Doug Lord

Steve and Dave Clarks Unidentified Foiling Object

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27 minutes ago, Jedel said:

I seem to have lost the (nylon?) thin ring that is fitted as a wear ring below the mast step.

Does anyone know what material this this? and if this a custom part? 

It's made of PTex. The material that surfaces the bottom of skis. As with most things, we try to be a customer as little as possible, so it's made in house with an interlocking holesaw head on a drill press.

DRC

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I need some advise.

I've had the boat out a number of times now and am getting frustrated with a couple issues and would like some guidance and how to handle some conditions

  • Getting stuck in the irons. I've read Dave's description on how to tack basically pushing the sail over with your shoulder but I haven't been able to do this and end up getting stuck in the irons. How do you get out? I've tried reversing the rudder when the boat starts going backwards but as soon as I get the bow somewhat around and start going forward the boat stalls out and I end up back, bow into the wind.
  • Launching through shallow and weedy areas. I put down the rudder part way but can't make any progress upwind and basically get blown back to shore or down a couple houses.

I'm hoping there are some techniques to deal with these situations. The times I've able to foil have been great but I'm struggling with these issues and getting somewhat frustrated.

Thanks for your help.

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If I'm not tacking with enough speed I let go of the main sheet and the tiller during the tack.
Try pushing the main out with both hands. You need to have momentum to get your bows low enough, so a snagged mainsheet can end up being problematic. Make sure that it can run through the block. While you're doing this, the rudder generally goes with the least resistance, no need to handle it if done properly.
When you're at the end of the push, the rudder tends to swing the other way to round you up, catch it, keep it in the middle or bearing away while you pump your mainsheet. All of this happens quickly.
If you do get stuck, remember that it takes momentum sailing backwards to get out.

I find I need at least half rudder on with Min AOA trim and weight forward enough to keep the boat level or the bows digging in slightly.
Don't pinch and you should be fine.

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Thanks for the quick response, couple more questions

Which way are pushing the main? Windward or leeward in reference the original tack? As the boat is turning through the wind and the sail should be pushed over and then all the way out?

You steer into the wind and then let go of the rudder? 

I know I've seen it someplace but which is the min AOA on the rudder? I presuming that most the thread should be showing for the min AOA. When the tiller is hitting the adjustment knob.

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Yes, I steer into the tack, duck onto the new side and push the main out.

So if you're on starboard tack, you tack, get to your old leeward and end up pushing/backwinding the main to starboard.
The push isn't a nudge with the shoulder. Think heisman trophy. If you need more leverage, get on your new leeward side. 
Digging in a back corder can help rotate the hull too.

Min AOA has thread showing. I don't go as far as having the tiller hit the knob.
This setting tends to keep my bows enough out of the water and from submarining.
I can see having issues if your weight is too far backwards and the bows aren't making proper contact with the water.

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Tacking can be a challenge, no doubt.   The fool proof method I've found, which is not particularly fast but will always get you through, is to use Dave's technique as follows.   Throw the helm to leeward to start the tack.   Pull the sail over your body before you move to windward.  Let out plenty of sheet and lean your shoulder into the sail.  Put one hand on the boom and push it to the new leeward side, even if you are backwinding it.   Most of the time, the boat will be going backwards by now, so reverse the tiller to begin to steer the bows down on the new tack.  To be sure you will not go into irons, let the sheet out ALL THE WAY and push the boom out, it will go almost 90 degrees.  When the boat stops moving backwards you are almost at a beam reach.  Center the tiller, move your body to the windward hull and forward, then pull in the main sheet slowly.  You'll begin moving forward and should have flow attached to the rudder.  If you sheet in too quickly, the rudder will stall.    

As you gain experience, you begin to get better  judgement of how far off the wind you need to go before you sheet in.  In some conditions, no backward travel is needed..   I find that in very light wind and heavy wind, successful tacks are slow and deliberate.   In moderate breezes, particularly in flat water, you can get away with much quicker, smoother ones.   Gybes are  almost always much easier!

As for weeds, I don't have an easy answer.   Late in the season we have troubles with them here too.  The hydrofoils are really effective at catching them.   In our lake, the weeds seem to to grow to the surface in water shallower than 5'.   So I can sail into 5' of water.  In heavy wind, I can power through to 3' of water (with foils up).  In light wind, I need to jump out and walk/swim the boat in or out, as the weeds will simply stop me.   Its the price we pay for sailing in water that doesn't require a dry suit, I guess.

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And here's how you do it in really light stuff. It's sort of a pirouette. The trick in the really light stuff is to pop the bows out during the turn and then stomp them back down to lock the new heading. Essentially the addition of that much ultra low aspect sideforce helps it maintain heading and build speed at super low speeds.

DRC

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Continuing the topic of displacement sailing / tacking (for me, getting outside the breakwall), do you put your front foil down right away? I'm not sure if the boat is or is not easier to tack in tight quarters with it up.

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9 hours ago, barthrh said:

Continuing the topic of displacement sailing / tacking (for me, getting outside the breakwall), do you put your front foil down right away? I'm not sure if the boat is or is not easier to tack in tight quarters with it up.

It seems a good deal easier to me. One of the critical drivers of tough tacking is the reversed relationship between the center of effort on the sail and the mainfoil. On a conventional dinghy, the center of effort on the mainsail is slightly forward of the daggerboard, so pumping the main will pull you out of irons and in a normal tack, once the sail catches on the new side, the tack is nearing its successful close. The opposite applies on the UFO, so you need to be very careful to keep the mainsail very far out during tacks before it wearther-vanes backwards around the mainfoil. Keeping the foil up does help a bit. There are other forces in play as well, but this would help in close quarters.

DRC

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On 8/17/2018 at 9:10 AM, GraniteGuy said:

I had a rather disturbing experience yesterday, in quite strong, gusty conditions.

I started to capsize to windward, saved it, but was washed off the UFO in the process. The boat turned downwind with the sail fully sheeted out and the rudder centered and I watched as it sailed, perfectly balanced, away from me for more than a minute. I was in a relatively small cove on Lake Winnipesaukee and it looked as though it would continue all the way to shore or into a moored boat but something upset the balance at the last minute (disturbed air near the shore?) and it turned into the wind and parked. I had a very long swim.

After an earlier event when the boat took more than a few seconds to park, I started trying to keep a death grip on the mainsheet if I went off the boat. That almost always causes the boat to capsize but that's much easier to deal with than a long swim. For some reason, I let the mainsheet go yesterday.

I think I may have solved the mystery of my runaway UFO and have come up with a possible fix for it. I apologize for the length of this.

In non-foiling conditions today, I played around with configurations a bit to see if I could replicate the problem. Initially, even with the sail sheeted all the way out and the boat on a broad reach or lower, it turned itself (slowly) into the wind and parked. The mainsheet traveler block interfered a bit but the tiller always managed to move past it so the rudder could turn the boat into the wind. However, it seems that the culprit is the BattleStick tiller extension. My BattleStick is sprung, for lack of a better word, so that it tries to lie parallel to the tiller when released. Because of that, it and the block can effectively "lock" the tiller so that it's positioned nearly perfectly amidships. Check out the picture. Once in this configuration, my boat happily ran downwind for several minutes. Eventually, something bumped the BattleStick out of position, the tiller moved past the block, and the boat turned into the wind. (The BattleStick can also prevent the tiller from moving past the block if it's resting on the mainsheet on the other side of the block but it's more easily dislodged from this position.)

I suspect that this is what happened to my boat when it and I parted company. I'm sure the circumstances that put it into this configuration are rather (incredibly?) rare but once was more than enough for me.

So, what to do? As the boat rolls to windward and I'm about to be washed off in the future, I could just give the BattleStick a hard shove so it moves well past the block so the tiller can't get locked, but I don't think I would have that much presence of mind in those circumstances.

I've decided to try an alternative. I disconnected the BattleStick by popping the cover off the base and sliding the foot out of the shoe, reversed the foot, and popped the cover back on. It took 10 seconds. Now the BattleStick is sprung so that it swings forward when released. I have not sailed with the new configuration yet.

I realize that there may be a very good reason that the BattleStick was sprung to swing backward when released and that I may have traded one problem for another. For example, perhaps it could become fouled on a hiking strap if no one is holding it. However, it seems incredibly unlikely that it could jam the tiller perfectly amidships and result in another runaway boat.

Does any know of any reason not to reverse the BattleStick?
 

 

BattleStick.JPG

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When new the joint for the battlestick is straight, but when you store it when not sailing, you store it with the battlestick along the tiller. This causes the joint to gain a permanent bend that causes this issue. The solution is to disconnect the battlestick from the tiller after each sail. This should allow the joint to remain straight and also prevents the joint from developing cracks, so it will last longer. It is just bloody annoying.

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Anyone got the dimensions on the width of the hulls?

I think the boat width is 67 inches, and I'm trying to work out if I can sit it on 47 inch roof crossbars...

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I tried roof topping it on 48 inch bars but they were too short. Distance from mid hull to mid hull (distance between the drain plugs) is about 52". You really should have minimum of 60" bars so it sits securely.

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Waiting for my boat but I decided to buy Thule bars model 393 - 69 " - in order to avoid any problem

Don't know if they are available in the States

 

On the US site I saw you can have 65 " square bars 

 

note : I have no Thule shares...

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Great photo Martin.   I'm all in favor of you getting your 8 year old son up on foils and have no doubt he will master the UFO within weeks.  However, it appears from the photo that you have greater ambitions.  Is that a stroller-bound UFO pilot that I spy?   Perhaps you are pushing the youth foiling envelope just a bit too far....   B)    (kidding, of course....)

Looks like an amazing  row of foiling cats.   I'm hoping you have great wind to allow those who make the trip to really enjoy themselves in great company.   I'm looking forward to the reports and comparisons.

I'm headed to Bristol tomorrow for the next Fulcrum clinic.  Dave states we will have over a dozen boats for the weekend, so I'm looking forward to meeting more UFO pilots and learning some new techniques for rigging and sailing these remarkable little boats.

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UNBELIEVABLE NEWS ALERT: After a little research, it turns out you can check a UFO as baggage on a flight across the Atlantic with Virgin Atlantic for $100 (Boston to London). That's the cheapest shipping of all time! If you're in Europe, reach out to us to fly over, demo the boat and fly back with it. 

That's right. You get one checked back for free so all you need to pay is the $100 oversized bag fee. I'm amazed! Time to book some regatta dates for myself in Europe.

DRC

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1 hour ago, Dave Clark said:

$100 oversized bag fee

I would not get my hopes up yet, unless you add hinges to the deck. Never mind schlepping an UFO through the airport.

Virgin Atlantic https://goo.gl/KdpMd6:

"If any of your bags are over 190 x 75 x 65cm (75 x 29.5 x 25.5in) or the three dimensions of a piece of luggage is more than 330cm/130ins, you won’t be able to check them in as baggage, but you might be able to fly them as cargo. [...] fees for oversized baggage are currently [...] USD 100 per item."

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35 minutes ago, Tom4FunOnly said:

I would not get my hopes up yet, unless you add hinges to the deck. Never mind schlepping an UFO through the airport.

Virgin Atlantic https://goo.gl/KdpMd6:

"If any of your bags are over 190 x 75 x 65cm (75 x 29.5 x 25.5in) or the three dimensions of a piece of luggage is more than 330cm/130ins, you won’t be able to check them in as baggage, but you might be able to fly them as cargo. [...] fees for oversized baggage are currently [...] USD 100 per item."

Ten feet is 305 cm. All I know is I called, gave the dimensions and asked and the people in customer service repeatedly "are you sure? I will be bringing this to logan airport with the expectation of bringing it on my trip" to which they replied "yes, we're sure", repeatedly. But sure, maybe you're right anyway.

 

DRC

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UFO #4 "Squirt" has landed in Miami. We've been having a ball with Alessandro on it -- started being a bit apprehensive,  got into bunny hops (with partial wand), and then into Kangaroo hops(?) where we get into full height foil, track a bit, then flail and crash-capsize into windward. (We're getting started in a bay, so it's irregular/gusty).

After the 2nd crash-capsize I was a bit apprehensive of his reaction... but he clambered on top of the capsized boat and started jumping, screaming of joy and waving his arms exultantly. 

This UFO is here to stay. (I'll ask a million questions later).

@Charlie P Mayer has an excellent writeup of the proceedings over here... 

 

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Alright, assorted questions about the UFO, coming from UFO#4 (an early build). Feel free to tell me to RTFM if that's what I should do ;-)

Main foil trunk seems loose -- the main foil, fully down and locked... moves, wobbles and shifts, specially when in displacement mode. Is this normal? The other foilers I know have a tight-ish profile at the exit point (bottom). These tight exit profiles do have some gap or flex to handle different rakes, but still hold it well in place.  I'm tempted to put 3M velcro (hook/loop side) tape in there to shrink it so it 'grabs' a bit...

Main foil - lifting it. Any tricks/rigs to make lifting the main foil easier? - say, for an 8yo. I'm mulling having a pulley/shockblock tied to the spreaders right against the mast (for minimal/no leverage against the spreaders themselves). 

Rudder - lifting it. Any tricks? No ideas here...

Loops for bow bridle. In some conditions, a line around the mast works great. In others, I wish there were loops like we have for the beach wheels. Would it be safe to drill through the joiner lip? (name?). This would work with some form of clip on bridle, that is clear forward of the crane/wand setup.

How do you walk it around on its wheels? Holding it from the bows or stern breaks my back. The bridle mentioned above might also be useful to walk the boat around with the right fore-aft balance.

Forward arm/crane moves a bit port/stbd. Say, 15-20 deg. Is this normal? We may have knocked it a bit around.

Is there a standard length to the dyneema jumper / diamond lines? We had a minor accident where one untied from its bottom sheave, and re-tying it ended up shorter, so we shortened the "good" one... before taking a measurement. So we're now a bit off in standard settings. Also, what's the right thickness?

Mainsheet line - what's the best mainsheet line? I am thinking of 4mm something light and grippy...

@Dave Clark - your "best settings for light air" post is excellent, couple of quick questions from there:

 - 15 turns on the batten... from whhat baseline? also, do you tighten after you hoist, or before?

 - say a boat is tuned just right with those setting, how do you depower from there? 

that's all for now ;-)

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Questions in italics, answers in normal text

Main foil trunk seems loose -- the main foil, fully down and locked... moves, wobbles and shifts, specially when in displacement mode. Is this normal? The other foilers I know have a tight-ish profile at the exit point (bottom). These tight exit profiles do have some gap or flex to handle different rakes, but still hold it well in place.  I'm tempted to put 3M velcro (hook/loop side) tape in there to shrink it so it 'grabs' a bit...

I've experimented with felt linings with no good results. As a daily user of the boat I've found little reason to date to eliminate minor clunking around. Major slop is detectible in sudden shifts in flightpath but I've never traced that to a sloppy trunk. In that case it was a loose nut in the hand wheel guiding the rudder, an affliciction I call "the jumpies". Note that, given that I use the boat at least twice a week and keep my demo boat turnover to a minumum (we've been running #73 very hard since January) I'd be the most motivated and equipped to fix something if I found it an impediment to making sure the boat presents its best possible performance during all demos. So I'm actually already making a pretty serious bet that this really is more "feature" than "problem". Progressively increasing side to side slop in the rudder gudgeon is, I think a bigger issue, and I have an upcoming reverse compatible fix for that.
 

Main foil - lifting it. Any tricks/rigs to make lifting the main foil easier? - say, for an 8yo. I'm mulling having a pulley/shockblock tied to the spreaders right against the mast (for minimal/no leverage against the spreaders themselves). 

The foils are heavy. A neat block and tackle system on the mast for little kids would probably be the most obvious and sensible addition of creature comfort.

Rudder - lifting it. Any tricks? No ideas here...

let off the rudder downhaul before you get into your landing zone and allow the foil lift to lift it up. Cleat it at half depth and proceed towards your ramp or dock. In later boats we added a nylon thumbscrew on the side of the rudderhead to act as a "brake" this when screwed in stops the rudder from falling back down due to gravity if you stop and thus decrease the hydrodynamic lift on the rudder.
 

Loops for bow bridle. In some conditions, a line around the mast works great. In others, I wish there were loops like we have for the beach wheels. Would it be safe to drill through the joiner lip? (name?). This would work with some form of clip on bridle, that is clear forward of the crane/wand setup.

Yes. I made one brief concession to cosmetics and left handles on the bow out of the hardware layout. Be sure to seal the inside of the holes

How do you walk it around on its wheels? Holding it from the bows or stern breaks my back. The bridle mentioned above might also be useful to walk the boat around with the right fore-aft balance.

One hand on the foredeck. One hand on the mast or mainfoil.

Forward arm/crane moves a bit port/stbd. Say, 15-20 deg. Is this normal? We may have knocked it a bit around.

Comprehensively normal.
 

Is there a standard length to the dyneema jumper / diamond lines? We had a minor accident where one untied from its bottom sheave, and re-tying it ended up shorter, so we shortened the "good" one... before taking a measurement. So we're now a bit off in standard settings. Also, what's the right thickness?

There are so many loose tolerances in that system that approaching any part of it with a tape measure is the wrong approach. A strain gauge gives you meaningful numbers. 
 

Mainsheet line - what's the best mainsheet line? I am thinking of 4mm something light and grippy...

@Dave Clark - your "best settings for light air" post is excellent, couple of quick questions from there:

 - 15 turns on the batten... from whhat baseline? also, do you tighten after you hoist, or before?

The battens come from north with nearly zero tension on them. One must initially turn them in until the "speed wrinkes" are gone. After that point you have a "loose batten" baseline. That's where you add from. Bear in mind that these are 180 degree wrist turns, not 360 degree revolutions.

 - say a boat is tuned just right with those setting, how do you depower from there? 

Ease Shrouds. ADD CUNNINGHAM AND OUTHAUL




DRC

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@Dave Clark - thanks for the quick response! Very useful. Follow up below on some of them.

Main foil trunk - I respect what you say, yet it's hard to tell whether my #4 is within your expectations of slop. Any rule of thumb? PM /email me if easier. If I am all OCD and add velcro, felt or carpet, any significant drawbacks? 

Rudder gudgeon seems to have no slop, but I'll be vigilant.

Rudder lifting - gotcha. I might copy a trick I know, tying a thick bungee that adds friction between gudgeon and foil -- though it makes it harder to hoist, so blah.

Length of dyneema jumper lines - ok, I do have a loos gauge, does that work? If not... what? What range of tensions should I be able to achieve, and how do you test it (with sail on and cunningham at X, without sail...) ? 

Depower - ease shrouds, add cunningham and outhaul. Aye aye sir! Fantastic stuff. Thank you.

 

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Martin:

I, too, am bothered by the loose fit of the main strut in its housing.   In Fulcrum's defense, it is not a problem once it is loaded up (when you are foiling).   The strut hold down/pitch adjustment mechanism was upgraded at some point,   The early boats had two composite blocks on either side of the strut with about 7 holes drilled in them.   Getting the pin through both blocks and the strut proved difficult.  Fulcrum upgraded to a system where 'gates' swing shut over the pin, and the rack under the gates has 5 positions for the pin to adjust your angle of attack.   This mechanism is much easier to use, but the pin and strut still move around alot.   The pin can wiggle to one side, and the gates can wiggle open.   Dave is now providing some velcro bands to keep the gates closed.  But I still am not satisfied with this solution... its one of the week points in the boat, in my opinion.  It works, but I think it can be better and I'm going to try to design and build a better mechanism, I just need to find the time!   However, the boat sails and flies just fine with the current design (pin goes in the middle goove 95% of the time).   

Your ideas on lifting the main foil should work.   I find it awkward but very doable, but I'm a bit bigger than an 8 year old.   The rudder is tougher.   Most times the rudder will come up when you ease the downhaul, but sometimes it sticks, and other times if the wind is light you won't generate enough lift.   Once up, the nylon thumbscrew retrofit works OK, but not great.   It may be difficult for your son to generate enough force on the screw to hold the strut.   It is also a foot behind the transom, so you really can't lean back and pull it up or the boat will flip over backwards on top of you.   Most of the time I end up jumping in the water and manually lifting the rudder up before it hits bottom.   I'm 6' tall, so I can jump in an work when its 5' deep.  This may not be an option for your son for a few more years.

Glad to hear that the first impressions are good!   I'm sure he will love it.  

 

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Same format as previously

Main foil trunk - I respect what you say, yet it's hard to tell whether my #4 is within your expectations of slop. Any rule of thumb? PM /email me if easier. If I am all OCD and add velcro, felt or carpet, any significant drawbacks? 

It's never going to hurt to recast or shim the trunk to tighten it. Realistically, though, a good amount of your slop is up at the board head, where arguably 8 wraps with electrical tape would arrest lateral wobble

Rudder lifting - gotcha. I might copy a trick I know, tying a thick bungee that adds friction between gudgeon and foil -- though it makes it harder to hoist, so blah.

Tis but the work of a 1/4 20 tap to add the threaded brake which is a lot less draggy and cumbersome.

Length of dyneema jumper lines - ok, I do have a loos gauge, does that work? If not... what? What range of tensions should I be able to achieve, and how do you test it (with sail on and cunningham at X, without sail...) ? 

See post 1532. All data established with a spinlock rigsense. $100 of greater clarity in all things rope. I don't schill gear, but that's a genuinely good tool.


DRC

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Main Foil Trunk -

Shim the bottom with four squares of progrip (EVA foam) and some sail tape. Works great for me and no problem gliding the strut in or out.
I used scraps that were laying around for this. It's been in place for more than a year without needing replacement.

 

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Champlain sailor - 
Were the 7 pin blocks really that much of an issue? I'm running with them and am happy. 
Took a day to lube it up and to work each pin hole a bit until it all ran smooth.

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9 hours ago, Merde2 said:

Champlain sailor - 
Were the 7 pin blocks really that much of an issue? I'm running with them and am happy. 
Took a day to lube it up and to work each pin hole a bit until it all ran smooth.

Maybe not.  I used one once on a local sailor's boat that I tried out before I got mine.  He really struggled with it, as did my son when he tried to help.  I did see several comments from other posters early in this thread who struggled to get the pin through reliably.   However, if you developed a technique to make it work well, I'm sure it is a pretty simple and robust mechanism once engaged.

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I just returned from 2 days of UFO coaching with the Fulcrum Team in Bristol.  Seven other UFO showed up.  Here are my top take-aways:

1. Tension the battens properly.  According to Dave, the sails ship with  the battens in their pockets and the batten tensioning screws just making contact.  From this point, turn the top batten tensioner 15 half rotations, the 2nd batten 10 half rotations, and the remaining battens 5 half rotations.  This will put a lot more shape in the sail and increase the power available in the marginal foiling conditions.  Note that the tensioning wrench is included with the sail, tied on a loop to the outhaul grommet.

2. Check your shroud tension.  Over the first few sails the knots in the shrouds slip a bit, and the shrouds will have too much slack between the spreaders and the hounds.  With the mast down, loosen the knots at the spreader tips and pull the shrouds down until both sides are hand tight.  Once the mast is up again, you may find that you have to re-tie the knots at the bottom of the shrouds that connect them to the purchase system.  I ended up taking about 3" of slack out of each shroud.  Dave states that you should likely do this after 3-5 outings on the boat.   I have to admit sailing over 2 dozen times and not noticing that this needed to be done.   The line that the shrouds are made of is sticky and stiff.  A leatherman is helpful to loosen the knots.  Its actually not as hard as it initially seems.   Once this is done, put WAY more tension on the rig in 8-12 knot conditions than I was initially doing.  The Spinlock Rigsense tool that Dave refers to is great.  Now that  I know what it 'feels' like, I don't think I need to buy one.  But it would be a handy little tool.

3. Use the 'other' hiking straps.  I know several folks on this forum are already doing it, but in marginal conditions, it helps tall people to use the 'far' hiking straps, so that you aren't putting your weight as far to windward.  This reduces windward splashdowns and capsizes significantly.   The downside, to me at least, is that the strap is much tighter, since your ankle is over the center arch, and you are really 'locked in'.  When you do capsize, it is kind of claustrophobic, having the boat come on top of you with your feet locked in the straps.  But they do slide out, and the panic subsides....

All in all, a very fun, productive weekend.  I really enjoyed getting to know more of the UFO sailors.  It is interesting how diverse the UFO owner's sailing backgrounds are.  

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10 hours ago, Merde2 said:

Champlain sailor - 
Were the 7 pin blocks really that much of an issue? I'm running with them and am happy. 
Took a day to lube it up and to work each pin hole a bit until it all ran smooth.

The top comment from passing testers in the first year was "this pinboard sucks". Basically if you're putting it through in very calm water it's fine, but if the boat is bouncing at all (imagine being 12 and trying to do it), it's a hellride. That and the improved righting handles were massive upgrades to the creature comfort factor of the boat. We saved just enough money in consumables in the BOM over the leadup to make those upgrades cost-neutral for the product. The second most common comment was "these hiking straps aren't comfy" but to be honest, having tried ten different iterations of hiking strap, they are the best you can get, without question. You can have initial comfort or you can be secure in the boat when foiling but not both.

In the great news category, I sailed #73 for about three hours yesterday in nasty swells and about 18 knots of wind with my old sloppy untightened gates and worn teeth held closed by the new velcro strap. The foil never budged. Issue finally resolved.
DRC

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With the hiking straps as-shipped, I could not get my feet under them without lifting them with a hand. I got an extra set of the "g10 plates" used at the aft end of the hiking straps and added them (and bungees) to the front of the straps, thinking that lifting both ends would let me wiggle my foot under more easily. It's a marginal improvement but not a solution because the central arch still blocks easy access. I think that the real solution (at least for me) would be to move the straps slightly more outboard from that arch, possibly as little as 1", to open up the gap. However, I'm not going to do it -- drilling new holes in the deck and plugging old ones just to do an experiment doesn't appeal to me.

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So Sat we sailed again, I followed the light wind setup to the T. Wind was marginal, around 6kt, but we got one gust and we flew with it.

Sunday we had a bit more wind - 8-10kt - but I expected it to pick up to 15kt, so I wasn't thorough in tightening the battens. No flight :-( ... Once in the water we capsized to tighten them further but it's hard to know what you're doing, so it didn't get much better, and it was time to return anyway.

Learned a few things. 

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Also, rudder had a lot of slop, which I understand isn't normal. The bottom gudgeon had a plastic washer/guide placed atop the gudgeon. It'd work itself loose and ride up the pintle rod. Nothing would keep it in place, and once it rides up, the rudder is really loose.

After we returned, I changed it to be inserted from the bottom of the gudgeon, so it's in a tight spot. Won't move from there and the rudder stock slop is gone. Not sure if it's right but it sure feels better than before. Picture of the spot after I had changed the plastic washer/guide to be under - https://photos.app.goo.gl/CKoSWtdaGWZQS9WX7

Hopefully it's clear, and I didn't mix up the rudder parts nomenclature.

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On 9/8/2018 at 8:09 AM, martin.langhoff said:

Here's a better link to our first sail and flight 

 

Great stuff! What is the app/device you're using that tracks the course, speed, etc.?

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16 hours ago, martin.langhoff said:

After we returned, I changed it to be inserted from the bottom of the gudgeon, so it's in a tight spot. Won't move from there and the rudder stock slop is gone. Not sure if it's right but it sure feels better than before. Picture of the spot after I had changed the plastic washer/guide to be under - https://photos.app.goo.gl/CKoSWtdaGWZQS9WX7

Martin:

I believe that you have the bushing in the correct place on the lower gudgeon.   There should also be two bushings on the rudder, one each in the hole on the arms that connect to the gudgeons, inserted from the bottom.    Since your rudder assembly is tight now, you likely have them all in place.  Your son certainly seems to be enjoying himself on the UFO.

Doug

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Added a "spare parts" section to the google doc, listing Mcmaster Carr and Amazon links to some useful & inexpensive spare/accessory parts I know of.

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On 5/7/2018 at 12:06 PM, Dave Clark said:

We now use a nylon thunbscew threaded into the cheek plate on the rudderhead. Email us if you want one in the mail. That bug should have been squashed a year ago.

DRC

Hi,

Any pictures of this? I would like to retrofit one on my UFO.

Thanks,

F.

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The thumbscrew supplied by Fulcrum is on the left. I found that it wasn't easy to tighten it enough to hold the rudder up so I created the one on the right, which consists of a 1/4-20 bolt, wing nut, and nut. I used gel super glue (CA) to hold the wing nut and nut in place, jamming the nut up against the wing nut as tight as possible. Later on, I pinned the wing nut in place with a piece of music wire, adding a tiny blob of epoxy at each end of the drilled hole. With the music wire and CA holding the wing nut in place, I'm sure that the extra nut wouldn't be necessary. With this "improved" version, it's easy to tighten the bolt sufficiently.

 

Rudder bolt.jpg

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22 hours ago, GraniteGuy said:

The thumbscrew supplied by Fulcrum is on the left. I found that it wasn't easy to tighten it enough to hold the rudder up so I created the one on the right, which consists of a 1/4-20 bolt, wing nut, and nut. I used gel super glue (CA) to hold the wing nut and nut in place, jamming the nut up against the wing nut as tight as possible. Later on, I pinned the wing nut in place with a piece of music wire, adding a tiny blob of epoxy at each end of the drilled hole. With the music wire and CA holding the wing nut in place, I'm sure that the extra nut wouldn't be necessary. With this "improved" version, it's easy to tighten the bolt sufficiently.

 

Rudder bolt.jpg

Interesting! that looks to be https://www.mcmaster.com/90462a660 ... added to the list of parts...

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On 7/23/2018 at 10:00 AM, Dave Clark said:

There does appear to be another option that works somewhat well, also, wich is a flat but more twisted sail. The twist seems to counteract the downside of a flat sail with a straight leech when you're pumping. If you have an outright flat and straight sail and you're pumping you have pretty high odds of stalling the sail, which sucks. If you twist it, you'll keep a bubble of attached flow on the sail somewhere which can be used to reattach flow elsewhere. We have a lot less hard data on this.

@Dave Clark - I've edited your "light to moderate winds - straight leech" setup, and included it in the UFO notes google doc where folks collect notes. The paragraph above stood out... how do you achieve the twisted sail setup?

(I have some ideas of how I think it'd be, but this rig is different than what I know so...)

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On 9/12/2018 at 4:50 PM, GraniteGuy said:

The thumbscrew supplied by Fulcrum is on the left. I found that it wasn't easy to tighten it enough to hold the rudder up so I created the one on the right, which consists of a 1/4-20 bolt, wing nut, and nut. I used gel super glue (CA) to hold the wing nut and nut in place, jamming the nut up against the wing nut as tight as possible. Later on, I pinned the wing nut in place with a piece of music wire, adding a tiny blob of epoxy at each end of the drilled hole. With the music wire and CA holding the wing nut in place, I'm sure that the extra nut wouldn't be necessary. With this "improved" version, it's easy to tighten the bolt sufficiently.

 

 

Thanks for the picture and explanations of the modified screw. How is it implemented? Did you have to drill and tap the rudder head? Drill and glue a nut?

Thanks,

F.

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23 hours ago, martin.langhoff said:

@Dave Clark - I've edited your "light to moderate winds - straight leech" setup, and included it in the UFO notes google doc where folks collect notes. The paragraph above stood out... how do you achieve the twisted sail setup?

(I have some ideas of how I think it'd be, but this rig is different than what I know so...)

That's one of the old setups. Some cunningham before rig tension. Then rig tension, then WAY WAY WAY more outhaul. Flat N twisted achieved

DRC

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On 9/14/2018 at 4:01 AM, Nervouster said:

Thanks for the picture and explanations of the modified screw. How is it implemented? Did you have to drill and tap the rudder head? Drill and glue a nut?

Thanks,

F.

Sorry -- missed the question until now.

When I took delivery of my boat, the rudder head had a hole which was tapped for a 1/4-20 bolt and I received the thumbscrew at that time. If your have a hole and it isn't tapped, it's quite easy to do it. There's no need for a nut on the rudder head.

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Tapping for imperial threads is not the easiest for us in Europe (apart from our friends on the other side of the Channel). So I guess I'll buy an iso threaded nylon screw, like M6, and a nut. And I'll glue the nut with epoxy to make for the female thread. So no tap is needed. Just a hole, and some resin or super glu. I like the wings nut you added on the screw and will try to do something like that.

F.

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