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sail69

Venture (not MacGregor) Memories...

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I cant be the only one...

 

My Dad buys a Venture 21 in 1969. Happiest day in this 9 year old's life.

 

(tried posting a picture but I am "not allowed to that image extension on this community")

 

Dad could barely sail and we were real slow that first year. We thought it was us and the fractional rig. Come to find out the dealer option of "painting" the bottom did not include the swing keel hidden in the well while on a trailer. We had about 3 inches of growth on the whole keel at seasons end. Was fun watching the boat crunch and settle its way down around the keel on the trailer on the way home.

 

Use to lie in the bow head first and listen to the water gurgle by. I was down below and not on deck. Those hulls were thin.

 

Turnbuckles? Nope. Those multi-holed thinger-mer-bobbers with piins. Rig didn't move too much considering.

 

No winches. Even with myself and my 11 year old brother hauling on halyards and sheets...everything was just a bit too loose.

 

Then we "upgraded" to the a masthead rig and a genoa the next year. Merriman sheet winches, backstay and genoa tracks. Hot stuff. We actually starting moving to not embarrassingly slow. And we were faster than my friend's Venture 17. Woo hoo.

 

Dad dropped the keel to properly paint the bottom. Was fun watching Dad line up the holes to re-pin the keel.

 

Don't let that reel winch handle get away from you when lowing the swing keel. Crack. Damn that hurt.

 

All in all not a bad looking boat. And for a 9 year old it was all good with a vertical learning curve.

 

And perhaps rigged properly with decent sailors it may have moved if given half a chance.

 

We had it for two years before we moved up to a Seafarer 24. But that's another story...

 

Thanks for your indulgence.

 

 

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Came back from Hawaii in 80....looking for a table saw at a yard sale....and the guy tells me YOU SHOULD BUY THIS BOAT. I looked over at this Mac 21 on a trailer with a Honda 5 and I say; let me measure my drive way......1000$ later I have a sailboat that me and buddies go out on on Sundays, drink beer and listen to reggae on....very cool. One afternoon we pull up to the dock and this guy looks over and said WOW, you have a 2 oz genie and a special this and that...you need to come out and race with us......cool....and you should join our little YC and you can park your boat at the harbor!!! very cool. First race we get in and one of the old guys (my age now) said to me how do you keep your rig up, the mast looks like a S and is in danger of breaking!.....you need and adjustable back stay and .......many more things. Slowly I learned how to sail, rig boats, maintain my fleet, met my wife, and tons of other great people, traveled the state, risked my life and enjoyed every moment of it. Before I sold the wonderful little boat, a friend said the most fun he ever had in his Mac 21 was to go down to Mexico to the gulf and sail around and drive home. So we did, got three of the largest people and the smallest truck and drove 20 hours straight to Bahia De los Angeles. When we got there we met some people leaving who told us where all the wonderful places they had gone with their Mac 21, gave us tide charts and we spent 10 days in the sun fishing, drinking and living the live of the rich and famous. When we were about to drive home another Mac venture pulls up......we gave them the tide charts, told them of all the wonderful things we had done and the fun continued. Needless to say I have a soft spot in my heart for this POS that most of you would like to burn, BUT it has its place. B

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My dad owned a Venture 17 when I was probably 7 or 8. He sold that, then one day he arrives home with a Venture 224. My mother was livid, as I assume there wasn't much discussion prior the purchase.

 

The 224 was the 'pop-top' version of the 24. I'll never forget my dad saying.."I now have stand up head room. What more do I need"? He called it 'Wet and Wild". Classic

 

If it wasn't for that...I wouldn't be enjoying the sport like I do today. :D

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When I was 15 me and two buddies sailed/motored a V222 with the poptop from Browns Creek Marina on Guntersville Lake all the way to Paducah KY. Took us a week because we stopped each night, either in a marina or tied to the bank. This was in 1975.

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I never sailed one but way back in the early to mid 70s, when I was first getting interested in a boat of my own, there was a guy in San Diego named Les Somethingorother who kicked a lot of ass racing as a quarter tonner in his tricked out V-21, "Mar V Les". Even with every racing upgrade you could buy in those days he couldn't have had more than three grand in that thing, trailer included.

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You guys do realize that not one person on SA has ever had a bad attitude toward the venture line right??? We had a whole fleet of em in waukegan Some are still there I think. Folks seemed to like em, moved up to bigger and better when life took them that way, but they all said they were great boats...

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Came back from Hawaii in 80....looking for a table saw at a yard sale....and the guy tells me YOU SHOULD BUY THIS BOAT. I looked over at this Mac 21 on a trailer with a Honda 5 and I say; let me measure my drive way......1000$ later I have a sailboat that me and buddies go out on on Sundays, drink beer and listen to reggae on....very cool. One afternoon we pull up to the dock and this guy looks over and said WOW, you have a 2 oz genie and a special this and that...you need to come out and race with us......cool....and you should join our little YC and you can park your boat at the harbor!!! very cool. First race we get in and one of the old guys (my age now) said to me how do you keep your rig up, the mast looks like a S and is in danger of breaking!.....you need and adjustable back stay and .......many more things. Slowly I learned how to sail, rig boats, maintain my fleet, met my wife, and tons of other great people, traveled the state, risked my life and enjoyed every moment of it. Before I sold the wonderful little boat, a friend said the most fun he ever had in his Mac 21 was to go down to Mexico to the gulf and sail around and drive home. So we did, got three of the largest people and the smallest truck and drove 20 hours straight to Bahia De los Angeles. When we got there we met some people leaving who told us where all the wonderful places they had gone with their Mac 21, gave us tide charts and we spent 10 days in the sun fishing, drinking and living the live of the rich and famous. When we were about to drive home another Mac venture pulls up......we gave them the tide charts, told them of all the wonderful things we had done and the fun continued. Needless to say I have a soft spot in my heart for this POS that most of you would like to burn, BUT it has its place. B

 

+21 this is a brilliant post! Expresses the joy of sailing at the most base level.

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Came back from Hawaii in 80....looking for a table saw at a yard sale....and the guy tells me YOU SHOULD BUY THIS BOAT. I looked over at this Mac 21 on a trailer with a Honda 5 and I say; let me measure my drive way......1000$ later I have a sailboat that me and buddies go out on on Sundays, drink beer and listen to reggae on....very cool. One afternoon we pull up to the dock and this guy looks over and said WOW, you have a 2 oz genie and a special this and that...you need to come out and race with us......cool....and you should join our little YC and you can park your boat at the harbor!!! very cool. First race we get in and one of the old guys (my age now) said to me how do you keep your rig up, the mast looks like a S and is in danger of breaking!.....you need and adjustable back stay and .......many more things. Slowly I learned how to sail, rig boats, maintain my fleet, met my wife, and tons of other great people, traveled the state, risked my life and enjoyed every moment of it. Before I sold the wonderful little boat, a friend said the most fun he ever had in his Mac 21 was to go down to Mexico to the gulf and sail around and drive home. So we did, got three of the largest people and the smallest truck and drove 20 hours straight to Bahia De los Angeles. When we got there we met some people leaving who told us where all the wonderful places they had gone with their Mac 21, gave us tide charts and we spent 10 days in the sun fishing, drinking and living the live of the rich and famous. When we were about to drive home another Mac venture pulls up......we gave them the tide charts, told them of all the wonderful things we had done and the fun continued. Needless to say I have a soft spot in my heart for this POS that most of you would like to burn, BUT it has its place. B

 

+21 this is a brilliant post! Expresses the joy of sailing at the most base level.

Agreed. Also demonstrates the value of a warm welcome several times.

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A Venture 224 was also my first experience with my family growing up sailing/racing. We started out camping as a family with a Starcraft popup camper and travel all over the place including a drive all the way thru Mexico to Alcapulco. In 1969 Dad decided to rent an oversized sunfish. Not sure what the boat is called but he failed miserably at sailing it. This was in Destin and the drive back to Texas frustrated him on why he couldn't sail. He was an areonautical engineer and he thought that was enough to figure it out. Anyways, that year he bought the Venture and we raced it one design on Lake Grapevine near Dallas with about 8 other Ventures. We also used the boat as the all in one camper vacation boat. I still have a pin from Turn Back Canyon regatta from '69 and we even towed that fuker all the way to Marina Del Ray!! I never learned how to fly a kite until much later in life since that boat did not have one. Just wing on wing. I wonder did anyone have a proper spinnaker on these boats? None that we raced with had that as far as I know.

 

Here's a vid of my first sail.

 

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We grew up with a Venture 24 until my parents upgraded in the 80s. Here is an old photo of us. We used to race her at our yacht club in the summer in the 70s. Good times!

 

13522832_1209851342382924_19329200589149

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You guys do realize that not one person on SA has ever had a bad attitude toward the venture line right??? We had a whole fleet of em in waukegan Some are still there I think. Folks seemed to like em, moved up to bigger and better when life took them that way, but they all said they were great boats...

 

The V21 was a great boat, a classic... and they made lots of them, so you can have one too. Given half-decent sails & skills, it will sail rings around most trailersailers it's size.

 

I think there are some SA'ers who haven't gotten the memo, can't distinguish between Ventures, MacGregors, and the widely-despised Mac26X/M.

 

FB- Doug

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The 1994 Mac 26 S (water ballast trailer sailor, not the later motor cruiser) was stripped and cut apart for internet voyeurism after the driver fell asleep on the highway and had a rollover.

 

Posted on trailersailor.com from Reddit. https://www.reddit.com/r/sailing/comments/59e7ne/today_i_cut_a_sailboat_in_half/

post-120910-0-71044600-1477500108_thumb.jpg

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You guys do realize that not one person on SA has ever had a bad attitude toward the venture line right??? We had a whole fleet of em in waukegan Some are still there I think. Folks seemed to like em, moved up to bigger and better when life took them that way, but they all said they were great boats...

 

The V21 was a great boat, a classic... and they made lots of them, so you can have one too. Given half-decent sails & skills, it will sail rings around most trailersailers it's size.

 

I think there are some SA'ers who haven't gotten the memo, can't distinguish between Ventures, MacGregors, and the widely-despised Mac26X/M.

 

FB- Doug

 

I think the Ventures remind of us a simple (real simple) and fun time sailing when growing up in a rapidly expanding sport.

 

Where the MacGregor 26 Zoom Zoom may be a stick in the eye of that joy of sailing. But to each his own for those who entered the sport later on.

 

I have always thought it would be a trip to buy a V-21, trick it out (keeping it stock) and see what it could do. Cheap ULDB platform 258 PHRFNE for those who are curious.

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There was a thread on doing just that a while ago.... Someone in so cal did just that, Cleaned up...

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There was a thread on doing just that a while ago.... Someone in so cal did just that, Cleaned up...

 

258 is a generous rating for the V21. Given decent sails and a decent skipper, they'll whip up on San Juan 21s and Catalina 22s in just about any conditions. I bet that rating probably comes from people tagging along in races with OEM stuff.

 

FB- Doug

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My family was a camping family who decided that we were going to try sailing. My dad bought a V21 in the early 70's and we sailed it out of Westbrook CT on Long island Sound. We went everywhere on that thing because we didn't know any better. Shelter Island, Block Island, the Vineyard, Nantucket, Newport, through the canal and up to Marblehead and even the coast of Maine. All with a family of five! I used to sleep in the cockpit under a boom tent, curling up when it rained so my feet didn't get wet.

 

But, compared to camping, it was easy! No tents to set up, camp kitchens to set up (we just left it open in the cabin) etc. When we went to Edgartown my dad refused to pay for a mooring so we cranked up the keel, set one anchor along the shore and the other off the stern and set up close enough to take our dingy the twenty feet or so to shore!

 

We eventually got "smart", moved up to bigger and bigger boats, but I can't say that we, as a family, ever had more fun than on the Venture 21

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There was a thread on doing just that a while ago.... Someone in so cal did just that, Cleaned up...

Will be starting my " how to turbo a v21" thread soon, promised myself that I won't think about until the keel is back in.....

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There was a thread on doing just that a while ago.... Someone in so cal did just that, Cleaned up...

 

Will be starting my " how to turbo a v21" thread soon, promised myself that I won't think about until the keel is back in.....

That will be cool to see.

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Thank you for the post! If it weren't for Ventures I wouldn't be sailing, and my family wouldn't have many of the friends we have today.

 

How great would it be to build another HUGE OD fleet based on a simple and inexpensive boat?

 

My parents became avid sailors, and over time, top of the fleet racers, all due to Venture boats. Heck, at one point, some high school kid named Robbie Haines was their third.

 

My parents knew noting about sailing when they bought a V21 in the 60's. The culture and support system of the San Diego Venture Club welcomed folks of all skill levels, allowing them to initially learn how to sail, and in time race at the top of the fleet. They eventually upgraded to a 24, so they could race both 21's and 24's.

 

Every August the SD Venture Club sailed from San Diego to Catalina, then spent a number of days sailing around the island. Those are some great memories. I recall one year surfing big swells all the way home.

 

Could you imagine sailing offshore in a boat that size with your wife and three toehead kids?

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Thank you for the post! If it weren't for Ventures I wouldn't be sailing, and my family wouldn't have many of the friends we have today.

 

How great would it be to build another HUGE OD fleet based on a simple and inexpensive boat?

 

My parents became avid sailors, and over time, top of the fleet racers, all due to Venture boats. Heck, at one point, some high school kid named Robbie Haines was their third.

 

My parents knew noting about sailing when they bought a V21 in the 60's. The culture and support system of the San Diego Venture Club welcomed folks of all skill levels, allowing them to initially learn how to sail, and in time race at the top of the fleet. They eventually upgraded to a 24, so they could race both 21's and 24's.

 

Every August the SD Venture Club sailed from San Diego to Catalina, then spent a number of days sailing around the island. Those are some great memories. I recall one year surfing big swells all the way home.

 

Could you imagine sailing offshore in a boat that size with your wife and three toehead kids?

 

Sounds a lot like my childhood but on the east coast. We started with a V24, family of five starting with kids ages 3mo to 5yrs in the beginning in the 70s. We eventually upgraded to an Irwin 28 in the 80s, but those early years were something special as a kid.

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Les Bartlett. A great sailor. He had the V21 Mar "V" Les. He won the 21 and 24 nationals. He was a neighbor growing up. My dad crewed on his 21 and he crewed on my dad's 24. They did the SD2E on MarVLes at least once. My dad still bitches about how miserably wet and cold he was.

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Would love to turbo-charge one within a local PHRF fleet. But Buzzards Bay would probably beat the crap out of it. Hmmm...put it in Narraganset Bay?

 

Would be a fun experiment.

 

My family was a camping family who decided that we were going to try sailing. My dad bought a V21 in the early 70's and we sailed it out of Westbrook CT on Long island Sound. We went everywhere on that thing because we didn't know any better. Shelter Island, Block Island, the Vineyard, Nantucket, Newport, through the canal and up to Marblehead and even the coast of Maine. All with a family of five! I used to sleep in the cockpit under a boom tent, curling up when it rained so my feet didn't get wet.

 

But, compared to camping, it was easy! No tents to set up, camp kitchens to set up (we just left it open in the cabin) etc. When we went to Edgartown my dad refused to pay for a mooring so we cranked up the keel, set one anchor along the shore and the other off the stern and set up close enough to take our dingy the twenty feet or so to shore!

 

We eventually got "smart", moved up to bigger and bigger boats, but I can't say that we, as a family, ever had more fun than on the Venture

 

That is awesome. A V-21 cruising! From Westbrook to The Islands? To Maine? That is impressive. An as a kid I would have given my left arm to do that.

 

But that is the way many of us cruised back way and it was the best. Small boats and big families. And I thought 5 of us on a Seafarer 24 overnight was a big deal.

 

Simple memories of families being together.

 

Its sad that I don't see parents "drag" kids around sailing (skiing etc) but kids dragging (parents fault) parents around to hockey/soccer/cheering/etc activities.

 

Exploring with leaky dinghy's. Adventure at every turn. Simple (real simple) meals with Moms and Pops on alcohol stoves. The smell of the alcohol stove still with me. Swimming and catching fish...some that scared the hell out of me (Sea Robin!).

 

I think I replicated some of that (really? with a 40'er?) with my kids in the mid 2000s, but I did my best and I am happy with the results of my 20something independent progress.

 

Thanks for contributing!

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Pls chime in on the thread I just started. I am ready to start thinking about rig options, all opinions welcome !

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Thank you for the post! If it weren't for Ventures I wouldn't be sailing, and my family wouldn't have many of the friends we have today.

 

How great would it be to build another HUGE OD fleet based on a simple and inexpensive boat?

 

My parents became avid sailors, and over time, top of the fleet racers, all due to Venture boats. Heck, at one point, some high school kid named Robbie Haines was their third.

 

My parents knew noting about sailing when they bought a V21 in the 60's. The culture and support system of the San Diego Venture Club welcomed folks of all skill levels, allowing them to initially learn how to sail, and in time race at the top of the fleet. They eventually upgraded to a 24, so they could race both 21's and 24's.

 

Every August the SD Venture Club sailed from San Diego to Catalina, then spent a number of days sailing around the island. Those are some great memories. I recall one year surfing big swells all the way home.

 

Could you imagine sailing offshore in a boat that size with your wife and three toehead kids?

 

Sounds a lot like my childhood but on the east coast. We started with a V24, family of five starting with kids ages 3mo to 5yrs in the beginning in the 70s. We eventually upgraded to an Irwin 28 in the 80s, but those early years were something special as a kid.

 

 

I sail a Snipe around Long Beach Harbor and want another trailer-able boat to sail to Catalina. I would sail the Snipe but my wife doesn't like to get soaked. I figure a Venture 21 should handle it, allow some shelter for wife and kid and also be good for a little cove camping.... and live cheaply in my driveway. I've read a lot of good things about this boat but I still wonder if it can take a beating out in the ocean. Is the basic hull construction strong enough? What about those whimpy looking 3-bolt chain plates? Can it ride out a gale without losing the mast or breaking apart? Any reason why a can't use this boat in the ocean?

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Thank you for the post! If it weren't for Ventures I wouldn't be sailing, and my family wouldn't have many of the friends we have today.

 

How great would it be to build another HUGE OD fleet based on a simple and inexpensive boat?

 

My parents became avid sailors, and over time, top of the fleet racers, all due to Venture boats. Heck, at one point, some high school kid named Robbie Haines was their third.

 

My parents knew noting about sailing when they bought a V21 in the 60's. The culture and support system of the San Diego Venture Club welcomed folks of all skill levels, allowing them to initially learn how to sail, and in time race at the top of the fleet. They eventually upgraded to a 24, so they could race both 21's and 24's.

 

Every August the SD Venture Club sailed from San Diego to Catalina, then spent a number of days sailing around the island. Those are some great memories. I recall one year surfing big swells all the way home.

 

Could you imagine sailing offshore in a boat that size with your wife and three toehead kids?

 

Sounds a lot like my childhood but on the east coast. We started with a V24, family of five starting with kids ages 3mo to 5yrs in the beginning in the 70s. We eventually upgraded to an Irwin 28 in the 80s, but those early years were something special as a kid.

 

 

I sail a Snipe around Long Beach Harbor and want another trailer-able boat to sail to Catalina. I would sail the Snipe but my wife doesn't like to get soaked. I figure a Venture 21 should handle it, allow some shelter for wife and kid and also be good for a little cove camping.... and live cheaply in my driveway. I've read a lot of good things about this boat but I still wonder if it can take a beating out in the ocean. Is the basic hull construction strong enough? What about those whimpy looking 3-bolt chain plates? Can it ride out a gale without losing the mast or breaking apart? Any reason why a can't use this boat in the ocean?

 

 

I am an East-coaster so I cannot speak to the prevalent ocean conditions going to Catalina...but taking a wife and child,in a V-21, in open water? No.

 

There is another thread where we are discussing "turbo-charging" (aka making it a cheap sport boat) because it was built so light And it will still need structural modifications just to make it strong enough to take a bit more sail to go fast round the buoys and not self-destruct.

 

There are plenty of other strong-enough classic-plastics out there that I am sure some other West-coasters can advise as being plentiful and therefore cheap to buy and own.

 

Good luck with your plans.

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Thank you for the post! If it weren't for Ventures I wouldn't be sailing, and my family wouldn't have many of the friends we have today.

 

How great would it be to build another HUGE OD fleet based on a simple and inexpensive boat?

 

My parents became avid sailors, and over time, top of the fleet racers, all due to Venture boats. Heck, at one point, some high school kid named Robbie Haines was their third.

 

My parents knew noting about sailing when they bought a V21 in the 60's. The culture and support system of the San Diego Venture Club welcomed folks of all skill levels, allowing them to initially learn how to sail, and in time race at the top of the fleet. They eventually upgraded to a 24, so they could race both 21's and 24's.

 

Every August the SD Venture Club sailed from San Diego to Catalina, then spent a number of days sailing around the island. Those are some great memories. I recall one year surfing big swells all the way home.

 

Could you imagine sailing offshore in a boat that size with your wife and three toehead kids?

 

Sounds a lot like my childhood but on the east coast. We started with a V24, family of five starting with kids ages 3mo to 5yrs in the beginning in the 70s. We eventually upgraded to an Irwin 28 in the 80s, but those early years were something special as a kid.

 

 

I sail a Snipe around Long Beach Harbor and want another trailer-able boat to sail to Catalina. I would sail the Snipe but my wife doesn't like to get soaked. I figure a Venture 21 should handle it, allow some shelter for wife and kid and also be good for a little cove camping.... and live cheaply in my driveway. I've read a lot of good things about this boat but I still wonder if it can take a beating out in the ocean. Is the basic hull construction strong enough? What about those whimpy looking 3-bolt chain plates? Can it ride out a gale without losing the mast or breaking apart? Any reason why a can't use this boat in the ocean?

 

 

I am an East-coaster so I cannot speak to the prevalent ocean conditions going to Catalina...but taking a wife and child,in a V-21, in open water? No.

 

There is another thread where we are discussing "turbo-charging" (aka making it a cheap sport boat) because it was built so light And it will still need structural modifications just to make it strong enough to take a bit more sail to go fast round the buoys and not self-destruct.

 

There are plenty of other strong-enough classic-plastics out there that I am sure some other West-coasters can advise as being plentiful and therefore cheap to buy and own.

 

Good luck with your plans.

 

 

I think the Venture/McGregors may be tougher than you think. A lot of them have kept sailing after a lot of years.

 

The real question is: can -this- Venture/McGregor, whichever specific one you find yourself sailing, take the stress of the voyage you're undertaking? Yes they were lightly built, but then they are also light, easily-driven boats that don't generate a lot of stress. Has your hull/deck been overstressed, or even damaged and poorly repaired over the past 3 ~ 4 decades?

 

Just like any older boat, I would carefully inspect it. By now, a sailable Venture/McGregor will have had the running rigging and much of the hardware replaced/upgraded, probably some new fiberglass bonded on here & there... hopefully not OEM sails.

 

No reason IMHO why a Venture/McGregor in good condition shouldn't be capable of coastal sailing. All else being equal, would some other better-original-build classic plastic be a better boat for offshore sailing, battling gales, etc etc? Well, yeah, and it's gonna cost more too. So?

 

FB- Doug

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Other than a 6.50 Mini I can't think of any boat in that size or class that I'd want to go battling gales offshore in. Weather in SoCal is highly predictable and I would venture to say (no pun intended) that picking your weather you will be fine in a reasonably well maintained and prepared Venture 21. Really, any time from May to September, barring Santa Ana conditions, you are more likely to be motoring in light winds and anchoring or mooring in the lee of prevailing westerlies.

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Then there is a series of boats that came after Venture but before the motorboats- like the 26D. Able to sail upwind and combining a pop top and full bed under the cockpit, my family have sail/camped from Priest Lake in Northern Idaho to Lake Mead (when there was still some water there). Water ballast means that launching requires very little depth, and little weight when towing. Claims that the boat wont sink due to foam blocks are subject to doubt, but at least it would slow down the event. Beachable and when combined with a good rudder from Ruddercraft, a very sailable boat for inland waters

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Thanks to all of you, these comments do address my general concerns. In my perfect world I would be able to afford a sturdy, classic wooden, high displacement 40' blue water boat with a nice slip in the harbor, but my Champagne marine dreams don't have caviar funding. I have read 2 or 3 people stating that they have often sailed a Venture 21 in the coastal waters off Southern CA and to the various Channel Islands. Of course I would check weather before starting out but I also, of course, want to be in a boat that can take some amount of heavy weather that I might get caught in.

 

Other reasons I think this boat might work are: It is supposedly self-righting (I've read) if the swing keel is locked down; It supposedly has positive flotation and won't sink if the cabin and cockpit fill with water (again I've only read that said); It's supposedly capable of planing which might get me out of bad weather faster (and might be as fun to sail as my Snipe); The early ones supposedly were built of heavier fiberglass; The early ones had no foredeck hatch and no cockpit hatches to let water in when capsized. So if this boat is pretty decent for the task, the next question I would ask is what modifications would YOU make for coastal ocean sailing (not trying to weather the 40s around the Horn ya know)? Such as: Chain plates; standing rigging; hull & deck re-inforcement; whatever. Thanks all!!!

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You would be throwing $$$ into the wrong pit IMHO.....

 

You would be better served in a bit larger yet still inexpensive starting point......An Ericson or Tarten maybe....

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Thanks to all of you, these comments do address my general concerns. In my perfect world I would be able to afford a sturdy, classic wooden, high displacement 40' blue water boat with a nice slip in the harbor, but my Champagne marine dreams don't have caviar funding. I have read 2 or 3 people stating that they have often sailed a Venture 21 in the coastal waters off Southern CA and to the various Channel Islands. Of course I would check weather before starting out but I also, of course, want to be in a boat that can take some amount of heavy weather that I might get caught in.

 

Other reasons I think this boat might work are: It is supposedly self-righting (I've read) if the swing keel is locked down; It supposedly has positive flotation and won't sink if the cabin and cockpit fill with water (again I've only read that said); It's supposedly capable of planing which might get me out of bad weather faster (and might be as fun to sail as my Snipe); The early ones supposedly were built of heavier fiberglass; The early ones had no foredeck hatch and no cockpit hatches to let water in when capsized. So if this boat is pretty decent for the task, the next question I would ask is what modifications would YOU make for coastal ocean sailing (not trying to weather the 40s around the Horn ya know)? Such as: Chain plates; standing rigging; hull & deck re-inforcement; whatever. Thanks all!!!

 

 

You would be throwing $$$ into the wrong pit IMHO.....

 

You would be better served in a bit larger yet still inexpensive starting point......An Ericson or Tarten maybe....

 

I dunno about throwing money away... isn't that kinda the point of having a boat FFS ???

However, here's two points to ponder- you're not going to get any money back that you spend on a Venture/MacGregor. If you keep it in good shape, good rigging, etc etc; then you will be able to sell it sooner, at the top of it's price range (which is never going to be higher than a couple grand at most) rather than having it become a give-away (or a pay-to-haul-it-away).

 

2nd- you really don't need to modify the boat, so much as get into good sailing shape. You will want jiffy/slab reefing (and good sails in general, this is the biggest cash outlay). New lines, obviously. You really want the keel winch to be work properly & smoothly. Making sure the chainplates are not corroded, and perhaps laying in some new glass and refastening & bedding them, would be far easier and more useful than worrying about upgrading to rod rigging or some such. Good ground tackle (and one nice thing is that it needn't be heavy for this boat).

 

Living far inland, my wife and I had a trailerable and cruised in company with other couples in trailerables for years. It's fun to be able to spend a weekend gunkholing 500 miles away from your home sailing waters. Given good care, good sense about the weather, such boats can be great and can definitely make coastal hops.

 

If you're boat shopping, I would not discourage you from looking at some boats that are a little higher up the pecking order. But if you looking on a tight budget, and/or already have a Venture/Mac... have at it!

 

FB- Doug

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My mast base got trashed by the swell and light wind. I would upgrade that or plug the base with 1 1/2 of aluminum or starboard, drilled and tapped in place.

 

A Loos gauge to keep that rig tight.

 

Inspect the backing for the rudder and outboard bracket and beef if required. Same for the compression post.

 

Use a suitable shackle and wire it closed for the main halyard.

 

Running rigging back to the cockpit. Rig a preventer for the boom when anchored or motoring waves.

 

Lot's of Throw Cushions! :)

 

 

post-105471-0-96285300-1481306870_thumb.jpg

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You could certainly sail it to Catalina. As far as the original post, one V21 memory I have was watching one capsize, turtle, and sink on a breezy Humboldt Bay day about 20 years ago, during a race. Not the boat's fault. Refloated, repaired, and probably still racing up there.

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Thanks to all of you, these comments do address my general concerns. In my perfect world I would be able to afford a sturdy, classic wooden, high displacement 40' blue water boat with a nice slip in the harbor, but my Champagne marine dreams don't have caviar funding. I have read 2 or 3 people stating that they have often sailed a Venture 21 in the coastal waters off Southern CA and to the various Channel Islands. Of course I would check weather before starting out but I also, of course, want to be in a boat that can take some amount of heavy weather that I might get caught in.

 

Other reasons I think this boat might work are: It is supposedly self-righting (I've read) if the swing keel is locked down; It supposedly has positive flotation and won't sink if the cabin and cockpit fill with water (again I've only read that said); It's supposedly capable of planing which might get me out of bad weather faster (and might be as fun to sail as my Snipe); The early ones supposedly were built of heavier fiberglass; The early ones had no foredeck hatch and no cockpit hatches to let water in when capsized. So if this boat is pretty decent for the task, the next question I would ask is what modifications would YOU make for coastal ocean sailing (not trying to weather the 40s around the Horn ya know)? Such as: Chain plates; standing rigging; hull & deck re-inforcement; whatever. Thanks all!!!

 

 

You would be throwing $$$ into the wrong pit IMHO.....

 

You would be better served in a bit larger yet still inexpensive starting point......An Ericson or Tarten maybe....

 

I dunno about throwing money away... isn't that kinda the point of having a boat FFS ???

However, here's two points to ponder- you're not going to get any money back that you spend on a Venture/MacGregor. If you keep it in good shape, good rigging, etc etc; then you will be able to sell it sooner, at the top of it's price range (which is never going to be higher than a couple grand at most) rather than having it become a give-away (or a pay-to-haul-it-away).

 

2nd- you really don't need to modify the boat, so much as get into good sailing shape. You will want jiffy/slab reefing (and good sails in general, this is the biggest cash outlay). New lines, obviously. You really want the keel winch to be work properly & smoothly. Making sure the chainplates are not corroded, and perhaps laying in some new glass and refastening & bedding them, would be far easier and more useful than worrying about upgrading to rod rigging or some such. Good ground tackle (and one nice thing is that it needn't be heavy for this boat).

 

Living far inland, my wife and I had a trailerable and cruised in company with other couples in trailerables for years. It's fun to be able to spend a weekend gunkholing 500 miles away from your home sailing waters. Given good care, good sense about the weather, such boats can be great and can definitely make coastal hops.

 

If you're boat shopping, I would not discourage you from looking at some boats that are a little higher up the pecking order. But if you looking on a tight budget, and/or already have a Venture/Mac... have at it!

 

FB- Doug

 

Agree with what you are saying, but the OP is talking about cat island and points out beyond gunkholing on the west coast. My point is that if you are talking about upgrading, strengthening, adding better standing rigging and chainplates, then he would be better served getting something a bit beefier to start, where those things definitely would be up to the task out of the box.. A 40 + yo Ericson 25 is going to be way closer to what he wants than a venture 21.... Not bagging the venture mind you, but suggesting he start with something closer to his needs. Spending an extra grand up front will save him a couple grand in upgrades.... IMHO

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Thanks to all of you, these comments do address my general concerns. In my perfect world I would be able to afford a sturdy, classic wooden, high displacement 40' blue water boat with a nice slip in the harbor, but my Champagne marine dreams don't have caviar funding. I have read 2 or 3 people stating that they have often sailed a Venture 21 in the coastal waters off Southern CA and to the various Channel Islands. Of course I would check weather before starting out but I also, of course, want to be in a boat that can take some amount of heavy weather that I might get caught in.

 

Other reasons I think this boat might work are: It is supposedly self-righting (I've read) if the swing keel is locked down; It supposedly has positive flotation and won't sink if the cabin and cockpit fill with water (again I've only read that said); It's supposedly capable of planing which might get me out of bad weather faster (and might be as fun to sail as my Snipe); The early ones supposedly were built of heavier fiberglass; The early ones had no foredeck hatch and no cockpit hatches to let water in when capsized. So if this boat is pretty decent for the task, the next question I would ask is what modifications would YOU make for coastal ocean sailing (not trying to weather the 40s around the Horn ya know)? Such as: Chain plates; standing rigging; hull & deck re-inforcement; whatever. Thanks all!!!

 

 

You would be throwing $$$ into the wrong pit IMHO.....

 

You would be better served in a bit larger yet still inexpensive starting point......An Ericson or Tarten maybe....

 

I dunno about throwing money away... isn't that kinda the point of having a boat FFS ???

However, here's two points to ponder- you're not going to get any money back that you spend on a Venture/MacGregor. If you keep it in good shape, good rigging, etc etc; then you will be able to sell it sooner, at the top of it's price range (which is never going to be higher than a couple grand at most) rather than having it become a give-away (or a pay-to-haul-it-away).

 

2nd- you really don't need to modify the boat, so much as get into good sailing shape. You will want jiffy/slab reefing (and good sails in general, this is the biggest cash outlay). New lines, obviously. You really want the keel winch to be work properly & smoothly. Making sure the chainplates are not corroded, and perhaps laying in some new glass and refastening & bedding them, would be far easier and more useful than worrying about upgrading to rod rigging or some such. Good ground tackle (and one nice thing is that it needn't be heavy for this boat).

 

Living far inland, my wife and I had a trailerable and cruised in company with other couples in trailerables for years. It's fun to be able to spend a weekend gunkholing 500 miles away from your home sailing waters. Given good care, good sense about the weather, such boats can be great and can definitely make coastal hops.

 

If you're boat shopping, I would not discourage you from looking at some boats that are a little higher up the pecking order. But if you looking on a tight budget, and/or already have a Venture/Mac... have at it!

 

FB- Doug

 

Agree with what you are saying, but the OP is talking about cat island and points out beyond gunkholing on the west coast. My point is that if you are talking about upgrading, strengthening, adding better standing rigging and chainplates, then he would be better served getting something a bit beefier to start, where those things definitely would be up to the task out of the box.. A 40 + yo Ericson 25 is going to be way closer to what he wants than a venture 21.... Not bagging the venture mind you, but suggesting he start with something closer to his needs. Spending an extra grand up front will save him a couple grand in upgrades.... IMHO

 

 

You can't turn a Venture 21 into an Ericson 25 for any amount of money, much less a couple grand. Either boat is going to need new sails which is the biggest sunk cost in getting them up to scratch for actual sailing; but overall you're right that the Ericson would be a better boat for coastal sailing. Or a Pearson.

 

But no boat's brand makes it a good economic bet to sink a lot of money into. They're all money pits.

 

FB- Doug

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You could certainly sail it to Catalina. As far as the original post, one V21 memory I have was watching one capsize, turtle, and sink on a breezy Humboldt Bay day about 20 years ago, during a race. Not the boat's fault. Refloated, repaired, and probably still racing up there.

If you don't pin the keel they can turtle on a knockdown. I can remember the bow sometimes canning in bigger waves on my v 22 but I would think its Catalina capable if you watch the weather.

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You would be throwing $$$ into the wrong pit IMHO.....

 

You would be better served in a bit larger yet still inexpensive starting point......An Ericson or Tarten maybe....

 

I know you're right but I gotta keep it small enough to fit on a trailer in my skinny driveway.

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You could certainly sail it to Catalina. As far as the original post, one V21 memory I have was watching one capsize, turtle, and sink on a breezy Humboldt Bay day about 20 years ago, during a race. Not the boat's fault. Refloated, repaired, and probably still racing up there.

Bummer. That would kill my buzz pretty well happening 10 miles out. Do you know if it turtled because the swing keel wasn't bolted? Wonder why it sank.

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You could certainly sail it to Catalina. As far as the original post, one V21 memory I have was watching one capsize, turtle, and sink on a breezy Humboldt Bay day about 20 years ago, during a race. Not the boat's fault. Refloated, repaired, and probably still racing up there.

If you don't pin the keel they can turtle on a knockdown. I can remember the bow sometimes canning in bigger waves on my v 22 but I would think its Catalina capable if you watch the weather.

 

Canning as in submarining? Like almost pitch poling?

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My mast base got trashed by the swell and light wind. I would upgrade that or plug the base with 1 1/2 of aluminum or starboard, drilled and tapped in place.

 

A Loos gauge to keep that rig tight.

 

Inspect the backing for the rudder and outboard bracket and beef if required. Same for the compression post.

 

Use a suitable shackle and wire it closed for the main halyard.

 

Running rigging back to the cockpit. Rig a preventer for the boom when anchored or motoring waves.

 

Lot's of Throw Cushions! :)

 

 

Yes, good points, thanks!

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Thanks to all of you, these comments do address my general concerns. In my perfect world I would be able to afford a sturdy, classic wooden, high displacement 40' blue water boat with a nice slip in the harbor, but my Champagne marine dreams don't have caviar funding. I have read 2 or 3 people stating that they have often sailed a Venture 21 in the coastal waters off Southern CA and to the various Channel Islands. Of course I would check weather before starting out but I also, of course, want to be in a boat that can take some amount of heavy weather that I might get caught in.

 

Other reasons I think this boat might work are: It is supposedly self-righting (I've read) if the swing keel is locked down; It supposedly has positive flotation and won't sink if the cabin and cockpit fill with water (again I've only read that said); It's supposedly capable of planing which might get me out of bad weather faster (and might be as fun to sail as my Snipe); The early ones supposedly were built of heavier fiberglass; The early ones had no foredeck hatch and no cockpit hatches to let water in when capsized. So if this boat is pretty decent for the task, the next question I would ask is what modifications would YOU make for coastal ocean sailing (not trying to weather the 40s around the Horn ya know)? Such as: Chain plates; standing rigging; hull & deck re-inforcement; whatever. Thanks all!!!

 

 

You would be throwing $$$ into the wrong pit IMHO.....

 

You would be better served in a bit larger yet still inexpensive starting point......An Ericson or Tarten maybe....

 

I dunno about throwing money away... isn't that kinda the point of having a boat FFS ???

However, here's two points to ponder- you're not going to get any money back that you spend on a Venture/MacGregor. If you keep it in good shape, good rigging, etc etc; then you will be able to sell it sooner, at the top of it's price range (which is never going to be higher than a couple grand at most) rather than having it become a give-away (or a pay-to-haul-it-away).

 

2nd- you really don't need to modify the boat, so much as get into good sailing shape. You will want jiffy/slab reefing (and good sails in general, this is the biggest cash outlay). New lines, obviously. You really want the keel winch to be work properly & smoothly. Making sure the chainplates are not corroded, and perhaps laying in some new glass and refastening & bedding them, would be far easier and more useful than worrying about upgrading to rod rigging or some such. Good ground tackle (and one nice thing is that it needn't be heavy for this boat).

 

Living far inland, my wife and I had a trailerable and cruised in company with other couples in trailerables for years. It's fun to be able to spend a weekend gunkholing 500 miles away from your home sailing waters. Given good care, good sense about the weather, such boats can be great and can definitely make coastal hops.

 

If you're boat shopping, I would not discourage you from looking at some boats that are a little higher up the pecking order. But if you looking on a tight budget, and/or already have a Venture/Mac... have at it!

 

FB- Doug

 

Thanks. Good points! Yes, I really want to keep it small enough to trailer easily but big enough for coastal cruising. I want a swing keel too for gunkholing and keeping it low on the trailer. Been 25 yrs but still remember how beautiful Charlotte was in the Spring!

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You could certainly sail it to Catalina. As far as the original post, one V21 memory I have was watching one capsize, turtle, and sink on a breezy Humboldt Bay day about 20 years ago, during a race. Not the boat's fault. Refloated, repaired, and probably still racing up there.

 

If you don't pin the keel they can turtle on a knockdown. I can remember the bow sometimes canning in bigger waves on my v 22 but I would think its Catalina capable if you watch the weather.

Canning as in submarining? Like almost pitch poling?

Canning as in the top sides near the bow flexing.

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You could certainly sail it to Catalina. As far as the original post, one V21 memory I have was watching one capsize, turtle, and sink on a breezy Humboldt Bay day about 20 years ago, during a race. Not the boat's fault. Refloated, repaired, and probably still racing up there.

If you don't pin the keel they can turtle on a knockdown. I can remember the bow sometimes canning in bigger waves on my v 22 but I would think its Catalina capable if you watch the weather.

Canning as in submarining? Like almost pitch poling?

Canning as in the top sides near the bow flexing.

 

That sounds bad, like what happens before the hull cracks. That's the kind of thing I would want to re-force the hull against. Looking at sailboatdata.com it appears that the V21 is about half the displacement of most of the other 21 footers, maybe in part to light construction I wonder?

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Might want to look at the v22-2, much bigger than the v21 for only being a foot longer, more room below, definitely capable of Catalina in good weather.

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You could certainly sail it to Catalina. As far as the original post, one V21 memory I have was watching one capsize, turtle, and sink on a breezy Humboldt Bay day about 20 years ago, during a race. Not the boat's fault. Refloated, repaired, and probably still racing up there.

 

If you don't pin the keel they can turtle on a knockdown. I can remember the bow sometimes canning in bigger waves on my v 22 but I would think its Catalina capable if you watch the weather.

Canning as in submarining? Like almost pitch poling?

Canning as in the top sides near the bow flexing.

That sounds bad, like what happens before the hull cracks. That's the kind of thing I would want to re-force the hull against. Looking at sailboatdata.com it appears that the V21 is about half the displacement of most of the other 21 footers, maybe in part to light construction I wonder?

Its not that uncommon for lightly built boats. Only happened occasionally in bigger waves. Fiberglass boats flex.

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Might want to look at the v22-2, much bigger than the v21 for only being a foot longer, more room below, definitely capable of Catalina in good weather.

Thanks for the tip. I am aware of that boat but I don't trust the pop-top. Seems to me like it would be unseaworthy in a knockdown. I'm kind of squeezing my parameters down to where just a tiny few boats will fit: Trailerable (w/o an F-350); Swing-keel for gunkholing and easy ramp launching; kinda fast (since I'm coming from a planing dinghy); not too pricey (or I'd be after something like a Cape Dory); Reasonably seaworthy (no trying for HI). One more thing I am almost embarrassed to admit is... I don't want an ugly boat (the V21 has some really nice lines IMHO). I would consider a Catalina 22 which has more room below and at twice the displacement and ballast must be a lot smoother ride. But I'd kinda of rather sacrifice that for a faster boat like the V21.

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I working on fixing a V21, my requirement were basically the same as yours except sea keeping abilities, we are quite protected here. I think you should google Holder 20, I would have rather have got one of those, but I didn't.

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I working on fixing a V21, my requirement were basically the same as yours except sea keeping abilities, we are quite protected here. I think you should google Holder 20, I would have rather have got one of those, but I didn't.

Looks fast. About same weight but more sail area, she must also be able to plane like the V21. A lot less ballast though so prob not as good in the ocean, Thanks.

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Might want to look at the v22-2, much bigger than the v21 for only being a foot longer, more room below, definitely capable of Catalina in good weather.

Thanks for the tip. I am aware of that boat but I don't trust the pop-top. Seems to me like it would be unseaworthy in a knockdown. I'm kind of squeezing my parameters down to where just a tiny few boats will fit: Trailerable (w/o an F-350); Swing-keel for gunkholing and easy ramp launching; kinda fast (since I'm coming from a planing dinghy); not too pricey (or I'd be after something like a Cape Dory); Reasonably seaworthy (no trying for HI). One more thing I am almost embarrassed to admit is... I don't want an ugly boat (the V21 has some really nice lines IMHO). I would consider a Catalina 22 which has more room below and at twice the displacement and ballast must be a lot smoother ride. But I'd kinda of rather sacrifice that for a faster boat like the V21.

 

 

Poptop isn't an issue, it can be locked down, and the boat will round up long before you run the risk of water in the cockpit...Back when I was learning, I tried. B) PM me if you want to look at one with all the bells and whistles, I've been neglecting it a bit the last couple of years, racing on opb, but after a little varnish, tabernacle, the new masthead fitting and internal halyards, I'm going to figure out how to fly the kite solo this year. :wacko:

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Man this brings back a lot of memories. Back in the mid-late sixties & early seventies, Chris Corlett and I worked for "Invader Marine" in Oakland, CA which sold a ton of these boats. The owner, Captain James Craig was such a cool guy and more than anyone else responsible for the beginning of the Alameda/Oakland Estuary sailing scene. We had so much fun, they would let us take one of the boats out for the Friday nighters or any other time we wanted. There were a lot of SF Bay sailors who started out in Ventures and then moved on to more robust craft, establishing a permanent "East Bay" presence in the racing community. My favorite story was during a Friday nighter our ex-football player jib "trimmer", who never used winch handles, pulled the clew of the 150 thru the jib fairlead. We had to hacksaw the fairlead apart to get it out.

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