.  I used the standard dolly on a friend's UFO last fall on a very smooth pebble beach.  It worked pretty well there, but I knew that it would not protect the boat or be easy to use on our shoreline, particularly when launching or retrieving single handed.  After Kirk at Fulcrum confirmed that larger wheels would not work on the stock dolly, I spoke to Ben at Dynamic Dollies who immediately understood what I wanted and suggested their Type 10 dolly with the large wheels.  Kirk agreed to substitute this dolly in place of the standard dolly for a $325 upcharge (the difference in the list prices of the two dollies).   The Type 10 dolly has a tongue and handle, making it much easier to move the boat up or down hill or across uneven terrain with one person.  I added a bow stop of my own design and making to locate the boat and keep the bow from lifting up.  I'm really happy with the result.   

If you have the luxury of a nice smooth launching and storage area, the stock dolly will work great.  But if you need something more robust, talk to Fulcrum and Dynamic about the Type 10 dolly.

 

Note, this picture is (obviously) not on our rocky beach.  And It is before I added the bowstop.  But it shows the dolly pretty well.

20180430_082537_resized.jpg

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I have a similar dolly. I have a question: Is it OK to store the boat with the mast up? I always take the mast down.

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4 minutes ago, barthrh said:

I have a similar dolly. I have a question: Is it OK to store the boat with the mast up? I always take the mast down.

Definitely stop taking the mast down. It's meant to be left with the mast up, the booms on and the foils in place but withdrawn. All setup should consist of hoisting the sail and changing out of your street clothes, or not as I'm known to do from time to time.


DRC

 

Ps. Note the ERROR cup T-shirt, Bill's Sock Puppet

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23 minutes ago, barthrh said:

I have a similar dolly. I have a question: Is it OK to store the boat with the mast up? I always take the mast down.

Glad you asked!  This will change your UFO sailing life!  As Dave already stated, yes, keep the mast up and foils in if your storage situation allows for it.  15 minutes from shore to sailing.  One caveat though....   The UFO is quite light, and has a lot of surface area.  If you keep the mast up (and likely even if you don't) I recommend tying it down.  We learned this the hard way when our UFO was less than one week old.  An afternoon thunderstorm and boom, its on its side.   Fortunately, the UFO is tough, so the only damage done was a couple of scratches on the hull to deck joint at the transom, a cheap lesson.

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Hi all, this is hull 74 (I think) from Perth, Australia. It has been christened Catapult, sail number 1947. What a machine!! Dave, any tips in keeping the upper shroud tight when storing the mast in the boat. I found they became slack pretty quickly. Photo below. Cheers!

IMG_20180526_130214.jpg

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Noooo!! Thats the batten key. Put the line through the clew and put the knot of the line through the loop in the line. Hooe that makes sense. In sure someone will post a pic.

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You need to really release as much slack in the outhaul as you can to get the soft shackle all the way to the grommet. It's a bit of a hassle because the shock cord is trying to steal it back, but you get the hang of it.

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Feel free to use some e-tape to keep the bungee from uptaking your outhaul.

- make sure that you don't have any rig tension on
- raise the main and cleat it.
- put cunno on hard
- then putting the outhaul should be easy. 

Depending on wind conditions, I either terminate the soft shackle at the sail or at the boom end.
I think that Dave recommends the boom end always.

In other news, the kid rig UFO has appeared.

UFOproto.jpg.1ee6b2b15cb04d3f771fa6759143a078.jpg

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UFO #4 "Squirt" will be transferring from central Texas to Miami just before Labor Day!

Whisper Cat foiler Martin Langhoff convinced me to bring it to him in Miami.

We'll have a Foiling 1/2 Week:  Whisper, UFO, S9, A Cat (maybe).

Anybody care to join us?  Sailing days August 31 through September 4.

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Hi 

thanks all for your help.

another question - the boat turtles pretty fast, if I fall off. Which is quite annoying since the sick mud at the SF Bay bottom is too close even at high tide.

Did anyone tried to seal the mast? Anyone used any must floats and could recommend one?

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I threw an Opti mast float at the top of mine; I think it possibly makes a difference but I still managed to turtle it in one wipeout. Fortunately, it was pretty easy to right by bringing a painter up & over one hull and climbing onto the other. I also considered putting some noodles on the shrouds.

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3 hours ago, Charlie P Mayer said:

UFO #4 "Squirt" will be transferring from central Texas to Miami just before Labor Day!

Whisper Cat foiler Martin Langhoff convinced me to bring it to him in Miami.

We'll have a Foiling 1/2 Week:  Whisper, UFO, S9, A Cat (maybe).

Anybody care to join us?  Sailing days August 31 through September 4.

Yay. Come to Miami everybody... ;)

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7 hours ago, barsuk1 said:

Hi 

thanks all for your help.

another question - the boat turtles pretty fast, if I fall off. Which is quite annoying since the sick mud at the SF Bay bottom is too close even at high tide.

Did anyone tried to seal the mast? Anyone used any must floats and could recommend one?

I agree, the boat does turtle pretty fast.  I recall Dave, likely in the early portion of this forum thread, mentioning that having the boat turtle is safer for a solo sailor that installing a float to prevent the turtle.  If you capsize and become separated from the boat in a decent breeze, the UFO (or most any light cat) on its side will blow downwind faster than you can swim, and you will be left on your own.  So while mast floats are great for keeping your mast out of the mud, keep in mind that if you are out by yourself and capsize in a blow, your usually loyal UFO may take off without you.  This is obviously an individual decision based on where you sail and how you use the boat.

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Took delivery of #17 this summer at Rutland Water in the centre of England. Unfortunately just as no wind season has kicked in so limited foiling so far. 

Don’t know if this has affected anyone else but one small issue I had was the wand bungee working it’s way up the wand and the wand not being super tight in the crank. Found a great fix using rubber ‘O’ rings 6x2mm one on either side holds everything in place nicely and still allows the wand to be adjusted on or off the water.

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16 hours ago, Merde2 said:

- make sure that you don't have any rig tension on
- raise the main and cleat it.
- put cunno on hard
- then putting the outhaul should be easy. 
UFOproto.jpg.1ee6b2b15cb04d3f771fa6759143a078.jpg

You're missing a step.

-No rig tension
-Raise the main, cleat. Yank the sail downwards a touch by hand to assure that the halyard is tight in the cleat.
-RIG TENSION! TONS! Before you do anything else. These will always feel like they have tension in them even if you have none because the sail bends back against them. The only real rig tension is the tension you apply before anything else.
-Lots of cunningham. 
-Then outhaul. I have actually abandoned doubling the knot back to the U-bolt for extra throw. I never seem to need it.



Re: turtling.

Small boats are better off turtled. The inconvenience of righting is nothing compared to losing your boat, which will happen.

Re: shroud creep.

I synch the knots from time to time but honestly I'm a bit stumped on this one. The top span has more mechanical advantage than the bottom span so the creep will naturally occur.


Re: UFO kids rig. This is in pre-production in the care of our 11 year old tester for the summer.. She doesn't like the opti and was considering leaving sailing. It just didn't click for her and the boom hit her in the head. Why do it and be confused and uncomfortable when she's getting so good at gymnastics? One is annoying and the other she's a star in. Enter the kids rig. 4.5 square meters. Short mast. Non foiling blades. Polite, fun, stable. She now likes sailing.

The whole project was inspired by a bunch of dads that I've met over the last two years who want a UFO but are aware that the kid will be old enough soon to need an opti, so there goes enough of the budget to sink the acquisition. Not so if the kid rig conversion is a 5 minute rig and board switch and costs only $1000 extra to have the option. It's a ferrari for dad and a first bicycle for the child, depending on what it's asked to do.


DRC

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23 hours ago, barthrh said:

You need to really release as much slack in the outhaul as you can to get the soft shackle all the way to the grommet. It's a bit of a hassle because the shock cord is trying to steal it back, but you get the hang of it.

Initially, I kept a piece of Velcro parked around the boom which I used when rigging the outhaul to keep the shock cord from pulling it in. I then realized that I could use a loop of the outhaul to clog the jam cleat. It works very well, eliminates the need for the Velcro, and is undone with a light tug.

 

IMG_2830.JPG

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50 minutes ago, Dave Clark said:

Small boats are better off turtled. The inconvenience of righting is nothing compared to losing your boat, which will happen.

The whole project was inspired by a bunch of dads that I've met over the last two years who want a UFO but are aware that the kid will be old enough soon to need an opti, so there goes enough of the budget to sink the acquisition. Not so if the kid rig conversion is a 5 minute rig and board switch and costs only $1000 extra to have the option. It's a ferrari for dad and a first bicycle for the child, depending on what it's asked to do.

You're better off turtling unless you sail in shallow water where ramming the carbon mast into a rocky bottom could be a tad expensive. Risk is dependent on context.

Fortunately, the boat is incredibly easy to right after turtling.

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13 hours ago, Champlain Sailor said:

I agree, the boat does turtle pretty fast.  I recall Dave, likely in the early portion of this forum thread, mentioning that having the boat turtle is safer for a solo sailor that installing a float to prevent the turtle.  If you capsize and become separated from the boat in a decent breeze, the UFO (or most any light cat) on its side will blow downwind faster than you can swim, and you will be left on your own.  So while mast floats are great for keeping your mast out of the mud, keep in mind that if you are out by yourself and capsize in a blow, your usually loyal UFO may take off without you.  This is obviously an individual decision based on where you sail and how you use the boat.

While we’re on the subject of your boat deserting you, DO NOT put a bungee over your tiller the way Moths/Waszps do. If you fall off the boat without capsizing it, it will sail away on autopilot very effectively. Thankfully, when I made this mistake the boat rounded up very slowly and I caught it, but a capsize and/or turtle would have been much less stressful.

You can get away with the bungee in the Moth/Waszp, because the boat has very little hullform stability. 

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@Dave Clark - is there a kids rig (with boomless skinny mainsail) and a skinny mainsail (with boom, full height but smaller surface), or are they the same sailplan?

I'm curious about how the turtle vs mast float will play out here in biscayne bay, which is shallow-ish (from nothing to ~3m) sand/mud. Also curious about the weight needed to right the skinny sail. 

I know one way to find out. :-)

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Regarding the shrouds, what is the proper length of the upper shrouds?  Mine look slack just as in Julianv's photo without the sail.  A length of 85 inches was mentioned much earlier on this forum, but I'm unsure if that's correct.  Thanks.

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Hi guys

I am a poor lonesome sailor from France and a totally Newbie here

Just waiting for my UFO - maybe in September ??????

Has anyone tried to install a GPS Speed puck on an UFO ??

The question is where ??

Just to improve my Ego on this awesome machine ? Boat? Foiler ? and so on ????????

 

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20 minutes ago, Nautilus06 said:

Has anyone tried to install a GPS Speed puck on an UFO ??

 

It seems to me that the only good place is on the wand arm (term?), so my daughter's boyfriend and I designed a mount that would fit securely on that and, a couple of days later I had a mount courtesy of his 3D printer. The mount is held in place with a set of zip ties and the Speedpuck case is attached to the mount with Scotch (3M) All Weather Fasteners which looks a bit like Velcro but is a LOT more secure. The picture shows version 1, which is a bit clunky but proved that the location and the general design was good. We've designed V2 but, alas, he's in the midst of a move and won't be able to print it for another month or so.

When we've got a final design, he'll put it online and I'll provide a link for anyone who has access to a 3D printer.

2088919391_Speedpuckmount.thumb.JPG.f5a5e19a0cbffad78f6879bc38233ffa.JPG

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31 minutes ago, Nautilus06 said:

 

Has anyone tried to install a GPS Speed puck on an UFO ??

The question is where ??

 

 

I mounted a 1st Gen Velocitek on my UFO, and find it very helpful, since once you are up on the foils many of the queues you are used to for judging boatspeed go away or get much smaller.  I made a bracket that lightly clamps around the gantry for the wand.   I cobbled it together from scrap wood and plastic, nothing fancy.  Two plastic 'plates' go around the gantry, and a small piece of wood the same width as the gantry extends up about 6".  I screwed a scrap plate of carbon fiber that is 3"X 5" to the wood, and covered it with Velcro.  The bottoms of the two clamp plates are held tight with a bolt and wing nut.  The Velocitek is easy to see from either tack, and relatively protected from flying sheets or my arms.   I do tie a small leash to it, run around the gantry, in case it is knocked off the Velcro.   I'll get and post a photo of it in the next few days.

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I just saw Granite Guy's post, which went up while I was posting mine.   Same exact location and concept.  Granite Guy's looks MUCH cooler than mine, though, so I don't need to post my photo and I will gladly accept his design once complete and have my son print one out.   Excellent application for the 3D printer!

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You can also track you speed by tossing your phone in a waterproof case and running RaceQs. It's after-the-fact but you get the whole track and can prove your speed exploits to others. 

My question is this: I see what you did with the paddle. When do you use that? I'm not gonna lie: I need to get in and out of a breakwall to get to open water and sometimes I think it would just be easier to drop the sail and paddle in.

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2 hours ago, barthrh said:

You can also track you speed by tossing your phone in a waterproof case and running RaceQs. It's after-the-fact but you get the whole track and can prove your speed exploits to others. 

My question is this: I see what you did with the paddle. When do you use that? I'm not gonna lie: I need to get in and out of a breakwall to get to open water and sometimes I think it would just be easier to drop the sail and paddle in.

I've found that RaceQs max speeds (and presumably instantaneous ones, too) are frequently amusingly high, way off from what the Speedpuck reports. (24 knots in my Weta? I don't think so.) I do like RaceQs track recording, though.

I love having the Speedpuck in sight all the time. Like Champlain Sailor, I have a hard time judging speed when on foils and am frequently aware of significant changes only by glancing at the readout.

As for the paddle, I'm on Lake Winnipesaukee, tucked in behind a point that shields me from the usual NW and W winds. The paddle is for times when sailing out to or in from the wind is just too frustrating.

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Hard at work on it and others! Believe it or not, our reliability on fulfilling orders on schedule is fully 800% better than it was this time last year. The present lead time is down to a lean and clean five weeks, depending on shipping hassles. 

So we're demoing at I420 worlds in Newport on and off through the event, see attached video of 1/3 of team Canada 


One HUGE takeaway I've learned in two years of teaching people to sail the boat, that I think is worth sharing. If you're up to Opti-race or above dinghy experience, you are more than equipped to learn the boat quickly. Essentially if you know how to sheet through your tiller hand, you have 90% of the requisite muscle memory to fly available already. Since sheeting to control roll doesn't get refined until you have a good amount of flight time under your belt, if you can't hand over hand the main to correct a weather roll, or pay out the main through an open hand to correct a lee roll, you need to get to work on that skill first. These are 420 sailors, ages 13 to 16 and all they're working on here is dynamics and timing. (The guy at the end is an adult from italy disregard). So a lot of the time, our most successful foiling beginners are Opti, 420, Radial and Laser sailors. Further up the ladder, 14, 49er, Windsurf, musto, contender, moth and IC sailors get it pretty quick. Really solid A-cat guys tend to get  it pretty quick too. The group that tends to be ironically hardest to teach are "cat guys" ie. beachcat sailors, as the innate stability of beachcats de-emphasizes playing the mainsheet over playing the course. Also it seems that most people skipper beach cats with the tiller down on the deck rather than held overhand. If you're not holding the tiller overhand, you're not able to sheet through your tiller hand. It is not a matter of taste. The boat won't work if you're holding the tiller down on the deck.  The other bit is that, unlike on catamarans, heel is no good. So the instinct to fly a hull sets you back entirely. 

Great work on the speedpuck, graniteguy. That's precisely where I'd build my dashboard too if I had the time. I find that having a speedpuck in sight makes it easier for me to take off in light air because I can tell if my pumping and ooching are incrementally increasing my speed or just tiring me out. If I'm creeping up past 6.5 knots, I know I'm getting really close and just need to muscle it around a bit more.


DRC
 

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Interesting. My background is all over the place, including windsurfing and a Hobie 16, with most of my recent experience in a Weta trimaran. I had thought that the windsurfing would make me quite comfortable with windward heel but I just can't seem to develop control of that. When on foils the best I seem to be able to do is to keep it flat. If I roll it to windward when I'm truly foiling and not just skimming, it usually rolls over on me and no amount of frenzied sheeting saves me from a dunking. What am I doing wrong? Should I be bearing up/off when that happens? Doing something else? Swearing doesn't seem to help.

By the way, converting to overhand grip on the tiller and sheeting through that hand was actually quite easy, and to my surprise I am able to hold a steady bearing despite the dual use of that hand.

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Dave is right about the beach cat sailors.  Same issue when the S9 showed up.  All those years of experience work against you when your new boat reacts differently than anything else you've sailed.  We had to learn how to keep the S9 flat and how to react to attitudes and behaviors not previously experienced.  Just when you think you've got a handle on the S9, the UFO shows up and you have to forget everything you learned on the S9 and learn windward heel and new ways to steer and sheet.  

There is lot of carryover in sailing technique from one dinghy to another, one cat to another, and one keelboat to another.  Carryover from one foiler to another: not so much.*  

An experienced on-the water tutor will cut hours and days off of your learning curve.  Dave's videos help a lot, but nothing beats the otw lessons.

Good job Dave, keep up the good work!

 

*(I'm comparing my sailing a Hobie TriFoiler, Windrider Rave,  S9, UFO, and a nice ride on a GC32) 

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1 hour ago, GraniteGuy said:

usually rolls over on me and no amount of frenzied sheeting saves me from a dunking

As a recent convert to windward heeled foilers, one situation where this happens is with marginal wind. The sheet-in-for-balance strategy works as long as you can get to balance without being oversheeted. 

In light winds, or heading upwind, it's easy to cross that line and lose flow on the leeward side of the sail. Remember: in light winds AW shifts faster forward with your speed.

What you can try instead is a modest - but quick - bearaway. IMHO. You can pull it as soon as you get the speed oompf of getting on the foils.

Depending on how much you bearaway, TW, your speed, etc you'll want to combine it with either sheet out or neutral, maybe even sheet in. Clear as mud? Try the bearaway and, if you can, watch the leeward telltales out of the corner of your eye or in your GoPro/virb footage.

When I was getting the hang of it on my cat, I would get foiling on a straight reach (tw) and bearaway to a mild broad reach the moment we broke free from the water.

When there's more wind you don't need all this dance, as your main has plenty power and leverage so you balance without ever oversheeted.

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Sheet but also revert to a reach. If it's light air, you also need to pray a little and pump a bit. If you're taking off downwind and roll to weather, oversheeting won't entirely help you as you'll stall the sail. Upwind it's more uniformly helpful. However if it's not helping enough, bearing off to a reach will help more.

DRC

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Hey everyone - is there a master list of late summer/fall UFO events in the northeast? 

Looks like Roton Point (9/14-16) and AYC HPR (10/6-7) might have us if we can get a few boats interested.

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there's also a paid training camp on labor day weekend.

Any interest in a midwinters?

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On 6/22/2018 at 11:52 AM, burritoughs said:

UFO owners, wanted to let everyone know there will be a free UFO and Waszp Clinic September 22-23 at Cedar Point Yacht Club in Westport, CT.

The clinic is free and open to everyone, you just have to bring your own UFO or Waszp. Housing will be provided where available on a first come first serve basis. Full details on the event via this link and the flyer attached. 

Hope to see a lot of UFOs there in September. I attended the two UFO clinics Fulcrum ran in Bristol this spring. Both events were tons of fun and great learning experiences. The event also sits nicely between Roton Point Multihull Regatta, September 14-16, and HPR at American Yacht Club, October 6-7, if you’re looking to do a trip to Western Long Island Sound for some fall sailing.

 

Nick, UFO 92

dHQy4D3aaB_misc_1521129954213.pdf

There's a free Waszp/UFO Clinic at Cedar Point Yacht Club September 22-23 as well.

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I had a rather disturbing experience yesterday, in quite strong, gusty conditions.

I started to capsize to windward, saved it, but was washed off the UFO in the process. The boat turned downwind with the sail fully sheeted out and the rudder centered and I watched as it sailed, perfectly balanced, away from me for more than a minute. I was in a relatively small cove on Lake Winnipesaukee and it looked as though it would continue all the way to shore or into a moored boat but something upset the balance at the last minute (disturbed air near the shore?) and it turned into the wind and parked. I had a very long swim.

After an earlier event when the boat took more than a few seconds to park, I started trying to keep a death grip on the mainsheet if I went off the boat. That almost always causes the boat to capsize but that's much easier to deal with than a long swim. For some reason, I let the mainsheet go yesterday.

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