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      Abbreviated rules   07/28/2017

      Underdawg did an excellent job of explaining the rules.  Here's the simplified version: Don't insinuate Pedo.  Warning and or timeout for a first offense.  PermaFlick for any subsequent offenses Don't out members.  See above for penalties.  Caveat:  if you have ever used your own real name or personal information here on the forums since, like, ever - it doesn't count and you are fair game. If you see spam posts, report it to the mods.  We do not hang out in every thread 24/7 If you see any of the above, report it to the mods by hitting the Report button in the offending post.   We do not take action for foul language, off-subject content, or abusive behavior unless it escalates to persistent stalking.  There may be times that we might warn someone or flick someone for something particularly egregious.  There is no standard, we will know it when we see it.  If you continually report things that do not fall into rules #1 or 2 above, you may very well get a timeout yourself for annoying the Mods with repeated whining.  Use your best judgement. Warnings, timeouts, suspensions and flicks are arbitrary and capricious.  Deal with it.  Welcome to anarchy.   If you are a newbie, there are unwritten rules to adhere to.  They will be explained to you soon enough.  
Wess

Metal Boats

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Re casting lead. 25 yrs in aerospace non ferrous foundry. Someone suggested foam for a pattern. Lost foam is great idea. Use T bead foam if you can find it. You can easily shape each block for the particular section of the sump. Don't need to draft the pattern. Glue on pieces of foam for sprues, runners, risers. Go to foundry supply company or local nonferrous shop and get core wash. Coat foam well. Put finished pattern in dry sand mold- no binders or moisture. Dry sand will pack down pretty easily. Melt and pour.

Don't like idea of pouring lead in place. Any moisture or foreign material is likely to blow back making the pouring dangerous, not to mention the obvious fume problem. I think you might have similar problems with your steel mold unless you used a wash and then warmed the mold above 200 for an hour or two.

Btw there used to be a couple of good non ferrous shops in the Seattle area and I would bet you could get some help/advice there.

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Re casting lead. 25 yrs in aerospace non ferrous foundry. Someone suggested foam for a pattern. Lost foam is great idea. Use T bead foam if you can find it. You can easily shape each block for the particular section of the sump. Don't need to draft the pattern. Glue on pieces of foam for sprues, runners, risers. Go to foundry supply company or local nonferrous shop and get core wash. Coat foam well. Put finished pattern in dry sand mold- no binders or moisture. Dry sand will pack down pretty easily. Melt and pour.

Don't like idea of pouring lead in place. Any moisture or foreign material is likely to blow back making the pouring dangerous, not to mention the obvious fume problem. I think you might have similar problems with your steel mold unless you used a wash and then warmed the mold above 200 for an hour or two.

Btw there used to be a couple of good non ferrous shops in the Seattle area and I would bet you could get some help/advice there.

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¿ Is fiberglass strong enough?

 

 

The Buenos Aires - Punta del Este race (160 nm) took place last weekend. We (somewhat prematurely) dropped of due to F9 forecast.

 

Among other accidents, one Frers-designed yacht (38 ft "Nativo" class) hit an unmarked obstruction (possibly a barge). Sailing 6-7 kts close-hauled. Note damages. However, no water ingress.

 

Some hours later this yacht responded to another boat´s Mayday call.

 

Scary indeed....

 

That is quite amazing. The picture of the keel & CB especially shows the magnitude of the impact. Glad they were ok.

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Nirie, thanks for the info.

 

I'm thinking I'll build the fire under the steel mold and melt lead directly. Skip the crucible and the pouring. Temps will rise slowly and should minimize blow back.

 

No need to be anywhere near the thing during the melt. Might set up some steel "rails" over the fire so that when fully melted, the mold can be slid/dragged away from the heat.

 

As soon as the lead solidifies, hose with water to cool quickly, thus being able to set up another melt. Might be able to make a half a dozen bricks per session. That pace would fit the character of the project nicely.

 

Steve

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Nirie, thanks for the info.

 

I'm thinking I'll build the fire under the steel mold and melt lead directly. Skip the crucible and the pouring. Temps will rise slowly and should minimize blow back.

 

No need to be anywhere near the thing during the melt. Might set up some steel "rails" over the fire so that when fully melted, the mold can be slid/dragged away from the heat.

 

As soon as the lead solidifies, hose with water to cool quickly, thus being able to set up another melt. Might be able to make a half a dozen bricks per session. That pace would fit the character of the project nicely.

 

Steve

 

Are you sure about the water? Water is the biggest hazard when pouring hot metal and if you leave even one tiny drop for the next pour it will explode and project molten metal everywhere.

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Nirie, thanks for the info.

 

I'm thinking I'll build the fire under the steel mold and melt lead directly. Skip the crucible and the pouring. Temps will rise slowly and should minimize blow back.

 

No need to be anywhere near the thing during the melt. Might set up some steel "rails" over the fire so that when fully melted, the mold can be slid/dragged away from the heat.

 

As soon as the lead solidifies, hose with water to cool quickly, thus being able to set up another melt. Might be able to make a half a dozen bricks per session. That pace would fit the character of the project nicely.

 

Steve

Are you sure about the water? Water is the biggest hazard when pouring hot metal and if you leave even one tiny drop for the next pour it will explode and project molten metal everywhere.

 

That won't be a problem since Steve says he will melt the lead in the mold. Any water will evaporate long before the lead melts.

 

I do wonder if the lead will release from the mold after it cools? As hobot asks, will the cold mold grip the lead due to contraction (or just surface roughness)?

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BTW, if you are ever down in the south-central part of the state, Maryhill Museum has a beautiful display of how lost-wax casting works, including a bunch of material from Auguste Rodin's studio.

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Steve,

If you want to use the steel mold then add about 5 degrees draft on the vertical surfaces so you can get the ingot out. I would still look at a wash coat on the steel to aid in release and buffer the metal/mold interface. If you can't get a wash then at least put a coating of carbon on the steel by using a propane torch with no O2. Old school lamp black.

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Nirie, thanks for the info.

 

I'm thinking I'll build the fire under the steel mold and melt lead directly. Skip the crucible and the pouring. Temps will rise slowly and should minimize blow back.

 

No need to be anywhere near the thing during the melt. Might set up some steel "rails" over the fire so that when fully melted, the mold can be slid/dragged away from the heat.

 

As soon as the lead solidifies, hose with water to cool quickly, thus being able to set up another melt. Might be able to make a half a dozen bricks per session. That pace would fit the character of the project nicely.

 

Steve

Are you sure about the water? Water is the biggest hazard when pouring hot metal and if you leave even one tiny drop for the next pour it will explode and project molten metal everywhere.

 

That won't be a problem since Steve says he will melt the lead in the mold. Any water will evaporate long before the lead melts.

 

I do wonder if the lead will release from the mold after it cools? As hobot asks, will the cold mold grip the lead due to contraction (or just surface roughness)?

 

 

If you don't put "draft" or taper in the mould it will grip the solidified part once cold.

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If you don't put "draft" or taper in the mould it will grip the solidified part once cold.

 

My plan is to make up a mold with a flat sheet for the bottom and angle steel for the sides. The angle will be clamped to the flat sheet with the flange outboard. I will try and seal the seams with that HIGH TEMP stove goop that was suggested earlier in this thread.

 

If that plan works, there will be no need to create angled "draft" - just release the clamps and knock it apart.

 

The other nice thing about this idea is I will be able to make any size mold with out using up a bunch of steel.

 

Steve

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Welcome to hell.


The forward 10 keel bays had ballast lead that was laid HORIZONTALY and were relatively easy to remove at least the top course of lead/cement.


The last 2 bays (aft) had the lead installed VERTICALLY making it ABSOLUTELY FUCKING IMPOSSIBLE to remove the lead pigs in one piece. I tried every tool in my possession to saw, grind, chisel, route, pound, etc. etc. etc.. NOTHING worked. Drill bits (twist, paddle, forstner, hole-saw) clogged. Grinder wheels disintegrated, Saws-all blades clogged/bent, Skill saw blade could not reach the work (this actually could remove material quickly), Router (used free hand like a die-grinder) was slow and sprayed umpteen fuckin million little lead shavings EVERYWHERE. Wood chisels were to small and weak, Cold chisel made some progress but was VERY slow. Roto-hammer with chisel bit worked but was VERY slow.


The answer: Rent a REAL demo hammer and chisel 1 inch thick slices of lead. The machine (Makita) is brutally heavy. Just what you want for hammering vertically. For horizontal work, it is a back-breaker.


uQ7Sw7W.jpg


Got about 200 pounds of lead chiseled out. Tomorrow morning, another 75 pounds of lead and finish up some pure concrete demo - up in the bow.


47YVZ9K.jpg

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Hah, when I saw the first post, my first thought was to recommend a breaker hammer. I've got the Bosch 90 pounder. Definitely the most phallic tool that I own. Indispensable around my rocky place.

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O.K. New Plan.


I am not going to remove ALL of the ballast. I will stop (soon) at 1500 pounds of lead (removed) and about 750 pounds of cement (removed).


Stopping the demo now will mean that the goal of LOWERING the ballast will be only partially achieved.


However, the other goals will be fully realized:


CHECK FOR CORROSION: Enough ballast has been removed to convince me that the condition of the aluminum under the ballast is satisfactory.


TRIM: Enough lead has now been removed from the AFT END of the keel to correct the stern heavy condition that has plagued the boat from the day she was launched in 1981.


BILGE DRAINAGE: Ballast has been removed in such a way so-as to allow water to drain properly from bow to stern.


CREATE BILGE STORAGE: The loosely placed top layer of lead/cement was spilling out of the keel-box making the bilge a very poor place to store stuff.


CREATE A SMOOTH, CLEANABLE BILGE: The nasty, rough concrete with lead ingots sticking out, bilge surface as been removed. Aluminum plate can now be welded over top the lead/epoxy/cement ballast leaving a proper, ship shape bilge surface.


Steve

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Myself and a couple guys rented a chainsaw to cut about 2000# of internal ballast out of a One-ton. Ruined the chainsaw (duh, that's why we rented one), and neglected to remove all the cushions....we were still picking little chunks of lead out of the aft berth cushions 6 months later. This was lead shot and polyester resin, I doubt the chainsaw would work for very long on lead pigs and concrete.

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Steve, you're so damn good with aluminum and welding, might you consider just sawing off that part of the existing keel and welding on a new one?

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Chainsaws work very well on lead, & not to shabby on aluminum. Cut the original keel off Ceramco in 3 hours of fun one night. It was a aluminum shell with lead poured into it, they did something really wrong & only got about 85% full - lots of pockets & lead dribbles.

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O.K. New Plan.

 

I am not going to remove ALL of the ballast. I will stop (soon) at 1500 pounds of lead (removed) and about 750 pounds of cement (removed).

 

Stopping the demo now will mean that the goal of LOWERING the ballast will be only partially achieved.

 

However, the other goals will be fully realized:

 

CHECK FOR CORROSION: Enough ballast has been removed to convince me that the condition of the aluminum under the ballast is satisfactory.

 

TRIM: Enough lead has now been removed from the AFT END of the keel to correct the stern heavy condition that has plagued the boat from the day she was launched in 1981.

 

BILGE DRAINAGE: Ballast has been removed in such a way so-as to allow water to drain properly from bow to stern.

 

CREATE BILGE STORAGE: The loosely placed top layer of lead/cement was spilling out of the keel-box making the bilge a very poor place to store stuff.

 

CREATE A SMOOTH, CLEANABLE BILGE: The nasty, rough concrete with lead ingots sticking out, bilge surface as been removed. Aluminum plate can now be welded over top the lead/epoxy/cement ballast leaving a proper, ship shape bilge surface.

 

Steve

Steve, You've already pulled 2250 lbs of lead and concrete out. You have the badass tool on-hand to get the last 75 lbs out. And now you're going to stop? WTF, man, where's your OCD? It's killing me just to think about you leaving that last little bit in there.

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Steve, You've already pulled 2250 lbs of lead and concrete out. You have the badass tool on-hand to get the last 75 lbs out. And now you're going to stop? WTF, man, where's your OCD? It's killing me just to think about you leaving that last little bit in there.

 

 

Stream, the total ballast was 5,800 lbs. I am only just over 1/3 of the way there. ENOUGH IS ENOUGH!

 

---------------------------------

 

Numbers.
I have exposed enough lead to be able to make a fairly accurate survey of the remaining Ballast. Here are the numbers:
Original LEAD (installed by my father in 1975) = 4600 lbs.
Original CEMENT (installed in 1975) = 800 lbs.
TRIM CEMENT (installed after 1981 launch) = 400 lbs.
Total BALLAST (prior to my recent demolition) = 5,800 lbs. Tom Colvin designed this boat to use 5,000 lbs of ballast.
This 800 lb. "over ballasting" helps explain the 2,500 pound over-weight condition of the boat (Displacement was recently 16,600 lb. whereas design displacement is 14,100 lb. The remaining 1,700 lb. overload is easily explained by my Pilot House addition, robust equipment, and the heavy construction techniques employed in the interior fit-out.
LEAD removed by me, recently= 1,500 lbs. This lead will be reinstalled well forward in the keel.
CEMENT removed by me, recently = 700 lbs. This cement WILL NOT be replaced (approximately 100 pounds of epoxy will be used to re-bed the lead, however).
Interior WOOD removed by me, recently = 1,000 lbs. I am confident that the replacement interior will weigh less than HALF of the original.
PROJECTED WEIGHT OF THE BOAT AFTER MY CURRENT MODIFICATION: = 15,500 lbs.
500 lb. less interior wood.
600 lb. less ballast.
1,100 lb. TOTAL weight reduction.
Steve

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Steve, you're so damn good with aluminum and welding, might you consider just sawing off that part of the existing keel and welding on a new one?

 

Too much work and $$$, Paul. Aluminum is expensive and I want to go shrimping in May.

 

Steve

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cje,

 

HULL PLATE is excellent. Perfect actually.

 

I did find two small spots with some shallow pitting in the KEEL SIDE PLATE, right where some bilge water would form a puddle, and the lead pigs were touching the metal.

 

I am very happy with the condition of the metal.

 

Steve

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Just my thoughts...fab up a 3/8" side / 5/8" bottom keel extension. Nice new material and lead that. Hot glue it on.

Just throwing that out there.

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If the boat needed a new keel for other reasons, I would consider a modified design.

 

The boat already has LOTS of wetted area and I'd hate to add more. A deeper keel in conjunction with a cut-away-forefoot could be good.

 

Ultimately, I trust Tom Colvin's design more than anything I could do. The boat has some really nice handling characteristics that would be a shame to screw up.

 

Steve

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If the boat needed a new keel for other reasons, I would consider a modified design.

 

The boat already has LOTS of wetted area and I'd hate to add more. A deeper keel in conjunction with a cut-away-forefoot could be good.

 

Ultimately, I trust Tom Colvin's design more than anything I could do. The boat has some really nice handling characteristics that would be a shame to screw up.

 

Steve

 

Good thinking. Tom said to me on a couple of occasions that builders had altered the lines of the Witch hull to avoid copyright lawsuits and the result was rarely any sort of improvement. Now, it's likely that he *would* say that, but if it's not broken I wouldn't try to fix it.

 

Interesting just how much extra ballast your hull has over the same hull in steel. Also interesting how yours has lap plating on the compound curvature of the bow. I bent & butt-welded the strips for mine which was a major PITA. However, it looks better to my eye so what the hell. That's about the only place on my hull where there's more than a very thin smear of fairing compound.

 

FKT

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I was only thinking she was tender. Steve has added weight high with all his cool mods. It may be a funner way to do that ballast task.

I never like to play with someones design either.

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FKT,

 

A friend of mine built a steel witch. If I remember correctly, Tom called for 3500 pounds of ballast (as opposed to 5000 pounds for an aluminum witch). Is my memory correct?

 

Also, can you tell us how much more your 'stretched' Witch will displace?

 

(For those that don't know, FKT is building a stretched Saugeen Witch. The change is made simply be increasing the frame spacing. This change was approved/advocated by Colvin.)

 

Steve

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Steve, do you have a Metabo ra grinder in that pile o tools? The thing is terrifying to use with a thin kerf (.040") cut off wheel, it'll slice your hand off quicker then you could say oops. It would easily and quickly slice and dice the lead and concrete while coating every imaginably nook and cranny of your boat with dust. I use one with GREAT caution and fear.

 

I also use a variable speed Makita ra grinder with a chicken plucker and a concrete dust hood hooked up to a Fein vacuum for heavy fiberglass grinding. I love that tool for prepping glass, it's does a pretty good job of minimizing dust.

 

 

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Arthur C. Clarke: "Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic".

..............................

 

.......................Imagine someone from the Industrial Revolution seeing a smart phone.

 

How long would a woman last in Salem in the 1600's with something like that? :D

 

They act the same way when encountering more effective ways to get a metal hull together today, than that which they have gained their "Expertise" in. As Trueman said

"An expert is someone who opposes change, because if change is accepted ,then he stops being an expert."

 

 

Ironic as you claim endlessly to be THE expert. But I'd be surprised if Trueman really made such an inane statement or that he isn't being misquoted.

 

Being an expert requires not just the initial learning but keeping your knowledge current. Not continually re-fabricating a false reality that matches your beliefs.

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Brent has lots of quotes from famous people who never said them.

 

He's particularly partial to quoting his peers like Einstein, Galileo, Leonardo etc.

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Steve, do you have a Metabo ra grinder in that pile o tools? The thing is terrifying to use with a thin kerf (.040") cut off wheel, it'll slice your hand off quicker then you could say oops. It would easily and quickly slice and dice the lead and concrete while coating every imaginably nook and cranny of your boat with dust. I use one with GREAT caution and fear.

 

I also use a variable speed Makita ra grinder with a chicken plucker and a concrete dust hood hooked up to a Fein vacuum for heavy fiberglass grinding. I love that tool for prepping glass, it's does a pretty good job of minimizing dust.

 

 

Joli,

 

No Metabo tools in that pile.

 

I did try a carbide, masonry cutting wheel in my 4 inch grinder. Works great for eating cement, but It was ineffective at removing lead.

 

Can you post a link of picture of the cut off wheel that you recommend?

 

Steve

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Rant,

 

Yep, that's the one. Great for the cement, did not touch the lead.

 

Steve

 

You will need more of a toothed saw blade to make chips rather than a grinding action. Lead is too soft and will load up the abrasive type of wheel

 

Edit: in an ideal world. Just got up to your post where you tried everything.

 

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Arthur C. Clarke: "Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic".

Thanx to both. I knew it was something like that, but it's been decades since I read Clarke, altho that quote is quite common. Still working on eutectics, tho.

The best illustration of it was a toy my granddaughter got some time back. It was a set of figurines and a sort of pedestal. When she put one of the figurines on the pedestal it would show up as a character in the video game on the TV.

 

I spent my life in the IT biz and even I was blown away - that was the most "magical" piece of tech I've ever seen.

 

Imagine someone from the Industrial Revolution seeing a smart phone.

 

How long would a woman last in Salem in the 1600's with something like that? :D

They act the same way when encountering more effective ways to get a metal hull together today, than that which they have gained their "Expertise" in. As Trueman said

"An expert is someone who opposes change, because if change is accepted ,then he stops being an expert."

An expert will quite happily accept change, as long as it's a proven process. That's why they are experts.

Continually dismissing every other approach is just showing ignorance.

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I wonder if one of the timber cut off grinding wheels would work in lead? I have used them quite a bit with all sorts of timber, I think they would clear well enough for lead. I imagine it would be a pain in the cock to switch between blades all the time.

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Arthur C. Clarke: "Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic".

Thanx to both. I knew it was something like that, but it's been decades since I read Clarke, altho that quote is quite common. Still working on eutectics, tho.

The best illustration of it was a toy my granddaughter got some time back. It was a set of figurines and a sort of pedestal. When she put one of the figurines on the pedestal it would show up as a character in the video game on the TV.

 

I spent my life in the IT biz and even I was blown away - that was the most "magical" piece of tech I've ever seen.

 

Imagine someone from the Industrial Revolution seeing a smart phone.

 

How long would a woman last in Salem in the 1600's with something like that? :D

They act the same way when encountering more effective ways to get a metal hull together today, than that which they have gained their "Expertise" in. As Trueman said

"An expert is someone who opposes change, because if change is accepted ,then he stops being an expert."

Continually dismissing every other approach is just showing ignorance.

 

 

And there we have the crux of the matter.

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Steve:

When are you going to melt the lead? Maybe I should come over and help.

Breath deeply when you do , Bob.

 

This is too far. I've been reading these threads for months now. Usually with mild amusement at your mutual geriatric one-upsmanship, transitioning to annoyance that it never stops, even on wildly valuable threads like this. But, as shown by this post, you've lost any sense of decorum. A sign of the times in my country of birth, methinks. If you haven't something valuable, constructive, supportive, and, above all - accurate - to say...STFU. How old are you? Time to grow up. Churlish old man.

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Takoyaki:

That did not bother me at all. I did not feel it was worth a response.

 

On the other hand maybe you were talking to me. Give me a moment while I look up what "churlish" means.

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Don't let 'churlish' go to your head Bob. I think it is sort of like 'curmudgeon' without the endearing underlying charm. Besides I don't think he was talking to you.

 

I had to look it up too.

 

quote-a-churlish-courtesy-rarely-comes-b

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Takoyaki:

That did not bother me at all. I did not feel it was worth a response.

 

On the other hand maybe you were talking to me. Give me a moment while I look up what "churlish" means.

No Bob, not referring to you as churlish. Merely referred to 'you both' as a balance; you ARE both involved. And I appreciate all the relevant input... Brent does have some valuable things to say... when he stays on point, and within his wheelhouse. Lately he seems to be grinding more axes. Do your best to stop taking the bait. good luck with that! hahaha

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I'll work on it Takoyaki. Thanks for the advice.

 

I don't see any balance at all. I like to keep the discussion substantive and on yachts and yacht design. BS prefers personal attack.

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Ah Takoyaki!

 

So you point out the essential nature of Yin and Yang and how BP and BS are in the endless dance of point and counterpoint. One way to consider the situation.

 

 

OK, am I the only one thinking of Frank Gorshen?

Bele_and_Lokai_zpsi7b5rlph.jpg

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Me, I'm a fully balanced personality, with chips on both shoulders.

 

Takoyaki - wasn't Japan the home of Stainless steel hulls, and even of Titanium ones? Loved the video of the Japanese sailor up the mast in the current Vendee. What a top man he seems.

 

 

E

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Takoyaki

You remind me of one of my favorite dishes when I was regurly traveling to Japan. Fun to watch it being cooked too!

 

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Takoyaki

Ahh yes, grilled octopus balls. I always had them at the many beach festivals and at other times.

 

In Japan I learned that food that had 'yaki' in the name is always good to eat. Takoyaki, yakitori, yakisoba, tamagoyaki, just to name a few.

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Takoyaki

You remind me of one of my favorite dishes when I was regurly traveling to Japan. Fun to watch it being cooked too!

 

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Takoyaki

Ahh yes, grilled octopus balls. I always had them at the many beach festivals and at other times.

 

In Japan I learned that food that had 'yaki' in the name is always good to eat. Takoyaki, yakitori, yakisoba, tamagoyaki, just to name a few.

 

 

yaki? maybe its the japanese word for fried?

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its a lesson I learned a long time ago, if you can fry it you can eat it, conversely if you cant fry it you cannot eat it. For example "salad" of any sort cannot be fried therefore it cannot and should not be eaten

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OK Gutter, try this one.

 

Fry up about four to six slices of bacon cut into pieces, not crisp. With the bacon fat still hot in the pan add about a half cup of white vinegar and a teaspoon of sugar, pinch of pepper. Bring to a boil and then while still very hot pour it over the salad. Yum! Fried salad.

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I'm reminded of my favorite recipe for "grits"

 

-- fry up some bacon, and set it aside

-- pour some grits into the pan, stir and simmer

-- then throw out the grits and eat the bacon

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The cafeteria where I once worked did something called sizzled salad. It was basically meat/chicken and some veggies sauteed in an oil & vinegar dressing. There was tortilla with a lettuce on it, and the sizzled stuff when on that. They liked to char the tortilla. I would prefer they not char the tortilla.

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Takoyaki

You remind me of one of my favorite dishes when I was regurly traveling to Japan. Fun to watch it being cooked too!

 

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Takoyaki

Ahh yes, grilled octopus balls. I always had them at the many beach festivals and at other times.

 

In Japan I learned that food that had 'yaki' in the name is always good to eat. Takoyaki, yakitori, yakisoba, tamagoyaki, just to name a few.

 

 

yaki? maybe its the japanese word for fried?

 

Grilled

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I'm reminded of my favorite recipe for "grits"

 

-- fry up some bacon, and set it aside

-- pour some grits into the pan, stir and simmer

-- then throw out the grits and eat the bacon

 

I'd heard about grits most of my life but I was in my 50's before I ever actually had a chance to try them. One forkful was more than enough.

 

Very much like the worst plain white rice you ever ate.

 

Easy to understand why they are regarded as low rent food - I'd have to be extremely hungry to ever eat them again.

 

Well..... maybe Sleds way.

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its a lesson I learned a long time ago, if you can fry it you can eat it, conversely if you cant fry it you cannot eat it. For example "salad" of any sort cannot be fried therefore it cannot and should not be eaten

But in Japan I found a restaurant that had a steak salad. There was mainly grilled steak and sauce on a small bed of lettuce. It came highly recommended and was very good.

 

I often bought takoyaki in store food courts. Yakisoba, gyoza, katsudon where all favorites of mine. Often bought them on my way home from work as a takeout.

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I Have never had grits. It doesn't sound good. It sounds like something that would fall out of your shorts after a day at the beach.

 

I'm still coming to grips with hushpuppies aka fried balls of dough. That's it. Fried fucking dough. When I eat with the PSC guys in NC they always order extra hushpuppies for me. If you can fry it,,,they will eat it.

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Eggs and grits and if you've been really good some bacon and it's a real breakfast.

Fried seafood isn't a meal without hushpuppies. I know it isn't all that good for me but sometimes you just have to go back to what you grew up on. I mean what's the point of living forever if you didn't enjoy it?

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I Have never had grits. It doesn't sound good. It sounds like something that would fall out of your shorts after a day at the beach.

 

I'm still coming to grips with hushpuppies aka fried balls of dough. That's it. Fried fucking dough. When I eat with the PSC guys in NC they always order extra hushpuppies for me. If you can fry it,,,they will eat it.

 

Hush puppies are NOT fried "dough". They are a fried cornmeal batter generally made of cornmeal, flour, baking powder, and salt - as well as egg, milk, and onion. Eat 'em hot! :lol:

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Fried seafood isn't a meal without hushpuppies.

+ gumbo!

 

http://www.winecellarsofannapolis.com/calendar/27-recipe-month--chicken-sausage-gumbo-hushpuppies

 

great recipe but in these parts it needs to be andouille. Even better is seafood with crawfish. OK, maybe not better but still dang good. In south LA I have had awesome gumbo and had no idea what all was in it. So, Bob, you have had gumbo? Bayou Teche, start at Breaux Bridge and just eat your way south.

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All you have to do is tell a southerner that you don't like grits and they ALWAYS tell you that's because you haven't had it done right.

+

Not southern, married into southern stock; shrimp & grits has become a favourite.

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great recipe but in these parts it needs to be andouille. Even better is seafood with crawfish. OK, maybe not better but still dang good. In south LA I have had awesome gumbo and had no idea what all was in it. So, Bob, you have had gumbo? Bayou Teche, start at Breaux Bridge and just eat your way south.

++

 

Got to be Andouille. Bit of butter on the hush puppies. Coonass comfort food.

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I Have never had grits. It doesn't sound good. It sounds like something that would fall out of your shorts after a day at the beach.

 

I'm still coming to grips with hushpuppies aka fried balls of dough. That's it. Fried fucking dough. When I eat with the PSC guys in NC they always order extra hushpuppies for me. If you can fry it,,,they will eat it.

 

Hush puppies are NOT fried "dough". They are a fried cornmeal batter generally made of cornmeal, flour, baking powder, and salt - as well as egg, milk, and onion. Eat 'em hot! :lol:

^^^^^^ that. . Very good when done right!

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great recipe but in these parts it needs to be andouille. Even better is seafood with crawfish. OK, maybe not better but still dang good.

+100 on andouille and crawfish (and shrimp, and...)

 

that recipe was just the first hit on google in a search for "gumbo + hushpuppies" ;-)

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I'm a flipping yankee up here in New England, but I love me some grits. Made properly with appropriate amounts of butter. Sometimes I like to serve it fancy-style with nicely poached eggs... the runny yolk makes a fantastic sauce. Cheese grits are another nice option...

 

Now I'm hungry sitting here at my desk.

 

DARNIT!

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how-to-make-cajun-shrimp-and-grits-500x3

 

The only thing I would add to this recipe is

 

SYM-Logo-300x300.png

 

Ingredients for Shrimp Marinade

  • 1/2 c. olive oil
  • 1/4 c. soy sauce
  • 1/4 c. fresh lemon juice
  • 1/4 c. fresh parsley
  • 2 tbsp. Worcestershire sauce
  • 2 tbsp. red wine vinegar
  • 1 tbsp. dry mustard
  • 1/2 tbsp. paprika
  • 1/2 tbsp. minced garlic
  • 1 tsp. brown sugar
  • 1 tsp. freshly grated lemon peel
  • 1/4 tsp. ground red pepper

Ingredients for Grits

  • 3 cups water
  • 3 pinches salt
  • 1 cup and 2 tablespoons grits

Additional Ingredients

  • 1/4 cup and 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1/4 cup finely diced onion
  • 60 medium shrimp, marinated, peeled and deveined
  • 1-1/2 cups diced tasso ham, prosciutto, or pancetta
  • 3/4 cup white wine
  • 1-1/2 cups heavy whipping cream
  • 3 tablespoons chopped green onion (scallions), green parts only

Cajun Shrimp and Grits Recipe

Mix all of the marinade ingredients in a bowl. Add shrimp. Allow to marinade for at least 20 minutes.

Start boiling the water for the grits. Once it starts boiling slowly stir in the grits and salt. Return it to a boil. Cover and cook on low for 20 minutes stirring often.

Heat a pan over medium-high heat. Add a swirl of oil to the pan and cook the tasso/prosciutto/pancetta and onions. Cook until the onions are translucent. That usually takes about 4-5 minutes. Don’t let them burn. Add the whole bowl of shrimp and marinade to the pan. Cook for another 3-5 minutes, just until shrimp are slightly pink. Deglaze with wine. Reduce by half.

Add the heavy cream. Stir until well combined. Let simmer for a minute or two.

Add a serving of grits to 6 bowls. Evenly divide the shrimp and sauce over the top. Sprinkle some green onions over the tops. Look over at the person sitting next to you and say, “Man, that Iowa boy doesn’t know what he is missing!” Enjoy!

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The secret to grits, which I learned early on to trips to Grandma's in NC, is that you just say you love them. I've stuck with that rule and avoided them with pretty good success ever since.

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I worked for a W Virginia hillbilly who was raised on grits but after having lived in Los Angeles and Wyoming had gone into denial about his redneck roots. He had moved to Alabama and really loved to joke around with southerners and did his best to act like a Carpetbagger. He still couldn't deny his deep rooted love of grits but couldn't help but order it from diner waitresses as 'grit'.

 

'Hey sweetheart, bring me an order of that grit with plenty of butter and sorghum syrup!' They would try and correct him to the plural use of the word but he just insisted on GRIT.

 

Just for the record.

 

http://www.snopes.com/media/notnews/gaygrits.asp

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The secret to grits, which I learned early on to trips to Grandma's in NC, is that you just say you love them. I've stuck with that rule and avoided them with pretty good success ever since.

That does work. I use the same strategy with my mother in law's sweet potatoes

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Local BBQ that recently closed had smoked cheddar jalapeño grits. Wow, they were good.

Smoke is good

Cheddar is good

Jalapeño is good

 

3 out of 4 is OK I suppose. Unless you're a surgeon maybe.

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