Doug Lord

Steve and Dave Clarks Unidentified Foiling Object

Recommended Posts

And our rudder head pulled out. We just stuck it back in. No glue. Seems fine. The rope holds it down. Don’t pull it up from the hole/rope on top. That’s what we did. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Convinced my wife to enjoy the beautiful Newport waterfront for an hour last weekend while Dave let me take a spin on his boat. Extremely cool setup and a very smoothly run program. I've known Dave from Canoe sailing for a long time now, and I really believe he's the man to import this alien technology to the masses. If you're on the fence--get off and just buy the thing. 

I've been foiling once before, on a Moth a few years back on a breezy day in Annapolis. It was an intense experience, physically very aggressive, and after about an hour it ended when I returned the boat to the owner with a crestfallen look on my face as the boat was a puddle of carbon shards. Last Saturday in Newport was a sales pitch for Dave's boat. The breeze was a not-very-exciting 5-7 knots, with some lump from traffic on the Bay. Can you imagine sailing a Moth out of the harbor in those conditions? Ugh. Anyway, it wasn't quite enough to get my fat ass up on foils, though Dave popped it up early on for a bit. But it was so...comfortable... for a small boat. 

Dave got me really excited when he mentioned the kiddie sail/foil package under development. I have a 3 and a 4 year old, and am already dreading optis. Apparently the theory is to put a non-hydrofoiling package under the water and a tiny little rig above. Boom, world's most stable kid's boat! This is really gonna help me sell this program to my wife! 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Millenium Falcon hull#42 entered the 2018 Around shelter island race yesterday. A grueling 30+ mile race in 0 to 15 knots of wind and every type of chop, boat wake and smooth water sailing. I sailed along with Dave and a personal safety boat from the team, props to Andrew for the amazing job with the rib. I was on the boat for over 6 hours. I'm sore today but still smiling. Only my 6th time on the boat and can now, hands down, say this boat is amazing to sail and bulletproof. I had some really great foiling runs and moments and only 1 capsize. This boat can go upwind and down foiling. If you really need to pinch for a mark you can easily just sail it in displacement mode and pinch. I completely shredded my sailing gloves which I've never done before in a single sail. It was such a great event I know Dave is already thinking of next years event and getting a large group of us entered so we can be our own class in the event and throw out the Portsmouth rating against the other cats. 

Millennium Falcon-1.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Todd, the results appear to be confusing. They show the UFOs as taking twice as long as a Prindle 19, Hobie 16s etc and even longer than the Sunfishes and C420s. What boats sailed what course, and what happened to the UFOs compared to the other cats?  If you're not competitive on 69, what sort of Portsmouth rating do you need to be competitive?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm sure Dave could answer this better. The course was simple keep the island to your left. It was not a bouy course. If your not foiling your slower than all those other boats. It was only foiling conditions for half the race if that. 2 other classes started an hour earlier when there was more favorable wind. Catamarans were a separate class. In light wind a hobie and other cats just sail away from you. Dave did have a go at some of the H16's. Even when there was just enough wind to foil, I couldn't get going because of the ridiculous amount of boat wake from every direction possible. I sailed this on my H17 several yeas ago and had completely different results because I could sail right through all that. I can't answer your question as to ratings because that's all new to me. It may be the reason the a-cats didn't show up this year. On this type of course and conditions a foiling boat with its theoretical rating will kill you. I assume the super fast rating is under the assumption your almost always foiling which is completely unreasonable in such a race. Personally I do the race for the experience. I probably wouldn't wake up and say hey lets sail around shelter island (its not easy. 2 ferry terminals, sandbars, ripping currents, super light wind on leeward side. Etc). I'd rather be blasting around the protected bay just screaming across the water. That being said and my 6th time on the boat. I am officially in training for the 2019 race, its a damn marathon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Elapsed time seems not to have been documented at all in the results. Notice how the corrected time and the elapsed are exactly the same but there is a handicap involved in the fleet. Fun race and I learned a lot. I appear to have stumbled into yet more upwind technique for pointing on the foils which was a lot of fun coming back to overtake half of the hobie 16s in the second segment of upwind climb on the south side of the island. Portsmouth ratings are based on polars, essentially on an open course, and don't ever account for times when there's a no-go zone on footing to take off on the foils etc etc which happens constantly in near shore distance races. Immensely broadening experience. I also need to get a lot more literate in flying downwind through multiple intersecting motor yacht wakes in a the mixing swirl of two tidal funnels.

DRC

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, Dave Clark said:

I appear to have stumbled into yet more upwind technique for pointing on the foils which was a lot of fun coming back to overtake half of the hobie 16s in the second segment of upwind climb on the south side of the island. 


DRC

Any chance you'd be interested in sharing this new upwind technique?   Or is it locked in Area 51 :-)   

FYI, on Lake Champlain the Regatta For Lake Champlain was sailed this weekend.  This is a 13 mile long race around three marks in the broad part of Lake Champlain, starting and finishing from Burlington.  It is a pursuit race, and is a benefit for lake focused organizations.  The entered boats are always a mishmash of local race boats (usual J/Boats, a Farr 400, etc.) and a fleet of cruising boats, and the start times are calculated using the boats PHRF ratings, plus some proprietary factors the RC uses to keep it fun. 

This year, a Whisper foiling catamaran was entered.  I'm sure the PHRF team was scratching their heads to rate it, and they somehow settled on 60.  Winds were 10-15, and the first two legs were a beam reach followed by a close reach.  The Whisper, which started pretty far back as one of the faster boats, seemed to be doing pretty well.   It had almost caught  our J/110 (PHRF 96) by the 2nd mark, and was reaching along on its foils really nicely.  The 3rd leg was a 3 mile beat, and the Whisper began to drop back.  It was on the foils most of the time, but it was pointing really low.  It had fallen way back at the 3rd mark.  The final run was a tight broad reach in 12-16 knots of breeze.  The Whisper seemed to make up some ground here.  We observed it coming into the finish, and the boat had decent speed but seemed to be struggling to control its pitch on a broad reach with a chute up.

I'm making no judgement on the Whisper or the skill of its skipper, positive or negative.   He finished a 2.5 hour race, and seemed to be enjoying himself just fine.  Just an observation that foiling boats are different animals than displacement or planing boats, and if your goal is to win open water races, they may not be the ideal platform.  Or maybe they are if your skills are developed enough!  If you want to win drag races in select conditions, they will almost certainly fulfill that wish!  And if you want to add a new skill to your normal sailing experience, they are great for that too.   

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Champlain Sailor said:

Any chance you'd be interested in sharing this new upwind technique?   Or is it locked in Area 51 :-)   

FYI, on Lake Champlain the Regatta For Lake Champlain was sailed this weekend.  This is a 13 mile long race around three marks in the broad part of Lake Champlain, starting and finishing from Burlington.  It is a pursuit race, and is a benefit for lake focused organizations.  The entered boats are always a mishmash of local race boats (usual J/Boats, a Farr 400, etc.) and a fleet of cruising boats, and the start times are calculated using the boats PHRF ratings, plus some proprietary factors the RC uses to keep it fun. 

This year, a Whisper foiling catamaran was entered.  I'm sure the PHRF team was scratching their heads to rate it, and they somehow settled on 60.  Winds were 10-15, and the first two legs were a beam reach followed by a close reach.  The Whisper, which started pretty far back as one of the faster boats, seemed to be doing pretty well.   It had almost caught  our J/110 (PHRF 96) by the 2nd mark, and was reaching along on its foils really nicely.  The 3rd leg was a 3 mile beat, and the Whisper began to drop back.  It was on the foils most of the time, but it was pointing really low.  It had fallen way back at the 3rd mark.  The final run was a tight broad reach in 12-16 knots of breeze.  The Whisper seemed to make up some ground here.  We observed it coming into the finish, and the boat had decent speed but seemed to be struggling to control its pitch on a broad reach with a chute up.

I'm making no judgement on the Whisper or the skill of its skipper, positive or negative.   He finished a 2.5 hour race, and seemed to be enjoying himself just fine.  Just an observation that foiling boats are different animals than displacement or planing boats, and if your goal is to win open water races, they may not be the ideal platform.  Or maybe they are if your skills are developed enough!  If you want to win drag races in select conditions, they will almost certainly fulfill that wish!  And if you want to add a new skill to your normal sailing experience, they are great for that too.   

That´s what happens with fast boats, top speed in ideal conditions is VERY different from VMG. I usually sail a 5 NM triangle and try to set my own "record". Even in beautiful days with 15 kt winds, with a reaching leg screaming (for a Weta) at 12-13 kt averages, I´m always dissapointed to find the total VMG around the triangle, after tacking, jibing, windholes, WAVES, fuckups and what not, is 6kt or less :-(

  • Like 1
  • Downvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In my opinion, if your desire is to have a Portsmouth slaying beast, move on from the UFO.  It's a dog when I sail it in non-foiling conditions (likely operator error), but when it foils, it's magic, especially for those who are beginners like myself.

I'd love to hear the techniques to improve upwind performance, too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, True North said:

In my opinion, if your desire is to have a Portsmouth slaying beast, move on from the UFO.  It's a dog when I sail it in non-foiling conditions (likely operator error), but when it foils, it's magic, especially for those who are beginners like myself.

I'd love to hear the techniques to improve upwind performance, too.

Nope, it's pretty canine in non-foiling conditions. However, I will say if you sail it upwind like a 12meter in light air you do seem to cut your losses a lot more. I didn't lose any more trees on the 16's once I figured that out. It's not moving fast but you can feel in the rudder that the induced drag on the foils is WAY down. Where I got killed on the first leg upwind was when the breeze climbed to 6 gusting 8 in the rollimng swells. I blew a whole bunch off ground bearing off and trying to fly, flying for a bit, coming down and trying to do it again. During that period my progress to weather was dwarfed by the 16's holding the same angle and simply seeing higher speeds. Once I was consistently foiling I was doing far better and seemed to be gaining ground quite steadily. However, what's got me very interested is a technique I started using that kept me on the foils (so going no slower than 8/8.5) but got my net angle even higher. Sit aft so that the control system is actually unstable. As opposed to sitting forward enough so the wand can dial back the lift and stop the boat from coming out of the surface, make it so that if you get up to enough speed, you're guaranteed to crash. Now point it upwind and build speed. Whenever the wand breaks free of the surface, pinch and lose speed but gain height. The bow will come back down and the wand will regain contact, bear back off to your true foiling angle and repeat. Skiffies call a trick like this "squirts", but I started calling it "climbing stairs". I'm not sure if it's always a good idea and I've only ever done it for one leg in specific conditions, but it sure did seem to yield some fearsome upwind VMG. Off the wind in waves, I learned to be a lot less fearful about pointing it deep downwind once my speed was up. Grow up and bear off and let your speed take you to the mark. What a huge learning experience! Thank you, southold yacht club!

DRC

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/10/2018 at 6:44 AM, Claire1000 said:

And our rudder head pulled out. We just stuck it back in. No glue. Seems fine. The rope holds it down. Don’t pull it up from the hole/rope on top. That’s what we did. 

I had the same rudder head issue this weekend.  My rudder head issue happened because I mis-rigged the rudder halyard by skipping the bullseye on the tiller--oops.  So make sure you rig your rudder halyard correctly or you may have issues. 

I was not able to get the rudder head back in on the water.  I had to beach the boat and really work the head back in the rudder, but after that everything worked fine.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another worthwhile note from nearly a full week on the water as much as 12 hours a day: The bungee/spectra strop over the top of the mainfoil adjusters is a way too variable answer for keeping the gates closed. What you want is a horizontal strap rather than a vertical one. I put a whole new replacement gate system on 73 for the trip down to Baltimore and it was jumping out on day 1. GRRRRRRR. Day 2, I tried wrapping the outside with electrical tape. 100% better. It hasn't popped open or slid forward since. The pin itself has slid out of one side, which did facilitate a slide forward a couple times on the bouncy side of shelter, but in general, it constituted a huge improvement. I'm now on the hunt for the right velcro to glue to the gates on future production boats, so the wrapping strap can be built in.

DRC

  • Downvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

6 hours ago, Champlain Sailor said:

Any chance you'd be interested in sharing this new upwind technique?   Or is it locked in Area 51 :-)

I wanna know too!

6 hours ago, Champlain Sailor said:

The Whisper seemed to make up some ground here.  We observed it coming into the finish, and the boat had decent speed but seemed to be struggling to control its pitch on a broad reach with a chute up.

Was it the light blue Whisper? If so that's Taylor Congleton of WhisperBoatsUSA. If he was running the chute solo... it's a handful. The chute has a very high CoE, it's hard to find a good balance, and even harder if conditions are gusty and/or choppy. I'm working on my technique for it, two handed. Solo I still fly it, but struggle would be very appropriate :-)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
34 minutes ago, martin.langhoff said:

 

Was it the light blue Whisper? If so that's Taylor Congleton of WhisperBoatsUSA. If he was running the chute solo... it's a handful. The chute has a very high CoE, it's hard to find a good balance, and even harder if conditions are gusty and/or choppy. I'm working on my technique for it, two handed. Solo I still fly it, but struggle would be very appropriate :-)

Yes, I'm pretty sure it was Taylor, and he was sailing single handed.  He looked pretty relaxed and smooth on the close reach.  And yes, it looked like a handful on the broad reach with the chute.  In fairness,  we only were able to see the last minute or so of his progress on this leg and he did not look like he was on the verge of a capsize or wipeout, his heading was pretty steady and he was making good progress.   But he was climbing and stalling on the foils a fair bit, as many of us on the UFO have experienced ourselves!   

I've sailed foiling boats.  I've sailed double handed dual trap asymmetric skiffs.  Both are challenging in a fun way.  The thought  of combining foiling with a trapeze flown spinnaker single handed makes my head hurt.   Kudos to anyone that can pull that off!   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Curious said:

Thanks for the info, guys. 

60 for a Whisper seems incredibly favourable - in SF boats like the Hobie 20 are -25 or so.

SCHRS on the other hand has it at 0.947, which seems optimistic -- ie: lower than the Nacra 17 full foiler.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, Dave Clark said:

(...) in non-foiling conditions (...) if you sail it upwind like a 12meter in light air you do seem to cut your losses a lot more. I didn't lose any more trees on the 16's once I figured that out. It's not moving fast but you can feel in the rudder that the induced drag on the foils is WAY down.

Am I reading this "sail it like a 12 meter" too literally? Is there something specific to sailing 12s upwind?

21 hours ago, Dave Clark said:

However, what's got me very interested is a technique I started using that kept me on the foils (so going no slower than 8/8.5) but got my net angle even higher. Sit aft so that the control system is actually unstable. As opposed to sitting forward enough so the wand can dial back the lift and stop the boat from coming out of the surface, make it so that if you get up to enough speed, you're guaranteed to crash. Now point it upwind and build speed. Whenever the wand breaks free of the surface, pinch and lose speed but gain height. The bow will come back down and the wand will regain contact, bear back off to your true foiling angle and repeat. Skiffies call a trick like this "squirts", but I started calling it "climbing stairs". I'm not sure if it's always a good idea and I've only ever done it for one leg in specific conditions, but it sure did seem to yield some fearsome upwind VMG.

Trying to boil this down:

  •  sit aft to increase AoA on the foil and "shorten" the wand by having it sit higher
  • get foiling, head upwind, build speed
  • when foiling high, pinch briefly, bear away as soon as the boat loses height

it'd be a more active version of the gentle snaking that most people work to windward. Instead of trying gently find the point where you lose some speed, actively (aggressively?) pinch, trading speed for "steps" to windward.

 

21 hours ago, Dave Clark said:

Off the wind in waves, I learned to be a lot less fearful about pointing it deep downwind once my speed was up. Grow up and bear off and let your speed take you to the mark. What a huge learning experience! Thank you, southold yacht club!

Yay! I wanna see the pitchpole videos ;-)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, martin.langhoff said:

Am I reading this "sail it like a 12 meter" too literally? Is there something specific to sailing 12s upwind?

Trying to boil this down:

  •  sit aft to increase AoA on the foil and "shorten" the wand by having it sit higher
  • get foiling, head upwind, build speed
  • when foiling high, pinch briefly, bear away as soon as the boat loses height

it'd be a more active version of the gentle snaking that most people work to windward. Instead of trying gently find the point where you lose some speed, actively (aggressively?) pinch, trading speed for "steps" to windward.

 

Yay! I wanna see the pitchpole videos ;-)

Re: "sail like a 12meter" this means adopt a yachtsmanlike mentality and focus almost exclusively on pointing as high as the boat will go. Forget about speed altogether and just point 30 degrees higher. 

Re: "climbing the stairs". I'm almost certain you can't do this on the whisper, the F101 or the glide free foil package because the wand is aft of the foil and is apparently decoupled from pitch.

DRC

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
37 minutes ago, Dave Clark said:

Re: "sail like a 12meter" this means adopt a yachtsmanlike mentality and focus almost exclusively on pointing as high as the boat will go. Forget about speed altogether and just point 30 degrees higher. 

Thanks, that's straightforward. I was clearly overthinking it.

Quote

Re: "climbing the stairs". I'm almost certain you can't do this on the whisper, the F101 or the glide free foil package because the wand is aft of the foil and is apparently decoupled from pitch.

Agreed. Somewhat surprised the pitch part is key, not sure I fully understand it. I'll be trying to figure it out. I can set the ride height control to fly high & increase foil rake, not sure if that'll help.

In any case, I'm still planning to get my hands on a UFO ;-)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, martin.langhoff said:

Thanks, that's straightforward. I was clearly overthinking it.

Agreed. Somewhat surprised the pitch part is key, not sure I fully understand it. I'll be trying to figure it out. I can set the ride height control to fly high & increase foil rake, not sure if that'll help.

In any case, I'm still planning to get my hands on a UFO ;-)

Essentially since the system is decoupled from pitch almost entirely, there is very limited control over overall flightpath. You're driving an oscillator. As a result you can't really play any sort of rhythm where you consistently gain altitude and cash it in as gain to weather. That's always been my experience with the foil following wands. They're gentler but their sense of where they are relative to the water and where the boat is going next is far duller. If you were blind, you would want to put your walking stick out in front of you, not behind you. Now I must get back to digging my turnips.

DRC

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fellow UFO pilots,  Any particular advice for foiling in lower winds?  I am particularly interested in any body position or point of sail advice.  I get a lot of 8-12 knot days around here and I am getting up on the foils fairly consistently but finding myself behind-in-the-water to windward often.  Watching Dave's videos I see him droop hiking during much of the footage.  I find myself with my behind solidly on pad 1 (as opposed to hiking off the windward side) and often trying to get even further to the center of the boat to avoid rolling to windward.  I can arrest the roll to windward by sheeting in but often times I am pulling arm lengths of main sheet to try to get back level.  Any tips?

 

Also wrt terminology...

15 hours ago, Dex Sawash said:

I'm too thick to follow this 100%. We need specific terms for 3 axes plus elevation now. We should never have used "height" to mean heading relative to wind direction.

 

http://youtu.be/rYFQZFL0yoo

 

Yaw, pitch, roll, altitude and heading from the aerospace world?  I agree there is new physics, techniques, and vocabulary with foiling boats.  We're entering a brave new world!

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/16/2018 at 1:32 PM, Dave Clark said:

<...>What you want is a horizontal strap rather than a vertical one. I put a whole new replacement gate system on 73 for the trip down to Baltimore and it was jumping out on day 1. GRRRRRRR. Day 2, I tried wrapping the outside with electrical tape. 100% better. It hasn't popped open or slid forward since. <...> I'm now on the hunt for the right velcro to glue to the gates on future production boats, so the wrapping strap can be built in.

DRC

Do you mean the new system where you slide the gates over the top to lock the pin down? I was also wondering how to keep them shut (I just received my new parts). What about another gate on top, perpendicular to the two gates? Or a snap-buckle like the one used on an Opti mastlock? As for the pin sliding out, isn't the solution a pin with a split ring on both ends?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/30/2018 at 5:36 PM, koolkat505 said:

A general question from #58-- How or where are you insuring your UFO??  There was some discussion last July on the thread about it, TT (#4) said he used Boat US, but when I just got off the phone with them 15 minutes ago, they said NO UFO due to the foils.  DH had suggest Gowrie Group, whom I had contacted last week.  They have a "one design program", but the only foiler they currently cover are "Moth " brands, which we aren't, so they will not cover the UFO either!  I had been thinking about going to the Ottawa regatta in June, but they are looking for 1.5 million dollar (Canadian) liability coverage.  Fortunately, Wickford has NO insurance coverage requirement.  Any ideas would be greatly appreciated- Thanks #58

I had no issue insuring mine. I insured it with Skippers' Plan (covered by Aviva) in Canada. $180/yr with $1M of liability. $2M was an extra $20.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
51 minutes ago, barthrh said:

Do you mean the new system where you slide the gates over the top to lock the pin down? I was also wondering how to keep them shut (I just received my new parts). What about another gate on top, perpendicular to the two gates? Or a snap-buckle like the one used on an Opti mastlock? As for the pin sliding out, isn't the solution a pin with a split ring on both ends?

I have had great luck simply tightening the lock nuts under the gates on the inside of the hull.  Tightening these nuts adds friction to the gates and now they only move when I put a decent amount of force to them.  Give it a shot, it worked for me.....and sometimes the simplest solution is the best one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
47 minutes ago, barthrh said:

I had no issue insuring mine. I insured it with Skippers' Plan (covered by Aviva) in Canada. $180/yr with $1M of liability. $2M was an extra $20.

Aviva won't provide coverage for our US friends.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have #35, purchased recently (it was in stock at Shoreline). We're getting used to the boat and have right now 1 retro fit to do for the new gated pin lock on the centerboard vs. the pin-through-the-hole method.

1. What other retrofits have happened since #35? It would be good to get a list of "release notes".

2. I consistently get water in the Port hull. I'd say almost 2 liters dumped out on the weekend. I think the issue is in the back of the boat as I'll get water in the hull no matter the conditions (i.e. the mast hole rarely / never getting wet). Any ideas on where to look? I plan to soap-test it.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, barthrh said:

I have #35, purchased recently (it was in stock at Shoreline). We're getting used to the boat and have right now 1 retro fit to do for the new gated pin lock on the centerboard vs. the pin-through-the-hole method.

1. What other retrofits have happened since #35? It would be good to get a list of "release notes".

2. I consistently get water in the Port hull. I'd say almost 2 liters dumped out on the weekend. I think the issue is in the back of the boat as I'll get water in the hull no matter the conditions (i.e. the mast hole rarely / never getting wet). Any ideas on where to look? I plan to soap-test it.

 

I don't have a full list, but I know that the spreader attachment fitting on the mast was changed from a stamped metal fitting to a carbon fiber fabrication on builds around the 110-120 range.  I have Hull #93 and the metal fitting failed.  Dave delivered one of the newly designed carbon fiber replacement fittings to me and I've been good to go since then.

I know on early boats there were holes drilled into the hand holds that are molded into the deck of the boat so that they would drain.  They were determined to be leak points, so the holes were eliminated.   I think this occurred early,  around boat 10, so you shouldn't have that problem.  If you do, I'd fill those holes. 

As for water in the hulls, that is a problem that several owners have reported and no one has solved yet.  I think it is driving Dave nuts because the factory rigorously leak tests each boat.  I don't get much water in, but I do get some, but not all the time.  And it doesn't follow any logical pattern that I have found so far, ie I don't seem to get a lot more on windy days when I spend time burying the bows or upside down.  So I don't know myself.   When I'm moving it on the dolly if I hear water sloshing, I drain it.   Not a big deal, just an irritant.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We've tried to keep all changes to a bare minimum for the sake of preserving the strict one design nature of the boat. However, some parts wore down or were found to fail and have needed to change. Usually this is a matter of "more glue here/add some carbon or a bolt there" to keep these things budget neutral we have worked hard to reduce wasted process materials (peel ply, tape, vacuum bag, wasted resin). To keep it weight neutral, we've worked to match any beefing up with minor weight savings in obvious places. Besides replacing the metal brackets which flatly didn't last (we're still getting those handed out to people in the field. We can only make so many), the most profound change has been the addition of a more potent righting handle system. This doesn't sound like a big deal, as the other system worked, but being able to right the boat from a turtle five times faster is the difference between taking big risks on foil gybes and playing things conservatively. See attached picture.

DRC
 

Righting handles.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now