soma

Gunboat 68

Recommended Posts

looks like there _is_ a forward cockpit - am i right?

 

and daggerboard slots too

 

i thought that at nyyc they said it was a 65...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

looks like there _is_ a forward cockpit - am i right?

 

and daggerboard slots too

 

i thought that at nyyc they said it was a 65...

Forward cockpit is back.

 

Definitely Daggerboards.

 

We always knew it was going to be 65' but didn't want to fill 68'. We kept the accommodations to 65' until the bitter end and then added 3'. It took some discipline. Similar volume to the gunboat 66 but 4 VIP cabins and 2 extra (smaller) cabins.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i like the forward cockpit

 

the side cockpits like on the bieker look really good - i've never been on that boat - but they give up a lot of interior space, so for something a bit more cruising oriented, the forward cockpit is good

 

i just really like being able to easily go outside where you can get a good view of where you are going - especially at night

 

the 55 with no forward cockpit.., and all the lines lead inside never made sense to me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well done Soma, she's a beauty. I 'll wait for more detailed drawings before asking questions, but I must say that you have a great foundation to build on, I look forward to seeing where it goes from here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One feature not pictured is we will be offering tillers with bucket seats aft, a sort of "belt and suspenders" solution. There will still be a forward inside helm, but for those wanting the wind in your face feel you can have both. It's an innovation from within the fleet that is being adopted by others, as well as us.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There was a big bright yellow cat dowunder with tillers & a bucket seat. It looked very cool. In NZ maybe.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There was a big bright yellow cat dowunder with tillers & a bucket seat. It looked very cool. In NZ maybe.

 

That's an Outremmer feature afaik.

 

 

Has anyone ever tried a main/boom setup with no clearance over the coachroof to get the A-cat/AC72 endplate effect?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i like the forward cockpit

 

the side cockpits like on the bieker look really good - i've never been on that boat - but they give up a lot of interior space, so for something a bit more cruising oriented, the forward cockpit is good

 

i just really like being able to easily go outside where you can get a good view of where you are going - especially at night

 

the 55 with no forward cockpit.., and all the lines lead inside never made sense to me.

Don't want to distract from the thread but drop me a PM if you have actually sailed the 55. Would like to know why you think this.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I don’t want to create any thread leeway from Soma’s intriguing and promising announcement (and as he now shows also on the Gunboat homepage). But just a quick question: Eastern, please excuse my unfamiliarity with your term ‘endplate effect’. By this do you mean the prevention of lift-draining vortexes at the foot of the mainsail? So the equivalent of modern winglet tips on jet planes? In this case, like what was talked about during the last America’s Cup, with New Zealand having the advantage of a solid deck, but America not? Bringing this back to Gunboat: the 68 is not zero clearance, but would it not be close enough so as to still materially accomplish this effect?


Obviously since you are talking about the boom, you are not referring to the A-cat-like (and G4-like) hull shapes about which Peter J had previously hinted as a next evolution. I acknowledge that I am inept at assessing this attribute from the current (or even future) drawings. Soma, I know that it is still early in the process, but are you able to comment on the actual evolution of the Gunboat hull shapes, in terms of the ultimate goals of both minimising hydraulic resistance, and in enhancing weight bearing when under a powered-up lean? Or should I patiently (oh, but that is hard to be :) ) wait – as Jaybird suggested – for more detailed drawings? Alternatively, please just ignore my question entirely if this is proprietary information.


Thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes that's what he is referring to with end plate effect. I think it's a good idea, but there are some limits (removal of boom = lack of positive rotation in light air, but then you are motor sailing anyway?). It doesn't work if there is a gap between the sail and coach roof/trampoline etc. It needs to be as sealed as possible. The upside is a lower rig center of effort, no boom (thus lighter). Another downside is potentially less rig area up high and controlling the sail shape that low with such a large foot and no boom.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

for a long time windsurfers worried about the end plate effect - a lot of effort was expended designing sails and rigs so that you could "close the gap".., by getting the foot of the sail to touch the board.

 

if you are powered up is is definitely faster to do that.., but it's not like the last inch where you actually close the gap (it's never really fully closed) makes a huge difference.

 

to rake that far back requires harder sheeting and it's not clear which causes which - maybe just the harder sheeting is responsible for the added speed...

 

you don't hear so much talk about it these days.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i think at NYYC they said 3 years until hull #1 launches - that seems like a long time.., is that still the estimate?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just vaporware until one is built. Soma I know you're working hard on it, and I think you guys are set up well to succeed, but it's a long way from renderings to a real boat. Looks awesome though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i think at NYYC they said 3 years until hull #1 launches - that seems like a long time.., is that still the estimate?

Target is 26 months from now for hull #1.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just vaporware until one is built. Soma I know you're working hard on it, and I think you guys are set up well to succeed, but it's a long way from renderings to a real boat. Looks awesome though.

Thanks! We have multiple buyers already and we are sold out through mid-2020. GLY (parent company) have sound financials with great access to capital. GLY have 700 boats on the water and we launch +/-50 boats/year. We begin construction of the Gunboat 68 in January. It's not theoretical, it's happening.

 

In the meantime we have multiple used boats for sale in the brokerage and are continuing production of the Gunboat 57.

 

Gunboat is back in a big way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I saw the Gunboat 57 at the show. It's lustworthy and beautifully done. Is that the only one? I hope Gunboat is truly back in a big way and continues to break new ground.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

There was a big bright yellow cat dowunder with tillers & a bucket seat. It looked very cool. In NZ maybe.

 

That's an Outremmer feature afaik.

 

 

Has anyone ever tried a main/boom setup with no clearance over the coachroof to get the A-cat/AC72 endplate effect?

 

The 55's I worked on had minimal clearance between the boom and coachroof. IMO,It doesn't seem reasonable to have it touch on a none thoroughbred race boat as every tack, jibe and flog is wearing on the coachroof . Not to mention stretch.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah that's attractive. What's the stern cutout for? Are the DB's asymmetric? I assume so since you went to the effort of making them curved. Is the bridgedeck concept like the Irens' designs or like the MM's i.e. open plan or totally separate or something intermediate?

 

I assume it's a fractional (self tacking) jib but is there a staysail option?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"What's the stern cutout for?"

 

Several things. One common complaint is boarding from low/medium height docks and/or yacht club launches. This gives you a foot hold below deck height. I can't tell you how many times I've seen people step on fenders. It's also a lead for shore power, hoses, and dock lines. Lastly, it's (likely) the sheet lead for the spin sheets to the aft beam winches. We are working on the ergonomics of the deck plan now.

 

"Are the DB's asymmetric? I assume so since you went to the effort of making them curved."

 

We are making the trunks oversized to accept either. It's a small concession on entrained water but it offers huge optionality. The standard boat will come with symmetric, mainly because tacking/gybing the boards is a pain. We will obviously have an asymmetric solution for those willing to do the work. There are elegant powered board up/down controls now, so the headache of tacking/gybing will be reduced, but will come with an increase in complexity. There are no free lunches.

 

"Is the bridgedeck concept like the Irens' designs or like the MM's i.e. open plan or totally separate or something intermediate?"

 

I'd say more MM than Nigel. There will be a cabin back bulkhead with sliding doors across the back. There will be a salon and a separate aft deck, both spacious. You'll be able to open everything up and make it feel connected, but there will be all weather protection and privacy when it's closed.

 

"I assume it's a fractional (self tacking) jib but is there a staysail option?"

 

We will offer a standard rig package for those happy with an off-the-shelf solution. That will have a self-tacker (J2) and a staysail (J3) as well as a J1 (all standard) as well as a J0 (optional). Then there will obviously be an R and A sails.

 

We are baking in a lot of optionality for the owner's that have specific wishes, though, so we aren't painting people into a corner. We are trying to foresee as many possible outcomes and future proofing where we can. The base boat will be a sick performer but will still be a sensible cruiser. There will be turbo options for those wanting to drop the hull fly wind speed. It's a fun mental exercise, trying to foresee as many different scenarios.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just curious, with the curved boards are you adding winglets to the rudders as well?

Yup.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some interesting details I hadn't heard before:

 

 

 

One neat idea is that the modular saloon interior is fully demountable. The company knew that racing owners stripped out their boats for events, so decided to design a modular layout.

 

http://www.yachtingworld.com/yachts-and-gear/gunboat-68-the-high-octane-luxury-performance-cruiser-104647

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some interesting details I hadn't heard before:

 

 

 

One neat idea is that the modular saloon interior is fully demountable. The company knew that racing owners stripped out their boats for events, so decided to design a modular layout.

 

http://www.yachtingworld.com/yachts-and-gear/gunboat-68-the-high-octane-luxury-performance-cruiser-104647

 

 

supposedly there is a cruising version and a turbo/racing version - so it's possible that the modular interior is a feature of the racing version but not the cruising version

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We have designed the boat with a broad target market in mind. The turbo version should comfortably be the fastest Gunboat afloat, but the cruising version will still be approachable by the world cruiser/circumnavigator. The cruising version has a 25m mast and symmetric boards. The regatta version has a 29m mast and asymmetric boards. There are a whole range of options between those book ends, though.

 

The interior is demountable in both cases. There is nearly a ton of weight that can be left in the container for a regatta. Often times, though, the first thing a new owner will do is a layout refit. We wanted to make that process a little easier. It's also nice to have customization options that are easily implemented within a production setting. If the interior can be carried off, then it can be built off the boat and installed quickly. The bottleneck during production is bodies on the boat, you want as much work to happen as possible concurrently, and to achieve that you need to spread the work around. So lots of pluses.

 

We've put ALOT of thought into this boat. We've gotten great input from the skippers in the fleet and our design team is incredible. This is definitely evolutionary, we've taken the best of the existing fleet and made it better.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

There was a big bright yellow cat dowunder with tillers & a bucket seat. It looked very cool. In NZ maybe.

 

That's an Outremmer feature afaik.

 

 

Has anyone ever tried a main/boom setup with no clearance over the coachroof to get the A-cat/AC72 endplate effect?

 

The 55's I worked on had minimal clearance between the boom and coachroof. IMO,It doesn't seem reasonable to have it touch on a none thoroughbred race boat as every tack, jibe and flog is wearing on the coachroof . Not to mention stretch.

 

While it is nice to have the boom low and close to the coachroof for both the end plate effect and to make it easier to get the main flaked and the sail cover on; I think that it is a good idea to have it high enough to pass over a person lying prone on the cabin top for safety reasons. That way, a crew member has the chance to 'hit the deck' for safety if they happen to be on the coachroof during a gybe, or when the boom is flailing around while hoisting or lowering the sail...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The boom floats up when the main is up, plenty of clearance to go under, unless you cut it to be a deck sweeper. If your lazy jacks are fixed on the mast, you won't have an issue with the coach roof, if they aren't fixed, remember to take up before dropping the main.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's a version of an endplate. Probably not quite a perfect one, but not bad. I don't let anyone up there. My one complaint is that there's no way to have a proper boom vang.

 

post-398-0-84059600-1486683944_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's a version of an endplate. Probably not quite a perfect one, but not bad. I don't let anyone up there. My one complaint is that there's no way to have a proper boom vang.

 

Nice lines, the only thing missing is a proper rotating rig....

 

I hope she has dagger boards as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To get an effective aerodynamic endplate, the gap has to be quite small - impractically small on a mainsail. This has been very well studied by NACA/NASA as well as Southhampton.

 

Veeger, you could put an inverted vang on that rig......

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Here's a version of an endplate. Probably not quite a perfect one, but not bad. I don't let anyone up there. My one complaint is that there's no way to have a proper boom vang.

 

Nice lines, the only thing missing is a proper rotating rig....

 

I hope she has dagger boards as well.

 

There's a rotating rig option. And of course she has daggerboards.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To get an effective aerodynamic endplate, the gap has to be quite small - impractically small on a mainsail. This has been very well studied by NACA/NASA as well as Southhampton.

 

Veeger, you could put an inverted vang on that rig......

 

 

That was why my comment about it not being a 'perfect' endplate. They have to be too impractically close to the deck/hardtop.

 

Not sure the inverted vang could be retrofitted to this rig... give me a couple years, I've been writing too many large checks of late.... shipping from Palm Beach to Victoria next week being the latest....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

To get an effective aerodynamic endplate, the gap has to be quite small - impractically small on a mainsail. This has been very well studied by NACA/NASA as well as Southhampton.

 

Veeger, you could put an inverted vang on that rig......

 

 

That was why my comment about it not being a 'perfect' endplate. They have to be too impractically close to the deck/hardtop.

 

Not sure the inverted vang could be retrofitted to this rig... give me a couple years, I've been writing too many large checks of late.... shipping from Palm Beach to Victoria next week being the latest....

Take a look at a modern A-Class deck sweeper main. It wouldn't be all that bad difficult or expensive to put a slab sail material from the boom down to the roof. It probably wouldn't even need much in the way of battens, just enough to keep it pegged to the top.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been writing too many large checks of late.... shipping from Palm Beach to Victoria next week being the latest....

 

 

 

That has to be a pretty penny - when I had them quote my boat it was over $45K....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I've been writing too many large checks of late.... shipping from Palm Beach to Victoria next week being the latest....

 

 

 

That has to be a pretty penny - when I had them quote my boat it was over $45K....

 

 

Not quite THAT much, but well more than half....! 3 weeks via ship, 3 months (minimum) on her own bottom. One always pays more for expedited shipping!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Odd - your boat must be at least as many sq ft of deck space as mine. I wonder how much it varies trip - to - trip? Maybe if it isn't filling up the price gets better? I notice they are running a few more ships now, so maybe more availability. When your boat gets to Victoria, wave at mine - it's in Van Isle.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll wave, but Ogden Point to Anacortes all take me a bit south of you... I suspect the rates are subject to demand as much as anything. It's actually about the same as it cost me to ship my 41 ten years ago. But the marina I'm in currently is running the meter up pretty fast. (West Palm Beach is like that....)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interior Layout options, seems that the main options are the aux cabins port and starboard, or a more roomy master cabin.

 

The cabin furniture can be moved around or removed for lightship racing

 

And bonus master cabin shot

GB68-layout-02-01-1.jpg

GB68-layout-02-02-1.jpg

GB68-layout-02-03-1.jpg

GB68-layout-02-04-1.jpg

LAYOUT-DECK-FURNITURE-01-01.jpg

LAYOUT-DECK-FURNITURE-02.jpg

LAYOUT-DECK-FURNITURE-03.jpg

LAYOUT-DECK-FURNITURE-04.jpg

master-cabin-calc-3.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like it a lot. Best looking GB on paper so far. Great interior options and great daybeds and relaxation areas on the interior and exterior. Look forward to seeing one on the water performing. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Priscilla said:

68ft and bugger all interior seating or lounging area.

SutPFSS.jpg

The Gunboat 68 offers more salon seating and volume than the Gunboat 60 and 62, but less than the Gunboat 66. With that said, the aft cockpit is bigger than the Gunboat 60/62/66's. All 4 of the 4 VIP cabins are larger than the largest cabins on anything but the Gunboat 78 and 90.

And it should sail circles around virtually any other production boat in the world, so it has that going for it. Which is nice.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/11/2017 at 2:44 PM, soma said:

 

And it should sail circles around virtually any other production boat in the world, so it has that going for it. Which is nice.

And that includes the Rapido 60 ? we will see ......

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Are those sinks in the heads in the renderings actually planned?  That style (the bowl sitting on a counter) seems to be popular recently but in real life think they kind of suck - hard to clean around the base, awkward to use, more prone to someone ripping the sink off the counter?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
24 minutes ago, drakeborer said:

Surprised no one else has replied...Congrats Nils.  Looks bad ass, as I am sure it will be.  Good for you

Thanks Drake!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, Saltfly said:

Anyone guess as to price? North of $3m?

 

Unfortunately, the days of selling Gunboats at a loss of over $2m per hull are over. Surprisingly, it just wasn't a sustainable business model. We now have to sell Gunboats with a slight margin built in. That puts it closer to $5m...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, soma said:

Unfortunately, the days of selling Gunboats at a loss of over $2m per hull are over. Surprisingly, it just wasn't a sustainable business model. We now have to sell Gunboats with a slight margin built in. That puts it closer to $5m...

If you look at >60+ Gunboats for sale (e.g. Fault Tolerant etc.) they're asking around $5mm. In light of that, pricing around 5 for new seems in inline.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Soma, a great looking bit of boat port congratulations on hull 1. 

How are you going to power her.

Best 

Ross

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, rmw207 said:

Soma, a great looking bit of boat port congratulations on hull 1. 

How are you going to power her.

Best 

Ross

The recommended engine is a 80-hp Yanmar turbo diesel with Saildrive that exists inboard. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I imagine the engine room is glassed-in in case the gasket(s) fail?

Have you decided the accessibility/location of the (main sheet) dump button?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, carlos said:

Can the Gunboat 68 be sailed by one person alone?

The sailing systems are very similar to the 62/66's, if not better, so the short answer is "yes".

 

I remember one day my wife singlehanded from Northeast Harbor to Camden. She dropped the mooring, motored out, hooked up and raised the main, unfurled the jib, hoisted the screecher, hit 24+ knots boatspeed, furled and dropped the screecher, dropped main, all while I was hungover in bed from a night of drinking Fireball in Bar Harbor. I finally got up at the outer channel marker in Camden. She had a blast!

 

Of course, she's a better sailor than me (as well most folks in this forum) but the point remains, you CAN sail it singlehanded. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can vouch for that story. But I can also vouch that your wife is a certified badass, so the REAL short answer, is that the GB can be sailed by one badass alone.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/19/2018 at 8:22 AM, carlos said:

Can the Gunboat 68 be sailed by one person alone?

I WOULD MAKE IT WORK!!!

GODDAMM is that a sexy image of the hull(s)! I am beyond obsessed.

*edit: I would make it work with a mug of hot chocolate in my hand, Steely Dan cranking on the soundsystem, and my pulse as low and slow as a purring kitten. The boat is already hardwired for remote control, so why not have a remote in hand for joystick docking from the foredeck? (Come to think of it though, it's probable the throttle linkages are mechanical and not fly by wire, so I'd pay a couple of geeks to install supplemental remote control throttle servos in the engine bays, and program a nice handheld remote). 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Seems like as good a time as any to tell you guys that I quit working for Gunboat. I gave notice about two months ago. Yesterday was my last day. I'll be returning to my independent consulting activities (working as buyer's rep for brokerage boats, owner's rep for new builds, and helping with refits, project management, etc). 

 

Best of luck to Grand Large Yachting and the French. One thing's for sure, they've got a great design with the new 68. 

 

Now I go back to the cheap seats, watching things unfold here in the forums and on Facebook!

 

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good luck Niels, spend more time with the family, get home and Soma sorted...all of which are way more important than ladder climbing in the corporate world.

D day against TJ set to be the Round Tortola race this November (maybe a bit hopeful?) or BVI Spring next Easter FOR SURE!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, thanks for the info, comments, answers, and pics. I hope your replacement posts here as well...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, dcnblues said:

Yes, thanks for the info, comments, answers, and pics. I hope your replacement posts here as well...

I am by no means soma's replacement but I will be sharing some Anarchists' exclusive updates from time to time direct from the factory and happy to answer any questions I can. In this photo we have just moved the boat into the assembly area in the brand new factory. All the furniture is in the forefront ready to be fitted. We moved into this factory about 2 months ago, the lamination shop is all set up, as is the fairing room. The assembly area you see here is still getting some final touches. The Gunboat 68 in grey is awlgrip finish primer that we made a little more glossy, put the boat out in the sun and checked the fairness. I can tell you that thanks to our awesome hull tooling there isn't much fairing on this! The boat will be painted a custom metallic once the deck is bonded. 

A huge shoutout and thank you to soma for the vision he had on the project, he added incredibly valuable real world insights during the creation of the Gunboat 68! 

 

 

GB68.JPG

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

you need a person for scale in that photo - looks like it could be a beach cat!

edit - i just saw them on the left... the boat is huge!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/2/2018 at 3:43 AM, Greenflash said:

I am by no means soma's replacement but I will be sharing some Anarchists' exclusive updates from time to time direct from the factory and happy to answer any questions I can.

Excellent! Thank you! Keep the sexy images coming (with that hull it's hard to go wrong, but the photographer does seem experienced at picking good angles)! Do remember that many of us are upgrading our computer monitors to higher resolutions, so give us these pics in as high a resolution as possible please! Many thanks!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I do have a question re hull shapes. The original 62 was a fairly straightforward tube, and shots of the wake at speed showed the water reuniting from a distinct shape of the hull's passage. The new hull looks more hydrodynamic, if that's the appropriate word. I assume the smoother the wake, the less drag and greater efficiency and greater speed benefit. The shape is designed in the computer, right? Can you talk about any of the improvements of the past, say, five years? Thank you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, dcnblues said:

I do have a question re hull shapes. The original 62 was a fairly straightforward tube, and shots of the wake at speed showed the water reuniting from a distinct shape of the hull's passage. The new hull looks more hydrodynamic, if that's the appropriate word. I assume the smoother the wake, the less drag and greater efficiency and greater speed benefit. The shape is designed in the computer, right? Can you talk about any of the improvements of the past, say, five years? Thank you.

I won’t try to get into the nitty-gritty of naval architecture behind this (because I’ll probably embarrass myself!) but in short: yes, there has been significant development of hullshapes over the past fifteen years (the 62 hull was drawn about 15 years ago!). The hullshapes are drawn with a computer, but so were they 15 years ago. The radical difference has come in the form of much better CFD analysis. You’ll notice a similar pattern throughout the raceboat world, even in monohulls with boats becoming faster the hull bottom is flatter because it is less in displacement mode less often. The other striking – and let’s face it, most badass – difference are the axe bows, but the more important thing is a fuller bow section down low to keep the nose up. For the Gunboat 68, VPLP have run several different hullshapes in their CFD program to optimize the hull for the very wide range of displacements it will see from racing to world cruising.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The hull shape looks great, reminds me of some of the latest beach cat optimized hull shapes but with a cruising flare to support the increased displacement.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/9/2018 at 3:21 AM, Greenflash said:

The other striking – and let’s face it, most badass – difference are the axe bows, but the more important thing is a fuller bow section down low to keep the nose up.

I hadn't noticed axe bows and am still struggling to see them?  Very subtle...  or maybe just an optical illusion due to the transition from zero deadrise at the bow?

29662968_10156169090048490_3047937855171

Are these hulls discussed in more detail anywhere else?  Beautiful!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, ProaSailor said:

I hadn't noticed axe bows and am still struggling to see them?  Very subtle...  or maybe just an optical illusion due to the transition from zero deadrise at the bow?

29662968_10156169090048490_3047937855171

Are these hulls discussed in more detail anywhere else?  Beautiful!!

X Bow or Axe Bow?

Image result for an x bow vessel

Image result for axe bow vessel

    Either one I don't think is a valid description of this Gunboat. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Excellent angle, thank you.  Not an axe bow.

gb68_bow.thumb.jpg.110aca272ba83e2730990f603d2471ac.jpg

Very interesting profile.  Very close to a straight line from the bow to nearly half the length of the boat where the belly starts.

gb68_bow2.thumb.jpg.1a1b1b6fe6bd27962cd8445fb4921862.jpg

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi guys! 

This is all a bit subjective and I was certainly throwing the word 'axe' around loosely. 

I would say between a reverse/wave piercing and a reverse or swept back axe bow...probably more towards an axe bow. A pure wave piercing bow is what you find on Macif floats for instance, Macif was indeed an inspiration for the bow design during the conception of the Gunboat 68.

Here's an interesting article from a few years back that tried to sum in up. https://www.sailmagazine.com/multihulls/a-look-at-wave-piercing-bows-on-multihulls

Now, please stop posting photos of steel ships, they are making me cringe! ;)

Image result for Macif trimaran

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, Greenflash said:

Hi guys! 

This is all a bit subjective and I was certainly throwing the word 'axe' around loosely. 

I would say between a reverse/wave piercing and a reverse or swept back axe bow...probably more towards an axe bow. A pure wave piercing bow is what you find on Macif floats for instance, Macif was indeed an inspiration for the bow design during the conception of the Gunboat 68.

Here's an interesting article from a few years back that tried to sum in up. https://www.sailmagazine.com/multihulls/a-look-at-wave-piercing-bows-on-multihulls

 

From your link..

The question arises WTF were you thinking? 

First and foremost, there is the undeniable fact that reverse bows are wet—very wet—as they go more through the waves than over them. On a race boat this can be disregarded, but for a cruiser it could make doing a passage in a steep chop a miserable experience—even if you don’t consider the increased risk of being swept off the bow of the boat! And if you happen to own a catamaran with a forward cockpit and wave-piercing bows, then you can be sure that the cockpit will at times become nearly uninhabitable.

  • Downvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll take the journalists article from 2015 with a pinch of salt. The Gunboat 60, 55 series, the HH66 "Flash", HH55 Minnehaha are all sailing around quite happily with swept back bows and forward cockpits. In fact, the Irens (GB60,55)and VPLP designs (GB68) with the exterior design done by Chedal Anglay have rounded bow sections, I've personally seen how this is more effective in allowing water slamming against the hulls to peel over the top of the hull and shed the water, rather than creating a great big splash of water. These boats are drier as a result. There will always be situations where you get some spray, at that point I would go hang out at the aft bucket seat and tiller, or close the doors, put the autopilot on and open a beer. 

Remember, we don't have 'pure' wave piercing bows meant to plough deep through waves like floats on a Ultim, this is a cruising boat first and a racing boat second, the bows are designed with huge volume for sails and toy storage space, you aren't submarining these things in day to day sailing. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, Greenflash said:

Hi guys! 

This is all a bit subjective and I was certainly throwing the word 'axe' around loosely. 

I would say between a reverse/wave piercing and a reverse or swept back axe bow...probably more towards an axe bow. A pure wave piercing bow is what you find on Macif floats for instance, Macif was indeed an inspiration for the bow design during the conception of the Gunboat 68.

Here's an interesting article from a few years back that tried to sum in up. https://www.sailmagazine.com/multihulls/a-look-at-wave-piercing-bows-on-multihulls

Now, please stop posting photos of steel ships, they are making me cringe! ;)

Image result for Macif trimaran

Axe bow is kind of a bs/no definition term.  the closest I would come to a description of the gb is a reverse wave piercing bow

  • Downvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites