Black Jack

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For CL (with an Alden), and anyone interested in the Alden event at Mystic Seaport this July. We've started promoting the event. I'm going, and we have at least one more boat! 

40918153851_c265d912cd_h.jpg

Sorry, we edited the copy, this is an old version, but the details are in stone. 

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10 hours ago, Kris Cringle said:

For CL (with an Alden), and anyone interested in the Alden event at Mystic Seaport this July. We've started promoting the event. I'm going, and we have at least one more boat! 

40918153851_c265d912cd_h.jpg

Sorry, we edited the copy, this is an old version, but the details are in stone. 

OK, I just need to be sure I've got crew to get from this event to the Eggemoggin Reach Regatta, then possibly back down for the Panerai event in Bristol/Newport at the end of August.  We're doing Halifax-St. Pierre et Miquelon in June.

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Here is my boat racing in 1969 taking the Perpetual Cup in San Francisco just after a successful (nearly winning) the SORC series. Note some of best sailors of the era on the boat.

40503249265_abeccde309_b.jpg

 

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1 hour ago, Black Jack said:

Here is my boat racing in 1969 taking the Perpetual Cup in San Francisco just after a successful (nearly winning) the SORC series. Note some of best sailors of the era on the boat.

40503249265_abeccde309_b.jpg

 

Great heritage. Big breeze, no PFD's, no tethers. Hell, half of them aren't wearing underwear.

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5 hours ago, Uncooperative Tom said:

That's a great pic. Taken by a competitor? Today I'd guess a drone but in 1969 I wonder who took it?

Probably a Diane Beeston photo... am I right Black Jack?

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1 hour ago, Black Jack said:

I believe it is.

Back in the days when lenses weren't computer designed and fabricated. Many early lenses were great in the center, not so much at the edges.

I have her San Francisco book. Great photography.

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On 4/13/2018 at 9:47 PM, Ishmael said:
On 4/13/2018 at 8:24 PM, Black Jack said:

Here is my boat racing in 1969 taking the Perpetual Cup in San Francisco just after a successful (nearly winning) the SORC series. Note some of best sailors of the era on the boat.

40503249265_abeccde309_b.jpg

 

Great heritage. Big breeze, no PFD's, no tethers. Hell, half of them aren't wearing underwear.

Wow, you can tell that from the photo? I mean it's a great photo and all, but.... dang...... I thought I was doing good picking up on their sail trim

FB- Doug

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11 minutes ago, frozenhawaiian said:

yesterday on our way into portland. 

 

32478058_10155634662262947_4553913717544189952_n.jpg

That is a beautiful yacht!!!

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1 hour ago, frozenhawaiian said:

yesterday on our way into portland. 

 

32478058_10155634662262947_4553913717544189952_n.jpg

Wow.

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8 hours ago, Sail4beer said:

That is a beautiful yacht!!!

thanks! 

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10 hours ago, frozenhawaiian said:

yesterday on our way into portland. 

 

32478058_10155634662262947_4553913717544189952_n.jpg

Would it be a challenge to get that into Boothbay?

Beautiful.

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2 hours ago, frozenhawaiian said:

same day, cruising past portland head light.

 

32418007_10155634662252947_3459127923888357376_n.jpg

Tell us more about her!

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20 minutes ago, socalrider said:

Tell us more about her!

NICTE HA is a 1975 John Alden boothbay challenger built by Hodgdon Yachts in east boothbay maine. I bought the boat in St. Thomas and we just sailed her up to her new home in Maine. Surprisingly fast boat offshore, we did several 200+ mile days 

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1 hour ago, tunesb said:

May 6. Lisbon Eurovision Regatta.

Sailing with wife and kids (3 and 6 years old )

31960478_2126891767326949_6915150637961314304_o.jpg

Is it a coco?

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43 minutes ago, frozenhawaiian said:

NICTE HA is a 1975 John Alden boothbay challenger built by Hodgdon Yachts in east boothbay maine. I bought the boat in St. Thomas and we just sailed her up to her new home in Maine. Surprisingly fast boat offshore, we did several 200+ mile days 

Congratulations. Looks like a nice ride. Did you sail direct, or stop along the way?

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58 minutes ago, frozenhawaiian said:

NICTE HA is a 1975 John Alden boothbay challenger built by Hodgdon Yachts in east boothbay maine. I bought the boat in St. Thomas and we just sailed her up to her new home in Maine. Surprisingly fast boat offshore, we did several 200+ mile days 

That ain’t shit compared to a Brent Boat

They do 4 or 500 miles and kilometers at the same time 

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1 hour ago, wick said:

Congratulations. Looks like a nice ride. Did you sail direct, or stop along the way?

we went st thomas to fairhaven MA where we stopped for fuel then hopped up to rockport MA to hang out with the family of one of our crew who live there then headed the last bit north up to portland. 

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44 minutes ago, tunesb said:

Great boat, Philippe Harlé design. The first mini-transat:

I thought this was. ;)

image.png.d81f77058b655a9be1631c914a2a0208.png

Has anyone noticed that Chichester's winning time in the first OSTAR was about the same as the current round the world record?

Over 40 days.

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Beautiful photo but are you being dragged by fishing line?

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On ‎5‎/‎16‎/‎2018 at 1:48 PM, SloopJonB said:

I thought this was. ;)

image.png.d81f77058b655a9be1631c914a2a0208.png

Has anyone noticed that Chichester's winning time in the first OSTAR was about the same as the current round the world record?

Over 40 days.

That's an interesting observation.

The present around the world sailing record (Jules Verne Trophy) is 40d 23h 30m 30s.  Francis Joyon of France was the skipper and boat was the trimaran IDEC 3.  The time is just eleven hours longer than the winning time for the first singlehanded transatlantic race in 1960.

The present around the world singlehanded sailing record is 42d 16h 40m 35s set by François Gabart  of France on the trimaran Macif.

The present Mini Transit race is from France to Brazil and is for boats of 6.5 meters (21.3 feet) in length.  One of the competitors in the 1960 singlehanded transatlantic race was almost small enough to qualify.

The five competitors in the 1960 singlehanded transatlantic race in order of finish are as follows.

Francis Chichester
Gipsy Moth III (40-foot cutter)
40 days 12 hours 30 min

Blondie Hasler
Jester (Highly-modified Folkboat with a junk rig)
48 days 12 hours 02 min

David Lewis
Cardinal Vertue (Laurent Giles Vertue Class sloop)
55 days 00 hours 50 min

Val Howells
EIRA (Folkboat)
Mono-25
62 days 05 hours 50 min

Jean Lacombe
Cap Horn (21.5-foot centerboard sloop)
74 days

 

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I love those boats. My dad owned one a long time ago and  remember it very well.

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6 hours ago, zzrider said:

A quick little vid of our C&C 34+ sailing, shot by my wife from her boat.

 

https://youtu.be/9CxFEx4RaEQ

 

 

 

Haa haa I forgot I was 1/6 of your Youtube subscriber base!

Looking good,  new sails or did they come with the boat? 

And any worries about future arguments over the Gender Sail Gap?  :D

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3 minutes ago, Dilligaf0220 said:

Haa haa I forgot I was 1/6 of your Youtube subscriber base!

Looking good,  new sails or did they come with the boat? 

And any worries about future arguments over the Gender Sail Gap?  :D

Actually, ancient sails.  It's amazing that main still sets as well as it does.  Yay for full battens.  Hoping to get a new one over the winter.

Gender sail gap...lol!  Not worried, wife is happy with her 26'.  She loves the 34+ too but has no interest in trying to singlehand it.l

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6 hours ago, Ajax said:

This was me, doing some easy Memorial Day cruising.  I love that big ol' main.

T33.jpeg

Where'd you get that fractional rig? I didn't think Tartan made them.

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12 hours ago, Bull City said:

Where'd you get that fractional rig? I didn't think Tartan made them.

She's bone stock, that's how the T-33 came.  There was a handful of T-33R's made with a masthead rig and a deep keel, then they discontinued that line and made the T34-2 which was a masthead configuration only.  You could get a T-34-2 in Scheel keel or deep keel.  All they did, was stretch the T-33 hull by 8 inches or so and re-arrange the interior a bit.

The T-33 came with a pilot bunk (which I have), then after some customer feedback they did away with the pilot berth and put the icebox over with the galley and made the salon area symmetrical, with double bunks port and starboard. This was called the "B" layout.  The T34-2 only had the "B" layout.

In reality, I probably would be better served by the T-33R due to the light Chesapeake summers but the fractional rig make the boat easier to singlehand and I love the pilot berth.  I was really pretty skeptical of the boat's sailing ability but I have been pleasantly surprised. The boat points "good enough" in light air and pretty damn good in 10+ knots if you play with all the sail fine tuning toys and the Scheel keel lets me get into all the skinny places without the bother of centerboard maintenance.

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1 hour ago, Ajax said:

She's bone stock, that's how the T-33 came.  There was a handful of T-33R's made with a masthead rig and a deep keel, then they discontinued that line and made the T34-2 which was a masthead configuration only.  You could get a T-34-2 in Scheel keel or deep keel.  All they did, was stretch the T-33 hull by 8 inches or so and re-arrange the interior a bit.

The T-33 came with a pilot bunk (which I have), then after some customer feedback they did away with the pilot berth and put the icebox over with the galley and made the salon area symmetrical, with double bunks port and starboard. This was called the "B" layout.  The T34-2 only had the "B" layout.

In reality, I probably would be better served by the T-33R due to the light Chesapeake summers but the fractional rig make the boat easier to singlehand and I love the pilot berth.  I was really pretty skeptical of the boat's sailing ability but I have been pleasantly surprised. The boat points "good enough" in light air and pretty damn good in 10+ knots if you play with all the sail fine tuning toys and the Scheel keel lets me get into all the skinny places without the bother of centerboard maintenance.

I'm a fan of fractional rigs (and tillers). My main sailing buddy (outside of Mrs. Bull) has a Tartan 34-2 (I think), which he keep near Oriental. It has the Scheel keel. The headsail is big. Furling it is a lot of work. 

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After dragging a 155% and even a 170%! around the mast of my Pearson 30 in light breezes, I do appreciate the fractional.

Tartan says that if I sheet to the toe rail when reaching, I can pick up a full knot sometimes.  I'm working on some kind of gadget that will allow me to do that while singlehanding.

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2 minutes ago, Ajax said:

After dragging a 155% and even a 170%! around the mast of my Pearson 30 in light breezes, I do appreciate the fractional.

Tartan says that if I sheet to the toe rail when reaching, I can pick up a full knot sometimes.  I'm working on some kind of gadget that will allow me to do that while singlehanding.

I have posted this before, but what the hell.

EwjDofL.jpg

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I think you explained this but I don't recall seeing a picture until now.  Either way, that's perfect and I'm going to try to buy the bits for it this weekend. Thanks for the refresher. This is better than what I was going to do.

Do you leave one rigged on each side? Do you run the tail through a block or anything?

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1 hour ago, Ajax said:

After dragging a 155% and even a 170%! around the mast of my Pearson 30 in light breezes, I do appreciate the fractional.

Tartan says that if I sheet to the toe rail when reaching, I can pick up a full knot sometimes.  I'm working on some kind of gadget that will allow me to do that while singlehanding.

I think they call that a Reverse Twing  (or was it twang).   Instead of pulling sheeting angle in, you would be pulling it out.

Or maybe a reaching strut.  :)

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1 hour ago, Ajax said:

I think you explained this but I don't recall seeing a picture until now.  Either way, that's perfect and I'm going to try to buy the bits for it this weekend. Thanks for the refresher. This is better than what I was going to do.

Do you leave one rigged on each side? Do you run the tail through a block or anything?

Yes, one on each side, I run the tail through the spinnaker sheet turning blocks and to stern mooring cleats. 

Edit: I know some people like to use locking carabiners so they won't hang up on the lifelines, but it has never been an issue in the 15+ years I've been doing this. I use the "genius" carabiners from West Marine because you can put a smaller carabiner in place. I have considered putting a stopper knot in the twing sheet so it stops the carabiner from being sucked into the genoa lead block but haven't quite got around to it.

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2 hours ago, Ishmael said:

Tartan says that if I sheet to the toe rail when reaching, I can pick up a full knot sometimes. 

When you say reaching, do you mean Broad, Beam or Close?

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4 hours ago, Ajax said:

After dragging a 155% and even a 170%! around the mast of my Pearson 30 in light breezes, I do appreciate the fractional.

Tartan says that if I sheet to the toe rail when reaching, I can pick up a full knot sometimes.  I'm working on some kind of gadget that will allow me to do that while singlehanding.

A snatch block

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5 hours ago, Ajax said:

Tartan says that if I sheet to the toe rail when reaching, I can pick up a full knot sometimes.  I'm working on some kind of gadget that will allow me to do that while singlehanding.

When you say reaching, do you mean Broad, Beam or Close? (I quoted the wrong person earlier.)

 

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I have snatch blocks.  I bought carabiners and rope this afternoon.  Looking forward to giving it a try!

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Ishmael's setup is pretty slick!

Sheeting to the toe rail makes a big difference for me, especially when running deck sweeping sails.  It lets me keep the headsail twist correct when the sheet is eased.  It isn't as big of a difference for sails that have a higher clew (well above lifelines).

I just do it using two sheets (the second is my changing sheet that I'd have handy for an inline peel).  When you ease off from the working sheet (setup with the jib tight in) just transition the load to the changing sheet run through the block on the rail.  Then when you want to come hard on the wind again you bring in old working sheet.  I've found this pretty easy to manage when singlehanded.

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On 6/15/2018 at 12:15 PM, Ishmael said:

I have posted this before, but what the hell.

EwjDofL.jpg

Doesn't that put a bunch of pressure on your lifelines/stantions? I just use a snatch block and an extra sheet, run it through the block and under the lifelines quick bowline on the sail and away we go.

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On 6/15/2018 at 12:15 PM, Ishmael said:

I have posted this before, but what the hell.

EwjDofL.jpg

I can't see how your sheets are attached, but assuming a bowline, would it not be better to attach the shackle to the bowline eye and run essentially a 2nd sheet outside the life lines? Would not do in heavy air, of course.

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1 hour ago, hard aground said:

Doesn't that put a bunch of pressure on your lifelines/stantions? I just use a snatch block and an extra sheet, run it through the block and under the lifelines quick bowline on the sail and away we go.

On a reach we seldom need to pull it down enough to interfere with the lifelines, so no worries there.

50 minutes ago, monsoon said:

I can't see how your sheets are attached, but assuming a bowline, would it not be better to attach the shackle to the bowline eye and run essentially a 2nd sheet outside the life lines? Would not do in heavy air, of course.

If we needed to go outside the lifelines that is what we would do.

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Ok, help me fine tune this setup a little bit.  I was unsure of where to put the snatch blocks-  Even with the clew ring? Aft of the clew ring?

twing1.jpg

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1 minute ago, Ajax said:

Ok, help me fine tune this setup a little bit.  I was unsure of where to put the snatch blocks-  Even with the clew ring? Aft of the clew ring?

twing1.jpg

Wherever it needs to be. Different reaching angles call for different lead positions. I'd probably move it back from where you have it, but I don't know your boat. Watch your telltales, you'll know when it's right.

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Ok, I'll work with it some more. I do think you're right that it should be further aft on this particular day.

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Ajax, you might consider initially running a separate sheet thru the snatch block and to the clew.  That way there’s only two variables (snatch block location & sheet tension) as you learn what shape/trim looks right & works best for your rig. Once you can “see the shape” then you can switch to the snatchblock /twing sheet setup which has multiple variables (genny car position, genny sheet tension, snatch block lead position and twing sheet tension) all in play to try to get the right shape...

Crash

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13 hours ago, Ajax said:

Ok, help me fine tune this setup a little bit.  I was unsure of where to put the snatch blocks-  Even with the clew ring? Aft of the clew ring?

twing1.jpg

Barber haulers are just a method of changing the lead angle on the jib sheet transversely - they have to be adjusted the same way sheet blocks are - you have to move them until the telltales fly evenly.

 

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Hrm.  The snatch blocks are not quickly or easily moved. I'll have to carefully check the breeze and get them set before the race starts.  My jib cars seem well positioned for a general wind range. I only move them forward when it gets really light.

Based on what you're saying, the snatch block was definitely too far forward in this photo. The breeze was fresh and I should have moved it aft.

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Since you have holey rail it's quick & easy to attach snatch blocks. Just use two and alternate them until you find the right spot - if the lead isn't right, put the other block in what you think would be a better spot and move the twing line to it.

It requires some experimentation, just like jib sheet blocks on tracks.

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We barber haul the genoa like that on the J/35 when reaching the #1.  Our setup is a 15 foot long length of old 5/8ths line spliced to a reefing hook, snatchblock on the T-track/toe-rail.  (The T-track adjusts easier, feel for you on that point).  With your perforated toerail, no reason adequately sized carabiners shouldn't work just fine. 

Procedurally - before we turn to a reach we put the snatch block on the toe rail around amidships, maybe 4' aft of the shrouds, and run the line to one of the cabin top winches.  We tack, sheet the genoa, stick the  reefing hook through the clew, then ease the sheet and trim the barber haul until the genoa's leech has the same curve as the main.  The snatch block is in the right place when it's pulling more or less straight downward from the clew. 

What makes it fast, IMAO, is not just the much more efficient jib trim, but that properly trimming the jib establishes a really nice efficient 'envelope' for the main.  This means there's some fussing between jib and main to get it just right.  . 

 

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Cool,  thanks. Maybe we can discuss in more detail over a beer this summer. 

Back on topic,  nobody loses with more style than I do.  This photo is from last week's race. 

received_1036467669850782.jpeg

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It may be just me Ajax, or the angle of the pic...but it looks like the top of the slot for the genny is way tight on the main.  Is the main all bagged out by the sailnumbers?  Or can you maybe get some twist on that genny (lead aft some to allow top of genny to twist off some?  That might add some upwind speed.

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9 hours ago, Crash said:

It may be just me Ajax, or the angle of the pic...but it looks like the top of the slot for the genny is way tight on the main.  Is the main all bagged out by the sailnumbers?  Or can you maybe get some twist on that genny (lead aft some to allow top of genny to twist off some?  That might add some upwind speed.

For sure the main is old and due for replacement but I wouldn't say that it's "all bagged out."  I do agree that the slot looks a bit tight up high.

I think that for the amount of breeze at the time, I over trimmed the genoa and I should have had the traveler higher and the main sheeted in a bit more so multiple small errors going on there. Ah, the miracle of "compound interest."

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2 hours ago, Ozmex said:

Hanging on to number one near finishing line in Hobart while plane took photos.

 

2D2FBFD5-43C6-4566-BAA0-6804ACFB8602.jpeg

Looks like you had it printed on your blue jeans or the photographer forgot to lift the screen in the window before the click!

nice shot!

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