Doug Lord

Steve and Dave Clarks Unidentified Foiling Object

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Yeah I through-bolted mine too. My boat has seen a lot of abuse, and it did come off at one point. If you're giving the mast some love, it's a good thing to do.

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My screws were still in good shape. 

However, given what can happen to the mast tip following a capsize in shallow water (sometimes with rocky bottoms), I did some buildup under the edges and added a little carbon just to make it a tad more rugged.

Note most the scratches came after the extra material was added.  And it looks even worse now.   

 

IMG_20200630_123238829_HDR.jpg

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Long UFO hiatus. I had a test sail last weekend, but I had things to tweak and my battered mainfoil horizontal failed (probably due to past abuse). 

Here's a new camera setup. Opinions? You miss the "foil action" but the sailor action is a lot clearer - is this ... better, worse? (should we have both? contribute to my 2nd gopro camera fund ;-) ).

 

 

GP020219 camera boom.jpg

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9 hours ago, martin 'hoff said:

Long UFO hiatus. I had a test sail last weekend, but I had things to tweak and my battered mainfoil horizontal failed (probably due to past abuse). 

Here's a new camera setup. Opinions? You miss the "foil action" but the sailor action is a lot clearer - is this ... better, worse? (should we have both? contribute to my 2nd gopro camera fund ;-) ).

 

 

GP020219 camera boom.jpg

It looks like the camera stick is monunted to the tiller/gudgeon - won't it move a lot when sailing? However,  I do prefer the angle as one can see better what you are doing and when the boat is lifting out of the water.

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10 hours ago, martin 'hoff said:

Here's a new camera setup. Opinions? You miss the "foil action" but the sailor action is a lot clearer - is this ... better, worse? (should we have both? contribute to my 2nd gopro camera fund ;-) ).

I think it's a good and interesting  alternative to complete the other camera set up. 

In fact the 2 options could complement each other in a video , and having the 2 viewing  angles seems instructive (especially to show some details when tacking or jibing)

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2 hours ago, citygent said:

It looks like the camera stick is monunted to the tiller/gudgeon - won't it move a lot when sailing? However,  I do prefer the angle as one can see better what you are doing and when the boat is lifting out of the water.

The less he steers (fast) the better the shot. Further, while a flaw for easy viewing it would get you a VERY clear idea of how many degrees of helm are being applied at any one time. I like it!

DRC

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A short clip shows it better. As Dave says, it looks good when you're steering smooth, and it looks crap if you're sawing. Steer smooth for speed and good camera work. I like it myself, but I also find it a bit eerie, it feels like a FPS view -- you might be wondering whether it's a 3D animation video. 

Eerie or not, it's great to see sheeting, steering and maneuvers in detail. Watch the vid below, you can see my steering and sheeting very clearly. The bad news is - I'm no Outteridge- my maneuvers are sloppy and inconsistent. Maybe the camera will shame me into fixing that.

Will bend the elbow a bit so the camera sits lower. 

 

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14 hours ago, martin 'hoff said:

... and my battered mainfoil horizontal failed (probably due to past abuse). 

(should we have both? contribute to my 2nd gopro camera fund ;-) ).

I am curious as to failure mode.  I have finished my main foil "repair attempt #2" but my only opportunity (correct tide & good wind) to try it out was Monday morning.  Given that Isaias was only a few hours away, I passed on the opportunity.  It will probably be Tuesday before another decent day shows up.

For a second action camera, you could consider a gopro alternative.  I got my Waspcam 9906 only because I found a really good deal on it and thought I would give it a try.  It does not come with any editing software (but you have that already) and the battery only lasts a couple of hours at most.  Otherwise it works and seems to be rugged enough.  It can be had for under $40.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/WASPCam-Action-Sport-Video-Camera-by-Cobra-4K-WiFi-Waterproof-BLK-9907/193498447954?hash=item2d0d680052:g:1DcAAOSwZRFetXgr

 

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2 hours ago, P Flados said:

I am curious as to failure mode.

Looks like yours, but much worse, it ended up with a 15 degree angle kink. It's my fault - it started as a small crack, but because I haven't hit anything recently (and I thought it was the newer foil), instead of a proper fix I just put gelcoat on it -- on the assumption that a flying stone from a lawnmower had dented it. Way to go. Next outing, just foiling moderately fast, it went "crack".

2 hours ago, P Flados said:

For a second action camera, you could consider a gopro alternative.

Yeah, I should. I'm somewhat "hooked" on the GoPro ecosystem. I need a way to trick the GoPro video editors, which are super nice, to accept other cameras' videos.

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3 hours ago, martin 'hoff said:

A short clip shows it better. As Dave says, it looks good when you're steering smooth, and it looks crap if you're sawing. Steer smooth for speed and good camera work. I like it myself, but I also find it a bit eerie, it feels like a FPS view -- you might be wondering whether it's a 3D animation video. 

Eerie or not, it's great to see sheeting, steering and maneuvers in detail. Watch the vid below, you can see my steering and sheeting very clearly. The bad news is - I'm no Outteridge- my maneuvers are sloppy and inconsistent. Maybe the camera will shame me into fixing that.

Will bend the elbow a bit so the camera sits lower. 

 

Love the video from the rudder boom!  I think you get a much better view of the tiller and sheeting technique.  There is also a heck of a lot less water splashes on the camera lens which is a constant problem with booms mounted on the spirit.  Awesome work Martin!

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In other news, Al, owner of #119 who is literally 80 years of age, just sent us over this photo with the comment "Good Fun!". What a triumph! I remember helping him load the boat up when he bought it new a couple summers ago. He acknowledged that his age was definitely going to be a factor but explained that he'd been taking on new challenges his whole life, including being in the first wave of people to tackle windsurfing. He's got a steely eyed-manner about him that put a good deal of my concerns to rest. Getting a photo from him of actually taking wing is just plain heartwarming. Some things only work by the numbers, but a lot of times in sports (and sailing is no exception) things come down to individual will at the end of the day. So cool!

DRC

unnamed-4.png

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5 minutes ago, DerekF said:

Love the video from the rudder boom!  I think you get a much better view of the tiller and sheeting technique.  There is also a heck of a lot less water splashes on the camera lens which is a constant problem with booms mounted on the spirit.  Awesome work Martin!

I agree, this angle is much better and it really feels as if I were on board with you. Much better for comparing notes and copying your good technique,  thanks Martin. I look forward to many more videos from this angle. Just try to improve the weather :-)

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On 8/6/2020 at 1:06 PM, DerekF said:

Love the video from the rudder boom!  I think you get a much better view of the tiller and sheeting technique.  There is also a heck of a lot less water splashes on the camera lens which is a constant problem with booms mounted on the spirit.  Awesome work Martin!

Martin, you are too modest. You look great, except I was scared you going to crash into the buildings. Seriously, Fulcrum should use this setup for a promo video--riding fast and high. They will sell more boats. Also, Fulcrum should use it for a training video, showing the good, the bad and the ugly. Who needs to see the foils or the view from underwater after stuffing the bows? 

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2 hours ago, Andyufo said:

Martin, you are too modest. You look great, except I was scared you going to crash into the buildings. Seriously, Fulcrum should use this setup for a promo video--riding fast and high. They will sell more boats. Also, Fulcrum should use it for a training video, showing the good, the bad and the ugly. Who needs to see the foils or the view from underwater after stuffing the bows? 

I tried a variant of it but didn't reach that level of sophistication. I'll need to redouble my efforts.

DRC

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Hi all, new to the Forum.

I have had my UFO now for a bit over a year. Last weekend while avoiding a kite boarder I had a nice big stack. I was heading in at the time so decided I would pull my boards while laying over, as there was a nice shore break happening, and I have found the best way to get in is just to pull the boards and sail in backwards through the small sand bar and waves. Afterwards I righted the boat to find the mast had fallen out while I was over. 

From what I can guess, the camelback that I had slid under the down haul lines must have helped pull this through. Obviously the stopper knot had come undone at some point in the sail, possibly in an earlier capsize. 

Has anyone put in a secondary hold down / safety measure? Luckily this happened only about 100m from the beach, so I could secure and swim the boat in. If it had happened a mile out to sea then this would have been a much less fun day. 

Cheers

image.png.ecfccac1eda17eded2947fa2c9fb866d.png

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12 hours ago, Dave Clark said:

I tried a variant of it but didn't reach that level of sophistication. I'll need to redouble my efforts.

DRC

+100! Or let's trade boats again.

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asp1135:    My son had the mast come out of the boat last summer when he capsized.  As he was righting the UFO from a full turtle, he noticed that the mast wasn't fully inserted into the boat.   He let the boat go back into a turtle and flagged down a local boater to head to our dock to summon me to help.   We fully removed the mast from the boat, placed the mast and sail on our motorboat, righted the UFO and towed it home.   I re-installed the mast and went sailing a little while later.  About 1 minutes into my sail, the mast canted over to one side.   I eased the sheet and attempted to pull the mast out of the step and in doing so, found that the lower mast had broken half way between the deck flange and the butt of the mast.   

I suspect that when my son tried to right the boat from a turtle, the mast was a only partially in the step, so the bottom was no longer supported and it damaged the outer surface of the mast between the flange and the butt.   I would have thought I would have noticed this damage, but apparently I did not.   the lower stump of the mast was dangling and actually broke off and sank as I made my way back to short (I had the mast sideways on the deck and held the boom up to jury rig an emergency sail).   The lower mast section is an expensive assembly.   

So I recommend inspecting your lower section really carefully before you sail again to make sure you didn't crush any of the fibers on the outside surface of the mast between the deck flange and the butt.  If you did, take some photos and consult with Fulcrum on the best technique for repair.  This is a highly stressed area, and unforgiving of damage, as I learned.   

Doug

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On 8/10/2020 at 5:35 PM, Champlain Sailor said:

asp1135:    My son had the mast come out of the boat last summer when he capsized.  As he was righting the UFO from a full turtle, he noticed that the mast wasn't fully inserted into the boat.   He let the boat go back into a turtle and flagged down a local boater to head to our dock to summon me to help.   We fully removed the mast from the boat, placed the mast and sail on our motorboat, righted the UFO and towed it home.   I re-installed the mast and went sailing a little while later.  About 1 minutes into my sail, the mast canted over to one side.   I eased the sheet and attempted to pull the mast out of the step and in doing so, found that the lower mast had broken half way between the deck flange and the butt of the mast.   

I suspect that when my son tried to right the boat from a turtle, the mast was a only partially in the step, so the bottom was no longer supported and it damaged the outer surface of the mast between the flange and the butt.   I would have thought I would have noticed this damage, but apparently I did not.   the lower stump of the mast was dangling and actually broke off and sank as I made my way back to short (I had the mast sideways on the deck and held the boom up to jury rig an emergency sail).   The lower mast section is an expensive assembly.   

So I recommend inspecting your lower section really carefully before you sail again to make sure you didn't crush any of the fibers on the outside surface of the mast between the deck flange and the butt.  If you did, take some photos and consult with Fulcrum on the best technique for repair.  This is a highly stressed area, and unforgiving of damage, as I learned.   

Doug

Is there something I didn't understand ?

With cunningham under tension and cunningham's rope stopped with a knot,  I thought  it  was not possible to have the mast come out of the boat.

after pulling the cunningham I always secure the rope with a knot ( port cleat) ; starboard rope is only used to adjust tension

 

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5 hours ago, Gilles29 said:

Is there something I didn't understand ?

With cunningham under tension and cunningham's rope stopped with a knot,  I thought  it  was not possible to have the mast come out of the boat.

after pulling the cunningham I always secure the rope with a knot ( port cleat) ; starboard rope is only used to adjust tension

 

In both anecdotes, the cunningham had uncleated. Folks have probably not put a knot on, or the knot came undone. 

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Is Throw-back-Tuesday still a thing?

A friend invited me to ChartedSails, and I found the GPX files for my races for the 2nd Winter Series 2020.

Day 1 - https://www.chartedsails.com/session/35530f5e-e108-4406-8112-7b80048800fe (this one is generally crap sailing)

Day 2 - https://www.chartedsails.com/session/841ed51b-e32a-474d-bdca-49b4ca1d2c37 (this one shows slightly better sailing) 

The UI is a bit confusing, but if you click around you can see it figured out my tacks and gybes, VMG (to a wind heading I approximated). I've marked the approximate location of start line and marks. 

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Has anyone been playing with "from the deck" ride height adjustment? On #4, the layout sorted out and the system works, but there's too much friction. Next up: add a couple low-friction rings in a couple spots, lubricate the wand and see whether it's any better.

With the setup partially working as it is now, I can adjust it by reaching the top of the mainfoil with my hand, and it's great. Not enough wind? Pull the wand up, go couple knots faster. Unstable/shifty downwind exiting the marina with traffic? have just a bit of wand down to prevent bows digging, or a bit more for skimming. 

Need to finish it up and document it - it's probably $50, could be $10 but low friction rings are stupid expensive.

 

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1 hour ago, martin 'hoff said:

Has anyone been playing with "from the deck" ride height adjustment? On #4, the layout sorted out and the system works, but there's too much friction. Next up: add a couple low-friction rings in a couple spots, lubricate the wand and see whether it's any better.

With the setup partially working as it is now, I can adjust it by reaching the top of the mainfoil with my hand, and it's great. Not enough wind? Pull the wand up, go couple knots faster. Unstable/shifty downwind exiting the marina with traffic? have just a bit of wand down to prevent bows digging, or a bit more for skimming. 

Need to finish it up and document it - it's probably $50, could be $10 but low friction rings are stupid expensive.

Yes Martin I have been playing with height adjustment from the UFO's deck, and my system works well, but I need to often lubricate it before sailing .

I can adjust it from my position,  my feet in the straps, and it's great !

But when lifting the daggerboard, I must not forget to disconnect control ropes !

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Hey team, anyone had experience with worn out main foil positioner (the piece with the five grooves in it where the 1/4" stainless steel pin sits)?  Is it an easy replacement?  Any way to repair it?  Thoughts?  Thanks all!

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10 hours ago, DerekF said:

Hey team, anyone had experience with worn out main foil positioner (the piece with the five grooves in it where the 1/4" stainless steel pin sits)?  Is it an easy replacement?  Any way to repair it?  Thoughts?  Thanks all!

We sell replacement teeth. The new ones have a waterjet cut stainless profile plate embedded in them making the contact stainless on stainless. Yet another example of finally having the time to execute on improvements I came up with a year and a half ago.

Note: for those with very keen eyes, the metal in that picture is actually aluminum. The final fitting prototype on the waterjet was done on a scrap of aluminum plate which was sitting around looking for a job. The tooth insert we actually carry is 316 stainless. 

DRC

 

steel teeth.jpg

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The new main foil pin racks with the SS insert works well, I can attest.    I've been thinking about modifying the pin that goes through the foil so that it is held in place with two C-Clips style retaining rings, one of either side of the blade.  Like this:

CGI-FST-ID4204-CGa01?hei=122&wid=122

I'd need to turn a groove in the pin (actually I'd likely just use some 1/4" rod stock and save the quick pin).    I find the quick pin tends to try to work it self to one side of the gate  or another.  I have a ring in one side with a line attached, and it tends to get hung up on the gate.   Having the pin 'permaently' centered in the main foil would solve both problems.  Thoughts?

 

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2 hours ago, Champlain Sailor said:

The new main foil pin racks with the SS insert works well, I can attest.    I've been thinking about modifying the pin that goes through the foil so that it is held in place with two C-Clips style retaining rings, one of either side of the blade.  Like this:

CGI-FST-ID4204-CGa01?hei=122&wid=122

I'd need to turn a groove in the pin (actually I'd likely just use some 1/4" rod stock and save the quick pin).    I find the quick pin tends to try to work it self to one side of the gate  or another.  I have a ring in one side with a line attached, and it tends to get hung up on the gate.   Having the pin 'permaently' centered in the main foil would solve both problems.  Thoughts?

 

Interesting. Couple quick thoughts

- would the groove get jammed in the main foil as you insert/remove?

- you'll need to tie that piece up so it doesn't go swimming...

If you stay with the quick pin, ideas

- remove the ring, file/sand the sharp edges around the hole, tie a 2.5mm spyderline or similar directly to the pin - the ring has failed me a bunch of times, with little warning. the cover of the spyderline eventually succumbs to chafe, but that's visually obvious with plenty of time before it's trouble

- add a bungee loop (tie it to the loop in the spyderline) that gets to the other side over the top of the sprit and catches the pin end on the other side, with some tension. Once you've inserted the pin fully, stretch the bungee and loop it over the pin end. This will keep the pin under tension, the system will no longer have a "slack" point where the pin can wiggle. 

If you're clever, you can replace the spyderline completely with bungee, and do the 2 jobs with one line. It's extra tricky to get right though, so I'd first do it with a safety line + a bungee. 

 

 

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Good ideas Martin.  I'm simply looking for ways to simplify the assembly and make the hold-down process more straightforward.   There is no need to have the pin in the foil removable or adjustable now that we have the swinging gates.   In the original 'pinboard' design, you did have to be able to pull the pin in and out.  With two circlips, one on either side of the main foil, the pin is trapped until a circlip is removed.   No leash is needed, and I find that the leash gets in the way of opening an closing the gates, or gets tangled with my wand height adjustment lines.   I plan to fabricate a pin this week and will let the forum know how it goes.   Unfortunately it may be some time before I can test it as a biking injury to my knee has put my foiling activities on hold for the next couple of weeks.

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3 hours ago, Champlain Sailor said:

Good ideas Martin.  I'm simply looking for ways to simplify the assembly and make the hold-down process more straightforward.   There is no need to have the pin in the foil removable or adjustable now that we have the swinging gates. 

Ah, you're right! I'm still using old pinboard. I've fiddled with almost everything on #4, but haven't changed to the new foil gates design. 

 

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@Gilles29 That looks fantastic! Pretty close to the setup I'm working on - still refining a couple bits. The only interesting difference I have is that I've added one more block so the line doesn't run straight across the deck. It goes to a small block attached to the same spot where the mainsheet block is.

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On 8/14/2020 at 7:26 PM, Champlain Sailor said:

... turn a groove in the pin (actually I'd likely just use some 1/4" rod stock and save the quick pin).    I find the quick pin tends to try to work it self to one side of the gate  or another.  I have a ring in one side with a line attached, and it tends to get hung up on the gate.   Having the pin 'permaently' centered in the main foil would solve both problems.  Thoughts?

 

If you have the pin inserted into the main foil strut, it engages the tab on the gantry.  To remove the gantry from the strut, you have to pull the pin. 

I remove the gantry from the strut every time I put the boat on my trailer.  I actually also remove the push rod from the gantry and store the push rod, both tie rods and the wand in a piece of PVC pipe for protection during trailering.

Messing with removing and reinstalling C-Clips can be a pain.  Also having a groove between the strut and positioner weakens the pin at a high load location should you ground your main foil while coming in.

You said "turn a groove", so it sounds like you have access to a lathe.  Turning down 1/4" on each end to 3/16" and threading for 10-32 or 10-24 would allow you to use nuts or wingnuts.   It would not be "held centered", but you would not need the retaining line.

Other choices include just thread for 1/4" and run a nut on until it "jams" in place at the end of the threads or drill holes and use a washer / ring-ding on both ends.

Make sure you pin is long enough so that what ever you put on the ends does not interfere with swinging the gates out.

Note that a long pin sticking out at this location makes it more likely for the shrouds to get hung up with the gantry when sailing with the main foil full up. 

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I am fortunate to be able to store my boat on the beach, mast up and foils raised, so pulling the gantry is something I only need to do at the beginning and end of the season, or when doing work on the boat.  I agree that the grooves for the C-Clip will weaken the pin somewhat.   I have also thought of making a two piece pin that captures the blade and threads together,  but that seems weaker still.   I have some scrap SS rod stock, C Clips are a few cents, and it will take less  than 30 minutes of shop time, so it seems like a really easy thing to try.  It also allows the rod to be minimum length, and basically be flush with the outside of the gates.  Enough theorizing....I need to go make it and see if it really works!

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Doug-when (if) you make your c-clip pin,  I would think about NOT making it snug to the foil pin rack.  I am thinking in heavy air, or just sloppy wave conditions, having to try and aim the pin not only to the right groove, but also having the c-clips in exactly the right spot could be tough.  Another thought to go along with that, is that if you are off a little as you drop the main foil into the rack, you could easily send the c-clip flying, then you would be up the river without a c-clip (no way to keep the pin in...).  If you were to make a "standard" length pin, the c-clips might work, however, about half the time I have used a c-clip, I manage to send it flying across the room.  Barry

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Hey team, was out with a few junior sailors from our club on Wed teaching them how to foil.  We had a great time but the breeze didn't quite cooperate.  We did have a power boat however.  If you've ever wondered if you can tow a UFO to foiling, the answer is yes.  Without wind in the sail however, controlling heel angle is more akin to foil surfing than sailing.  

 

 

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New outhaul setup on #4, so you can change sail shape while sailing. Should allow fuller sail to take off, then flatten for upwind speed. Also ease it for more control (and less death roll) downwind.

Now all I need is for tropical storm Laura to give me wind to test it properly.

https://photos.app.goo.gl/LdDgYk2QBB5xJ7FWA

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10 hours ago, martin 'hoff said:

New outhaul setup on #4, so you can change sail shape while sailing. Should allow fuller sail to take off, then flatten for upwind speed. Also ease it for more control (and less death roll) downwind.

Now all I need is for tropical storm Laura to give me wind to test it properly.

https://photos.app.goo.gl/LdDgYk2QBB5xJ7FWA

Your control line while sailing is it only on port , or also starboard?

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7 hours ago, Gilles29 said:

Your control line while sailing is it only on port , or also starboard?

The system is symmetrical, that's why there's a block on the soft shackle, you can control it from both port and starboard, each has a cleat. Each has a take-up. 

The system has some extra line in the take-ups, but it's not endless... So you have to be careful to "balance" the slack rope on the take-ups. 

Once I have it debugged like this I'll look at making it endless. 

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33 minutes ago, martin 'hoff said:

The system is symmetrical, that's why there's a block on the soft shackle, you can control it from both port and starboard, each has a cleat. Each has a take-up. 

The system has some extra line in the take-ups, but it's not endless... So you have to be careful to "balance" the slack rope on the take-ups. 

Once I have it debugged like this I'll look at making it endless. 

Martin

That's look great! 

Are the 2 cleats only glued on UFO's deck?

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14 minutes ago, Gilles29 said:

Martin

That's look great! 

Are the 2 cleats only glued on UFO's deck?

I took 2 scraps of g10 - got them from fulcrum in some part I ordered last year - gave them shape with a dremel so they'd  be bases for the cleats. I screwed the cleats to them.

To experiment with cleat position, I used hot glue sticks and a heat gun. Glad I did that because my initial mounting idea was bad. So after a bit of experimentation, I settled on a spot and yesterday used gflex.

I'll later add a couple more cleats on the same base. Outhaul is clearly the most effective control line to have there. Once it's working well I'll probably add cunningham. 

 

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First outing with new outhaul setup. It worked a treat. At around 30s you can see me working it.

Halyard slipped a bit on the cleat, so my overall settings were a bit off, and I'm rusty. Wand control mechanism needs a bit more work.

 

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The outer ring of Tropical storm Laura is blowing through. This was an early morning outing before work - short on time, stayed in my launching bay. Prevailing winds were 15-27kt, inside the bay the wind mixes between funnelled and dampened.

Incredibly hard to keep a foiler under control in these conditions. So crashes and spills all over. A workout and a ton of fun.

 

 

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Martin-fun-fun-fun!!  BUT,  tell us the story about the bow of the bigger boat with FL registration on it at 53 seconds....  Barry

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1 hour ago, koolkat505 said:

Martin-fun-fun-fun!!  BUT,  tell us the story about the bow of the bigger boat with FL registration on it at 53 seconds....  Barry

Ha ha ha. I was in an epic downwind, had to decide to clear that boat to port or to starboard; the split second thinking about that was too long... lost control and capsized right next to it. Wind and tide did the rest.

Anyway, powered by some swear words, I managed to clear the tangle without scratches to either.

Downwinds in a blow are tricky!

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I can tell you from personal Key Largo experience that being dead downwind up on the foil is about as scary as it can get.  Would be a PERFECT time for your wand adjuster to hopefully gently lower you back down onto the hulls.  Fortunately for me, the boat was kind to me, and put me back down.  Wouldn't have been quite so scary if the Moths/Wasps weren't starting a race 50 yards in front of me, and me on port!.

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Went out last Saturday and had another good learning/training session.  Wind came up so fast and so much that I put the main foil in the 1 position and I was still popping out of the water. 

Afterwards I noticed that my boat felt heavy and sure enough there was a significant amount of water in the starboard hull.  Has anybody experienced this?  Are there any trouble spots that I should look at?

 

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45 minutes ago, WCB said:

Went out last Saturday and had another good learning/training session.  Wind came up so fast and so much that I put the main foil in the 1 position and I was still popping out of the water. 

Afterwards I noticed that my boat felt heavy and sure enough there was a significant amount of water in the starboard hull.  Has anybody experienced this?  Are there any trouble spots that I should look at?

 

Areas that have come unsealed (scuffed or abused) along the trimline of the hull--deck joint and hardware holes are the two most likely culprits. 

When the boat is reallly really hurtling along like that I find that I have to trim the rudder back on to drive the nose down and begin scooting into the front of the boat and hiking close to the mainbeam at the outright limit to keep the nose down. I get this very pleasing nose-down ripping mode that reminds me a lot of AC50s/F50s 

DRC

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28 minutes ago, Dave Clark said:

Areas that have come unsealed (scuffed or abused) along the trimline of the hull--deck joint and hardware holes are the two most likely culprits. 

When the boat is reallly really hurtling along like that I find that I have to trim the rudder back on to drive the nose down and begin scooting into the front of the boat and hiking close to the mainbeam at the outright limit to keep the nose down. I get this very pleasing nose-down ripping mode that reminds me a lot of AC50s/F50s 

DRC

Thanks Dave. I did a cursory look around yesterday when repairing some 420s but I didn't see anything glaring for an opening.  I've been meaning to do a full wash and wax anyways so I'll look over the hull.

I should have messed with the rudder more.  I didn't.  I did move way forward though and that helped a lot in the effort to keep the nose down.

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Always informative to give it a bubble bath with an inflator not quite sealed on one of the drains...

Don't forget out soap on the footstrap attachments and capsize recovery line attachments. Those sometimes bubble...

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I find mine picks up some water when sailing as well.   The windier the conditions, the more it picks up.   Its never become problematic, I just have to remember to drain it at the end of longer sessions.   I have been unable to located the leak (but have not tried really hard, to be honest).   The most important thing is to re-install the drain plugs before the next sail.   The UFO does not foil well without those installed.  I speak to this from empirical evidence, not theoretical conjecturing. 

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1 hour ago, Champlain Sailor said:

I find mine picks up some water when sailing as well.   The windier the conditions, the more it picks up.   Its never become problematic, I just have to remember to drain it at the end of longer sessions.   I have been unable to located the leak (but have not tried really hard, to be honest).   The most important thing is to re-install the drain plugs before the next sail.   The UFO does not foil well without those installed.  I speak to this from empirical evidence, not theoretical conjecturing. 

I wonder if that is the same problem I'm having.  I didn't look too hard but I looked around the other day and saw no apparent signs of trouble.  I may have to suck it up, or blow it out, and do the bubble test.  It was a windy day...lots of crashes.

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9 hours ago, Champlain Sailor said:

I find mine picks up some water when sailing as well.   The windier the conditions, the more it picks up.   Its never become problematic, I just have to remember to drain it at the end of longer sessions.   I have been unable to located the leak (but have not tried really hard, to be honest).   The most important thing is to re-install the drain plugs before the next sail.   The UFO does not foil well without those installed.  I speak to this from empirical evidence, not theoretical conjecturing. 

Hah. I've definitely done that one on the UFO. And on the Taz.

A close friend accuses me of attempted murder -- apparently I took the drain plug out of the Weta for whatever reason shortly before he took it sailing. I recall no such nonsense :-) -- I guess it's a function of launching boats many many times, every 100th or so I'll forget the plug.

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3 minutes ago, martin 'hoff said:

- I guess it's a function of launching boats many many times, every 100th or so I'll forget the plug.

Did that once with the first prototype out of the UFO mold BEFORE we started putting buoyancy foam into the hulls (which we did on production hull 1). Realization was followed by a hasty reach over to ANY shore with the knowledge that the boat was literally actively sinking.

DRC

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9 hours ago, Dave Clark said:

Did that once with the first prototype out of the UFO mold BEFORE we started putting buoyancy foam into the hulls (which we did on production hull 1). Realization was followed by a hasty reach over to ANY shore with the knowledge that the boat was literally actively sinking.

DRC

To make this triply clear for anyone reading this now. All production UFOs with a hull number of 1 or higher contain several cubic feet of buoyancy foam which will stop the hull from sinking if the worst should happen. 

DRC

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10 hours ago, Dave Clark said:

To make this triply clear for anyone reading this now. All production UFOs with a hull number of 1 or higher contain several cubic feet of buoyancy foam which will stop the hull from sinking if the worst should happen. 

DRC

By "the worst should happen" you mean Martin forgetting to put the plugs in his boat!

 

 

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Hey team. Heard some funny noises coming from the mast earlier this week.  I noticed that the collar that sits just below the deck (pic) had cracked. I also noticed a lot of wear on the lower base of the mast (pic).  Should I be concerned with the wear? 

20200904_085645.jpg

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11 minutes ago, DerekF said:

Hey team. Heard some funny noises coming from the mast earlier this week.  I noticed that the collar that sits just below the deck (pic) had cracked. I also noticed a lot of wear on the lower base of the mast (pic).  Should I be concerned with the wear? 

20200904_085645.jpg

 

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Another image of wear on the mast base

20200821_094049.jpg

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@DerekF - you just dodged a bullet.

That plexiglass ring that's cracked in two - and half gone in the picture... if that happens while sailing, the hull will typically cut the mast in 2. As that didn't happen, if the mast didn't get further damage (I think the pics show no damage, but get a Fulcrum opinion on that), you can probably get a new plexiglass ring for a modest cost, and g/flex it into place.

It pays to be vigilant of the health of the mast lower, in particular mast collar and wear ring. 

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16 hours ago, Dave Clark said:

To make this triply clear for anyone reading this now. All production UFOs with a hull number of 1 or higher contain several cubic feet of buoyancy foam which will stop the hull from sinking if the worst should happen. 

DRC

Thanks.  I gave it a test.  I was able to launch and paddle from the ramp out and around over to the beach.  I was more than half way there before I figured out that I forgot to check that the plugs were installed.  With no floatation, she probably would have sunk at the ramp while I was parking my car / trailer. 

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Derek, I would not worry too much about the external damage at the bottom of the mast.  Bending loads are minimal at the base of the mast.  If It were my mast, I would build up the worn area with epoxy and structural filler or with fiberglass and then sand it back to the original profile just because of my anal nature.

However, I would actually worry more about what happened up top.  Without the plexiglass bearing, the mast is being compression loaded from the side at the point of contact at the same time it is under high axial compression from bending loads. 

You should also do the best you can to look inside the mast at the location where there has external wear.  Any raised areas on the inside would be a sign of internal damage to the mast structure.  

My lower mast failure occurred during an outing where I sailed for a while after the plexiglass bearing had slipped down below the deck.  The actual failure occurred at a time when loads on the mast were very low.

I would definitely get Dave's opinion on what to do next before taking it back out.

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Hi all

Does somebody knows where I can find a mainfoil's pin ; I lost mine during my last sailing...

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19 minutes ago, Gilles29 said:

Hi all

Does somebody knows where I can find a mainfoil's pin ; I lost mine during my last sailing...

Well, there's two on the bottom of Biscayne Bay :-)

Alternatively -- McMaster-Carr seems to have them in stock. I think I put the exact part number in the unofficial user's guide (link in my sig). I ordered 4 myself, to have spares... McMaster-Carr has a bunch of other things that are good to have spares of, do check the guide so you save on shipping and have spares that might save a day's sailing. 

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1 hour ago, martin 'hoff said:

Well, there's two on the bottom of Biscayne Bay :-)

Alternatively -- McMaster-Carr seems to have them in stock. I think I put the exact part number in the unofficial user's guide (link in my sig). I ordered 4 myself, to have spares... McMaster-Carr has a bunch of other things that are good to have spares of, do check the guide so you save on shipping and have spares that might save a day's sailing. 

Yup, that's where we get 'em. 

This is the part number: 

95255A285

We have zero interest in receiving these, marking them up, and shipping them out. If you need them, buy them from the source. 

Other Mcmaster parts in the UFO that are easier and faster to get from them:

Gate-topping weldnuts:

90860A113


Nylon braking knob for rudderhead:
 

94323A840



Boom end U-bolt
8896T106

Spring pin joining upper and mid mast: 

92988A570



Glad to help

DRC


Ps. This video got sent over to me by a customer who picked up on Friday. Clearly he got the rare privilage of surprising his kids and it is just heartwarming to see them lose their minds over their new UFO. All three have been out flying since.
 

 

 

 

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Great video Dave!   I'm guessing the kids reaction was exactly what the father was hoping for.    He is clearly raising those kids right.

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Love the video, a great end-of-summer gift for the kids.  I hope they have lots of great weather and fun to enjoy the new ride!

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We have a tropical storm on top of us in Miami, forecast of 20kt gusting 30. So I rigged up with the orange sail and out I went. Port side spreader tip was on its last legs and broke so I had to retreat.

But not before I tested my new secret invention! Auto-Righting system! ;-)

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2 hours ago, martin 'hoff said:

We have a tropical storm on top of us in Miami, forecast of 20kt gusting 30. So I rigged up with the orange sail and out I went. Port side spreader tip was on its last legs and broke so I had to retreat.

But not before I tested my new secret invention! Auto-Righting system! ;-)

you arouse my curiosity; what is it about?

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38 minutes ago, Gilles29 said:

you arouse my curiosity; what is it about?

Watch the video carefully... ;-)

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Another UFO sighting in San Diego. Actually I got my UFO a few months ago but it took me awhile to get through the 27 pages of helpful comments on this site. Having a great time learning to fly. 

My 2 cents are an extra line I use to get shroud tension.

I pulled my biceps swimming. Instead of waiting to sail a couple weeks while it healed, I tied an extra red line to the top the mast here.

image.thumb.png.89d9ee87b0c95cbe1382fcf6ce1d282e.png

 

I use the red line to straighten the mast when applying shroud tension. I have the spot marked on the mast where 40 kg of tension is with the rigsense device. It does not take long and it is easy to get 40 kg of tension even with one arm.
image.png.ec95d3c4cb86d66d7bcf0f3f453d3e9c.png

Then I just used my good arm to sheet in both directions. The arm I was resting held the tiller.

Hope that helps,

Paul B

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Hey team,  I was out yesterday with a repaired and healthy lower mast section.  I was out in ~15 knots of breeze and I was swept off the boat during a higher speed crash (not too uncommon).  Typically, when this happens the boat heads up into the wind and sits there for me to swim over, but this time it put itself on a downwind trajectory and sailed off into a slipped mega yacht at about 6 knots (according to my onboard GPS).  Not that hitting a $20M yacht is a good outcome but considering the boat could have sailed miles across a fairly empty bay leaving me stranded, it wasn't terrible.  Has anyone else had a "sail away" experience like this?  I suppose I should get in a better habit of holding on to the mainsheet with a death grip if I feel I'm getting ejected.  Any other tricks or tips?

I have some bow damage and will need a new want and spirit; the mega yacht suffered a minor paint scuff.  I left my contact info for the owner, we'll see if he calls me.  

 

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3 hours ago, DerekF said:

Hey team,  I was out yesterday with a repaired and healthy lower mast section.  I was out in ~15 knots of breeze and I was swept off the boat during a higher speed crash (not too uncommon).  Typically, when this happens the boat heads up into the wind and sits there for me to swim over, but this time it put itself on a downwind trajectory and sailed off into a slipped mega yacht at about 6 knots (according to my onboard GPS).  Not that hitting a $20M yacht is a good outcome but considering the boat could have sailed miles across a fairly empty bay leaving me stranded, it wasn't terrible.  Has anyone else had a "sail away" experience like this?  I suppose I should get in a better habit of holding on to the mainsheet with a death grip if I feel I'm getting ejected.  Any other tricks or tips?

I have some bow damage and will need a new want and spirit; the mega yacht suffered a minor paint scuff.  I left my contact info for the owner, we'll see if he calls me.  

 

I haven't seen it myself, but I do recall in this thread, long ago, someone reporting that the tiller extension, thanks to the rubber hinge being perma-bent forward, snuck into something like the footstraps and the boat sailed away.

Iirc the lesson learned there was take the tiller extension off the tiller when storing the boat. Which I'm too lazy to do myself... 

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Last outing, I was coming into shore on a non-foiling downwind tack and did a little zig-zag to dodge a kiteboarder that had just left shore.  Coming out of the zig zag, the lee hull popped out of the water with me just sitting on the hull (no feet under straps) . 

I went splash and the boat settled back onto course and sailed at a casual pace (not much tension on the sheet) into the muddy bottom shallows until it stopped.  I had a 50 yard swim to chest high water and a 20 yard walk to get to the boat.   

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My first swim was similar;  my UFO started to capsize and I was thrown outboard, but the boat had automatically  righting, and continued to sail on 150 yards before capsizing and turtle, so I had to swim a long distance before catching it!

Since I always try to keep firmly my mainsheet in my hand,  while capsizing !

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On 6/8/2020 at 3:44 PM, Champlain Sailor said:

I haven't seen it myself, but I do recall in this thread, long ago, someone reporting that the tiller extension, thanks to the rubber hinge being perma-bent forward, snuck into something like the footstraps and the boat sailed away.

 

I was the poster, in #1611 on 8/29/2018. There are a lot of details in that post, plus my solution, but the summary is that I figured out that in my case the tiller extension sprung aft when released and could lock the tiller straight so it didn't go head-to-wind. My solution was simply to reverse the extension so that it springs forward when released, and I haven't had a runaway since then.

That said, I try to keep a death grip on the mainsheet (NOT the tiller) if I'm departing the boat involuntarily. That almost guarantees that the boat will capsize but I find that easier to deal with than a swim to the boat after it parks.

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UFO and trailer for sale. $6900

Located in Waco, TX. Used approximately 30 times. Always garage kept. Works great, just with 2 and 4 year old daughters we know the next several years we won’t get to play with it much. Green pads and sails  

Comes with large and small sails, full cover and foil cover. Small sail is brand new.
 

Also for sale- Nice aluminum trailer and Yakima truck rack. 
 

254-644-1728
Claire 

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Also, ours never ran away more than 100 yards or so. I did have a Hobie go a few miles once. It was a long swim in. :) 

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Bottom line for UFO sailors is that runaways can happen. 

Sheets can tangle with tillers.  Stuff happens. 

I have been slack as far as keeping at least one foot under a strap and/or focused on not letting go of the main sheet. 

When out alone, we really need to develop "good habits" to avoid runaway boats.  This is especially true if you are a good distance from shore.

 

Claire,

Sorry to see you leave the UFO game.  I really enjoyed the enthusiasm in your early posts.  I understand that living in Waco probably meant infrequent "good wind" days and I also understand the hassle of operating in trailer sailor mode (time & effort to set up / break down with each trip).  Be sure to replace your UFO sailing with some kind of kid fun sailing to inspire your little ones to carry on with the sport.  

 

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2 hours ago, Claire1000 said:

UFO and trailer for sale.

:-( Don't go. Pull the wand up and sail it to a sandbar with the kids... Or pair it with a Taz (or similar). One parent with the kids on the Taz, sailing along with the UFO. It's a tortoise and hare dynamic ...

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Ha. Thanks. We actually have an awesome lake with 9 good months of wind and sailing. Just a 2 and 4 year old don’t mix right now. They are 5 handfuls. We’ve spent all summer wake surfing so they are growing up on the water at least. We will be back to sailing when they get older. :) Enjoyed our UFO and look forward to more time to play later in life. 

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