Doug Lord

Steve and Dave Clarks Unidentified Foiling Object

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52 minutes ago, MR.CLEAN said:

what might those be

I was picturing a video shot where you might see them matched for a few seconds, and that can happen for a million reasons -- ufo gets the gust,  camera is moving, etc. Around a course, none.

In between races, UFOs win, 'cause we sit back and relax, trade tuning tips, etc. We have some great pics of that from last KL race.

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31 minutes ago, martin.langhoff said:

I was picturing a video shot where you might see them matched for a few seconds, and that can happen for a million reasons -- ufo gets the gust,  camera is moving, etc. Around a course, none.

In between races, UFOs win, 'cause we sit back and relax, trade tuning tips, etc. We have some great pics of that from last KL race.

In other words, the conditions when a UFO matches a moth are in between races when you are lying on the deck.  

Fair enough.  I'd say the UFO is way better than the Moth in between races.

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52 minutes ago, MR.CLEAN said:

the conditions when a UFO matches a moth are in between races when you are lying on the deck

I don't think the Moth matches the UFO, it looks pretty uncomfortable...

In any case, the UFO isn't trying to be a Moth. It has many use cases where it's better, a learn-to-foil fleet, affordable foiling, od racing, any sailor who wants a sturdy boat  / doesn't want to be fixing & learning composites, etc etc.

If anything, it's closer to a Waszp.

The most relevant comparisons would be with Mothquito, F101, etc. And there, on cost, sturdiness and simplicity...

 

Edited by martin.langhoff

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11 minutes ago, martin.langhoff said:

 

In any case, the UFO isn't trying to be a Moth.

 

then stop saying dumb shit

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37 minutes ago, martin.langhoff said:

I don't think the Moth matches the UFO, it looks pretty uncomfortable...

In any case, the UFO isn't trying to be a Moth. It has many use cases where it's better, a learn-to-foil fleet, affordable foiling, od racing, any sailor who wants a sturdy boat  / doesn't want to be fixing & learning composites, etc etc.

If anything, it's closer to a Waszp.

The most relevant comparisons would be with Mothquito, F101, etc. And there, on cost, sturdiness and simplicity...

 

Kind of like Clean was alluding to, I just wanted to know about outright speed because I thought it was a strong exaggeration that a ufo was as fast as a Moth. I like the UFO, I've been trying to get some families to buy them so that we can evolve our program with next level sailboats but I also want a dose of reality.

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1 minute ago, WCB said:

Kind of like Clean was alluding to, I just wanted to know about outright speed because I thought it was a strong exaggeration that a ufo was as fast as a Moth. I like the UFO, I've been trying to get some families to buy them so that we can evolve our program with next level sailboats but I also want a dose of reality.

I am not sure where mr 'langhoff' is from but he feels like either an ESL person, a child, or a troll.  In any event, UFO is slower than a Waszp which is slower than a Moth, and each step is fairly large.  Similarly, though I cannot verify this personally (until next month), the UFO is by far the easiest to sail.  Even a big fat fuck like me can sail a Moth, but it ain't pretty.

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...? I think you are confusing me with someone else. Or you're misunderstanding a polite hedge ("might").

Here's a hint: being pointlessly rude on the internet is for small people. 

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1 minute ago, MR.CLEAN said:

I am not sure where mr 'langhoff' is from but he feels like either an ESL person, a child, or a troll.  In any event, UFO is slower than a Waszp which is slower than a Moth, and each step is fairly large.  Similarly, though I cannot verify this personally (until next month), the UFO is by far the easiest to sail.  Even a big fat fuck like me can sail a Moth, but it ain't pretty.

Thanks Clean. I'll get to try a UFO June 1st when this guy brings one to our opening day sail festival.  However, I have a Moth that I built so it's nothing new.  I didn't think that it was possible for a UFO to outpace a Moth especially since Moths have multiple foils but I didn't want to answer back without facts.

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19 minutes ago, martin.langhoff said:

...? I think you are confusing me with someone else. Or you're misunderstanding a polite hedge ("might").

Here's a hint: being pointlessly rude on the internet is for small people. 

Being rude is never, ever pointless.  It can make you president apparently.

But a couple of people told me you're a nice guy so I'll stop for now.

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Clean: not so sure the UFO is slower than. Waszp. 

Dave has cuffed more than one or two around, but that could also be pilot differentiation.

But to repeat and reiterate, we weren’t trying to be faster, just a shit ton more practical and way more affordable.

The  sizzle is flying, not thirty knots

SHC

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On another note. My main complaint and jealousy of other sailors is the ability to leave your boat on a dock or beach rigged and ready to go. I live on Long island and no such beach exists without joining a full blown yacht club. I went to the town supervisor who got me in touch with head of maritime services for the town. Explained how every surrounding state has beaches with designated catamaran parking available. We discussed it (last June) in detail. I just reached out again to find out to my delight that, in fact, the town is setting up designated spots at 2 of our local town beaches for this summer and going forward.

It pays to speak up and let your voice be heard.

The downside is that I'm now selling my boat only for the reason that I now need a hip replacement and can no longer do yoga moves on a small boat. At least I can say I have foiled and will again hopefully in the future. Thanks UFO for making that possible.

Best to all,

Todd

 

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On 3/28/2019 at 8:48 PM, WCB said:

What's the top speed recorded in a UFO so far?  Faster than a Moth?

Going back to the original question that got sideways a bit....   The fastest UFO speed that I have seen reported is in one of Dave Clark's videos from over a year ago.  I believe his GPS indicated 25mph (22knots).  I think Dave would tell you that he has had faster sessions than that, but did not have the GPS aboard to record his top speed.   My personal top speed on a UFO is 17.4 knots.   Otto in Charleston posted 20+ knots.   I believe modern Moths are hitting 30 knots now, so they are indeed faster, once set up and mastered.   My personal top speed in a Moth is 21 knots, so I can attest that even in my hands, the Moth is faster, and I have a lot more time in a UFO than I do in a Moth.  

Is a UFO ever faster than a Moth?   I'd bet that if you have 2 equal sailors and give one a UFO and one a Moth, the UFO will be foiling first, and therefore faster for a little while.   Particularly if the Moth is not fully sorted for the new sailor and there aren't any experienced Moth sailors nearby to help the newbie along.   The UFO learning curve is much easier to climb, both rigging and sailing.   But boat for boat, I've never heard or read anyone claiming that the UFO is as fast or faster than a Moth.   It's not, and its not even close.

I have no personal data on the Waszp.   I have not had the pleasure of sailing one.   Since it is heavier, it seems obvious that it will not be as fast as the Moth.   Is it faster than the UFO?   Is it as rewarding to sail as a Moth?   I don't know, but I'd like to find out!  They look like well thought out boats and are really popular in Europe.    

What I can certainly confirm is that the UFO foils well, and it is the easiest boat to foil 'out of the box' that I know of.   When it is foiling, I find my speeds are in the 12-15 knot range most of the time, in 10-12 knots of wind.   For a fairly inexpensive dinghy that doesn't require expert boat building or tuning skills, I think that is pretty impressive.   It is certainly fun and challenging.   For those that want more speed than a planing dinghy can offer, but don't want the complexity and cost of a Moth or really high performance skiff, the UFO is a great choice.    

 

 

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, Champlain Sailor said:

Going back to the original question that got sideways a bit....   The fastest UFO speed that I have seen reported is in one of Dave Clark's videos from over a year ago.  I believe his GPS indicated 25mph (22knots).  I think Dave would tell you that he has had faster sessions than that, but did not have the GPS aboard to record his top speed.   My personal top speed on a UFO is 17.4 knots.   Otto in Charleston posted 20+ knots.   I believe modern Moths are hitting 30 knots now, so they are indeed faster, once set up and mastered.   My personal top speed in a Moth is 21 knots, so I can attest that even in my hands, the Moth is faster, and I have a lot more time in a UFO than I do in a Moth.  

Is a UFO ever faster than a Moth?   I'd bet that if you have 2 equal sailors and give one a UFO and one a Moth, the UFO will be foiling first, and therefore faster for a little while.   Particularly if the Moth is not fully sorted for the new sailor and there aren't any experienced Moth sailors nearby to help the newbie along.   The UFO learning curve is much easier to climb, both rigging and sailing.   But boat for boat, I've never heard or read anyone claiming that the UFO is as fast or faster than a Moth.   It's not, and its not even close.

I have no personal data on the Waszp.   I have not had the pleasure of sailing one.   Since it is heavier, it seems obvious that it will not be as fast as the Moth.   Is it faster than the UFO?   Is it as rewarding to sail as a Moth?   I don't know, but I'd like to find out!  They look like well thought out boats and are really popular in Europe.    

What I can certainly confirm is that the UFO foils well, and it is the easiest boat to foil 'out of the box' that I know of.   When it is foiling, I find my speeds are in the 12-15 knot range most of the time, in 10-12 knots of wind.   For a fairly inexpensive dinghy that doesn't require expert boat building or tuning skills, I think that is pretty impressive.   It is certainly fun and challenging.   For those that want more speed than a planing dinghy can offer, but don't want the complexity and cost of a Moth or really high performance skiff, the UFO is a great choice.    

 

 

 

 

 

Thanks for laying it all out for me, Champlain, and giving a well written and thorough answer.  

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9 hours ago, Champlain Sailor said:

The fastest UFO speed that I have seen reported is in one of Dave Clark's videos from over a year ago.  I believe his GPS indicated 25mph (22knots).  I think Dave would tell you that he has had faster sessions than that, but did not have the GPS aboard to record his top speed.   My personal top speed on a UFO is 17.4 knots.   Otto in Charleston posted 20+ knots.  

Thanks for the summary. That matches the speeds I get, which can be seen in the telemetry of my videos :)

I have to report that, unfortunately, evidence of light wind foiling is that good moths start foiling earlier than UFOs. Lighter hull and less hull drag are likely factors.

(I say good moths because the fleet was all/most Exocets and Mach 2 with upgrades).

What we saw was the UFOs close with the sole Wazsp there. How much sailor skill factored in I don't know.

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This got me thinking a bit (always dangerous)....

The UFO weighs 50kg and has a 7.8 square meter sail

The Waszp weighs 48kg and has an 8.2 meter sail.  

A Mach 2 Moth is closer to 30Kg and has an 8 meter sail.  

It is not hard to see why the Mach 2 foils in less wind, it is carrying 20kg less weight with a similarly sized sail.   Moths also have a variety of foils available, and a multitude of sail and rig adjustments, many of which can be adjusted while flying, assuming you are skilled enough to know what to pull or ease and have the ability to fly one handed while making the adjustments.  I believe top speed is far more dependent on foil geometry and control and sail control than power to weight ratio.   I note that on the Mach 2 website, they are posting reports of top speeds above 30 knots.   There are a few in the 30-31 range, and one (Ned Goss) at 36.6 knots.   Holy ****, that is fast.  

The Waszp and UFO are much more similar on paper.  The UFO has a more optimized foil shape, since it is not restricted to a single profile by using an extrusion.   The outhaul and cunningham adjustments on the Waszp look easier to use while foiling.   The Waszp has marginally higher power to weight ratio.   Based on these similarities and differences, I would  very much believe that the 'faster' boat will be the one with the more experienced pilot.    Dave seems to shy away from reporting the top speeds of the factory pilots, but his video shows that they have seen at least 22 knots.  The Waszp website reports a top speed of 24+ knots.   Casual reports of UFOs and Waszps indicate that they mingle happily (no abductions or stings) and seem to have comparable performance in the hands of similarly experienced sailors.   That sounds about right.

The more relevant question to me is if either the UFO or Waszp will show a better ability to foil through tacks and gybes.    Currently, I'm seeing more Waszps master these maneuvers.   This could be because that the Waszp has been around a bit longer and has more folks sailing it in the high performance regions of Europe and Austraila/NZ (in other words, they are in the hands of better foilers).   But it could be that the UFO's arrangement placing the front foil in front of the mast makes foiling through maneuvers more difficult, I really don't know.   Looks like we simply need to get more UFOs and Waszps together, hopefully in venues where pilots will swap craft for a few runs so we can all learn the pros and cons of these great little dinghies.

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 my 2c regarding ufos and waszps, I think the other main difference is righting moment (much bigger on the waszp), so I'd suspect waszp overall should be faster upwind, even with less efficient foils. and with the latest big foil now they're finally ok on manouvres.

so around the course with equal pilot I guess waszp may be quicker because of upwind and manouvres. of course in practicality and ease of lowriding the ufo wins by a country mile, that is the whole point of the boat. 

 

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12 hours ago, 17mika said:

 I think the other main difference is righting moment (much bigger on the waszp), so I'd suspect waszp overall should be faster upwind, even with less efficient foils.

Good point.  The max beam on the Waszp is listed at 2.25 meters, or 88", versus the UFO's 67" beam.  Hiking leverage will be an advantage as the wind builds.  I also like the fact that you can fold the wings on the Waszp for tight storage.   

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I think both classes have their pros and cons in the end. UFO is cheaper, cooler (I'm loving the outside of the box thinking behind it), easier to lowride. I finally saw one for real at the dinghy show and I reeeeeally liked it. Hopefully I'll be able to try one at the foiling week in Malcesine this July.

Waszp is probably a bit more "efficient" around the buoys, being easier to tack/gybe on foils. At least here in Europe Waszp is maily targeted as a Youth racing boat, and this is a reason we're racing toghether in the Ita moth circuit, cause they may also be a feeder for us (moths)

Still both UFOS and Waszp are doing a lot to get sailing more fun and more accessible for more people, and that's what matters for me. to make sailing expensive (albeit extracool) we as moth class do a very good job already :D, so we do not need anymore of that. My latest moth sail was 2500€, you normally buy boats for that money (!)

Sorry for going a bit OT. as I said looking fw to try one UFO for real soon.

 

 

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Isn't the correct way to look at this Max Velocity / Dollars?  An AC72 is faster than a Moth which is faster than a UFO.  The max velocity decreases quasi-linearly between the three boats; the price tag, on the other hand, decreases quadratically or cubically.  UFO for the win!

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1 minute ago, DerekF said:

Isn't the correct way to look at this Max Velocity / Dollars.  An AC72 is faster than a Moth which is faster than a UFO.  The max velocity decreases quasi-linearly between the three boats; the price tag, on the other hand, decreases quadratically or cubically.  UFO for the win!

+ swimming vs sailing during the learning process

+ repairtime between outings

I think the last 4-5 posts summarize the boats perfectly. If/when I get really good on the UFO I might start salivating for a moth. Or I might get into the UFO regatta circuit... 

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6 hours ago, 17mika said:

IStill both UFOS and Waszp are doing a lot to get sailing more fun and more accessible for more people, and that's what matters for me. to make sailing expensive (albeit extracool) we as moth class do a very good job already :D, so we do not need anymore of that. My latest moth sail was 2500€, you normally buy boats for that money (!)

Sorry for going a bit OT. as I said looking fw to try one UFO for real soon.

 

 

Very good points.  I hope you have an opportunity to sail a UFO soon and look forward to reading your impressions of it.   I fully agree that both the UFO and the Waszp will get a lot more people out on foils.  Some will decide to take it to the next level with Moths.  Others will try to maximize their performance on the Waszp or UFO, nothing wrong with either.   

I'm thrilled with my UFO.  I suspect I'd be happy with a Waszp too.   I'll sail a Moth whenever I get the chance, but don't want to invest the time or money necessary to call one my own.

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Looking at the last few posts, and comparing the boats:

1. The best value speed for $ is by far the foiling kite board. The UFO is probably only a strong second.

2. I have not yet seen a UFO in Aust, the WASZP has spread pretty well with several fleets. So getting UFOs started as a racing fleet  In Aust will be a challenge. WASZP and UFO will have to share the market.

3. Based on the hypothesis of my point 2, I suspect the WASP, UFO. and several other Euro foilers will establish local fleets but not spread universally. They will also sell into the non racing market but only the sellers will know who/where/ and how big this really is. Most of these boats will rot in a shed unused anyay. Maybe the UFO will do better here as I suspect this market is bigger in USA.

4. From a Moth enthusiast point of view, all these inferior foilers are just oportunities for wanabe foilers to try and test the type, spend a month or two learning the basics and then graduate into a proper high performance foiler like a Moth, or ACat or Phantom (maybe not sure about the Phantom really?)

The problem with one desgn foilers is that the science is moving too fast. The Flying Phantom and the GC32 adopted the San Fran AC72 science and by the time they were in production it was obsolete. The Waszp and UFO use pretty basic moth tech which was well obsolete from a racing point of view before they were marketted.

Sailing your basic foiler on foils is great for a few rides but as soon as you see a state of the art foiler glide past at double your speed, the gloss wears off. We are finding WAZP fleets are not growing where there are Moth fleets, going slow is too embarrasing.

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4 hours ago, Phil S said:

Looking at the last few posts, and comparing the boats:

1. The best value speed for $ is by far the foiling kite board. The UFO is probably only a strong second.

2. I have not yet seen a UFO in Aust, the WASZP has spread pretty well with several fleets. So getting UFOs started as a racing fleet  In Aust will be a challenge. WASZP and UFO will have to share the market.

3. Based on the hypothesis of my point 2, I suspect the WASP, UFO. and several other Euro foilers will establish local fleets but not spread universally. They will also sell into the non racing market but only the sellers will know who/where/ and how big this really is. Most of these boats will rot in a shed unused anyay. Maybe the UFO will do better here as I suspect this market is bigger in USA.

4. From a Moth enthusiast point of view, all these inferior foilers are just oportunities for wanabe foilers to try and test the type, spend a month or two learning the basics and then graduate into a proper high performance foiler like a Moth, or ACat or Phantom (maybe not sure about the Phantom really?)

The problem with one desgn foilers is that the science is moving too fast. The Flying Phantom and the GC32 adopted the San Fran AC72 science and by the time they were in production it was obsolete. The Waszp and UFO use pretty basic moth tech which was well obsolete from a racing point of view before they were marketted.

Sailing your basic foiler on foils is great for a few rides but as soon as you see a state of the art foiler glide past at double your speed, the gloss wears off. We are finding WAZP fleets are not growing where there are Moth fleets, going slow is too embarrasing.

Heya Phil

Re 2 ... You need to get west of the Harbour Bridge, where there are two UFO's having a bit of fun - one racing out of Greenwich Sailing Club (pics on their GB page) and the other, what was the first in Oz, blatting around under my teen when he takes a break from his Nacra15, or my daughter when she takes a break from radial sailing (or ILCA5 video shoots! ;-) ).   Yes I hear all the arguments about the speed of moths etc, but for "regular folks" who can't do the boat work required of a moth, these things are pretty cool!!

Agree getting a racing fleet will be a challenge ...

IMG_0200.HEIC

UNADJUSTEDNONRAW_thumb_308b6.jpg

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4 hours ago, Phil S said:

From a Moth enthusiast point of view, all these inferior foilers...

:-)

I don't entirely disagree, with the "from the point of view of a Mothie" caveat.

What you are leaving out is that...

  • It's pretty darn frustrating to learn on a Moth. Kudos to those who break through!
    • Every mistake is a swim.
    • The "sorted out, easy to get started" moths are new and expensive.
    • The "cheap" moths are not actually cheap, and can refuse to foil for mysterious (to the newbie) reasons (ie: the ride height gearing is a bit off).
    • With so much variability across the Moth hardware, it's impossible to get reference configurations (ie: baseline batten/cunno/outhaul tension)
    • ... Of course, if a local friend sells you a cheap-but-sorted moth, rigs it with you, helps with the first fixes, and coaches you for a couple beers, you're golden. Winning the lottery, however, is not a plan.
  • Folks coming from regular production boats (ie: Lasers) expect a boat that doesn't break all the time. They want to learn foiling, not composite work ;-)
  • Overall purchase cost.
  • Frequency and cost of breakages
  • Launch and recovery are horrible -- except in ideal spots
  • Departure and return to narrow channels, areas with shallows are horrible, specially for a newbie -- except in ideal spots

The UFO is massive fun to learn from the ground up. They are sturdy -- I foiled mine into a sandbar, the damage was not crippling, and the repair was low cost.

It will be a feeder class to Moths, as you say, and learning on a UFO might be a good idea for some folks (depending on starting skills, local launching conditions). Personally, I'll be saving to get a 2nd UFO to race against my son instead.

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5 hours ago, Phil S said:

4. From a Moth enthusiast point of view, all these inferior foilers are just oportunities for wanabe foilers to try and test the type, spend a month or two learning the basics and then graduate into a proper high performance foiler like a Moth, or ACat or Phantom (maybe not sure about the Phantom really?)

The problem with one desgn foilers is that the science is moving too fast. The Flying Phantom and the GC32 adopted the San Fran AC72 science and by the time they were in production it was obsolete. The Waszp and UFO use pretty basic moth tech which was well obsolete from a racing point of view before they were marketted.

Sailing your basic foiler on foils is great for a few rides but as soon as you see a state of the art foiler glide past at double your speed, the gloss wears off. We are finding WAZP fleets are not growing where there are Moth fleets, going slow is too embarrasing.

I don't agree with your point #4.   I learned to foil on a friend's Mach 2 Moth back in 2013.  I'd been wanting to foil for years, and it was every bit as difficult, thrilling, and rewarding as I expected it to be.  I really love sailing the Moth when I have the chance.   I have nothing but respect for the designers and sailors in the class, all foiling enthusiasts owe a lot to their skill and perseverance.

However, summers in New England are short and I sail & race a lot of other boats as well (my wife would say too many) including a Laser, and old I-14, and our J/110.  The time required to rig, sail, and de-rig a moth, and keep it in good sailing condition was simply more than I wanted to invest in one boat, not to mention the fact that it would cost the equivalent of a nice small car.

Enter the Waszp and UFO.   Two small foilers that have costs similar to other single handed dinghies, and time requirements that are similar as well.  Neither the UFO nor the Waszp is a 'wannabe' foiler.  They both foil upwind and down.  When sailed alongside a Moth, they will be slower than the Moth.  But when sailed alongside a Laser, Aero, or most any other conventional dinghy, they will be fast (once foiling).  Different boats have different speed potentials.  Prior to purchasing the UFO, I was concerned that it would be too 'beginner level' to keep me engaged after the first few foils.  Happily, it is not.  I sailed it a lot last summer, and have lots more to learn.   Will a new one-design come out that makes me want to trade my UFO for something faster and better?  Probably...and that will be a nice choice to have. Who knows if a better design will be here in 1 year or 10 years?  I'm happy to spend the waiting time blasting around the bay at 12-15 knots.

I agree with you that some folks who get started on 'entry level' foilers like the UFO and Waszp will want more performance or competition and will move up to the Moth class, and that is terrific.   But I doubt that most of the UFO customers will.  Will the UFO and Waszp racing fleets grow?   I don't know.  The Waszp fleets certainly have in Europe and Australia, but don't seem to have critical mass in the US yet.  I hope to get to a few events in the Northeast this summer in my UFO.  I attended one race/clinic in Bristol last fall which was really fun.  The competition was not great (not enough wind most of the time), but I learned a lot from the builders and the other sailors, and as always, the best part was simply meeting other like-minded enthusiasts.  

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10 hours ago, Phil S said:

Looking at the last few posts, and comparing the boats:

1. The best value speed for $ is by far the foiling kite board. The UFO is probably only a strong second.

2. I have not yet seen a UFO in Aust, the WASZP has spread pretty well with several fleets. So getting UFOs started as a racing fleet  In Aust will be a challenge. WASZP and UFO will have to share the market.

3. Based on the hypothesis of my point 2, I suspect the WASP, UFO. and several other Euro foilers will establish local fleets but not spread universally. They will also sell into the non racing market but only the sellers will know who/where/ and how big this really is. Most of these boats will rot in a shed unused anyay. Maybe the UFO will do better here as I suspect this market is bigger in USA.

4. From a Moth enthusiast point of view, all these inferior foilers are just oportunities for wanabe foilers to try and test the type, spend a month or two learning the basics and then graduate into a proper high performance foiler like a Moth, or ACat or Phantom (maybe not sure about the Phantom really?)

The problem with one desgn foilers is that the science is moving too fast. The Flying Phantom and the GC32 adopted the San Fran AC72 science and by the time they were in production it was obsolete. The Waszp and UFO use pretty basic moth tech which was well obsolete from a racing point of view before they were marketted.

Sailing your basic foiler on foils is great for a few rides but as soon as you see a state of the art foiler glide past at double your speed, the gloss wears off. We are finding WAZP fleets are not growing where there are Moth fleets, going slow is too embarrasing.

I think the UFO is growing steadily in the U.S, and the current sh$tstorm brewing in Laser land is probably helping sales...I know I'd rather buy one in the same price range as a Laser and have waaaaay more fun.

Updates to one design boats can be made mid cycle...usually its cheaper to sell your existing boat then to the recreational market and buy new but in that case but maybe not. My experience in the A-Cat is that foils aren't that bad, about the same price as a new sail. If you only have to do once every 3 years its manageable. Buying every year makes your single handed boat cost about the same as running a 2 handed high performance boat (with double the sail cost), so for some that is also manageable but I suspect for most looking at the UFO they would be happy with updated foils on a scheduled 3-4 year release cycle.

In terms of high performance foiling classes in the U.S you really only have 1, maybe 2/3 options if you want to race. The first and by far most logical choice is the A class catamaran, not because the boat is superior per se but on the East Coast the class is the largest. We had 41 boats in Sarasota vs. 13 Moths at their recent Nationals. I'm expecting 60 A-Cats in St. Pete for our Nationals in the fall; that is a mix of floating and foiling but we're still talking 30-40 foilers and 20+ classics! The second option is the Nacra 17 Mk. 2, but that is focused on the Olympic path. The Moth is your 3rd option, unfortunately as I mentioned the fleet has sort of imploded in the U.S. It is the best foiler of the bunch though, gets up in light air easier, can foil on all points of sail and handles chop reasonably well. There are a handful of F20FCS' and Phantoms in the U.S; from what I know they are easier to get on foils than the A Cat but harder to maintain and in some cases downright scary with high ride heights and a very powerful rig.

Some more notes on the A Cat in case folks are interested; I think it is a logical progression from the UFO if you are looking for higher speeds (top end at 30kts):

1) The boat can be sailed in low rider mode by raking the boards forward, up to about 15 kts of breeze.

2) The boat is stable in between races

3) Downwind the foiling is there in about 8-9 kts for the experienced sailors with adjustable rudders across a wide sailor weight range (160-200lbs).

4) Upwind foiling is coming; the boats can do it, and I have done it in 16 kts+ of breeze with the correct technique. The key is technique, its not as friendly/easy as a Moth or UFO in this regard. The good guys are making it pay in 12-13kts of breeze I believe, but we are still talking about world class sailors.

5) Cost, this is the gotcha. New boats are sitting at around $29k without a trailer but that is with a mast and rig. Used options are out there for ~2/3rds that cost. Most people sell platforms only as they keep their rig for the next ride; the masts have been stable now for quite some time.

 

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17 hours ago, Phil S said:

Looking at the last few posts, and comparing the boats:

1. The best value speed for $ is by far the foiling kite board. The UFO is probably only a strong second.

2. I have not yet seen a UFO in Aust, the WASZP has spread pretty well with several fleets. So getting UFOs started as a racing fleet  In Aust will be a challenge. WASZP and UFO will have to share the market.

3. Based on the hypothesis of my point 2, I suspect the WASP, UFO. and several other Euro foilers will establish local fleets but not spread universally. They will also sell into the non racing market but only the sellers will know who/where/ and how big this really is. Most of these boats will rot in a shed unused anyay. Maybe the UFO will do better here as I suspect this market is bigger in USA.

4. From a Moth enthusiast point of view, all these inferior foilers are just oportunities for wanabe foilers to try and test the type, spend a month or two learning the basics and then graduate into a proper high performance foiler like a Moth, or ACat or Phantom (maybe not sure about the Phantom really?)

The problem with one desgn foilers is that the science is moving too fast. The Flying Phantom and the GC32 adopted the San Fran AC72 science and by the time they were in production it was obsolete. The Waszp and UFO use pretty basic moth tech which was well obsolete from a racing point of view before they were marketted.

Sailing your basic foiler on foils is great for a few rides but as soon as you see a state of the art foiler glide past at double your speed, the gloss wears off. We are finding WAZP fleets are not growing where there are Moth fleets, going slow is too embarrasing.

Strongly disagree on absolutely every point. The moth is only relevant to the moth. This level condescension expressed above is precisely what motivates people like me to build cheap anti-moths.

DRC

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Sorry Dave but without the moth class starting to foil 20 years ago, there would be no foilers now. Moths proved it was possible and until then no one was even trying. Suddenly everyone thought they could make a foiling boat like a moth and so far very few have succeeded. Only a few have made it past prototype.

Conratulations on the UFO being one of the best, simplest design, simplest construction, most accessible for the less nimble, and most of all the lowest price. 

But foiling slow is not as easy as planing fast, and not as much fun as foiling fast. You will sell a lot of UFOs but some buyers (not all or even a majority) will move on to faster boats just as we have found with Waszp, and that was what I was pointing out.

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Ever watched a one design foiling race? 60+ WASZPs around a course is just as intense as Moth racing, purely because its closer, super competitve and it is fast enough to still get the heart pumping. I would hardly say the WASZP has not kicked on? All fleets around the world have shown significant growth, honing in on 800 boats in 2 1/2 years, in Australia they are outnumbering Moths 2-1 in every market except NSW and even then there is a similar amount of boats sailing in Sydney albeit spread out. Given the fact the WASZP and also the UFO are 2 and a bit years into a journey I would say they have made significant in-roads. Plus the culture of the WASZP is what is getting a lot of people in, its fun to sail, its fun to race and the people are fun to be around. When you are at an event, you can go to the pub or spend time with your family and friends, roll-up an hour before the start and go sailing/be competitive, then party afterwards, this appeals to a significant amount of people.

Moths are moths, they are the fastest and most efficent thing out there by a mile outside of Kite-foiling. But a lot of people aren't that interested in spending an extra 25k to go 3-4 knots quicker. Nor are they that interested in spending the same amount of money to go quicker and spend their life not going as fast as someone in a race because of $$. 

Its development vs one-design. Its tech heads against people who just want to go sailing. They are nothing alike except the fact they all fly above the water.

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WASZP doesn't have significant market share in the U.S. There are 19 boats registered for the Atlantic Coast Championship. Not bad for a weekend event, but its nothing like a 40+ fleet! If there were events with large fleets in the U.S I could see it gaining popularity.

I think where the Moth went wrong in the U.S is pushing out the non gear-heads. The A-Cat fleet has done well because those less interested in the equipment can sail an older c-board boat and still be competitive in a range of conditions. Most of the guys in the foiling fleet are focusing on rigging and sailing, less so on the actual gear. Its hard to build a set of foils for a Moth, but harder still to do so for an A-Cat as you need 2 sets of boards and a 5 axis mill.

The UFO wins for a lot of reasons and I wish the class the best of luck moving forward.

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@Dave Clark"...condescension expressed above is precisely what motivates people like me to build cheap anti-moths."

Dude!  Don't let the emotions get to you... surely you meant inexpensive... I didn't see anything cheap about the UFOs I saw last year in Ottawa...

bb

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Internet forums stir emotions. In person, UFO pilots and Mothies have the best of times together. We had a couple of regattas running together in Key Largo and it was epic.

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When tuning my  rig with the rig-sense I got maximum 60 kg on each stay.  It's the maximum I can...

My stays seem to be distended in their upper part; so,  is it necessary to modify the knots on the shrouds ?

20190416_175707.jpg

20190416_175747.jpg

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Simple answer is yes. You want to move the knots so that when the mast is straight and unloaded with the lower shrouds loose there is still a little tension on the upper shrouds. This powers up the rig and makes it easier to fly in marginal foiling conditions.

Here's the SA post showing you the measurement from the tip of spreader to the hounds that you should aim for:

Note, the relevant measurement is to where the horizontal strop goes across the front of the mast (90" in the picture). Measuring to the shackle as was done in the post doesn't work as the strops differ in length and stretch in with use over the course of your first week of sailing. If you've pulled tension into the upper shrouds, but can't get to the measurement to 90", that's fine. Getting there may require bending your spreaders, which you don't want to do. I aim for 90.5" right now. Side to side within a 1/4" of the desired measurement is close enough. Better to spend time foiling than tuning.

Additionally, when retying your spreader tips you should make sure you tie the knot to minimize slip. When you tie the hitches at the end of the spreaders, you want the knots to be on the top of the spreaders. Here's what the knot should look like when its loosened up. Arrow points towards the top of the mast. Note that your personal boat was early enough that we may not have tied the ideal knot when rigging it. We were still figuring out the best attachment at the spreader tip.

jcTZeL2WfRuEXGxU81V6XOYwkZMW2kwK8cqwuo2FM8fQf1YqMZmjqPEtWL7-N1jeBUOKJhYCEDCADm-g0wVZpHdL9MLzqDzOCtn2v7inJPpYkwCyctFHIm4gn11mHGgJjhUS-zOR

-Nick

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I had a  mishap last season that shaved a bit off the starboard tip of my rudder foil. Is this enough to be an issue?

 

 

 

2DE61A71-9620-4307-8073-7D89880A4EFB.jpeg

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I own hull number 36 (or thereabouts) and haven’t done any updating yet. What should I be doing? I have the new kit for the front foil (are there instructions on how to best set that up?). The boat includes the drain holes that I believe should be epoxied in. What about the similar holes through which there are cord loops that hold the boat onto the dolly? What else?

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Simple answer is no. Just go foiling. A ding like that is not a big deal.

2 hours ago, barthrh said:

I had a  mishap last season that shaved a bit off the starboard tip of my rudder foil. Is this enough to be an issue?

2DE61A71-9620-4307-8073-7D89880A4EFB.jpeg

If you want to spend a small amount of time fixing it, you could sand it smooth and polish it, which is probably your best value for improved performance versus time/money invested.

If you want it to be perfect, you could add back what was lost with laminate, fair, gelcoat, sand and polish. We can also do that for you in the shop if you send us the foil. FYI, shipping round trip will likely cost more than the repair, but if you wanted to buy one of the new 6.0m2 Pinhead sails or some other spare parts, it could be worth it to get to back a pristine foil. Or you could join us in Rhode Island for Wickford Regatta June 8-9 or Newport Regatta July 6-7, and we could take care whatever you need while you're down here. Rhode Island's a beautiful place to visit in the summer. 

-Nick

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As far as epoxying in drain holes, I wouldn't worry about it unless your boat has a leak. For the holes for the righting handles and the loops the dolly clips to, you can seal the hole without closing it up entirely. A pipe cleaner covered in epoxy wiped inside the hole should solve any leaking issues you may have from those holes. You'll want to widen the holes slightly with a drill bit before you do this, so the lines still fit through once you've painted epoxy around the inside.

Below I've linked a photo album that shows how to switch from the pinboard to gates. You need to line up the center position in the pinboard with the center position in the lower teeth of the new gates system. The boltholes are not in the same place for the two systems. You should additionally know that we've started gluing the lower teeth to the deck plate with Plexus when assembling the gates. You could do the same at home with thickened epoxy to secure the hardware better than through bolts alone.

https://photos.app.goo.gl/YKDvw8nwdKy8nBdP6

-Nick

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Hey, how about an update from participants in the Fort to Battery race in Charleston?  Conditions sounded ideal, with 10-12 knots of breeze.  The results website was difficult to read, but it looks like at least 3 UFOs were there.  How was the racing?  

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Speaking of regattas, it looks like Wickford and Newport are on the calendar for June / July.  Anything upcoming for Aug or Sept?  I am still interested in getting out east for a regatta.

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The event ended up being awesome. First day of foilmania racing was crazy as winds were in the mid 20s gusting up to 38. The actually fort to battery race was hectic but cool with all of the kiteboarders and a confusing start sequence but conditions were perfect making an almost 100% foiling reach for 15 minutes to the finish. The last day of foilmania ended up being very competitive and fun with the UFOs out there on the course. 

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Hello , is someone in Europe interested in a 3 times sailed UFO ? Trade in of a good Hobie 14 considered  ( sounds crazy ? ).

Pls. contact    loesspijker7@gmail.com

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19 hours ago, Otto Pilot said:

conditions were perfect making an almost 100% foiling reach for 15 minutes to the finish

Aye! Videos? 

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1 hour ago, martin.langhoff said:

Aye! Videos? 

Multiple videos and a full regatta report.

https://ufoclass.com/2019/04/28/ufos-cap-off-winter-series-with-fort-2-battery/

-Nick

P.S. If you click on this immediately, the second video may not be up yet. We're at work on it and it will be up tonight or tomorrow.

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Got the second video from Charleston done. Enjoy.

 

-Nick

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UFOwners,

Wanted to let you all know about a clinic we're hosting Memorial Day Weekend in Bristol, RI. If you own a UFO, you should already have gotten an email from me about this. If you didn't, then you aren't on our UFOwners email list. Mistakes and typos do happen. PM or email me to get in touch and get added to the list. Clinic invites, how to manuals, recall notices that come with free replacement parts and all sorts of other great tidbits get dispensed via the UFOwner's email list. Sign-up today.

Now onto the clinic details. The clinic will be free for owner's of new UFOs who've never been to clinic before. Bring your own boat and get tuned up for the summer. All ability levels welcome. If you're coming via plane a limited number of charter boats will be available. We will be sailing out of the Herreshoff Marine Museum on Bristol Harbor.
 
You can arrive on Friday (5/24/2019) afternoon to rig and launch your boat for a free sail. No coaching will be provided on Friday. On Saturday and Sunday (5/25-26/2019) we'll have the full Fulcrum coaching staff on site to help you master foiling on your UFO. 
 
Cost will be $300 for the full weekend or $175/day for Saturday or Sunday individually.
 
Email Nick Burroughs to reserve your slot now. Click here to add the event to your calendar.
 
And if you still aren't inspired to join us for a weekend full of learning with your fellow UFO foilers, here's some footage from one of last year's clinics.
 
-Nick
 
P.S. Check out www.ufoclass.com/events for all the latest info on regattas, clinics and other UFO events. We'll be posting additional events for the summer soon.
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Has anyone figured out if we can use a loos gauge for tuning? If not is it the 2-5mm spin lock gauge thats needed?

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5 hours ago, Claire1000 said:

Has anyone figured out if we can use a loos gauge for tuning? If not is it the 2-5mm spin lock gauge thats needed?

Yes, I did. Some posts back I tuned with spinlock and took loos readings as per your request...

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Awesome. I can’t figure out how to search these on a phone but I’ll dig my computer out and look. 

 

Also, if anyone cares, we converted a RIB/jet ski trailer to hold our UFO. Just took the bunks off, mounted 4x4s horizontally, then screwed the bunks on the end. Took about 45 minute total including carpeting the 4x4s. If anyone wants pics let me know. 

 

The car car rack is good but requires 2 people. This just takes 1. 

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11 hours ago, Claire1000 said:

Awesome. I can’t figure out how to search these on a phone but I’ll dig my computer out and look. 

 

Also, if anyone cares, we converted a RIB/jet ski trailer to hold our UFO. Just took the bunks off, mounted 4x4s horizontally, then screwed the bunks on the end. Took about 45 minute total including carpeting the 4x4s. If anyone wants pics let me know.  

 

The car car rack is good but requires 2 people. This just takes 1. 

Hi Claire,

As I am currently trying to figure out the best trailer option myself I would be very keen to see how you solved it using the converted a RIB/jet ski trailer. Please do send some pics ideally showing how the UFO looks sitting on the trailer and any trailer model details for research. Thanks very much.

Peter

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5 hours ago, citygent said:

Hi Claire,

As I am currently trying to figure out the best trailer option myself I would be very keen to see how you solved it using the converted a RIB/jet ski trailer. Please do send some pics ideally showing how the UFO looks sitting on the trailer and any trailer model details for research. Thanks very much.

Peter

 

Peter,

I did the same thing with an old power boat trailer. I could dig up the model name and number, but it wouldn't be much help as I don't think the Yacht Club trailer brand exists anymore. Moral of the story is most small power boat and jet ski trailers will work. Just take some measurements to be sure.image.png.1304a0780f31eef2225a21375b3f4039.pngThe main issue is to elevate the hulls of the UFO above the fenders as the boat will be wider than a small power boat or jet ski trailer. I used 4x4s as the cross beams instead of 2x4s to pull this off. Everything bolted to the trailer with U-bolts. Then I got fancy and built some nice pads and carpet out of some noodles, a microfiber doormat and lots of duct tape, which has held up surprisingly well for the last year. The fancy padding solution is unnecessary. You could just add carpet directly to the 4x4s and you'd be all set.

-Nick

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2 hours ago, burritoughs said:

I did the same thing with an old power boat trailer

Looks good! If you add one of those PVC tubes with end caps, with large enough diameter you can probably fit all the rigging & foils. 

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17 minutes ago, martin.langhoff said:

Looks good! If you add one of those PVC tubes with end caps, with large enough diameter you can probably fit all the rigging & foils. 

I could, but I have much better and more extensive plans. I intend to add one more cross beam forward and turn it into a flatbed with some 4x8 sheets of plywood. Then I'll build a little fence around the outer perimeter and I'll have a giant box into which I can put my UFO and all its parts, tools, sailing gear, etc. that then gets covered by a tarp. If you price it out, those PVC tubes are absurdly expensive compared to plywood, 2x4s and 4x4s and they add a lot less utility to your trailer than turning it into a flatbed would.

Which reminds me, if you want a primo UFO trailer, just go buy a small flatbed trailer (aka utility trailer). You want a 6'x10' platform minimum to fit the boat and its components, but a 7'x12' trailer is luxurious as you can roll the boat on the 6'9" wide dolly onto the flatbed. With the 7'x12' utility trailer you have plenty of room for tool boxes, sailing gear, cooler, etc. in addition to your UFO and all its parts. All the luxury of the utility trailer will cost you in both price and weight, but it will be a sweet setup.

-Nick

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There’s some quick and dirty pictures. Don’t know the make or model of the trailer. Also we wouldn’t tow it with the stuff underneath it’s just there for now and it’s not really tied down. 

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For using my Westmersea trailer for both dinghies D-One and UFO , I made too some arrangements as shown in these pics

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So the current tuning thought is 80-90kg in heavy wind (16 on the loos PT1) and 40kg in lighter stuff (5 on the PT-1, which ours doesn't read 5 so we will got to 8 when it starts to read then back down a little)? 

Also, not if  people are still using the google doc, but I added the tensions to it. Everyone please continue to edit it as you'd like.If you disagree with someones notes, just add your own with your name by them. 

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1q1W-dATx_QTq5XPyLWv7PcFnwU4EbmFOBxnck7PQJwU/edit#

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Lighter stuff, does you mean for example, under 10 knts (up to 3 Beaufort) and heavy wind above 11 knts  (from 4 Beaufort to ...) ?

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1 hour ago, Claire1000 said:

So the current tuning thought is 80-90kg in heavy wind (16 on the loos PT1) and 40kg in lighter stuff (5 on the PT-1, which ours doesn't read 5 so we will got to 8 when it starts to read then back down a little)? 

Also, not if  people are still using the google doc, but I added the tensions to it. Everyone please continue to edit it as you'd like.If you disagree with someones notes, just add your own with your name by them. 

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1q1W-dATx_QTq5XPyLWv7PcFnwU4EbmFOBxnck7PQJwU/edit#

Ouch -- someone removed the whole section on rig tuning. I'll look around later to restore it. 

Your tension notes are wrong for light winds. Higher tension for light winds. We need to get the original notes back.

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Here's how I have my setup with Yakima 78" roundbars.
I think I'm using 1.5" straps at the main block and rear hiking straps. The bridal at the front really serves as a safety and visual reminder that I have a boat on my roof since I don't see the hull when I'm driving.
Seen here in the Blue Ridge mountains.

20190504_192917.jpg

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OK, just signed up for the Wickford Regatta.  Happy to see four other boats there, Dave, Nick, and Otto along with Luca, who I have not met yet.  I got the boat rigged and down to the shoreline last weekend, now I'm just waiting for a little warmth and wind to combine on the same day to encourage me to get back out on the water.  There are four Waszps and a few Moths signed up too, hopefully we'll get a nice little foiling regatta going.  Come on UFO pilots, sign up and fly with us!

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It's not just Wickford Regatta coming up June 8-9. We have a UFO Owner's Clinic May 26-28. Clinic is free for new owners that haven't been to a clinic yet. Great opportunity to shake off the rust and learn some new skills before the summer regatta schedule starts. 

And the fun doesn't end there. We have a bunch of UFO events coming up this summer. Check out the event calendar at www.ufoclass.com for all the events announced so far. More events to be announced soon.

-Nick

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Ok my UFO arrived and I am very excited. Coming from the world of sunfish and lasers. I sat there looking at everything today and watched the video about rigging the UFO from DRC, but it seems like there are a lot of lines that are left out (I got the halyard, cunningham, and rear foil halyard...but clearly there are lines around the stays as well as through the front foil, and perhaps some others but I can’t see exactly how they attach/ run) Anyone mind either telling me where these lines run? Or better yet just sending me pictures of their UFO so I can see where the lines run and replicate them. 

Sorry to put UFO owners back into the dark ages with such simple questions, but I want to sail!!

Adam

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Wickford Regatta (June 8-9) is just around and late fees kick in tonight when the clock strikes 12. Don’t turn into a pumpkin. Get registered right now before late fees kick in. We have 6 UFOs (plus 5 Moths and 5 Waszps) registered already. Come join the party.

As always check out www.ufoclass.com/events for all the latest information on UFO activity.

-Nick

P.S. Here’s the highlights from Foiling Midwinters in Key Largo, FL to get you salivating. Sign up now.

 

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Has there been any mention of a lower wind / larger surface area sail?  I end up on the water in a lot of borderline days where another 15-20% more canvas would be awesome.  It may involve a different mast section for a taller mast but I would be interested.  Anyone else?

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6 hours ago, DerekF said:

Has there been any mention of a lower wind / larger surface area sail?  I end up on the water in a lot of borderline days where another 15-20% more canvas would be awesome.  It may involve a different mast section for a taller mast but I would be interested.  Anyone else?

What is your rest mass?

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Has anyone implemented an alternative to the halyard cleat at the top of the mast? I find it fussy to hook up sometimes and impossible to release while on the boat (it needs too much angle). There are times when, due to wind direction, I'd prefer to just dump the sail and paddle in because I have to work my way though a passage in a break wall and then down a relatively narrow channel between the wall and docked boats. I can't easily do that without capsizing the boat (perhaps undesirable in some conditions).

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12 hours ago, fastyacht said:

What is your rest mass?

I am 150 lbs. with plus the weight of the boat (another ~150 lbs or so)

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UFO 093 is loaded up and ready to head down to Wickford on Friday.   There are six UFOs signed up so far, and registration is still open.  Join us!

UFO on CRV Roof (2).jpg

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I take delivery on my new UFO later today. Hull #163. Will be sailing it in 8-12mph of wind over this coming weekend (or at least that's the forecast). 

Anything I should know to make my future foiling life more enjoyable or to tune the boat for getting started? I'm a long time Hobie sailor and feel that foiling is pretty close to maintaining a long hull flight on a Hobie 18 or 20. If so, I should be in excellent shape. I weight in at 200lbs so I'm a little worried I'll need more wind 

What are you your tips and tricks or are there resources or pages I should check out?

I've watched all the UFO and Fulcrum videos I can find. I feel like I understand the tuning process etc. at this point. 

Any advise, help, warnings, etc will be appreciated!

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On 4/16/2019 at 3:21 PM, barthrh said:

I had a  mishap last season that shaved a bit off the starboard tip of my rudder foil. Is this enough to be an issue?

 

 

 

2DE61A71-9620-4307-8073-7D89880A4EFB.jpeg

 

Hi

I am new to the forum.  My UFO should arrive in a couple of weeks.

This picture has me thinking about a topic that I have not seen any discussion in the forum.

That is "debris strike"

The reason it is top of mind is that Lake Ontario is at a 100 year record high level. This has floated a lot of crap off the shore. The stray dock platforms are easy to see and avoid, but it is the waterlogged branches that have me concerned. They are 99% below the surface and really tough to see until you are right on top of them.  Some of them have a significant mass underwater.

Does anybody have experience with this type of "incident"?

How much abuse can the UFO take before we are talking about a new foil or hull rebuild?

Any war stories or near misses?

THANKS

Stu

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22 minutes ago, Shannan said:

I take delivery on my new UFO later today. Hull #163. Will be sailing it in 8-12mph of wind over this coming weekend (or at least that's the forecast). 

Anything I should know to make my future foiling life more enjoyable or to tune the boat for getting started? I'm a long time Hobie sailor and feel that foiling is pretty close to maintaining a long hull flight on a Hobie 18 or 20. If so, I should be in excellent shape. I weight in at 200lbs so I'm a little worried I'll need more wind 

Any advise, help, warnings, etc will be appreciated!

Cat sailors tend to aim to get the windward hull just barely flying to maximize speed.   While you can do this in a UFO, it is not the path to fast foiling.  Keep the boat flat, or even healed to windward a bit.   Other than that, read this forum, watch the videos, and get out there and have fun!   I weigh 180-185, and need 9-10 knots to fly.  You should be fine in 10-11.

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6 hours ago, Shannan said:

Any advise, help, warnings, etc will be appreciated!

There's a nice document, a bit rambling but has a ton of good info. 

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1q1W-dATx_QTq5XPyLWv7PcFnwU4EbmFOBxnck7PQJwU/edit?usp=sharing

Also - try to get the batten tension video from Nick.

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5 hours ago, stuartbutton said:

That is "debris strike"

(...)

Does anybody have experience with this type of "incident"?

I have foiled into a sandbar. The UFO is sturdy and very much unlike other foilers in this regard.

Eventually, after much abuse (ie: the crash into the sandbar, plus other groundings where the rudder hits first as it's deeper), the lower rudder gudgeon needed a repair/rebuild. Localized repair.

Generally the hulls are very strong, I've hit piers, coconuts (Miami!) and other boats (my son has a rotomolded dinghy and thought it'd be ok to slam into me). Couple notable weaknesses:

  • The wand 'crane' should be treated with care. It's easy to put excessive force on it -- ie someone who doesn't know the boat tries to tow the boat, or move it on land, grabbing the wand crane. 
  • The top of the hulls just forward of the front crossbeam. It can be tempting to stand there when you hoist or drop the main. Don't. The hulls are skinny in that spot. 
  • You can break the tiller by holding on to the extension during a capsize. Don't.

 

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If you weren't at the first UFO Owner's clinic of 2019 a couple weeks ago, you missed out. Everyone mastered new skills, gained confidence in the boat and refined their technique with help of the Fulcrum coaching staff. Great seabreeze both afternoons and the protected waters of Bristol Harbor certainly didn't hurt anyone's enjoyment either. But don't worry, we have another clinic coming up July 26-28th at the Herreshoff Marine Museum in Bristol, RI. Sign up now.
 
Not convinced? Check out some highlights of our most recent clinic below. 
Clinic Highlights:
  • Free for owners of new UFOs who've never been to a clinic.
  • Technique demonstrations from Fulcrum coaches on the water--a new addition at the most recent clinic
  • Plus private coaching via BBtalkin headset, group drills, adventure sailing, practice races and more...
  • All ability levels welcome
Logistical Details:
  • Bring your own boat.  If you're coming via plane a limited number of charter boats will be available.
  • Free sail with a safety boat, but no coaching on Friday afternoon.
  • Full day clinic on both Saturday and Sunday with the Fulcrum coaching staff. Lunch will be provided.
  • Cost will be $300 for the full weekend or $175/day for Saturday or Sunday individually. But remember it's free, if it's your first clinic.
Email Nick Burroughs to reserve your slot now. Click here to add the event to your calendar.
 
-Nick
 
P.S. There are all kinds of great UFO events going on this summer. Check www.ufoclass.com/events for more details. Next up is Wickford Regatta June 8-9. Registration fees go up another $15 at midnight tomorrow. So if you're coming, register now.
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You may be a far better sailor than me but I haven’t found foiling to be “easy.” 

 

The UFO is a great boat and I’m confident it’s the easiest foiling to be had, but I’d recommend going in knowing it will be hard like all new things are hard and a good scoop of patience will be very very helpful. 

Biggest tip- EASE. 

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Bit of a long shot but does anyone (anywhere) have a UFO Deck Cover they are able to sell me?

 

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