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Thomas Coville RTW attempt 2016

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His routing has been spectacular. It looks like he's set up to work that narrow band for the next day or two. Might be another jibe fest coming since it's pretty DDW.

 

Agree. The routing is mainly Nélias' work, right?

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You ask, and you will get...

 

"

Conditions are not really easy for the past 24 hrs. Big swell, and winds between 30 and 40 knots. The sea state is not very well organized, and the Indian Ocean is giving me a hard time. I am going towards the Kergelen Islands, one of the least welcoming places on Earth; and it is getting really cold...

Yesterday, I had to do some repair, sitting at the back of the float, horse-riding style, to fix the rudder system. It was kind of hairy playing the tight-rope walker in the middle of nowhere.. But now, it is fixed and well done!

I may not look like it, but as we speak, we are barrelling down at 32 knots.

Those transition zones, from one system to the next are tiring...

See you!

"

Thank you so much!

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His routing has been spectacular. It looks like he's set up to work that narrow band for the next day or two. Might be another jibe fest coming since it's pretty DDW.

Agree. The routing is mainly Nélias' work, right?

Yep, and backed up by Sam Davies.

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Thomas should extend in the coming days... Straight line all the way to Tasmania. Lets see if he can hook up the low under New Zealand in a week.

 

P.S.

Transat: Keep up the good work...

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Thomas should extend in the coming days... Straight line all the way to Tasmania. Lets see if he can hook up the low under New Zealand in a week.

 

P.S.

Transat: Keep up the good work...

 

+1

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A bit more explanation in the video ^^^^ about his trip to the ama rudder I explained in post #94.

 

He hit a whale, the boat stopped and he flew on the boat and hit his knee and was hurt. The rod connecting the ama rudder to the other 2 broke because of the shock; so the ama rudder was "free wheeling".

He attached himself (of course) and wanted first to take some pictures of the breakage. He was sitting on top of the ama, and felt that he was sliding away to the outside of the ama. He let go the camera and reached to grab something to hold on...

His comment is: even if you are tied to the boat, even if I slowed down the boat to go to the ama rudder, if I slip on the side of the ama, if a wave catches me, it is over...

 

So like so many boats in the Vendee Globe, he hit something too....

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A bit more explanation in the video ^^^^ about his trip to the ama rudder I explained in post #94.

 

He hit a whale, the boat stopped and he flew on the boat and hit his knee and was hurt. The rod connecting the ama rudder to the other 2 broke because of the shock; so the ama rudder was "free wheeling".

He attached himself (of course) and wanted first to take some pictures of the breakage. He was sitting on top of the ama, and felt that he was sliding away to the outside of the ama. He let go the camera and reached to grab something to hold on...

His comment is: even if you are tied to the boat, even if I slowed down the boat to go to the ama rudder, if I slip on the side of the ama, if a wave catches me, it is over...

 

So like so many boats in the Vendee Globe, he hit something too....

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His routing has been spectacular. It looks like he's set up to work that narrow band for the next day or two. Might be another jibe fest coming since it's pretty DDW.

Agree. The routing is mainly Nélias' work, right?

Yep, and backed up by Sam Davies.

 

 

Yes! I wondered who else was on the routing team, and couldn't find a quick answer. She's a great choice, and since she'll be studying the paths ahead to see Romain's options, guess it wasn't much of an extra obligation for her.

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Thomas is getting close to 24 hr distance record... some 60 miles missing to his personal record and app. 120 nm to Gabart's 784 nm...

 

He needs to be "only" 18% faster... ;)

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On Sodebo site, there is an interview of Jean-Luc Nelias who explains how they work out the ice thing.

Basically, they do the route first, not taking into account ice. Once they have established the best course, then they get the satellite images. It is not clearly said in the interview, but my understanding is that they have to buy each photo from the satellite company... and I guess this is not cheap...

The pictures show blocks as small as 100 m (330 ft); then they have another software estimating the "plume" where the growlers could be due to currents.

If it interferes with the optimum route, they re-work it...

 

When Thomas was gibing back and forth below South Africa, they estimated that he was getting 30 miles from the growlers before jibing back to North East. And then he had to quickly jibe again to avoid getting becalmed. Truly, Nelias says, he had a 20 miles wide corridor to stay within.

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New video from Coville, he his with 3 reefs in the mainsail :

 

 

 

"

Here we go, reduced sails, I cannot make it smaller: 3 reefs. The sea state is heavy, but we have seen worse...

But we can't see a thing! It is dark and not very welcoming...

Days like this are very important; they are hard. But you have to work them well, because they allow you to get to the next level. It is a little bit like an exam! You must not fail!

We have been in strong winds for close to 10 days now, and it is tiring.

Speeds are high; another day at 30 knots average speed.

The Indian Ocean is almost over. He has been up to its reputation! (Thomas laughing)

We are going to start the Pacific Ocean, and I think the name is misleading...

Have a good evening...

I just learned that the All Blacks beat the Rugby French team... That's the only thing I know from the outside world! Not too many news in the past few days...

 

Good evening!

"

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His routing has been spectacular. It looks like he's set up to work that narrow band for the next day or two. Might be another jibe fest coming since it's pretty DDW.

Agree. The routing is mainly Nélias' work, right?

Yep, and backed up by Sam Davies.

 

found a link to the weather team at http://www.cotebrest.fr/2016/11/03/voile-thomas-coville-veut-retenter-le-record-du-tour-du-monde-en-solitaire/

Il sera guidé par un quatuor de spécialistes de la météo et du routage : Jean-Luc Nélias, Thierry Douillard, Thierry Briend et Samantha Davies.

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So at Cap Leuwinn, he is 1 day 12 hours and 19 minutes ahead of Francis Joyon.

 

On Sodebo website, there is a small article with a bit more details about the Cap Leuwinn landmark: Thomas explained that it has been fog and continuous rain for the past 5 days. Ambient temperature is 0°C to 1°C; with the wind factor, more like -5°C. And he almost lost a jib.

 

"

It was night time, the boat was going really fast; 25 to 30 knots. I was going to change jib and lower a sail of 140 kg, about twice my own weight. I was putting it down when one of the sheets fell in the water. With those speeds, the sheet was pulling the sail into the water; I reacted very quickly and just in time to catch it. I even burnt my hands in the process to avoid for the sail to fall in the water. I was able to recover the sail and the sheet. It took me 1h45m. I was exhausted. It ended up well. I was all sweaty and freezing at the same time.

 

The hardest part this time around was a few days ago; I had 7 to 8 meter swells, I felt the boat was really small and me even smaller. The Indian Ocean is the worst place on the planet; each time, I tell myself that it is not a place for men, but a place for birds.

"

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With al the claims of records being challenged and broken this RTW season, I'm confused what record has tumbled. E.g., can't find a defined "Ushant to Leuwin" or Ushant to Cap Horn/ Agulas course. Help?

 

Here are the found-so-far start/end points used for Intermediate points on round-the-world records that can be considered "official":

 

 

26.3 INTERMEDIATE ROUND THE WORLD RECORDS

a. South Indian Ocean.
Western limit: Cape Agulhas, crossing the meridian 20° E
Eastern limit: The southern point of Tasmania, South East Cape, crossing the meridian 146° 49'.E.

b. South Pacific Ocean.
Western limit: the southern point of Tasmania, South East Cape, crossing the meridian 146° 49' E.
Eastern limit: Cape Horn crossing the meridian 67° 16' W.

c. South Atlantic.
Western limit: Cape Horn crossing the meridian 67° 16' W
Eastern limit: Cape Agulhas crossing the meridian 20° E.

d. Equator to Equator.
From the North Atlantic Ocean: Equator, Cape Agulhas, around Antarctic Continent, Cape Horn, Equator.

e. North Atlantic Ushant start to Equator. (for Round the World attempts starting at Ushant.

https://www.sailspeedrecords.com/the-courses-offshore

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Wow. 21 days 3 hours to Cape Leeuwin and already east of my longitude already. Keep it up Thomas

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Laurent,

 

My deep appreciation for your language skills and understanding of sailing go back many years at this point. It is always a treat to read your contributions and gain a small, but vital, window into the actions of these brave and skillful men in the Southern Ocean.

 

I look forward to many more acts of kindness on your part and wish you well. I'm liberally swiping these reports of yours and adding them to my own running account of the present journey by Thomas Coville with full attribution. My FB site is: https://www.facebook.com/Lunada-Design-169605889877937/

 

Merci

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He has just now crossed the thousand nautical mile threshold. It is a combination of boat speed, as you suggest and his willingness to risk a much shorter route around Antarctica. His risk?... that he has entered a zone where bergy bits could quickly end his run. There must be incredible radar support from his ground crew to allow such a strategy. I stand back and watch in awe while Coville continues to bank the miles in his favor, knowing that he might run out of wind at some point and really need the lead they provide.

 

Very heady stuff going on right now.

 

http://tour-du-monde.sodebo.com/

.

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Good!

 

Demain matin au passage de la Tasmanie, Thomas Coville devrait empocher un nouveau record WSSRC : celui de l'Océan Indien

Translated from French by BingWrong translation?

Tomorrow morning the passage of Tasmania, Thomas Coville should pocket a new WSSRC record: that of the Indian Ocean

 

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Diving to 58-8 South.... ballssssssss

 

Cool. Guess the routing team bought more satellite photos and see a clear path ahead, and he's taking it. Gutsy call indeed.

 

Perhaps other races will see how Coville and his team deals with ice and maybe try his model.

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It is only weather routing. He will have to make a sharp turn towards NZ i.e. NE in a day or two.

 

Well, that's easy for you to say in the comfort of your home with the heater on. ;-)

 

That turn will be more like a gentle arc to take full advantage of the wind. Until he crosses the path laid by Joyon, every mile traveled will add to his lead. Even then, better boat speed will still add miles. I think he is banking the mileage when he can, knowing the crap that happened his last time around that cost him the record. This is beginning to shape into quite a story.

 

.

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Wow. Brass monkey's all round down there. I'm guessing he's trying to hook on to the system in front of him to bring him out of the deep south.

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Record hes trying to beat is 57 days. Fully crewed record is 45 days and change. Hes 22.5 days in right now, 1,000 miles ahead of the solo record, and 1,400 miles past the halfway point around the world. Make of that what you will.

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Diving to 58-8 South.... ballssssssss

 

Sooo Cooool

 

COV_2016_11_28_1800_000hrs.png

Thanks for posting your charts in both this thread and the VG thread! Your contribution is appreciated. (So much so, let's ignore the rules :) for now)

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Is he anywhere close to the fully crewed record?

 

Here is BPV´s record from 2011/2012:

http://banquepopulaire.geovoile.fr/julesverne/2011/

 

BPV was south of Australia after 20 days so he is about 2 days behind.

But Groupama 3 (record holder before BPV) was south of Australia after 23 days, so he is 1 day faster than the old crewed record.

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Isn't he coming close to breaking the 24 hr record as well, for solo? I've checked at not consistent times over the last couple of days, and it appears Thomas is nearing 700 miles in 24 hrs at times. Even if not, he is doing way over the top of awesomeness here!

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Isn't he coming close to breaking the 24 hr record as well, for solo? I've checked at not consistent times over the last couple of days, and it appears Thomas is nearing 700 miles in 24 hrs at times. Even if not, he is doing way over the top of awesomeness here!

 

Indeed. Has a way to go to beat 2016 "MACIF" 100ft Tri, Francois Gabart FRA, 784NM, 32.67 kts https://www.sailspeedrecords.com/24-hour-distance

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Record hes trying to beat is 57 days. Fully crewed record is 45 days and change. Hes 22.5 days in right now, 1,000 miles ahead of the solo record, and 1,400 miles past the halfway point around the world. Make of that what you will.

Yes. If he keeps this up he will beat both records.

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Is he anywhere close to the fully crewed record?

 

Here is BPV´s record from 2011/2012:

http://banquepopulaire.geovoile.fr/julesverne/2011/

 

BPV was south of Australia after 20 days so he is about 2 days behind.

But Groupama 3 (record holder before BPV) was south of Australia after 23 days, so he is 1 day faster than the old crewed record.

 

 

Got the Indian Ocean Record as well (Agulhas-Tasmania) by nearly a day from Joyon, but ....

On that section, if 1 d 13h slower than Joyon crewed in 2015, he was just 5 hours slower than BP V !!!

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Going to be a wild, wet, cold, and fast next 48 hours as he hooks into the next system in front of him and rides the strong SWesterly on starboard gybe. Hang on there Thomas!

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Cybhyq0UcAAXrvJ.jpgNelias Jean-Luc@jlnelias 1h

1 hour agoView translation

Venté cet indien en 8J13h18mn.Record battu. Vitesse moyenne 25.94 nds @UltimBoat @Sodebo_voile

Translated from French by BingWrong translation?

Windy this Indian in 8J13h18mn.Record beaten. Average speed 25.94 nds @UltimBoat @Sodebo_voile

 

 

Do you think the grey triangles are icebergs and the little blue dots growlers?

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Major bummer that FJ didn't take the same start as TC. Not only would it have been a drag race of the ages to watch go down, but if TC gets the new solo record, it would be like a double slap in the face.

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For the second time in this Jules Verne attempt, Coville is a full, two-days of sailing in advance of the astounding record set by Francis Joyon, with lots of miles to go. He is presently solidly locked into a strong low pressure system with steady boat speeds in the high 20's as he charts a clear path to Tierra del Fuego.

 

Coville is no fool and he remembers the last time he was pressing for the record when his wind crapped-out off the coast of Brazil with Ushant virtually in sight and came home two days shy of the record. He is, no doubt, banking these miles now when he has such a sweet ride on a very fast and solid boat, knowing it could all go away with the miles still left to sail. There's no free lunch with so many variables on any given day.

 

.

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Cybhyq0UcAAXrvJ.jpgNelias Jean-Luc@jlnelias 1h

1 hour agoView translation

Venté cet indien en 8J13h18mn.Record battu. Vitesse moyenne 25.94 nds @UltimBoat @Sodebo_voile

Translated from French by BingWrong translation?

 

Windy this Indian in 8J13h18mn.Record beaten. Average speed 25.94 nds @UltimBoat @Sodebo_voile

 

 

Do you think the grey triangles are icebergs and the little blue dots growlers?

 

 

I think the answer might be here, but my French is too poor to tell

For the second time in this Jules Verne attempt, Coville is a full, two-days of sailing in advance of the astounding record set by Francis Joyon, with lots of miles to go. He is presently solidly locked into a strong low pressure system with steady boat speeds in the high 20's as he charts a clear path to Tierra del Fuego.

 

Coville is no fool and he remembers the last time he was pressing for the record when his wind crapped-out off the coast of Brazil with Ushant virtually in sight and came home two days shy of the record. He is, no doubt, banking these miles now when he has such a sweet ride on a very fast and solid boat, knowing it could all go away with the miles still left to sail. There's no free lunch with so many variables on any given day.

 

+1

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"

We just crossed one ocean...

And not any ocean, the Indian Ocean. Each time, this is the one I am the most fearful of. This is the one which is the hardest... And this time, well.... We shall see! (Thomas laughing). We'll see how the other ones will be.

We did a really good time. We have just a bit more than 2 days cushion, compared to Francis Joyon record, our reference time. I am very happy today to switch over to the Pacific Ocean, with 2 days ahead of the record.

Of course, when you are ahead, you are pumped up! Now, next mark: Cape Horn! (Thomas eating)

I had a good time... I had a really good time!

The good news is that the Pacific routing should be a little bit more North, so a little bit warmer...

(Computer bipping)

They are calling me at the office...

 

Thanks a lot.

Kisses!

See ya!

"

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[...]

 

Thanks a lot.

Kisses!

See ya!

"

 

You too.

 

 

 

great, thanks for translating, Laurent.

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Great, in my mind the Pacific Ocean is always the worst, have to learn from guys actually been there.Indian ocean is the worst, got it...

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His problem now is he is too fast for this low pressure system, which is moving too slowly, hence his gybe north. What a pain for him, having caught up to it. I wonder if he will be faced with the question at some point, like Joyon did just before Cape Horn, of whether to go straight through one of them.

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Looks like he needs to jump on to the next one in front of him. He might just hook on to the tail of it in about 24 hours.If he does he'll have the escalator all the way to the corner :)

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By the way, Coville's Sodebo (ex Geronimo) is almost as big as Idec, and has in fact a bigger mast :

 

Sodebo Ultim :

Nom : Sodebo Ultim'

Numéro : 73 (En référence à la création de Sodebo par Simone et Joseph Bougro en 1973)
Architectes : cabinet VPLP (Van Peteghem-Lauriot Prévost)

Structure : HDS

Structures : Hervé Devaux Structures et Gsea Design

Réalisation plateforme : chantier Multiplast et team Sodebo
Mise à l’eau : mai 2014
Longueur : 31m
Largeur : 21,20m

Constructeur mât : Lorima
Hauteur mât : 35m
Corde mât : 1,20m

Tirant d’air : 37m

Conception et fabrication voiles : North Sails

Surface GV : 283m2
Surface voiles max au près : 444m2
Surface voiles max au portant : 663m2

3m2 d'espace de vie de plain-pied

Cockpit avec 1 colonne et 6 winchs
400m2 de filets de dyneema

https://www.sodebo.com/fr/voile/sodebo-et-la-voile/teams-bateaux/le-sodebo-ultim

Idec :

  • Architectes : Cabinet VPLP (Van Péteghem-Lauriot Prévost)
  • Noms précédents : Groupama 3, Banque Populaire VII
  • Longueur : 31,50 m
  • Largeur : 22,50 m
  • Déplacement : 18 000 kg
  • Tirant d’eau : 5,70 m
  • Hauteur du mât : 33,50 m
  • Structure : carbone-Nomex
  • Voilure au près : 411 m2
  • Voilure au portant : 678 m2
  • Date de la première mise à l’eau : juin 2006

http://www.idecsport-sailing.com/le-bateau/

And Macif (Gabard will probably go for the solo record next year), just a bit smaller , but also a bigger mast than Idec :

trimaran-schema-01_0.png

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In 5 days or so entering the Atlantic... there the real difficulties start weatherwise.

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In 5 days or so entering the Atlantic... there the real difficulties start weatherwise.

 

Hmm. 5 days sounds about right, but even with the uncertainty of a 5 day forecast, there look to be some decent lows forming that he might be able to ride up to the equator (on the Universal tracker). Am I missing something like a hurricane forecast?

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Horn expected for the night of Wednesday to Thursday.

I'm not sure whether it refers to French night or Coville's night ... but it's about 5 hours difference only.

 

I like these antartic projections !

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It's awesome he is so far ahead and having such an excellent run! TC has been at it so many times, it seems like it is his turn to make it happen for himself and grab this brass ring.

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Horn expected for the night of Wednesday to Thursday.

I'm not sure whether it refers to French night or Coville's night ... but it's about 5 hours difference only.

 

I like these antartic projections !

 

Assuming a Wednesday night cape horn rounding he would need to make about 23kts VMG up the Atlantic to beat the crewed record. Wouldn't that be quite a feat.

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The tour in 45 days doesn't look completely impossible, but even doing it in 50 days like Orange II would be quite something.

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What is quite interesting to me is how "conservatively" he sails. On all his videos the windward hull is hardly in the air.

 

It must reeeealy hurt Joyon for not starting a month ago. He could have broken the old record IMHO quite easily.

 

For crewed record he would need to round Horn already or at least be really close. Even 50 days are quite optimistic, but for sure he is on a good way to brake the single-handed RTW record :)

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^^^^^^

 

Just imagine, the Trimaran Sodebo is a mountain refuge, about 3 to 4 square meters, with everything you need to cope with cold weather. Now imagine that this small shack is installed on three big skis; the three hulls of the trimaran. And you are skying down a giant slope for several days.

To get to the top of this slope, you have to climb with ice axe and crampons... The top is somewhere near New Zealand. And after that, it is downhill all the way to Cape Horn. WWWOOOOOOOO !!!

 

So on paper, it is great... Great surfs, super fast.... The problem is like in skying, after a few hours, and here it is after a few days; you legs are starting to hurt, and you have tears in your eyes... You are feeling a bit tired...

And in the middle of all of that great run, there might be a few hard bumps. And here just like hard bumps when skying in the montains, we have a tropical storm coming towards us and it is going to pass right behind us.., In skying, it is like you had a guaranteed avalanche. So in your video game of sky vacations, you know that there will be an avanlanche at this time on this spot; and the game is to pass in front of it. It is a little bit like this here in the Pacific Ocean...

 

We are about 3 1/2 or 4 days from Cape Horn. We are starting to get a better picture of what it is going to be like. But personally, I do not look that far. I am in the day to day job.

 

So here it is, just to give you a feel of what it is like to be on Sodebo in the Southern Pacific Ocean.

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^^^^^^

 

Just imagine, the Trimaran Sodebo is a mountain refuge, about 3 to 4 square meters, with everything you need to cope with cold weather. Now imagine that this small shack is installed on three big skis; the three hulls of the trimaran. And you are skying down a giant slope for several days.

To get to the top of this slope, you have to climb with ice axe and crampons... The top is somewhere near New Zealand. And after that, it is downhill all the way to Cape Horn. WWWOOOOOOOO !!!

 

So on paper, it is great... Great surfs, super fast.... The problem is like in skying, after a few hours, and here it is after a few days; you legs are starting to hurt, and you have tears in your eyes... You are feeling a bit tired...

And in the middle of all of that great run, there might be a few hard bumps. And here just like hard bumps when skying in the montains, we have a tropical storm coming towards us and it is going to pass right behind us.., In skying, it is like you had a guaranteed avalanche. So in your video game of sky vacations, you know that there will be an avanlanche at this time on this spot; and the game is to pass in front of it. It is a little bit like this here in the Pacific Ocean...

 

We are about 3 1/2 or 4 days from Cape Horn. We are starting to get a better picture of what it is going to be like. But personally, I do not look that far. I am in the day to day job.

 

So here it is, just to give you a feel of what it is like to be on Sodebo in the Southern Pacific Ocean.

 

Encore un fois, merci. The mountain metaphors sure confused the google auto-translate captions :)

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Thanks Laurent.

 

@stief

Can the videos be google auto-translated or have you tried "manually" ;)

 

Not sure what you mean by 'manually', but yes, there is sometimes an auto-translate option In YouTube. Turn on captions (when available), and then the settings button might allow "auto-translate", with a further sub-menu to pick the language. Results are often quite funny, but still give decent hints at the dialogue.

 

However, by the time I get all those settings set, Laurent usually has posted and saved the day :)

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Manually -> listening to the video and then writing in google translate...

 

I knew there is an "auto-translate" in captions but didn't know about language setting. Until now it was always in french ;)

 

Anyway... Thanks for your hint...

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Unless automatic subtiles were turned off on youtube they can be activated after a while. (they need processing)

If so you can activate automatic translation via the video settings.

 

Subtitles are still very underutilized on most channels. Even a good original language subtitle would help a lot, the automatic translations are only as good as the source material.

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What is quite interesting to me is how "conservatively" he sails. On all his videos the windward hull is hardly in the air.

 

It must reeeealy hurt Joyon for not starting a month ago. He could have broken the old record IMHO quite easily.

 

For crewed record he would need to round Horn already or at least be really close. Even 50 days are quite optimistic, but for sure he is on a good way to brake the single-handed RTW record :)

Last one it is in the air for the majority of the shot, only getting wet in waves. On his 60 he had less dihedral so fast in breeze, slow in light, or so i heard.

Bravo, Thomas, hang in there.

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In some video, IIRC, he says that you can not go all the time pedal to the metal or the boat whould end up breaking up.

 

He's 1500 nm ahead, and still not in the Atlantic. Keeping these almost 3 days advantage going from the Horn to the finish line will not be easy neither, but it looks good.

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In some video, IIRC, he says that you can not go all the time pedal to the metal or the boat whould end up breaking up.

 

He's 1500 nm ahead, and still not in the Atlantic. Keeping these almost 3 days advantage going from the Horn to the finish line will not be easy neither, but it looks good.

 

Looks good indeed. He's routed south of the Vendee Ice Limit and should nicely miss the high and stay on the train. 30+ knots in decent seas. post-63767-0-56529200-1480959934_thumb.png

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Looks like a good overview; might be something new about the routing team and energy systems.

 

Hope other RTW races are taking a careful look at Coville's way of dealing with ice.

 

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Wow! 1600 miles ahead and cruising at 30.1 knots!!!

Allèz Thomas!!!

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The Indian lives again and what a life!

 

One slow section in N Atlantic and could not cut the corned in S Atlantic as much as might have liked but its been a fairly blessed weather routing so far. Hope it holds for the climb back north. Going to be one heck of a benchmark if it does all hold together (man, machine and weather).

 

Just amazing how far things have come in a decade and a half. Geeze.

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He got to the equator in less than 6 days, and pocketed the record of that stint too, hard to find a "slow" section there !

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Going north again, if he can keep those 670 nm per day will enter the atlantic on wednesday.

 

Yes. And there there looks like a nice low for the rounding to carry him up into the Atlantic

post-63767-0-89162200-1481027576_thumb.png

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He got to the equator in less than 6 days, and pocketed the record of that stint too, hard to find a "slow" section there !

Oh, I agree. Was just referring to the short leg of negative VMG north of the Canaries. Don't think that was envisioned in the original routing but I could very very easily be wrong. But either way other than that and the extra miles he has to sail in the south Atlantic its been pretty much an ideal run.

 

FJ and Idec must be wondering what if...

 

Go the Indian!

 

Hopefully the climb north is equally kind.

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