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      Abbreviated rules   07/28/2017

      Underdawg did an excellent job of explaining the rules.  Here's the simplified version: Don't insinuate Pedo.  Warning and or timeout for a first offense.  PermaFlick for any subsequent offenses Don't out members.  See above for penalties.  Caveat:  if you have ever used your own real name or personal information here on the forums since, like, ever - it doesn't count and you are fair game. If you see spam posts, report it to the mods.  We do not hang out in every thread 24/7 If you see any of the above, report it to the mods by hitting the Report button in the offending post.   We do not take action for foul language, off-subject content, or abusive behavior unless it escalates to persistent stalking.  There may be times that we might warn someone or flick someone for something particularly egregious.  There is no standard, we will know it when we see it.  If you continually report things that do not fall into rules #1 or 2 above, you may very well get a timeout yourself for annoying the Mods with repeated whining.  Use your best judgement. Warnings, timeouts, suspensions and flicks are arbitrary and capricious.  Deal with it.  Welcome to anarchy.   If you are a newbie, there are unwritten rules to adhere to.  They will be explained to you soon enough.  
Black Jack

Show your boat sailing thread

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IIRC, the Buccaneer was made by Chrysler. They also made a 15' Mutineer. I had one for a few months in the 1970s. Fast, but not very well made.

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4 hours ago, bplipschitz said:

No trap, but with enough wind and enough weight on the rail to keep it flat, it'll plane.

@Chester, nothing especially significant about pre-79 (it's a 77).  I would say pre-76 built like a tank, 77-79 can be kinda mushy in the forward parts of the hull, post 80 was no longer Chrysler, and had a higher mast step which may cause it to turtle faster once capsized.  Mine rights pretty easily if knocked down (easier than my 13' long Banshee).

Definitely fun boats, and can be found cheap.

thanks.  "turtle faster once capsized.  Mine rights pretty easily if knocked down"  hmmm, i'm looking for a dingy that can extend my sailing season here in the north country.  get a few days in in april before the other boat goes in and in october after it's out.  not really interested in having to right it it on a regular basis!  I assume you cxan sail it so that it stays right side up?

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13 hours ago, chester said:
18 hours ago, bplipschitz said:

No trap, but with enough wind and enough weight on the rail to keep it flat, it'll plane.

@Chester, nothing especially significant about pre-79 (it's a 77).  I would say pre-76 built like a tank, 77-79 can be kinda mushy in the forward parts of the hull, post 80 was no longer Chrysler, and had a higher mast step which may cause it to turtle faster once capsized.  Mine rights pretty easily if knocked down (easier than my 13' long Banshee).

Definitely fun boats, and can be found cheap.

thanks.  "turtle faster once capsized.  Mine rights pretty easily if knocked down"  hmmm, i'm looking for a dingy that can extend my sailing season here in the north country.  get a few days in in april before the other boat goes in and in october after it's out.  not really interested in having to right it it on a regular basis!  I assume you cxan sail it so that it stays right side up?

I've never capsized mine, and I sail pretty often in ~20 kt winds. It gets a little hairy when it's gusty/shifty.

I don't see what the position of the mast step would have to do with turtling. I've heard the Bucc turtles readily but never had the experience myself. We should practice capsizing some time in calm conditions.

 

15 hours ago, Bull City said:

IIRC, the Buccaneer was made by Chrysler. They also made a 15' Mutineer. I had one for a few months in the 1970s. Fast, but not very well made.

Well, I wouldn't call many '70s production boats "well made." You have to judge by standards of the time. They're not worse than most others, they were very simply rigged though. The old-old ones with the pipe & flange "roller furler" should be avoided unless you can afford to upgrade it. For some reason, some people "restore" them and there is a demand for sleeve-luff jibs. I really like the roller-furler jib. The boat is stable enough that you can board it over the foredeck and sturdy enough that you can walk on it anywhere without feeling like you're going to put your foot thru it. Most boats in this size range are either boring (heavy slow) or light-built to the point that you have to be careful with them, I like that the Buccaneer has some jump to it and is sturdy. The newer Nickels Buccs really are well built though.

Apologies for thread drift.

FB- Doug

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17 hours ago, Bull City said:

My compliments too. BP 24 is a very pretty boat. Is yours FG or wood? Inboard or OB?

Fiberglass hull and a wood deck. I've been chasing a few leaks around the cabin/deck joint, but it seems to work well.

I have a Westerbeke diesel. Reliable, but hard to find parts sometimes.

IMG_1589.JPG

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On 9/21/2017 at 1:37 PM, bplipschitz said:

No trap, but with enough wind and enough weight on the rail to keep it flat, it'll plane.

@Chester, nothing especially significant about pre-79 (it's a 77).  I would say pre-76 built like a tank, 77-79 can be kinda mushy in the forward parts of the hull, post 80 was no longer Chrysler, and had a higher mast step which may cause it to turtle faster once capsized.  Mine rights pretty easily if knocked down (easier than my 13' long Banshee).

Definitely fun boats, and can be found cheap.

Coming to Buccaneer North Americans? Next week, and the long range forecast is promising!

 

I'll be there with Red Ryder.

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8 hours ago, Steam Flyer said:

I've never capsized mine, and I sail pretty often in ~20 kt winds. It gets a little hairy when it's gusty/shifty.

I don't see what the position of the mast step would have to do with turtling. I've heard the Bucc turtles readily but never had the experience myself. We should practice capsizing some time in calm conditions.

 

Well, I wouldn't call many '70s production boats "well made." You have to judge by standards of the time. They're not worse than most others, they were very simply rigged though. The old-old ones with the pipe & flange "roller furler" should be avoided unless you can afford to upgrade it. For some reason, some people "restore" them and there is a demand for sleeve-luff jibs. I really like the roller-furler jib. The boat is stable enough that you can board it over the foredeck and sturdy enough that you can walk on it anywhere without feeling like you're going to put your foot thru it. Most boats in this size range are either boring (heavy slow) or light-built to the point that you have to be careful with them, I like that the Buccaneer has some jump to it and is sturdy. The newer Nickels Buccs really are well built though.

Apologies for thread drift.

FB- Doug

Nothing wrong with thread drift!

 

I'm not sure the mast step has much to do with turtling. But my old '82 Starwind Buccaneer would lie down nicely when capsized - and righting wasn't bad. My newer '94 Nickels Buccaneer is a different beast. It's nice and tightly sealed. The hull rides quite high when capsized, which means that the open mast quickly fills with water and turtles readily. I can't right it myself - I need to hang on the centerboard with my big crew to do it.

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16 hours ago, RedRyder said:

Coming to Buccaneer North Americans? Next week, and the long range forecast is promising!

 

I'll be there with Red Ryder.

Unfortunately no, but have a blast!

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On 9/20/2017 at 5:32 PM, Cruisin Loser said:

Built by Brooklin? I'm in negotiations to own a Brooklin/Alden 48', whose present owner also has a Center Harbor 31, among his 8 or 9 boats.

You know we're looking for a little pic of that for a while now. Is this her? 

I'm getting Restive here!

IMG_5784.JPG

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4 minutes ago, Bryanjb said:

59c66bb16ef09_DSC_0235(2).thumb.jpg.442870612e6b742af0fe0e4032f98d15.jpg

Out of the water for the season.  Keel off (leaking keel bolt) and spar at the shop for refit

Good luck with it, saw the keel off and felt for you... it isn't cheap

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We're pretty use to writing checks with this boat, it'll be ok but thanks.  Maybe I need a go fund me?  I'll bet Jack and LB will throw in big $$'s.  :lol:

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Good luck with that one.

They spell the f word differently, but are major contributors to that cause!

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Tartan 38, 1978 vintage. It's a Tartan 37 (S&S) with a fin keel and tall rig. Only (I think) 11 made. 

 

IMG_3289.JPG

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14 hours ago, Sean said:

Tartan 38, 1978 vintage. It's a Tartan 37 (S&S) with a fin keel and tall rig. Only (I think) 11 made. 

 

IMG_3289.JPG

Looking good!

Interested - what can you tell me about that genoa?

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2 hours ago, RedRyder said:

Looking good!

Interested - what can you tell me about that genoa?

Ah, thought I might get that question. 

That's a UK "Tape Drive" originally made for a different boat, but fit mine well without recut. Pretty much brand new when I bought it at about 40% of cost. As you can see, the original boat had a different spreader arrangement, hence the plethora of spreader patches. 

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37079382160_de11ed755e_b.jpg

 

Another shot of Olson 29 Ronin sailing on Budd Inlet before we moved to Elliott Bay

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1 hour ago, Sean said:

Ah, thought I might get that question. 

That's a UK "Tape Drive" originally made for a different boat, but fit mine well without recut. Pretty much brand new when I bought it at about 40% of cost. As you can see, the original boat had a different spreader arrangement, hence the plethora of spreader patches. 

Beautiful boat...but I'm biased. ;)

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Santana 27 (Gary Mull), tucked into Effingham Bay, doing what I like best. At some point I'll get some pictures of her underway, but whenever the wind blowing I seem to forget about taking photos.....

IMG_20170828_200354-2024x1518.jpg

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2 hours ago, Ajax said:

Beautiful boat...but I'm biased. ;)

Thanks Ajax. Some pretty lines came out of the S&S shop. 

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On 9/25/2017 at 2:11 PM, A horse, of course said:

Gosh Andy, some serious superstructures there. What's the story?

Charter boat... the Arch has seating for six+ charter guests, speakers and lights... in addition to holding the solar panels and wind generator and all the other stuff not yet replaced... 

On top off all that it keeps my guests out of the cockpit so I and the crew can sail the boat... at least that is the theory... not chartering much yet (again) and the charter market in the Bay area isn't what it was in Hawaii...

the dodger should be obvious...

 

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6 hours ago, andyk said:

Charter boat... the Arch has seating for six+ charter guests, speakers and lights... in addition to holding the solar panels and wind generator and all the other stuff not yet replaced... 

On top off all that it keeps my guests out of the cockpit so I and the crew can sail the boat... at least that is the theory... not chartering much yet (again) and the charter market in the Bay area isn't what it was in Hawaii...

the dodger should be obvious...

 

Yup, well that's certainly an obvious dodger.

Sorry, couldn't help myself. 

What's her back story?

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On 9/26/2017 at 7:49 PM, andyk said:

Charter boat... the Arch has seating for six+ charter guests, speakers and lights... in addition to holding the solar panels and wind generator and all the other stuff not yet replaced... 

On top off all that it keeps my guests out of the cockpit so I and the crew can sail the boat... at least that is the theory... not chartering much yet (again) and the charter market in the Bay area isn't what it was in Hawaii...

the dodger should be obvious...

 

They built that nice platform and didn't put a diving board or slide on it?

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I don't have very many, but, I had someone take a pic of our 4KSB this summer while sailing!! I'd like to say we were hard on the wind, but the working jib position tells otherwise...we had a pesky channel marker we had to crack off to get around on our way in to Solomons after a great daysail with unusual northerly winds in summer. Go the hanks!

July2017_sailing.jpg

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On ‎9‎/‎26‎/‎2017 at 11:32 AM, Sean said:

Ah, thought I might get that question. 

That's a UK "Tape Drive" originally made for a different boat, but fit mine well without recut. Pretty much brand new when I bought it at about 40% of cost. As you can see, the original boat had a different spreader arrangement, hence the plethora of spreader patches. 

Also a UK Tape Drive.

IMG_7379mhr copy 2.jpg

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On 10/1/2017 at 10:57 PM, Hike, Bitches! said:

I don't have very many, but, I had someone take a pic of our 4KSB this summer while sailing!! I'd like to say we were hard on the wind, but the working jib position tells otherwise...we had a pesky channel marker we had to crack off to get around on our way in to Solomons after a great daysail with unusual northerly winds in summer. Go the hanks!

July2017_sailing.jpg

 

You have done a great job with that old girl.

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This is an interesting angle, from the race on the weekend. We weren't really in gung ho mode hence why she looks so fat on the water.  

Introducing the new dreadnought, the Pogo 12.50! 

Pogo_STHC2017c.thumb.jpg.f9781e095614ae868f880438d6b4c9fd.jpg

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Those hull lights look a bit odd from this angle but that's just picking nits. Good looking boat.

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3 minutes ago, IStream said:

Those hull lights look a bit odd from this angle but that's just picking nits. Good looking boat.

Heh! You're not the only one IStream, I've had that comment especially when you see it beam on. They're flat with the waterline, but not the sheerline, so they do look a bit funny. I was tempted to black out around the windows to align them with the deck , look less weird. 

Edit: sorry, I assume you referring to the cabin windows  ?

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4 minutes ago, shaggybaxter said:

Heh! You're not the only one IStream, I've had that comment especially when you see it beam on. They're flat with the waterline, but not the sheerline, so they do look a bit funny. I was tempted to black out around the windows to align them with the deck , look less weird. 

Edit: sorry, I assume you referring to the cabin windows  ?

I thought the same, but it's rare to look good from every angle. Just like me.

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47 minutes ago, shaggybaxter said:

This is an interesting angle, from the race on the weekend. We weren't really in gung ho mode hence why she looks so fat on the water.  

Introducing the new dreadnought, the Pogo 12.50! 

Pogo_STHC2017c.thumb.jpg.f9781e095614ae868f880438d6b4c9fd.jpg

WTF? Did you put all that shit back onboard? 

I thought the tide was higher than forecast on Saturday but it was just you guys displacing Moreton bay.  You sure it's not sinking?

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41 minutes ago, Ishmael said:

I thought the same, but it's rare to look good from every angle. Just like me.

You should see it down below. Looks like the set from a 1980's Japanese porn movie. 

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7 minutes ago, LB 15 said:

You should see it down below. Looks like the set from a 1980's Japanese porn movie. 

Your lace stockings draped over the light fixtures, gagged girls going "meep meep meep". I can see it all now.

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1 hour ago, shaggybaxter said:

Heh! You're not the only one IStream, I've had that comment especially when you see it beam on. They're flat with the waterline, but not the sheerline, so they do look a bit funny. I was tempted to black out around the windows to align them with the deck , look less weird. 

Edit: sorry, I assume you referring to the cabin windows  ?

No, actually I was referring to the lights in the hull below your rail. They look to be parallel to the top edge of your cabin windows.

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22 minutes ago, IStream said:

No, actually I was referring to the lights in the hull below your rail. They look to be parallel to the top edge of your cabin windows.

I think you're talking about the same things.

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8 hours ago, Ishmael said:

I think you're talking about the same things.

I refuse to be in agreement.

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9 hours ago, LB 15 said:

WTF? Did you put all that shit back onboard? 

I thought the tide was higher than forecast on Saturday but it was just you guys displacing Moreton bay.  You sure it's not sinking?

Yeah, it's weird, it looks like a Uboat that has just blown tanks and popped up on the surface. Mebbe that's what the depth gauge thingy's for? 

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On ‎9‎/‎23‎/‎2017 at 9:14 AM, Sail4beer said:

You know we're looking for a little pic of that for a while now. Is this her? 

I'm getting Restive here!

IMG_5784.JPG

Yes, I believe that is she. Where'd you find the photo?

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Can't remember off the top of my head, but it's deep at the top of my Best Ever Designs file. I'll go back and find it and let you know!

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 It was blowing hard yesterday out of the Southwest, gusting to 30 knots. Pelting rain, it was a good day NOT to be on a boat. Instead, we took in the Andrew Wyeth at 100 (he would be 100 this year, if still alive), exhibit at the Farnsworth Museum in Rockland Me. 

The bulk of the exhibit on display are the artists ‘studies’; simple works of pencil and watercolor, where he refined his ideas and details, probably on-site, for the finished works completed in his studio. 

‘Goodbye, My Love’ is the study of Andrew Wyeth’s final work, completed in 2008, the year he died.

img_0720-jpg.141683

Spending so many years living and working on the coast of Maine, he must have been a sailor. The Maine coast infuses all his art including more than a few boats under sail. Yet I can find no record of his sailing or sailboats he had owned(he may have owned a Friendship sloop, I've found). 

I was touched by his final study, ‘Goodbye, My Love’, set on a familiar (to me) thread of water between Allen’s and Benner Island, above which he worked his final years. 

‘Goodbye, My Love’, in pencil and watercolor, shows a Friendship sloop effortlessly sailing away, leaving a placid wake behind.

In his mind, this must have been Wyeth's boat, under sail. 

goodbye-my-love-wyeth-study-jpg.141684

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On 10/7/2017 at 4:48 PM, Cruisin Loser said:

Yes, I believe that is she. Where'd you find the photo?

Jamie Morrison Photography. He has a gallery I was looking through. No other boat looks like her

IMG_5986.JPG

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2 hours ago, Kris Cringle said:

 It was blowing hard yesterday out of the Southwest, gusting to 30 knots. Pelting rain, it was a good day NOT to be on a boat.

We were sailing downwind in that breeze in Narragansett Bay yesterday. Glorious sailing.

We had two bottlenose dolphins swimming with us for a while, got in before the rain started falling.

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4 hours ago, Kris Cringle said:

 It was blowing hard yesterday out of the Southwest, gusting to 30 knots. Pelting rain, it was a good day NOT to be on a boat. Instead, we took in the Andrew Wyeth at 100 (he would be 100 this year, if still alive), exhibit at the Farnsworth Museum in Rockland Me. 

The bulk of the exhibit on display are the artists ‘studies’; simple works of pencil and watercolor, where he refined his ideas and details, probably on-site, for the finished works completed in his studio. 

goodbye-my-love-wyeth-study-jpg.141684

On our trips to the Okanagan we used to pass an old farmhouse that could have been the setting for "Christina's World".

The first time I saw it I was struck by the uncanny resemblance - the house, the colour, the lay of the land - everything. 

I mentioned it to my wife but she was not familiar with the work. I showed it to her later and she basically said "Wow - that's the place".

Some years back they changed the road and the illusion was spoiled.

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2 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

On our trips to the Okanagan we used to pass an old farmhouse that could have been the setting for "Christina's World".

The first time I saw it I was struck by the uncanny resemblance - the house, the colour, the lay of the land - everything. 

I mentioned it to my wife but she was not familiar with the work. I showed it to her later and she basically said "Wow - that's the place".

Some years back they changed the road and the illusion was spoiled.

Wish you had taken a photo.

The Farnsworth (as you may know) now owns the Olsen house. It's open to the public and fun to walk around with a camera. He took some license with the house when he did that painting (early 40's) but it still strikes you as you approach it. The Olsen's (Christina and husband) were dirt poor. They couldn't afford to paint their house so what paint there was on it, just weathered right off over the years. No paint on it today, either. 

Like most of his work, Christina's World was controversial. He didn't like it upon completion, "A total flat tire", Wyeth called it, and much of the art world railed against it.

But it caught fire fast and quickly became his iconic life work. Pretty rare for a living artist to be alive to see his work worth millions. 

12CHRISTINA5-jumbo.jpg

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20 hours ago, Kris Cringle said:

Wish you had taken a photo.

The Farnsworth (as you may know) now owns the Olsen house. It's open to the public and fun to walk around with a camera. He took some license with the house when he did that painting (early 40's) but it still strikes you as you approach it. The Olsen's (Christina and husband) were dirt poor. They couldn't afford to paint their house so what paint there was on it, just weathered right off over the years. No paint on it today, either. 

Like most of his work, Christina's World was controversial. He didn't like it upon completion, "A total flat tire", Wyeth called it, and much of the art world railed against it.

But it caught fire fast and quickly became his iconic life work. Pretty rare for a living artist to be alive to see his work worth millions. 

12CHRISTINA5-jumbo.jpg

 

Maple Juice Cove is typically my first stop of any cruise - kind of a shakedown - If anything goes wrong, it's not a long trip back up the river to the yard. Often when we come back, it's our last stop as it makes for a nice morning sail up the river. It's a nice sheltered anchorage with easy access and is almost always empty - lots of room if it isn't. 

I'm never sure which house it is, exactly. The one on southern the point?  Often there are interesting boats on one of Cabot's moorings. This pic is looking North. 

 

20504987560_9828da371c_c.jpg

 

 

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7 minutes ago, Elegua said:

 

Maple Juice Cove is typically my first stop of any cruise - kind of a shakedown - If anything goes wrong, it's not a long trip back up the river to the yard. Often when we come back, it's our last stop as it makes for a nice morning sail up the river. It's a nice sheltered anchorage with easy access and is almost always empty - lots of room if it isn't. 

I'm never sure which house it is, exactly. The one on southern the point?  Often there are interesting boats on one of Cabot's moorings. This pic is looking North. 

 

20504987560_9828da371c_c.jpg

 

 

We've never been in Maple Juice Cove (close), or up the St. George. Do you keep the boat up at Lyman Morse? 

We know that area more by car as we live not far. We get into Tenants Harbor and Port Clyde on the water every few years but more often, on the roads. Every time we're on the road down to Tenants Harbor (to the Cod End for years, now Luke's Lobster-with better food!), I always say I have to go up the St.George. Truth is, this area of the coast is so big and has such a fractured coastline, it's just about infinite in length, for a sailboat. 

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1 hour ago, Kris Cringle said:

I always say I have to go up the St.George. Truth is, this area of the coast is so big and has such a fractured coastline, it's just about infinite in length, for a sailboat. 

So true.

I stayed in Tenants once bringing by boat back to Southwest Harbor. I'll remember the route in there as the most clogged with lobster pots I've ever experienced.

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13 minutes ago, Kris Cringle said:

We've never been in Maple Juice Cove (close), or up the St. George. Do you keep the boat up at Lyman Morse? 

We know that area more by car as we live not far. We get into Tenants Harbor and Port Clyde on the water every few years but more often, on the roads. Every time we're on the road down to Tenants Harbor (to the Cod End for years, now Luke's Lobster-with better food!), I always say I have to go up the St.George. Truth is, this area of the coast is so big and has such a fractured coastline, it's just about infinite in length, for a sailboat. 

Yes, I keep my boat at LM. I really enjoy keeping my boat there. I recommend the Slipway next to the ramp, and the Thomaston Cafe on the corner. I've never had Luke's.  My kids love Waterworks in Rockland. 

I end up in Tenants every other year or so...I go by Port Clyde every season, but have only stopped once. I stood at the peak of Mt Cadillac on a clear day and I could see most of my playground....and it's clear I've not covered more than 30% in 5 years of cruising while trying to avoid repeats. Maybe I won't move my boat West - certainly not this coming year.  

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For many years my boat was moored right in Maplejuice cove with pretty much the exact view depicted in Christina's World.  That's one of the great little harbors in Maine than most folks just pass by on their way down east.  

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I like the baby dodger over the fwd coach roof hatch.  And thank God for those steel loops over the dorades to keep the sheets from fouling.

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If you're not overlapping the jib, why not? Structurally, it's great, and it keeps a lot of mass out of the mast.

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On ‎23‎/‎10‎/‎2017 at 4:12 PM, IStream said:

If you're not overlapping the jib, why not? Structurally, it's great, and it keeps a lot of mass out of the mast.

and less strain in the boat.

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I took my tripod sailing this weekend. Lashed to stanchions, rigging, I thought I'd get a different lens perspective (my wife said, "oh, you're taking selfies out there?")

I got some shots I liked. Boats pretty much sail themselves in these conditions (I'm pretending I'm steering), windward in 5 to 10. It's late October, you can read a book and glance ahead occasionally. There's nobody out there (to see you running between camera and helm - you have 10 seconds on the timer). The whole bay is mine today. 

sailing-2-full-sails-tack_-jpg.142216

October weather is nearly always a pleasant surprise on the coast of Maine. I couldn't care less about miles covered - only the time I spend,  when I'm sailing.

In late October I sail through the warm mid-day hours. I love it so much(sailing), I forget to eat a wonderful lunch someone so thoughtfully prepared for me (not the first time).

Steering off the wind, I make it shirtsleeve weather onboard. For my lens, October light is richer. Water and sky are bluer. The Ochre color on the Rockweed along the Sugar Loaves (background) is a redder orange. 

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This one of my favorite stretches of sailing. You don't need a vang in 5 to 10 with a 60 pound boom. 

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Turning the bend, it's calm and warm inside. Just enough wind to move nicely through the flat water. This stretch ended too soon. 

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October days are short. I have just enough time to cook and enjoy a nice dinner 'for one' before the last ferry of the day docks up. This is me trying to sit still after bolting into place,  for a 2 second exposure. Not bad, a little fuzzy and I didn't spill my wine. 

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A little better shot. Except for these lights on the ferry dock, this whole area (the shore of two busy islands), went completely black 15 minutes after the ferry docked and the crew and passengers disappeared inland.  

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Next morning, I rode a rare East wind off the mooring on about 80% of the genoa(I left the cold engine alone). That headsail and mizzen were plenty and kept the boat very nimble to jibe around anything. You can see there wasn't much to worry about. Everybody is gone on the water(except for one lobsterboat ahead). 

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I passed the islands life support system on the way out. The ferry. 

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Heading out: Sunday was a different day. Some of the blue in the sky and sea was giving way to a steely gunmetal color. Cooler. A few good days are left, but the end is near. 

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It doesn't get much better than that.

Gorgeous boat - you should be proud. (I know, you are ;))

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E

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40 minutes ago, Ajax said:

Ah, such nice pictures.

Thanks. The tripod gets the lens out of my vision, which are my usual shots. Like getting someone else to take the picture - except, nobody acts normally when a lens is pointed at them. 

The cost of keeping my boat in through October is I have to deal with more fall gales. One just roared through and for 24+ hours, blew strong out of the South. South is completely open in my funnel shaped harbor. The gusts stayed a bit below 40 knts,. the speed I start thinking about moving the boat to better protection. 

Ironically, the late haul is usually easy weather. Because most everyone else is out by the end of the month, I can pick my day(weather) to have the travel lift haul me. Of course you never know, with weather,...

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Plus, you get to be the first one launched in spring!

Like many in the Chesapeake, I keep my boat in during the winter. I'm at a private dock and we put plenty of bubblers in the water, so the dock doesn't get pile-jacked and the boats sit in liquid. The dock is in a very sheltered cove so it can be ripping at 40kts and we'll probably feel 15-20 from most directions.

My boat isn't as photogenic as your though!

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