Black Jack

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On ‎9‎/‎11‎/‎2018 at 12:40 PM, TwoLegged said:

I'm not in the slightest bit worried.  :)

I'm just having mischevious fun teasing @Cruisin Loser, who is a vice nice guy and is taking it all in the friendly spirit in which it is intended.

Just like any offset companionway, no matter how well implemented, gets a barrage of "ye will die" comments.  

I'm not sure how to break this to you, but not only is she wood, with an ugly boom, but Restive has a companionway that is just ever so slightly offset.

 

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YER GONNA DIE in that ugly, unseaworthy, vegetable-matter coffin!

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18 minutes ago, Cruisin Loser said:

I'm not sure how to break this to you, but not only is she wood, with an ugly boom, but Restive has a companionway that is just ever so slightly offset.

1

You are DOOOMED!!!!!!

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But like the mystique of a dog magically resembling their owner, Cruising, are you; 

Finding your smile becoming somewhat lopsided?

Walking with any noticeable lean in one direction or the other??

Finding coffee constantly dribbles out as you're drinking?

We're just concerned for you mate.

 

 

 

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17 hours ago, shaggybaxter said:

But like the mystique of a dog magically resembling their owner, Cruising, are you; 

Finding your smile becoming somewhat lopsided?

Walking with any noticeable lean in one direction or the other??

Finding coffee constantly dribbles out as you're drinking?

We're just concerned for you mate.

 

 

 

Oh fuck! I have all of those symptoms, but it's not just coffee dribbling, and not just out of my mouth. And the lean has become a limp, and...oh crap! That's not all that's limp!

Shit, I should have kept the Hinckley with the centerline companionway.

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Aaannd, there ya have it folks!  Let this ^^^^^^ be a lesson.  Immortalize it, repeat it, tell it to your children.  There be dragons here!

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On 9/14/2018 at 7:29 AM, Cruisin Loser said:

Oh fuck! I have all of those symptoms, but it's not just coffee dribbling, and not just out of my mouth. And the lean has become a limp, and...oh crap! That's not all that's limp!

Shit, I should have kept the Hinckley with the centerline companionway.

The (second) limp is a red herring and often mistakenly associated with an offset companionway. In fact, the most common effect is slow-onset Peyronie's disease, which is treatable with certain medications, by moving the companionway, or by breaking parity between the number of entrances and exits but this is impractical except on boats with double companionways (e.g. Lafitte 44). 

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Santana on her way to winning against boats that all owed her a bunch of time. 

 

 

8118E347-AE97-45B7-A860-B4E62362EBD7.jpeg

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Sailing jib and jigger in light air,...could be considered for fitting into either the Sailing, or Non-Sailing thread, but this thread needs bringing to the top.

How it's done: 

First you need crew willing to sail slowly, very slowly. It was hard to get the tell tales on the genoa to move in a few knots of wind, but speed (+-2kts), is more than ample when you're close to home and you're enjoying the foliage and the coastline. 

31550727908_dbb6d90958_o.jpg

Any yawl sailer knows, the secret is back here: Trimming the mizzen is tricky (the 'kick ass' as a Scottish friend of mine refers to his yawls mizzen). You don't look for speed change, it's more subtle than that. You tweak the miniature strings like a violin. In light air, you 'believe', in perfect yawl mizzen trim. 

31550727848_7d694154e0_o.jpg

I nailed it, eventually(the engine stayed cold), and we got out into clear air in the bay and home after a few hours of pleasant sailing. There is hardly anyone out there these days except the ferry boats.  

31550727918_db1ff609df_o.jpg

On the mooring I marveled at the nicely flaked and covered mainsail, that I never touched all weekend. Our harbor is clearing out, I'm going sailing this weekend. 

45374432652_089c434397_o.jpg

 

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On 9/13/2018 at 7:30 AM, TwoLegged said:

You are DOOOMED!!!!!!

 

I believe there is proportionality to consider here. If it's only slightly off-center, then CL is only slightly doomed. 

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Just now, Elegua said:

I believe there is proportionality to consider here. If it's only slightly off-center, then CL is only slightly doomed. 

1

I love the concept of "slightly doomed".

I had always considered doomedness as a binary condition — yer either dooomed or not doomed — so I will have to reflect on its meaning

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Lovely photos as usual Tom. No wonder the mizzen's well set, seeing as it's made by the Papal sail loft. I should think he'd know how to cut a sail. Here's to late season sailing. On our own in Donegal Bay as I type. Idyllic.

 

 

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4 hours ago, Kris Cringle said:

Sailing jib and jigger in light air,...could be considered for fitting into either the Sailing, or Non-Sailing thread, but this thread needs bringing to the top.

When I see ketches and yawls, Ii mostly think "pretty, but too much gear".

But you have reminded me of the calm pleasure of sailing with jib and jigger.  I recall from long-ago days of sailing a yawl that it somehow felt very different to sailing with main up.  Much calmer.

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I like a jigger now and then as well

libbey-3-oz-whiskey-lexington-jigger-gla

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40 minutes ago, TwoLegged said:

When I see ketches and yawls, Ii mostly think "pretty, but too much gear".

But you have reminded me of the calm pleasure of sailing with jib and jigger.  I recall from long-ago days of sailing a yawl that it somehow felt very different to sailing with main up.  Much calmer.

I certainly had my opinion changed when sailing @Illegal Smile's Pathfinder.

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9 hours ago, Mr. Ed said:

I only put this in to show how good Tom is at photos of boats!

 

donegal harbour copy.jpg

In your defense, that the UK. Skill aside, of course there is not the sun that Kris enjoys. 

Nice photo!

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Donegal's not been the UK for nearly 100 years! History . . . it's just one thing after another . . . 

And it was a photo in real time, as it were. 

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10 hours ago, Elegua said:

In your defense, that the UK. Skill aside, of course there is not the sun that Kris enjoys. 

Nice photo!

It is a good photo of an interesting deck. First -the worst problem- you have to level the horizon. You can play around with the light levels, contrast, etc. and squeeze a little light out of the setting. I couldn't put any blue in it though,...Maybe the promise of clearing skies, to come? 

31571886128_5e50a40b65_o.jpg

 

 

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Not cleared yet, but it has just stopped raining. Rather beautiful in its way.

I've just spent hours playing with tilting photos trying to get horizons flat - they were all right hand down. I now think I've over compensated here! Photoshop Elements "straighten" gadget doesn't seem to work.

greatmans bay 3.jpg

 

inse mac cionaith 2.JPG

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5 hours ago, Mr. Ed said:

Donegal's not been the UK for nearly 100 years! History . . . it's just one thing after another . . . 

And it was a photo in real time, as it were. 

Apologies, I’m American, so I only speak in geographic generalities. If it’s Ireland I was only 2/3’s wrong.  

That’s a beautiful playground. You should tell us more about what it is to cruise there. 

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1 hour ago, Elegua said:

Apologies, I’m American, so I only speak in geographic generalities. If it’s Ireland I was only 2/3’s wrong.  

That’s a beautiful playground. You should tell us more about what it is to cruise there. 

Am just writing up the logs as I sit, being distracted by yott gossip. I'm an aged ingenue in this game, so I don't have much to compare it to, but we're both utterly smote with the landscapes, the culture, the sailing. Everything. Not much infrastructure, which is fine by us. A month's sailing and a total of 14 euros docking fees. It's cheaper not to work!

 

 

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Last sail,...

Gusting to 30, forward of the beam, is no way to end a season. Once in the lee of my home harbor, I had time to kill so I sailed her in under genoa and mizzen alone. Going to windward, 'jib n' jigger' is a test with my boat. Sometimes it's hard to realize any progress to windward. And while the harbor in the lee was pretty flat, wind was still in the 15 to 20 range, and the outgoing tide was working against me.

 

This is how it went, I can't embellish this track, but at times I got a good speed: 

jib-and-jigger-track-to-windward-jpg.157

Even with the centerboard down, in the gusty conditions, the lee helm makes it difficult to keep her drawing to windward. I started to get the motion. I had to anticipate rudder changes, before I could feel the bow blowing off, to make much progress. But then it got pretty good, overall, and I was happy to see the old boat - lee helm hobbled - clawing her way in. 

And then the yawl bonus at the end (final hair pin loop at the top), heaving to in the (now) 15 knot cold North wind.  With the main already furled, all you do is, furl the genoa in and let the wheel go; it spins and hits the quadrant on the stop block below the cockpit sole. Done. 

hove-to-15kts-jpg.157668

It was good to relax, warm up and just sit. We (the boat and I) sat in our slick for 20 minutes or more moving at 0 to .5 knots, DDW, away from the outer moorings. 

hove-to-15kts-slick-jpg.157669

I hate 30 knots but love the calm out on the water. This was a good end to my season. Apologies if I caused anyone, yawl envy

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I see your yawl and raise you a ketch. Our last day of the season, also in a big breeze (mid 20s mostly). On our way from Donegal Harbour to Killybegs via Mullaghmore for lunch. You can see Ben Bulben and its mates under the boom from time to time, and that's Mullaghmore we're headed for. Good times. 

For what it's worth, if I have to go to weather in any breeze, I now hang on to the full main (which is gaff-rigged) for as long as possible, losing the mizzen and jib first. Later on that day as the breeze built we went to that sail plain and I was pleased to be tacking through about 110 degrees, despite a decent sea running. The first time I tried to go to windward under jib and mizzen was dangerous and felt very unseamanlike, for she wouldn't point at all. It may be to do with the length of the luff on the main. The smacks used to set topsails over reefed mains to go to windward, the gain being in the length of the luff.

 

ps - you might want to take some Stugeron before watching the video!

 

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14 minutes ago, Mr. Ed said:

I see your yawl and raise you a ketch. Our last day of the season, also in a big breeze (mid 20s mostly). On our way from Donegal Harbour to Killybegs via Mullaghmore for lunch. You can see Ben Bulben and its mates under the boom from time to time, and that's Mullaghmore we're headed for. Good times.

Lovely to see a video of familiar stomping grounds.

But did you really spend the night in Killybegs? Hope you were fell upwind of the fish processing plant.  The last few times I was in Killybegs, the stench carried for miles :( 

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2 minutes ago, TwoLegged said:

Lovely to see a video of familiar stomping grounds.

But did you really spend the night in Killybegs? Hope you were fell upwind of the fish processing plant.  The last few times I was in Killybegs, the stench carried for miles :( 

 

Oh, we've spent a lot of time there - they have a good yacht harbour now. We've had no big stink, but only one of the factories was running. Very good harbour, and easy to enter.

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16 minutes ago, Mr. Ed said:

Oh, we've spent a lot of time there - they have a good yacht harbour now. We've had no big stink, but only one of the factories was running. Very good harbour, and easy to enter.

Yes, it's by far the best harbour in Donegal Bay.  But that stink ...

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7 hours ago, IStream said:

Sorry, but nothing is worse than the rotting-seafood-plus-rancid-oil stench from the Shanghai Chinese restaurant at Point Hudson Marina. 

https://goo.gl/maps/qjWHSk5Z3bR2

 

Does anyone actually eat there?

love the breakfast place next door though..

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Bob mentioned that he ate there once and got sick from it. I never have. Why would you when Khu Larb, an absolutely fantastic Thai place, is a short walk from the marina?

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On ‎9‎/‎13‎/‎2018 at 9:30 AM, TwoLegged said:

You are DOOOMED!!!!!!

 

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On ‎10‎/‎19‎/‎2018 at 11:17 AM, woahboy said:

I like a jigger now and then as well

libbey-3-oz-whiskey-lexington-jigger-gla

If I were the Scottish grammar police. That would be a dram. 

Or would that be Scottish grammar polis?

 

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Sailing south outside Baja last fall. Perfect conditions for our 12 yr old daughter to ride the bow watching dolphins.

Not beating into 30kts.... and not going home.

SailingGoblin.jpg

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20 hours ago, bmiller said:

If I were the Scottish grammar police. That would be a dram. 

Or would that be Scottish grammar polis?

 

I'm not arguing but just saying. The interweb has the definition of a Dram being less than a teaspoon. But, amongst friends a Dram is the amount that one would like to share with a friend. Hey Legs, you out there?

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46 minutes ago, Ajax said:

In the Maritime Republic of Eastport, we measure rum in Gills.

https://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gill_(unit)

I'll make sure that if I am ever in your neck of the woods to never order a gill. Or perhaps one gets a discount for that much?

1 U.S. gill = 4 U.S. fl. oz.

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3 hours ago, woahboy said:

I'm not arguing but just saying. The interweb has the definition of a Dram being less than a teaspoon. But, amongst friends a Dram is the amount that one would like to share with a friend. Hey Legs, you out there?

Technically, a dram is  a weight equal to 1/8 of an ounce or a volume equal to 1/8 of a fluid ounce.

But in practice a "dram" means a "small quantity", where the smallness may not be very evident.   So a "wee dram" may mean a tiny sip, or enough  to get legless.  It all depends on context.

In England,  similar forms understatement are used. The  late Lionel Trippett — author of the 1980s bestseller "Real Men Don't Eat Quiche" — used to invite his friends to join him for a "notional half" (i.e half pint).  This usually involved the consumption of a few gallons of beer.

In Ireland, our preferred understatement is "a few jars".  It may mean anything from a half pint to a half barrel, but it usually understood to mean something closer to the latter.

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17 hours ago, oysterhead said:

Sailing south outside Baja last fall. Perfect conditions for our 12 yr old daughter to ride the bow watching dolphins.

Not beating into 30kts.... and not going home.

SailingGoblin.jpg

Lovely.  Is that an Atlantic 42?

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Our new boat Bella Sera :) she’s s Crealock 37 hull #15 of 16 built. She’s in great shape! She’s a cutter rigged yawl with a tiller... my fave rig!

5E9C4A53-7413-4366-A39E-998FE9E8B657.jpeg

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Congrats, but that shot belongs in the "not sailing" thread. Just trying to keep the place organized but it's like anarchy around here...

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Noting Istream's admonition re thread but...the boat has a hailing port of "Dayton, Montana".  do you think it once lived on Flathead Lake or perhaps you or a previous owner was from there and kept the boat on the coast?

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On 10/30/2018 at 4:13 PM, bmiller said:

If I were the Scottish grammar police. That would be a dram. 

Or would that be Scottish grammar polis?

 

“Sodjers” I think according to James Kelman. In Glasgow at any rate. 

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1 hour ago, WindnCs said:

Our new boat Bella Sera :) she’s s Crealock 37 hull #15 of 16 built. She’s in great shape! She’s a cutter rigged yawl with a tiller... my fave rig!

5E9C4A53-7413-4366-A39E-998FE9E8B657.jpeg

Grammar Police to dock A!

She's a double head sail yawl.

A cutter is a cutter and a yawl is a yawl and never the twain shall meet. ;)

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36 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

Grammar Police to dock A!

She's a double head sail yawl.

A cutter is a cutter and a yawl is a yawl and never the twain shall meet. ;)

Does that apply to a ketch as well? 

I've heard a lot of boats described as 'cutter rigged ketches' but don't really know if the nomenclature would please the Grammar Police.

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Well thanks for the clarification JonB! I might keep calling her a cutter rigged yawl however, I like the way that sounds! I doubt seriously the “sailing grammar police” will catch me in all my stealthy and conniving ways, stashed away in all the desolate anchorages I’ll be visiting, where I’ll be lazily exploiting my poor grammar :)

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1 hour ago, WindnCs said:

Well thanks for the clarification JonB! I might keep calling her a cutter rigged yawl however, I like the way that sounds! I doubt seriously the “sailing grammar police” will catch me in all my stealthy and conniving ways, stashed away in all the desolate anchorages I’ll be visiting, where I’ll be lazily exploiting my poor grammar :)

And I think we know what you mean, so it's alright. Trying to get Mrs. Ed (who is otherwise a good sailor) to join in the game of terminology is impossible. She clings to kitchen, toilet, bedroom, even front and back. The problem is that I'm so fucking pedantic that when it actually matters (as in "the buoy doesn't have port and starboard sides, we do") I've already lost my credibility.

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4 hours ago, TwoLegged said:

Lovely.  Is that an Atlantic 42?

Yes. Very happily wandering south under a fabulous Ballard Sails Code 0... Taking the old spin pole and making it into

a fixed sprit, adding a ProFurl Spinex for the Assymetric kite and the Code 0, made for many happy days enroute to Ecuador

where we are now for a while.

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This is not just a yawl trick, but a CB trick. If I furl the jib, strap the main, pull up the CB and jam the helm to windward - we'll slide to leeward in a slick at less than a kt.  Works reefed in heavier breezes too. 

On 10/28/2018 at 4:43 AM, Kris Cringle said:

was good to relax, warm up and just sit. We (the boat and I) sat in our slick for 20 minutes or more moving at 0 to .5 knots, DDW, away from the outer moorings. 

  hove-to-15kts-slick-jpg.157669

 

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Ah, very sorry about that! Great pun too :)

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2 hours ago, fufkin said:

Does that apply to a ketch as well?

Yes

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Back in the 'old' days, many but not all sloops, cutters, ketches and yawls had multiple headsails.  It was the best way to fill the foretriangle with the current technology of the time.  Later generations began to distinguish cutters by the multiple headsail configuration and it's probably somewhat natural to now think of a staysail and jib combo as being 'like' a cutter.  Less pedantic (thanks Mr Ed) folks found that most people 'understood' what they were talking about.  But Sloop is a keeper of history and tradition around here and (correctly) likes to clarify and promote proper terminology.  Someone's got to do it or it will all die out---Thanks SloopJonB!

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Cutter rigged cat boat?

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1 hour ago, Bull City said:

Cutter rigged cat boat?

Well.

There were some sloop rigged catboats.....

And

Some catboats that could change their rig to a sloop rig depending on the race they were entered into...

 

Five men on board catboat with jib, near Mystic River railroad bridge.jpg

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7 hours ago, Veeger said:

Well.

There were some sloop rigged catboats.....

And

Some catboats that could change their rig to a sloop rig depending on the race they were entered into...

 

Five men on board catboat with jib, near Mystic River railroad bridge.jpg

Do you know where this photo was taken? For some reason, it reminds me of Baltimore. I love the wool trousers, jackets and bowlers on these guys.

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This thread is being neglected.  It is late season for a lot of us so it stands to reason.  We are having a great fall.  Finally got the balls to fly the drone whilst sailing.  Slammed it into the BBQ while trying to land it.  It recovered though.  It is a bitch catching the DJI Spark.  Too small I am thinking.  

These are captured from video so the quality is a bit off.  That and the damn limit on photo size here.

IMG_0053.thumb.jpg.f6cc78b48f142b5ef9adaf827d63c5f6.jpg

IMG_0054.thumb.jpg.bb2f0538537bd2fa9731baad49d3a1f0.jpg

IMG_0055.thumb.jpg.86649bc61d277c81b11a017712fcec42.jpg

 

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6 hours ago, Beer fueled Mayhem said:

This thread is being neglected.  It is late season for a lot of us so it stands to reason.  We are having a great fall.  Finally got the balls to fly the drone whilst sailing.  Slammed it into the BBQ while trying to land it.  It recovered though.  It is a bitch catching the DJI Spark.  Too small I am thinking.  

These are captured from video so the quality is a bit off.  That and the damn limit on photo size here.

IMG_0053.thumb.jpg.f6cc78b48f142b5ef9adaf827d63c5f6.jpg

IMG_0054.thumb.jpg.bb2f0538537bd2fa9731baad49d3a1f0.jpg

IMG_0055.thumb.jpg.86649bc61d277c81b11a017712fcec42.jpg

 

Oh my Christ, you deployed and retrieved a Spark from your boat?  Pretty damned amazing considering that they have shorter flight time and wind tolerance than the larger models.

I can barely safely fly mine from the boat while I'm anchored. I'd love to have a GOOD drone pilot onboard to get some footage of my boat.

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On 10/31/2018 at 10:50 PM, Veeger said:

Well.

There were some sloop rigged catboats.....

And

Some catboats that could change their rig to a sloop rig depending on the race they were entered into...

 

Five men on board catboat with jib, near Mystic River railroad bridge.jpg

The catboats of Barnegat Bay would use the cat rig to clam,fish and transport tourist to the barrier island of NJ before the advent of mobos and the automobile. The southeast sea breeze was a constant 8-15 knots all summer and the big rig was needed.

In the winter, they would move the mast aft and they would sail as Sloop rugged cats for the winter when a mostly west wind blows in the 20’s often. The reduced sail area was easier to handle in the blustery conditions when fighting the sea for their share of bounty.

Eventually, the internal combustion engine erased the need for rigs and the boats were denuded of sail and the cabin tops got larger to accommodate goods and Hereshoff developed Merry Thought, a Sloop that destroyed the catboat fleet with its speed and handling.

Thanks Capt. Nat! Innovation kills!!!

http://www.woodboatbuilder.com/pages/jerseycats.html

John Brady compiled this history for us. 

0EEEA8D9-5637-4A86-9EC5-2E837C7028AD.jpeg

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Waiting for spring patiently with a laundry list of finishing g touches.

I can’t believe how much work it takes to restore a classic wooden yacht. 

751BE851-BD40-4555-9FF7-3B9219C5A64D.jpeg

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That's a beauty, beer. Tell us more.

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1949 St. Lawrence composite ocean racer. Built in St.Lawrence, Quebec for a prince to race the 1950 Newport Bermuda race. Injured, he never raced. The boat was privately owned until 2012 when Superstorm Sandy beached it in Staten Island. It was hauled back to Atlantic Highlands,NJ with no damage and then dropped 3 times from the slings during harbor clearing in the aftermath. The partial hung rudder,  propeller aperture and deadwoods were torn out and the leading edge of the cutaway forefoot keel split as well as shattering the taffrail and cracking 12+ frames. I bought it and restored it over the past 5 years.

1” Alaskan white cedar on steam bent white oak frames. Douglas fir keel boom and bowsprit. Deck stepped 50’ aluminum mast on a Canadian steel c frame bolted to steel floors with a steel centerboard trunk. 

46’ overall

40’ on deck 

37’ waterline 

4’10” draft board up

9’board down

10’4” beam

Helm: tiller

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Wow Sail, that looks gorgeous. I'd love to see a before photo! You quiet little devil Sail, that is a hell of a lot of boat.

Congratulations mate, she's hot. 

 

 

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3 hours ago, Sail4beer said:

1949 St. Lawrence composite ocean racer. Built in St.Lawrence, Quebec for a prince to race the 1950 Newport Bermuda race. Injured, he never raced. The boat was privately owned until 2012 when Superstorm Sandy beached it in Staten Island. It was hauled back to Atlantic Highlands,NJ with no damage and then dropped 3 times from the slings during harbor clearing in the aftermath. The partial hung rudder,  propeller aperture and deadwoods were torn out and the leading edge of the cutaway forefoot keel split as well as shattering the taffrail and cracking 12+ frames. I bought it and restored it over the past 5 years.

1” Alaskan white cedar on steam bent white oak frames. Douglas fir keel boom and bowsprit. Deck stepped 50’ aluminum mast on a Canadian steel c frame bolted to steel floors with a steel centerboard trunk. 

46’ overall

40’ on deck 

37’ waterline 

4’10” draft board up

9’board down

10’4” beam

Helm: tiller

Mein Gott im Himmel, that is beautiful. *sigh*  If I lived nearby, I'd be your new, best friend just so I could hang out near that boat.

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I’ve had a lot of admirers once the boat hit the water!

Before that, I think the trash cans full of empty beer cans led people to believe the usual for a restoration-drink and dream. 

I have to get the computer to cough up some good early pics of the damage and I have a ton of pics of the underwater restoration/ frame scarphing and two time varnish stripping and re-doing in Awlwood. 

Here’s a shot someone took at Midland Beach, Staten Island, New York after the storm. Other than the pedestal helm snapped off by the force of the gear driven auto helm, the bow chocks, a couple of feet of cap rail on port and starboard and the jib club snapped to pieces, the boat was in good shape before it was hauled/mauled.

C103D305-D5BB-47BF-8BA9-F54B0A6CD823.jpeg

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Here’s my brother taking the tender back across the Toms River for winter storage today.

 

40BF0A51-3113-47C3-A1CC-E0506AF6B635.jpeg

CDE11A97-8323-432C-8112-21720E75FBD9.jpeg

B15FBDD2-53D0-4136-AFBD-D7B3A2200881.jpeg

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1 hour ago, Sail4beer said:

And Silent Maid in the dark tonight 

Absolutely beautiful 

F3120121-63DB-4924-932B-971CFCAE18B5.jpeg

My boats look better in the dark too. 

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17 hours ago, Ajax said:

Oh my Christ, you deployed and retrieved a Spark from your boat?  Pretty damned amazing considering that they have shorter flight time and wind tolerance than the larger models.

I can barely safely fly mine from the boat while I'm anchored. I'd love to have a GOOD drone pilot onboard to get some footage of my boat.

My buddy was wearing Kevlar gloves that I bought just for catching that little bastard.  I flew it right into him and he grabbed it with both hands.  Says it hurt pretty bad when the blades got him but no lacerations.  The price of "art" I guess! 

I think I am going to use a fish landing net to get the drone if we can't get it by hand.  Might break a prop but I'll at least get it back.  

I am getting obsessed now over getting good footage of the boat sailing.  We are going out for Thanksgiving.  If the weather is nice, I'll try again.

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Oops! I thought this was the show your boat not sailing thread. The tender is a sailboat under aux power

The big boat still needs some engine work and a couple of new sails. The old ones look like rags...

I’ll re-post these and the other 2 boats up thread in the other forum

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Sail, I personally dont care if we're staring at a piece of wood floating past, thanks for the pics. Some sick addiction makes all pics of boats and the water addictive.  Silent Maid, I thought you said Silent Mad, which somehow appealed to me a lot!

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Here's one sailing. We're rounding an island into an opposing wind/tide sloppy section. Pressed a bit with full jib and the 1st reef in about 20-25 kn on the beam. 

814735868_BeneteauCup18JulesVidPicPro.com-5164.thumb.jpg.5289321d15b1ea3ef0e55ac3628aa563.jpg

Spot the mistake?

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Great shot but the leading edge of the jib looks funny.

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G'day Istream, 

Thanks for pointing that out, I'd forgotten about that. We did have a bit of of sag in the forestay, too much sail up I think. 

I was referring to the furled gennaker slowly snaking under the lifelines on the leeward rail. 

If I didn't come clean, you guys would find all these other problems with my trim and my false sense of happy place would be in pieces :ph34r: 

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I saw the gennaker but didn't realize what it was. Since it was leading around the furler, I thought it might've been associated in some way with the jib situation. That looks like a fun day out!

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I saw it loose on the bow but the rest looked like reflection..

I hope LB isn’t out there yelling at you guys about it. The guy in back looks way serious, but that’s not you, you’re on the rail?

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18 minutes ago, Sail4beer said:

I saw it loose on the bow but the rest looked like reflection..

I hope LB isn’t out there yelling at you guys about it. The guy in back looks way serious, but that’s not you, you’re on the rail?

Hi Sail,

I'm still drooling over your boat. Yes mate, that's me trying adding value on the rail, need more crew weight or less sail.

To add perspective, the preceding shot.....we're planing nicely even though it doesn't look like it  :).

390795249_BeneteauCup18JulesVidPicPro.com-5154.thumb.jpg.8c4978a1c20c6bbcc8a90d08ac505d82.jpg

 

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Hah, he’s too busy blasting Randumb on PA.

Seriously, he probably took the pic to throw shade at Shaggy!

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3 hours ago, shaggybaxter said:

Here's one sailing. We're rounding an island into an opposing wind/tide sloppy section. Pressed a bit with full jib and the 1st reef in about 20-25 kn on the beam. 

814735868_BeneteauCup18JulesVidPicPro.com-5164.thumb.jpg.5289321d15b1ea3ef0e55ac3628aa563.jpg

Spot the mistake?

Yes, I have spotted it: the guy on the rail wearing dark socks with shorts. The only thing worse would be if he were also wearing leather sandals. :D

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8 minutes ago, Bull City said:

Yes, I have spotted it: the guy on the rail wearing dark socks with shorts. The only thing worse would be if he were also wearing leather sandals. :D

:lol::lol::lol:

Yes!

 

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5 hours ago, shaggybaxter said:

Here's one sailing. We're rounding an island into an opposing wind/tide sloppy section. Pressed a bit with full jib and the 1st reef in about 20-25 kn on the beam. 

814735868_BeneteauCup18JulesVidPicPro.com-5164.thumb.jpg.5289321d15b1ea3ef0e55ac3628aa563.jpg

Spot the mistake?

Waldo isn't hiding?

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Blowing about 8 knots, doing 5 knots. Today, Mt. Baker in the far distance.

YaP4jTw.jpg

 

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36 minutes ago, Ishmael said:

Blowing about 8 knots, doing 5 knots. Today, Mt. Baker in the far distance.

YaP4jTw.jpg

 

讚!非常漂亮! 雖然你在cruising,在八節風速只有5節船速,不會算太快。

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