Doug Lord

Steve and Dave Clarks Unidentified Foiling Object

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On 12/24/2018 at 4:56 PM, upnatum said:

Instead of adding the eye ring to the threaded rod I just added a loop to the existing eye.

IMG_7490.jpg

 

On 12/24/2018 at 9:47 PM, koolkat505 said:

upnatum-- NO!!!  I am pretty sure you run the risk of pulling the fitting out of the top of the rudder--  See back some earlier posts--- the fitting is only screwed into a plastic piece, fine for holding down, NG for lifting up!!   #58

 

On 12/25/2018 at 3:09 AM, Claire1000 said:

No! You’ll pull it off unless it’s being made differently now. And once you pull it off it’s a pain. Switch to the brilliant eye nut. Happy sailing!

Thank you all.  I had rigged with the same "solution."  Is there a good source for the dos and do nots of rigging?  I have a little bit of a challenge of a long gradual sloping beach to launch from and generally either on or offshore breeze so gonna have to be careful with foils (raising lowering and sailing in and out). 

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UFO sailors we have our first confirmed regatta of the winter circuit. We've been invited to sail with the Moths in their Winter Series at the Upper Keys Sailing Club in Key Largo, FL. The first event is January 25-27 and here's the event website for registration (http://www.regattanetwork.com/event/18055) and the NOR (http://www.regattanetwork.com/clubmgmt/regatta_uploads/18055/FoilingMidwinters2019.pdf). The second event is March 1-3 and we're still waiting for an NOR on that one, but I've been told it will be published very soon. Additionally, there's a house next door where boats can be stored in the yard for a fee between the two events. PM me for contact info and details on how to reserve that or any other questions that you have about the event. Finally, the Fulcrum trailer will have at least one extra spot on it heading down to the events and back to RI in the spring, so if you're interested in that let me know.

Hope to see many of you in Key Largo for some foiling.

-Nick

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4 UFOs registered already! Beating every other fleet by 4.

Also the first batch of 6 square meter heavy wind (or lightweight) sails arrived! Check out that Safety Orange! Also I can't resist sharing this picture of the new deck pad color options. Old favorites and new head-turners. 

Also a note to Stanno on review of the above images: More positive angle on the rudder. Three more turns over the top of the wheel to starboard will do it.

DRC

production 6 sail.jpg

Rainbow.jpg

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Now there are five--#58

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On 12/27/2018 at 11:14 AM, Wess said:

 

 

Thank you all.  I had rigged with the same "solution."  Is there a good source for the dos and do nots of rigging?  I have a little bit of a challenge of a long gradual sloping beach to launch from and generally either on or offshore breeze so gonna have to be careful with foils (raising lowering and sailing in and out). 

I ordered an M5 stainless lifting ring  on line and installed it. Works fine. Thanks.

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We were blessed to be able to take our boat yesterday on on a warm Texas January day. Even though we haven't sailed in almost 2 years (had a baby), aren't amazing sailors to begin with, and we were both able to get up and foil and somehow I pulled off my best day yet. We've been a bit out of the loop for a while and probably still will be but it was great to go play. I think you may be able to see a video here.

"https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FClaire1000%2Fvideos%2F10104815232367623%2F&show_text=0&width=560" width="560" height="315" style="border:none;overflow:hidden" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowTransparency="true" allowFullScreen="true"></iframe>

Things we maybe did better-

  1. Tensioned the rig tight. Not insane and didn't measure but it plucked like a guitar string. 
  2. Didn't screw with pin placement or rear foil trim really at all. Put it in the middle and focused on butt placement and keeping the sail eased. 
  3. Kept the wand at a more appropriate level. 
  4. Got more physical overall with the boat with hiking and pumping. I'm tired.

I am constantly fighting with our foils falling off the struts when I'm trying to attach the upper nuts. Our hold up spinny things don't hold up the foils. Anyone have any ideas? I'd like to just leave the foils on the struts so can we make a washer and nut that goes through the hull or something? 

What's the new methods for holding the front strut and rudder  up while going in? 

That little trick of just sticking a piece of rope under the rudder hold on washer and using it to pull up is a great one.

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Claire, great to see you're getting back out on the boat. Overall your self-coaching tips were very astute. Boat looked good in the video, but link seemed a little messed up. I have no idea how to share a facebook video outside facebook (I think that's part of their business model), but the video has been shared through the Fulcrum Speedworks facebook account for anyone who wants to see it.

Here's some quick answers to your questions. 

You don't want a washer and nut that goes through the hull or rudderhead. If there's no washer on the top of the rudder, it can fall through the rudderhead and sink all the way to the bottom (if the rudder downhaul isn't 8-knotted, so it can't pull through the jam cleat on the tiller). Rudders have been lost this way, so you want to have a nice big washer there. On the mainfoil you need the washer to distribute the load, so you don't damage the sprit when cranking on the foils nice and tight. Instead, put the foils together with the struts horizontal to the ground (say sitting on a picnic table), but don't put the nuts on them. Then load them into a hull that has been capsized on the dolly, using the mast as a kickstand. This way the horizontals are held into the struts by gravity while you're getting the nuts tightened up. Additionally, if you have a big enough car (really a van or truck), you can just pull the pintle pin for the rudder and remove the whole rudder assembly (foil, strut and rudderhead/tiller) from the boat fully assembled. Doesn't fit in my Mustang in this configuration, but works just fine the company van.

For keeping up the rudder on the way in, we now have thumb screws on newer boats (since hull #115-ish) that act as a friction brake to hold the rudder up. On your rudderhead, you'll notice there's a small hole in the side plate on either side. You dead end the rudder downhaul with an 8-knot in the hole on the port side, and on the starboard side you can tap the hole with a 1/4"-20 thread. We can send you a thumb screw that will screw into that and act as a friction brake. You can also find 1/4"-20 nylon thumb screws in most good hardware stores.

-Nick

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On 8/27/2018 at 7:57 AM, Jedel said:

I seem to have lost the (nylon?) thin ring that is fitted as a wear ring below the mast step.

Does anyone know what material this this? and if this a custom part? 

PTEX. It's the material that forms the bottoms of skis between the steel edges. We've been using it on and off for a decade for wear applications since it's proven to be very tough. By the numbers high density polyethelene will also work. It's cut with a set of intersecting hole-saws, like a very angry russian nesting doll.

DRC

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On 1/8/2019 at 7:11 AM, Dave Clark said:

PTEX. It's the material that forms the bottoms of skis between the steel edges. We've been using it on and off for a decade for wear applications since it's proven to be very tough. By the numbers high density polyethelene will also work. It's cut with a set of intersecting hole-saws, like a very angry russian nesting doll.

DRC

Dave:  At the clinic you were advocating lubricating the PTEX ring with lard.  I know some sailors use silicone, others vasoline.   We all agree that some sort of periodic lubrication is necessary. 

Consider buying a bottle of the DPS Phantom lifetime ski treatment.  It is designed to impregrate PTEX bases and provide a lifetime of lubrication.   I've spoken to a few skiers that have used it for two seasons, and so far are impressed.  I don't know if it only excels at the PTEX to snow interface, or if it would provide 'lifetime' slipperiness for the PTEX to fiberglass interface on the UFO.  By my calcuations, a kit that has treats a pair of skis should cover 100 of the rings, so for $99 it would cost a buck a boat.  Seems like a pretty easy, cheap R&D project!

https://www.dpsskis.com/phantom-glide

Doug

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What am I supposed to do with my bucket of lard then?  JK. 

And seriously though, I know the rudder and foil need the big washer but still wish there was a way to hold the foil on the strut for install. Oh well. 

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Claire: I screw the threaded rod to the foil horizontal first. With lubricant but I make it tight.

Then I slide the foil vertical. Takes a few tries for the rod to find the top hole but it isn't too hard.

In fact with this procedure I don't capsize the boat for the main foil. I put the main foil horizontal under the foil trunk... Add the rod, then the foil vertical...

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Should also say -- I'm very happy with the Velcro hooks tape on the main foil. Slop is gone, and it's trivial to do.

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12 hours ago, martin.langhoff said:

In fact with this procedure I don't capsize the boat for the main foil. I put the main foil horizontal under the foil trunk... Add the rod, then the foil vertical...

I use the same procedure for the main foil and for the rudder without capsizing the boa.

I protect the horizontal foils from the ground by using carpets.

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22 hours ago, Claire1000 said:

What am I supposed to do with my bucket of lard then?  JK. 

And seriously though, I know the rudder and foil need the big washer but still wish there was a way to hold the foil on the strut for install. Oh well. 

Claire, there is one thing I forgot to mention. If you shim the stocks of your foils, so the fit between the vertical and the horizontal is very tight, friction alone will hold the horizontals into the verticals.

I did this on my boat with a couple wraps of packing tape, which will wear out with use and need to be replaced occasionally. You can also thicken your stocks with something more permanent like epoxy, but if you overdo this you have a lot of sanding to do in order to get your foils into your verticals. If you put too much packing tape on, it only takes seconds to peel it off. So I suggest starting with tape.

Once you've shimmed the stocks you'll need a rubber mallet to assemble and disassemble your foils. I like to wrap a soft towel around the foil to protect it from scratches and then hammer it into the vertical. **Please note**, when hammering in your foils don't hit the tips or trailing edge with the rubber mallet. Hitting the tips or trailing edge of your foil with anything is a good way to break something. When hammering in you should smack the foil directly underneath the stock and you should avoid hitting the flap on the mainfoil. When hammering your foils back out, you can hit the foil directly adjacent to the vertical and switch sides occasionally as you go, so the stock stays aligned in the vertical and comes out smoothly. Additionally, you should do this with the tie-rod already threaded into the stock. Otherwise you'll be fishing around in the vertical with the tie-rod to try to get the threads started.

With your foil connection so tight the horizontal must be hammered into the vertical, gravity certainly isn't going to cause them to come apart.

-Nick

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21 minutes ago, burritoughs said:

gravity certainly isn't going to cause them to come apart.

There's a number of things that pull down. I've had foils tangled in boats' mooring lines. And in crab / lobster trap recovery lines. It's hard to untangle, the sail is loaded, the foil is deep... Not yet on the UFO, but definitely on the Whisper.

I'll keep the threaded rod :-)

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22 minutes ago, martin.langhoff said:

There's a number of things that pull down. I've had foils tangled in boats' mooring lines. And in crab / lobster trap recovery lines. It's hard to untangle, the sail is loaded, the foil is deep... Not yet on the UFO, but definitely on the Whisper.

I'll keep the threaded rod :-)

Whoa there. Guess I have a clarification to make. Going to edit the original post as well as this is very important.

***You still must use the "threaded rod" or tie-rod, to hold the foil assembly together.***

My suggestion only intended to solve the problem of the horizontal and vertical falling apart on the yacht club lawn while you're trying to put the boat together. When you're underway, you 100% NEED the tie-rod to keep the foil assembly together.

-Nick

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So I can't edit the original post anymore (quoted below), but I'm going to repeat myself to be absolutely clear. 

***The tie-rod is a REQUIRED part of the foil assembly.*** It must be done up tight to hold the foils together. If you don't use the tie-rod to hold the foil assembly together, you will have an expensive and unhappy day losing important parts of your boat (like the hydrofoils).

My post merely addressed the problem of carrying the foils across the parking lot to put them in your boat when you're assembling it. Under those circumstances the friction from wrapping the stock in tape will mean the horizontal doesn't drop out of the vertical as you're trying to put it into the hull. Under any other circumstances the tie-rod is REQUIRED to hold the foil assembly together.

Additionally, the tape will wear out over time, and the horizontal will loosen up and again be able to fall out due to gravity. When you notice it getting loose, you can either be careful to hold both the horizontal and the vertical when carrying the foils, or redo the tape so friction keeps the pieces together during the assembly process.

-Nick

 

49 minutes ago, burritoughs said:

Claire, there is one thing I forgot to mention. If you shim the stocks of your foils, so the fit between the vertical and the horizontal is very tight, friction alone will hold the horizontals into the verticals.

I did this on my boat with a couple wraps of packing tape, which will wear out with use and need to be replaced occasionally. You can also thicken your stocks with something more permanent like epoxy, but if you overdo this you have a lot of sanding to do in order to get your foils into your verticals. If you put too much packing tape on, it only takes seconds to peel it off. So I suggest starting with tape.

Once you've shimmed the stocks you'll need a rubber mallet to assemble and disassemble your foils. I like to wrap a soft towel around the foil to protect it from scratches and then hammer it into the vertical. **Please note**, when hammering in your foils don't hit the tips or trailing edge with the rubber mallet. Hitting the tips or trailing edge of your foil with anything is a good way to break something. When hammering in you should smack the foil directly underneath the stock and you should avoid hitting the flap on the mainfoil. When hammering your foils back out, you can hit the foil directly adjacent to the vertical and switch sides occasionally as you go, so the stock stays aligned in the vertical and comes out smoothly. Additionally, you should do this with the tie-rod already threaded into the stock. Otherwise you'll be fishing around in the vertical with the tie-rod to try to get the threads started.

With your foil connection so tight the horizontal must be hammered into the vertical, gravity certainly isn't going to cause them to come apart.

-Nick

 

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Now that’s the idea I’m looking for. 

And I sure don’t thing/I hope nobody thought you meant holding on thousands of dollars of foils with package tape friction...

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So we've been working on this for awhile, but a southern racing circuit for the UFO has finally come together. Right now we have two events confirmed at UKSC in Key Largo--big thanks to the US Moth Class and UKSC for the invite--and a still tentative third event in Charleston, SC. The Charleston event is Foilmania & Fort 2 Battery, which will be the Fort 2 Battery race on Saturday sandwiched by 2 days of short-course racing. The details of the Charleston event are still being finalized, but the NOR should be out soon.

 

UFO Southern Circuit

East Coast Foiling Midwinters: Moths, Waszps and UFOs                                         January 25-27, 2019      Upper Keys Sailing Club     Key Largo, FL

Moth US Nationals/Ladd Lewis Memorial Regatta: Moths, Waszps and UFOs      March 1-3, 2019              Upper Keys Sailing Club     Key Largo, FL

TENTATIVE: Foilmania & Fort 2 Battery                                                                         April 26-28, 2019            James Island Yacht Club   Charleston, SC

 

-Nick

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Technique question 1 -- I am having trouble staying aloft after takeoff in light-ish air.

When I work my way into taking off in soft-to-marginal conditions, I am having a hard time finding the groove. I get to ~7kt, bear away, and as it pops up I sheet in and head up working to ensure windward heel. At that point, I either...

  • sheet in too much, which stalls the sail, slow down, soft landing to windward
  • don't sheet in enough, and roll windward, which I compensate with a mix of sheeting in and bearing away, in small-but-quick steps, no matter how clever or subtle, I extend the flight a bit but inevitably end up stalling

I am sorting out a couple details on my boat, so it's performance is not 100% "clean". However, I had this problem even when it was "clean".

Technique question 2 -- I roll to windward on broad reaches

When there's a bit more wind, I find heading downwind to be... unstable! I get going on a reach/broad reach hiking out, but as I bear away, I find that I need to get my rear back on deck, and that the boat wants to roll to windward. If I steer for balance (sheet in, head up slightly) then I can control it, but it is tricky to get that right, if I head up too much I need my weight back on the straps. And I'm diverting from my VMG course, so meh.

Is there a better position, or a different approach to the balance?

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1. Is it possible to do a foiling gybe (tack) with the UFO?

2. Will the UFO be exhibited at the Boot in Düsseldorf?

 

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2 hours ago, thegood said:

1. Is it possible to do a foiling gybe (tack) with the UFO?

There's a video on YouTube of David Clark doing foiling gybes and explaining the technique.

Foiling tacks are usually much harder. I cannot recall videos.

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On 1/16/2019 at 6:54 AM, martin.langhoff said:

Foiling tacks are usually much harder. I cannot recall videos.

I believe Nick, who works for Fulcrum Speedworks, has successfully foiled through a tack, or come very close to it.  However, I have not seen video evidence.   UFOs have eluded close video scrutiny for decades, why should this generation be different :-)    In any case, Martin is correct, a foiling tack is going to be very difficult to pull off.  Foiling gybes, for that matter, are difficult as well for most mortals.  I have seen a video of Dave completing one, and I watched Nick complete one in person.  However, I have yet to see a graceful, banked, foiling gybe on a UFO, something that the top Moth sailors are now able to do consistently.   Hopefully with more sailors and more practice, the gybes and tacks will get smoother, faster, and higher.  I worked on foiling gybes for much of last summer.  My UFO was able to foil through several times, unfortunately on those gybes it had already thrown me off and I watched it foiling on while I was swimming!  

 

On 1/15/2019 at 7:49 PM, martin.langhoff said:

Technique question 2 -- I roll to windward on broad reaches

When there's a bit more wind, I find heading downwind to be... unstable!

Martin  - I have found the same challenge.  In winds over 14-15 knots, I find making downwind progress on the foils very tricky.   The speeds are good, but managing the heel angle is quite challenging.  This is when the big crashes seem to happen.  I recall that this was also a challenge in the Moth, so I think it is part of the nature of learning to sail a centerline foiling dinghy.  I suspect this is one area where practice, practice, practice will help!  

My normal sailing venue now has 3" of ice covering it.  It is great to think about foiling, and I wish all of you that are headed to the midwinters this weekend the best.  Please share your experiences here.  I am going to try to make the March and/or April events if I can line up a boat!

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Just been out in 12 gusting 19. Epic.

Took a few tries to find the right setting for the sail. Too full, too flat, just right. Same with foil and rudder rake. 

Still, epic crashes mostly. I did find the groove at one point but my rudder has a buster lower rudder gudgeon. I had a temporary fix which blew away under pressure so I was slaloming in the breeze with the sloppiest rudder in town. Wasn't going to work.

Having tried other small foilers I'm impressed that most of the crashes didn't lead to a capsize, and just holding on to the mainsheet and rudder the boat - plus it's beaten up sailor - came through. 

Screenshot_20190120-192108.png

(I was out 15:30 to 6pm, didn't catch the 30kt gusts we had in the morn)

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