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BobBill

Front Page...In the Name of Love (Pride of Baltimore)

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Me too! Guy has to know his stuff on practical level.

 

Real sailing...no computer captain...fascinating.

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Wow - a great front page article ! Who woulda thunk it....

 

One of my favorite boating memories was many years back (mid-90s), the Californian was sailing up the Chesapeake Bay towards Annapolis/Baltimore when the Pride was moored at City Dock. Fortunately we had a powerboat at the time so was able to keep up.... The Californian tacked up the Severn and gybed off the Naval Academy while the Pride shipped her lines and set off in pursuit. They both headed out into the Bay for a little match racing.... Not sure if it was orchestrated, but quite the show. Wish I had a video camera that day ! (far before the days of GoPro)

 

Here's a rare pic of the Pride flying a ringtail:

 

2016Oct31_Downrigging-Weekend-10-620x250

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Very Cool!! Jordan raced in our Etchells fleet for a season or maybe two, when he was a rigger at Pilots Point. The boat is still at the yard, I believe. Nice bloke, great to hear that he landed such a nice gig on that sweet old girl!!! :wub:

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VERY COOL front page article!

 

I had the opportunity to sail alongside the Pride when they were in Erie for the tall ships festival this summer. My son and I were in a windmill. Sailed right up to their transom, said hi to the crew who were very friendly, then bore off and cruised a mile or so down the bay alongside them. IMHO, the sexiest tall ship in the fleet!

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I have been sailing a few decades...and nothing gets me going like reading (O'Brian) about sailing ships and what they knew and did and how they managed...nothing quite like it. I still cannot imagine what it must have been like to be ship store in "the day." Gimme more!

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I feel very fortunate to sail in the Chesapeake and alongside Pride sometimes. Thanks for posting the article.

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Thanks - great article.

The Baltimore Clippers were the VOR/Maxi/AC boats of their day. Reading about the original Pride I was impressed by how little these boats were anything like a typical merchant vessel and how much they were bleeding edge hot rods needing the best rock stars available.

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Excerpts from the Pride web site . . on the history.

 

"In July, 1814, Boyle took command of a larger Baltimore Clipper termed Chasseur, whose privateering success brought her renown as the “Pride of Baltimore. . . .

 

Captain Thomas Boyle’s privateer Chasseur cruised British home waters in the summer of 1814, capturing prizes and frustrating their Royal Navy pursuers. Chasseur home in the fall, but in December set out on a winter cruise of the Caribbean. Eight prizes were captured before Chasseur battled and beat a stronger British schooner sent out to pursue American privateers. Chasseur had a triumphant return to Baltimore in March 1815 after learning about the end of the war. "

 

The "Pride" is indeed very well sailed . .

 

Here she is off Cleveland in 2010, racing and putting the hurt on the "Lynx" because "Pride" was quickly able to deploy and fly a studding sail. Perfect conditions - 10 kts, broad reach . .

post-53316-0-15451600-1478716223_thumb.jpg

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I really enjoyed the article but thank God for the development of the modern sloop. Tacking in 3-2-1 ready about, helms alee.

McF...dig, but maybe not...simple is mostly best in the beginning, and always best later...but really, would a sloop that large to so simple to sail? Regardless, a wonderment!

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My brother sailed on the original Pride along with John Flanagan, though he was lucky enough to get off just before the fateful return trip. One of his favorite boats.

Dave, it's Dave!

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Materials did not exist to make a giant J-boat warship back then that could be sailed in all conditions.

If you read about how the original boats sailed, the large (for the size of the boat) crews did kind of the spot rigging and unrigging as conditions changed.

 

I really enjoyed the article but thank God for the development of the modern sloop. Tacking in 3-2-1 ready about, helms alee.

McF...dig, but maybe not...simple is mostly best in the beginning, and always best later...but really, would a sloop that large to so simple to sail? Regardless, a wonderment!

 

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http://people.com/archive/when-the-pride-of-baltimore-sank-eight-sailors-got-a-crash-course-in-ocean-survival-vol-26-no-2/

 

 

long time friend John Flanagan, his late Dad was a great friend, as was his late older brother. Great family.

 

Thanks for the link. I've always loved the Pride, and at the time this hit a little close to home as my father and I and 4 others set sail for Bermuda that May in 1986. The day we left Cape May the story was on the front page of the New York Times (unbeknownst to us). We had a very rough passage and found out 6 days later when we made Bermuda.

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That is very cool, I love model building. Start a thread and show your progress when you start to build it, I am sure I'm not the only one that would be interested.

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I guest crewed on Pride in '08 or '09 from Halifax to Port Hawksbury NS. Nothing like the crystal clear midnight watch on that stretch of ocean with that rig towering overhead.

 

Most exhausting vaca I ever loved.

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Interesting anecdote... the crew said that during the parade of sails they sometimes have to run the engine in reverse to keep from passing boats in front of them.

 

Not sure if that's true or just tourist speak, but I can say she is fast!

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Wow - a great front page article ! Who woulda thunk it....

 

One of my favorite boating memories was many years back (mid-90s), the Californian was sailing up the Chesapeake Bay towards Annapolis/Baltimore when the Pride was moored at City Dock. Fortunately we had a powerboat at the time so was able to keep up.... The Californian tacked up the Severn and gybed off the Naval Academy while the Pride shipped her lines and set off in pursuit. They both headed out into the Bay for a little match racing.... Not sure if it was orchestrated, but quite the show. Wish I had a video camera that day ! (far before the days of GoPro)

 

Here's a rare pic of the Pride flying a ringtail:

 

2016Oct31_Downrigging-Weekend-10-620x250

That damned thing. It's almost like a blooper on an old one tonner- you carry it around, and every third year there's an opportunity to use it. Our Tall Ships America handicap rating does not include it, for that reason. I've found that sailing the ship at hotter angles, more or less like you would do with an asym rigged racing sloop, is far more efficient.

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Very Cool!! Jordan raced in our Etchells fleet for a season or maybe two, when he was a rigger at Pilots Point. The boat is still at the yard, I believe. Nice bloke, great to hear that he landed such a nice gig on that sweet old girl!!! :wub:

That old thing was FAST. Hull #44- The Ancient One! I still get out in the Etchells from time to time. Next year on Pride will be mostly local, so I'm considering getting one to sail on Wednesday nights in Annapolis. Maybe I'll paint it black with a yellow stripe.

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Congrats on your sweet ride, Jordan!! Probably be nice to be local, next season, and spend more family time. As a teenager, I cut my teeth on gaff rigged schooners, much smaller, but real traditional. Raced in Nova Scotia one summer, good fun. Cheers!

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Thanks - great article.

The Baltimore Clippers were the VOR/Maxi/AC boats of their day. Reading about the original Pride I was impressed by how little these boats were anything like a typical merchant vessel and how much they were bleeding edge hot rods needing the best rock stars available.

Indeed. Probably the biggest difference, if you put Pride alongside a historic Baltimore Clipper and said, "Ready, set, go....." is that an 1812 vessel would be a bit more extreme in the SA/D category.....but would be an all rope boat. We have wire standing rigging, and this makes a huge difference, particularly in the head rig (bowsprit and jibboom) as regards how much sail you can carry without busting something. The head rig on Pride is tuned up to such an extent that the jibboom has prebend in it. As a result, the theoretical limit for shortening sail, in a slowly building breeze at least, comes down to efficiency and comfort first, probably breaking a piece of running rigging second, possibly tearing a sail third, before you get anywhere near putting the rig itself in danger. On an all rope boat, that set of prioritizations gets turned on its head, or at the very least jumbled.

 

Of course, it took a few iterations to arrive at this point- this ship was dismasted in the Bay of Biscay 10 years ago due to a faulty fitting in the head rig.

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Interesting anecdote... the crew said that during the parade of sails they sometimes have to run the engine in reverse to keep from passing boats in front of them.

 

Not sure if that's true or just tourist speak, but I can say she is fast!

Most definitely true.

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Thanks - great article.

The Baltimore Clippers were the VOR/Maxi/AC boats of their day. Reading about the original Pride I was impressed by how little these boats were anything like a typical merchant vessel and how much they were bleeding edge hot rods needing the best rock stars available.

Indeed. Probably the biggest difference, if you put Pride alongside a historic Baltimore Clipper and said, "Ready, set, go....." is that an 1812 vessel would be a bit more extreme in the SA/D category.....but would be an all rope boat. We have wire standing rigging, and this makes a huge difference, particularly in the head rig (bowsprit and jibboom) as regards how much sail you can carry without busting something. The head rig on Pride is tuned up to such an extent that the jibboom has prebend in it. As a result, the theoretical limit for shortening sail, in a slowly building breeze at least, comes down to efficiency and comfort first, probably breaking a piece of running rigging second, possibly tearing a sail third, before you get anywhere near putting the rig itself in danger. On an all rope boat, that set of prioritizations gets turned on its head, or at the very least jumbled.

 

Of course, it took a few iterations to arrive at this point- this ship was dismasted in the Bay of Biscay 10 years ago due to a faulty fitting in the head rig.

 

 

Tried to post a picture of that particular piece of mayhem, but maybe driving a 200 year old design and messing with modern technology don't fit in the same brain. If the brain is mine. No one was hurt, which is amazing. The old spars were trees- the new ones are laminated spruce. Lighter, and stiffer. A piece of ironwork on the head rig that wasn't designed right caused it- the new design of that piece and the new spars (added strength and weight savings aloft) have made a huge difference in the ship's performance and how hard she can be pushed.

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