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      Abbreviated rules   07/28/2017

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LeoV

Jules Verne Trophy 2016

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If you compare Joyon's route to Coville ones in the down the Atlantic part, Coville almost had no slow down in the Doldrums, I'm afraid Joyon really lost an opportunity there ..

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The South Atlantic looks extremely tricky for Joyon, but maybe there is a small path allowing them to cut the corner with sufficient wind ?

Difficult to say just playing with Forss tracker

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Some kind of bug in my browser, now windyty makes sense again.

 

L. Peyron had a couple not so good days in the Pacific and a very long turn around the Azores high, there Joyon & his commando can catch up, they are not so far behind yet.

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For more than 20 years we have witnessed rapid innovation and improvement in ocean going sail boats. Weather prediction improvements and communications advances have improved to allow sailors to keep their fast boats in relatively favorable conditions far more often. The result has beenlong standing records have fallen by substantial margins. So we have become accustomed to watching the performance improve with such regularity.

 

These innovations have also pushed the sailors to work harder and better. (I recall race leaders formerly read books, no reports of that in the last decade.). So much they can do to squeeze all the knots out of these impressive boats. These latest attempts by Joyon and crew are to use those efforts of the sailors, and simplicity, rather than the technological improvements to boats or routing, to best an already high bar. If they succeed it won't be by a large margin brought by a 10-15% improvement in boat speed. That's the challenge here, and it seems rather Corinthian.

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L. Peyron had a couple not so good days in the Pacific and a very long turn around the Azores high, there Joyon & his commando can catch up, they are not so far behind yet.

 

Indeed, and in fact Peyron has neither the best time on good hope2 Lewin, or Lewin to the Horn (both best times by Idec/groupama), about the Atlantic up it will be a question of luck, and Peyron made a huge turn around the Azores, but with a great speed.

We will see !

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If Joyon manages to take below route (without going full South), they might have an ok time at good hope, maybe even good.

joyon2-e1482600566622.jpeg

 

At this morning vacation he said they would try.

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It's about time they turn East if they don't want to fall further behind.

But L. Peyron's BP was doing 30 kn and in 3 days got to Good Hope, I can't see IDEC Sport matching this with the forecasts.

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Joyon has complimented Coville :)

He has not said "It took you long enough!" XD

 

They seem happy about the weather forecast: no so fast as BP, but a shorter route to Good Hope.

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After 2 feints they are really going east at 34 knots.

The bad news: 730 nm , 24 hours behind the ghost of BP, who was also doing 34 kn ... as a 24 hours average.

 

But as I said before, it will be back in the Atlantic when the oportunities to get ahead will appear, till then just keeping pace seems difficult enough.

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Amazing emotional interview with Coville. What an effort.

 

Joyon's video was pretty funny

Not finding. Any chance you have a link to the video?

 

Looks like they have a nice track ahead for a bit to make some serious miles back. Be interesting to watch the 24 hour runs.

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855 nm sailed in the last 24 hours, at the average speed of 35.6 knots !!! How about that?

 

Now less than 550 nm behind Banque Populaire V.

From IDEC website, it seems that knowing the weather window for the Atlantic when they started, Francis Joyon was estimating: "if we are one to one and half day behind by Cape of Good Hope, it is OK".

They should be behind, but much less than 1 1/2 days when they cross the cape. They should also be able to keep that strong NNW wind well beyond Cape of Good Hope.

 

Crossed fingers...

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Amazing that Banque Populaire V still holds the 24-hour record at 908.2nm and 37.84 knots since 2009. Maybe these guys can break that, although I realize that is not their primary objective. Keeping the boat together while sailing fast is the goal.

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Amazing that Banque Populaire V still holds the 24-hour record at 908.2nm and 37.84 knots since 2009. Maybe these guys can break that, although I realize that is not their primary objective. Keeping the boat together while sailing fast is the goal.

 

That was not too long after the start of Bidegorry west to east transatlantic record if I remember well, great wind angle and flat sea.

Idec for sure could break the JV record (but BPV now Spindrift could most probably take it back)

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Only 366 nm behind, has averaged 35 kn for 2 days non stop.

 

IDEC sport and Sodebo have about the same size, with more or less the same sail area.

IDEC weight is reported at 18000 kg,

Sodebo Ultim had 7000 removed from Geronimo, but have not found how much have been added or the final weight.

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Probably the longest mileage ever with a sail during these 4 days at 36 knots average. I don't thin full foilers will do better in the future, but who knows.

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3 days at 35 knots.

They expect to be ahead of BP ghost before Leewin.

The small crew is relentless. It is amazing to see such consistent speed, just some 5% off the 24 hour record, but for days. It sounds like the train they are riding will keep carrying them too.

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Amazing speed for an incredible length of time. In the last article on their website, they explain that they HAVE to stay ahead of the front that is chasing them... which mean that they have to maintain an AVERAGE speed of 36 knots... If they can do so, the same weather system they caught before Cape of Good Hope will bring them all the way to Cape Leuwin. Has this been done before? One weather system across the Indian Ocean? When you look at the ghost track of BP, you can see that they had several gibes in the middle of the Indian Ocean, which seems to mean that they did not stay on the same system for the whole Indian Ocean crossing; right?

 

According to the WSSRC Record list, the Indian Ocean crossing outright record is currently held by Francis Joyon and was established last winter in 7 days. Are they going to shatter it? I guess so.

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If they keep this pace till Leuwin, they will cross the Indian Ocean in less than 5 days.

They are following almost the same path just 10 hours behind, but 3 kn faster than BP5, that had some hiccups after the Kerguelen.

 

Joyon : "We try to be near 40 kn. We are very motivated because it's a matter of not being caught by the low that is following us."

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Surprised to read that they are relying on changes in water temp as a part of their strategy to avoid ice. At close to 40 knots, that must be quite the sensor.

The water is at 4.4 °, we are watching a drop in temperature that would be linked to the approach of an iceberg. We had one this night very close to the boat, so we are hyper vigilent with that. One has the eyes permanently on the radar and on the temperature of the water. There are icebergs landing south of the Kerguelen, we will have to be very vigilant at that time.

Guessing that the ice leaves a trail of colder water that they can detect in enough time. Not fun.

Chrome trans from the day 15 report on http://www.fralo.info/jv01.html

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Coville also said that he used water temperature to minimize ice troubles, not going into water in less than 2ºC IIRC.

And I've read about it somewhere else.

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Coville also said that he used water temperature to minimize ice troubles, not going into water in less than 2ºC IIRC.

And I've read about it somewhere else.

 

Thought I'd read about 2º somewhere. Found it in your post #496 Can't recall any other links.

Don't think the Titanic used that technique :) Probably the oldest tech was "prayer."

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Believe me, the moment the portable temperature gauge was invented, it was onboard a ship, the ones doing the whaling in the North. Around 1650 or so, wild guess. Seen one in a maritime museum.

Just for that reason. And before that sailors knew the trick and just guessed temp.

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Bilan jour 12 - distance en 24h : 832.30 mn - moyenne : 34.68 nds - retard : 587.60 mn

Bilan jour 13 - distance en 24h : 872.80 mn - moyenne : 36.37 nds - retard : 369.20 mn

Bilan jour 14 - distance en 24h : 872.30 mn - moyenne : 36.35 nds - retard : 294 mn

Bilan jour 15 - distance en 24h : 869.40 mn - moyenne : 36.23 nds - retard : 117.40 mn

 

And it keeps going on !

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Bilan jour 12 - distance en 24h : 832.30 mn - moyenne : 34.68 nds - retard : 587.60 mn

Bilan jour 13 - distance en 24h : 872.80 mn - moyenne : 36.37 nds - retard : 369.20 mn

Bilan jour 14 - distance en 24h : 872.30 mn - moyenne : 36.35 nds - retard : 294 mn

Bilan jour 15 - distance en 24h : 869.40 mn - moyenne : 36.23 nds - retard : 117.40 mn

 

And it keeps going on !

That is astounding.

 

 

If Joyon pulls this off he'll surely be the greatest- solo record which stood close to a decade, now pushing hard to break a record set by arguably a faster boat.

Doing it with a small crew too.

Chapeau.

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2 more days like this and they will beat their own Indian Ocean record.

Seeing those speeds with the boat loaded for TJV, they are already thinking of new projects.

I guess that means either the 24h or the NewYork - CapLizard (or both) records.

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Sebastien Destremau, one of the last competitors in the current Vendee Globe, is talking of IDEC an Francis Joyon rushing behing him... It's pretty funny.

 

On the French version of his video, he says that Joyon is sailing towards him at Mach 2...

 

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Almost there: retard: 0.6 nm; by Leeuwin they will be ahead :)

by 24 hours, and 48 hours while passing New Zealand. At current pace they would be at least 5 days (120 hours) ahead while passing Cap Horn if they stay at the same latitude.

Sub 40 days circumnavigation? Or slowed down at some point.

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They hope that the front that is propelling them since the Atlantic will last to Tasmania, but I doubt very much that they can ride it all the way across the Pacific too.

And then there's Cape Horn, either too much wind or not enough, it's always delicate.

And, after seeing how many hundreds of miles has lost ALC to AT in a matter of days, going north the Atlantic seems always dicey.

 

But lets hope :)

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It seems they have rudder problems when they hit 44 knots :blink:

A nice place to follow the JV with lots of statistics.

Where did you find the rudder comment?

 

Wow what a runway. Looks like they have a reasonable shot to be able to ride this system all the way across the Indian and into the Pacific without a single gybe if they can keep this pace. Dang!

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It seems they have rudder problems when they hit 44 knots :blink:

A nice place to follow the JV with lots of statistics.

 

my kind of site. Thanks

 

+1, thanks. If IDEC continues its over 800 mile per day pace until Leeuwin, it looks like they may shave off nearly a day from the reference time for that mark, and it will be the first time (in both tries) that IDEC will have established an intermediate reference time. Go fast!

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It seems they have rudder problems when they hit 44 knots :blink:

A nice place to follow the JV with lots of statistics.

Where did you find the rudder comment?

 

Wow what a runway. Looks like they have a reasonable shot to be able to ride this system all the way across the Indian and into the Pacific without a single gybe if they can keep this pace. Dang!

 

The rudder comment is on day 15th transcription of the audio podcasts they put on soundcloud, you can hear complete audios here, it's the Joyon's interview for the 30/12/2016.

It seems that they have choosen tweeter to broadcast news.

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In 18~24 hours the low they have behind will kinda merge with a low coming from the north, IF they can jump ahead, that seems to go past New Zealand in 3 days, if not, the sea state may force them to slow down.

At 870 nm per day is barely possible.

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BP only had 1 day above 800 m. These guys are having 6 in a row. I still can't explain how this boat can make such performances after 12 years. Maybe they never push it so hard like now. I hope they don't brake it. It will be ugly at those speeds.

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It already broke during the first attempt by Frank Camas, with the higher mast and more crew and weight. It was reinforced both sides.

It seems that the modifications to be driven solo that allowed Camas and Loick Peyron in the next edition to win the Cup du Rhum actually made it lighter but also better overall.

The conditions across the Indian ocean have been almost perfect, almost like the North Atlantic race with BP5 that Bidegorry won, and there both boats went over 900 nm in 24 hours.

Wind is turning north now, and things will be more complicated with the crossed seas, but first they talked about keeping it to Leeuwin, then Tasmania, now New Zealand ...

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There is also Joyon's original strategy on this JV project (both 2015 and 2016 attempts).

 

- Keep the small mast -at a cost in the Atlantic - as he felt the better balanced boat would be behaving better, down South, without the "added" topmast

- Maximise the down South performance in aiming to keep as much as possible at "Lows" speed (which they seem to do)

- In this order, go for a commando of singlehanded sailors, with the idea that the boat would be hand-steered, and instill a contest between helmsmen (lots of fast ones on board) to max polars % attained. .

 

Up to now he seems to stick to that strategy with some success.

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The French version of the IDEC Sport Sailing website has a bit more articles than the English version...

 

Last post, just to show how they get used to those incredible speeds...

 

Comment from Francis Joyon:

"Last night, I woke up and we were sailing at 30 knots: I thought we were stopped!"

 

Other comment from Sébastien Audigane:

"40 knots, it's heaven! Below that, it's boring!"

 

We do not have the same references...

 

From the (crude) map on the official website, it looks like they could keep more or less the same system all the way to south of New-Zealand, which they could reach in 3 days from now...

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Before they reach New Zealand they will have been from 15ºW hooked on the front of the same low half the way around the Antartica, 10 days.

It really looks possible !!

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Their track line from the moment they turned East is just incredible. Almost straight with large spaces between the dots. Almost 400 miles ahead now.

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Funny, they straight line it on a globe.

They soon are catching up wit the back of the VG fleet :)

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Any bets on their position at the end within the VG fleet ? :)

 

The VG is at its 56 almost 57 days

Gabart made it 78 days

Let's say the winner of the current one makes 73 days

That's 16 days left (tough but possible )

 

Joyon is at 17 days, record 47, so that's 30 days left

 

I bet on Joyon and crew being ..... 5th

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I'll say 7th, after the two Jean's and Jann. Still, that's passing twelve VG boats. I hope they have their locations on their screen! And that maybe some are close enough for video. I recall a video, was it of BPV?, of one of these massive trimarans passing a cruising cat in the North Atlantic and the speed was amazing and a little shocking for the cat crew.

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Thanks for the find. And at least BP passed to leeward.

 

So, IDEC has 19 hrs to beat the Leeuwin intermediate record?

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Thanks for the find. And at least BP passed to leeward.

 

So, IDEC has 19 hrs to beat the Leeuwin intermediate record?

 

Thks for making me think to check ;)

 

Done !!

 

IDEC SPORT crossed Cap Leeuwin longitude at 15 hours 18 minutes (GMT), 17 days, 06 hours, 59 minutes after starting, that is close to 16 hours 57 minutes ahead of BP V reference time (17 days, 23 hours, 56 minutes); average SOG is above 28 knots.

 

Indian Ocean Record between Cape Agulhas and Cape Leeuwin is totally shattered in 4 days, 09 hours, 37 minutes; that's 1 day, 1 hour, 46 minutes less than Francis Joyon's standing record (5 days, 11 hours, 23 minutes in 2015) et 1 jour, 12 heures ;Banque Populaire V had needed 6 days and 8 minutes on this section of the course.

The Indian Ocean has been crossed at an average SOG of 35.08 knots (3 705 miles).

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That's an amazing achievement for a smaller boat. Says it's mostly about the perfect conditions.

 

mostly about a faster boat.

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That's an amazing achievement for a smaller boat. Says it's mostly about the perfect conditions.

 

mostly about a faster boat.

 

 

faster boat ? I don't thnik it is, but pushed much harder that's for sure.

(BPV/spindrift 2 has probably not been pushed to its full potential yet, fr from it)

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I'm sure BPV was pushed very hard during the North Atlantic record when it got the 24 hours record too.

 

IDECsport has began it's 8th day riding in front of the low, speed has gone down a bit, with the wind and the seas going NNE, but 717 miles in 24 hours still is pretty good.

And they say that the Pacific looks better than last year :)

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I'm sure BPV was pushed very hard during the North Atlantic record when it got the 24 hours record too.

 

IDECsport has began it's 8th day riding in front of the low, speed has gone down a bit, with the wind and the seas going NNE, but 717 miles in 24 hours still is pretty good.

And they say that the Pacific looks better than last year :)

 

To put things into perspective, they had a "bad" Pacific (Tasmania to Horn) last year as did BP V earlier ( 10 days 17-18 hours), when Coville has just crossed it in 8d 18 hours - 20' short of Orange II long standing overall record).

 

It somehow makes that ocean a key leg in their attempt.

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I'm sure BPV was pushed very hard during the North Atlantic record when it got the 24 hours record too.

 

IDECsport has began it's 8th day riding in front of the low, speed has gone down a bit, with the wind and the seas going NNE, but 717 miles in 24 hours still is pretty good.

And they say that the Pacific looks better than last year :)

 

Yes for sure, but with Peyron and Guichard on the JV I have a feeling they "kept some under their foot"(as we say in french)

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I'm sure BPV was pushed very hard during the North Atlantic record when it got the 24 hours record too.

 

IDECsport has began it's 8th day riding in front of the low, speed has gone down a bit, with the wind and the seas going NNE, but 717 miles in 24 hours still is pretty good.

And they say that the Pacific looks better than last year :)

 

Yes for sure, but with Peyron and Guichard on the JV I have a feeling they "kept some under their foot"(as we say in french)

 

 

Having been 3 days ahead of Groupama all the way from Cape Horn, this sounds plausible for Peyron who had little experience with that boat at the start.

 

But why should Guichard have done that when he was not ahead of Peyron's time (or not more than a few hours) ?

Betting everything on the Atlantic ?

Having such a big beast in his hands that pushing it really hard was beyond human capabilities ?

 

I have kind of understood that the latest possibility is what triggered Joyon's strategy.

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If I translated correctly, IDEC will get the official Indian Ocean record in about 300 nm.

Précisions utiles : le WSSRC, seul organisme certificateur des records mondiaux, a décidé en 2005 que le record de l'Océan Indien devait être calculé du Cap des Aiguilles à la Pointe Sud de la Tasmanie. Par la force des choses, le Cap de Bonne Espérance et le Cap Leeuwin sont tombés en désuétude, même s'ils constituent encore une marque de passage symbolique. Les temps constatés aujourd'hui ne sont donc que des temps intermédiaires de référence

http://www.fralo.info/jv01.html

 

The shorter mast enabling the boat to better work the speeds of the lows seems to pay off. Impressive they gambled on a forecast two weeks ahead.

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If the boat is faster now because the mast is 8 m shorter and 2 T lighter then is a faulty design by the architects when first planned. Reality check is that this vessel is the fastest in the planet riding a low. Still doing 800 m a day for more than a week now and probably by Cape Horn she will have cut the record by 5 days. I can't believe F. Cammas didn't realize that 10 years ago. And he is good at that probably the best) when helming a multi-hull.

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BP had quite some difficulties before the Hoorn and if they manage to avoid that it would be a great jump forward.

BUT beware of the South Atlantic. Look at th VG!

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Could be almost 2 days ahead post NZ!

If they can't catch the previous low developing east of NZ they will practically stop with hardly any wind at all in the south latitudes or have to climb quite a lot further north making the pass slow.

Although they have a good chance to catch it, just need to be somewhere around 49 South 175 West by 6th January 06 UTC. Managing to do that should result wind all the way to Cap horn, if wintytv predictions hold.

 

But first they need to across the front twice, the one they are dropping behind before 06 UTC resulting winds becoming further west (TWD < 300 degs).

And it seems it's not possible to keep that front behind them all the time if the wind prediction on their site is correct, as that requires moving 13 degs longitude east in just 12 hours from 138 East into 151 east.

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Any bets on their position at the end within the VG fleet ? :)

 

The VG is at its 56 almost 57 days

Gabart made it 78 days

Let's say the winner of the current one makes 73 days

That's 16 days left (tough but possible )

 

Joyon is at 17 days, record 47, so that's 30 days left

 

I bet on Joyon and crew being ..... 5th

The record is 45d 13 hours 42 min 53 s, so only 27 days left to make it in time.

Or 28 at the time you wrote that, not 30.

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Considering the boat accomplished exactly the goals it was designed for more than a decade ago and continues to set outright records year after year under various configurations, I think you meant to say that the boat is an absolutely brilliant design, perfectly executed.

 

If the boat is faster now because the mast is 8 m shorter and 2 T lighter then is a faulty design by the architects when first planned.

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VPLP was saying in their congratulatory message for Coleville http://www.vplp.fr/news/93/60/From-Geronimo-to-Sodebo-Ultim-fifteen-innovative-years.html that his success supports their position that there is lots of room to develop these older boats and none of the big tris are therefore obsolete. We are evidently seeing the same thing with IDEC and it shows that going out and doing it is the only way to know where to develop next.

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Could be almost 2 days ahead post NZ!

 

And it seems it's not possible to keep that front behind them all the time if the wind prediction on their site is correct, as that requires moving 13 degs longitude east in just 12 hours from 138 East into 151 east

On days 13, 14 and 15, they crossed around 23 degrees of longitude in each 24 hours, or about a degree per hour for 72 hours. I agree it seems not possible to sail that fast, but they're doing it!

 

It looks like the WSSRC record for the Indian Ocean crossing it coming right up, looking like it will be around 1.5 days ahead, with over 1,000 mile lead.

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I'm sure BPV was pushed very hard during the North Atlantic record when it got the 24 hours record too.

 

IDECsport has began it's 8th day riding in front of the low, speed has gone down a bit, with the wind and the seas going NNE, but 717 miles in 24 hours still is pretty good.

And they say that the Pacific looks better than last year :)

 

Yes for sure, but with Peyron and Guichard on the JV I have a feeling they "kept some under their foot"(as we say in french)

 

 

Having been 3 days ahead of Groupama all the way from Cape Horn, this sounds plausible for Peyron who had little experience with that boat at the start.

 

But why should Guichard have done that when he was not ahead of Peyron's time (or not more than a few hours) ?

Betting everything on the Atlantic ?

Having such a big beast in his hands that pushing it really hard was beyond human capabilities ?

 

I have kind of understood that the latest possibility is what triggered Joyon's strategy.

 

 

For Guichard, it was also his first major "race" on the boat, no ?

 

 

By the way what is happening with spindrift 2 team ? Anybody knows ?

I guess the accident at the start of the VOR leg in Lorient must have put a serious "down" on the whole thing ...

 

Edit :

They will go back for it in 2017 :

 

 

Enfin, le bateau amiral de Spindrift racing, le Maxi Trimaran Spindrift 2, sera lui aussi au cœur de la saison avec une nouvelle tentative de record du Trophée Jules Verne pendant l’hiver 2017-2018.

« Avant ce grand rendez-vous, nous avions à l’origine prévu de courir THE BRIDGE, course transatlantique entre Saint-Nazaire et New-York. Malheureusement l’avis de course (pre notice of race) sorti récemment restreint le nombre d’équipiers à bord à 6 dans la catégorie Ultime ouverte à tous les grands multicoques, nous empêchant ainsi de participer avec Spindrift 2, un bateau optimisé pour 12 à 14 personnes en vue de la prochaine tentative de Trophée Jules Verne. Dans cette configuration, en équipage réduit, hormis les questions de sécurité qui se posent, il y a celle de la performance. Nous ne pourrons pas exploiter tout le potentiel sportif de Spindrift 2 pour tenter de battre le Queen Mary II. Ainsi cette année nous ne ferons pas de Transatlantique mais des records européens (comme le Tour des Iles Britanniques, record de la Manche, Tour de l’Irlande etc.) dans le cadre de notre campagne d’entraînement au Trophée Jules Verne », conclut Yann Guichard.

 

 

http://www.spindrift-racing.com/fr/news/spindrift-racing-annonce-son-programme-sportif-2017-fr

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VPLP was saying in their congratulatory message for Coleville http://www.vplp.fr/news/93/60/From-Geronimo-to-Sodebo-Ultim-fifteen-innovative-years.html that his success supports their position that there is lots of room to develop these older boats and none of the big tris are therefore obsolete. We are evidently seeing the same thing with IDEC and it shows that going out and doing it is the only way to know where to develop next.

Sodebo Ultime keeps from Geronimo the crossbeams ( that had to be reinforced to support the C-foils ) and part of the floats, not including the bow that was redesigned. Everything else is new or from somewhere else, to me it seems a bit of an exageration to call this development.

IDECsport OTOH is a development for short handed crew of a development for solo sailing from the original Groupama 3.

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While they have been delivering great speeds for the last while these graphs from their data show that in fact they have been sailing at way less than max VMG recently....seems like they throttle back once they hit 33 knots so at least they have some performance in reserve when it comes to the merge of the 2 lows in the next couple of days.

[Edit] on the x-axis 0 = now, done in 2 day divisions of 96 time stamps (30 min intervals). Just looked, 1060 nm ahead :)

Average VMG to date is 84.45% of max

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post-41572-0-45048400-1483494084_thumb.jpg

post-41572-0-14378000-1483494086_thumb.jpg

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I am following it in silence, this is so out of my experience level, I can not find anything to say other then, awesome...

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While they have been delivering great speeds for the last while these graphs from their data show that in fact they have been sailing at way less than max VMG recently....seems like they throttle back once they hit 33 knots so at least they have some performance in reserve when it comes to the merge of the 2 lows in the next couple of days.

[Edit] on the x-axis 0 = now, done in 2 day divisions of 96 time stamps (30 min intervals). Just looked, 1060 nm ahead :)

Average VMG to date is 84.45% of max

hmmm not sure that I am following...the VMG will be dependent on the angle they are sailing relative to the ideal route at a particular moment, so even if they are sailing 100% VMG it doesn't mean that they go any fast in case they are sailing with the wrong sails. ...or is there something I am missing?

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While they have been delivering great speeds for the last while these graphs from their data show that in fact they have been sailing at way less than max VMG recently....seems like they throttle back once they hit 33 knots so at least they have some performance in reserve when it comes to the merge of the 2 lows in the next couple of days.

[Edit] on the x-axis 0 = now, done in 2 day divisions of 96 time stamps (30 min intervals). Just looked, 1060 nm ahead :)

Average VMG to date is 84.45% of max

hmmm not sure that I am following...the VMG will be dependent on the angle they are sailing relative to the ideal route at a particular moment, so even if they are sailing 100% VMG it doesn't mean that they go any fast in case they are sailing with the wrong sails. ...or is there something I am missing?

 

I think that VMC - Velocity made along Course - should be used for these graphs. It is not VMG - velocity made good up or down wind.

 

Stunning performance to keep the boat at these speeds for so long.

 

I wonder if the WSSRC keeps records for the greatest distance in one week - these guys would have smashed that one.

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