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Newbie photo exercise

I'll see your Lake Harriet and raise you 235.

 

P6270151a-1_zpsnkpidfsx.jpg

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post-11311-0-34054000-1481836935_thumb.jpg

winning the race with a blown up main (tacking at the finish line)

attachicon.gifripped.jpg

 

the pics from non rip, to small tear to a wee bit bigger to full blown destruction were epic. The whole time we held the lead and all I hoped was we kept it until the finish

 

here's a good close up

attachicon.gifIMG_0466.JPG

 

me in cruising mode (roller furler , dodger) heading out for my annual 3 week sojourn to somewhere

attachicon.gifripple1.jpg

 

S2 9.1

 

 

someone just sent me these....taking a "Boat Load" of my new Jr. Sailors out on the 4th of July Race

post-11311-0-34054000-1481836935_thumb.jpg

 

and winning race No. 2 that day

post-11311-0-67921100-1481836999_thumb.jpg

 

 

 

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That's the lazy runner for the staysail, it's tied off on the rail to keep it from swinging around. Our boat has inline spreaders so we need the runners to keep the mast in column with the staysail up.

 

I've been trying to get my parents to ditch the cans for years, with no success.

 

Keep trying but it's really a design problem. I bet if we asked for a show of hands from those who have carried fuel on the rail we'd get nearly everyone, including me.

 

 

Unfortunately there's no easy way to store dinghy fuel, or spare diesel, or spare just-in-case water down below that doesn't get underfoot when the boat is stopped. We can stick the blue jugs in the shower on passages, but the yellow and red ones are smelly and dangerous!

 

And we've actually used those jugs...all of them!

 

I think Will is determined to design a "hideaway jerry can locker" concept he can implement in a cruising yacht some day so the owners won't mess up his lines. Of course, most of us will still be like "MOAR JERRY CANS" and lash them on anyway once we've filled the hideaway lockers.

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I wish I could find some better pics of my parents old trailer sailer than the sales pictures. It was an 8.5m trailer boat, 1200kg fully rigged including fuel and sails, standing headroom, bunks for 5, shitter and a galley. Bullshit fast downhill.

 

With the light air kite up, somewhere north of 110m^2

​2_2.jpg

 

And with the smaller reacher up

1_3.jpg

 

We did have a smaller kite, a 38m^2 pink number called the nipple, but whenever we had it out there was no one willing to bring out a camera.

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That's the lazy runner for the staysail, it's tied off on the rail to keep it from swinging around. Our boat has inline spreaders so we need the runners to keep the mast in column with the staysail up.

 

I've been trying to get my parents to ditch the cans for years, with no success.

 

Keep trying but it's really a design problem. I bet if we asked for a show of hands from those who have carried fuel on the rail we'd get nearly everyone, including me.

 

 

Unfortunately there's no easy way to store dinghy fuel, or spare diesel, or spare just-in-case water down below that doesn't get underfoot when the boat is stopped. We can stick the blue jugs in the shower on passages, but the yellow and red ones are smelly and dangerous!

 

And we've actually used those jugs...all of them!

 

I think Will is determined to design a "hideaway jerry can locker" concept he can implement in a cruising yacht some day so the owners won't mess up his lines. Of course, most of us will still be like "MOAR JERRY CANS" and lash them on anyway once we've filled the hideaway lockers.

 

 

I understand the utility. I have carried cans on the rail too. It just makes me nutz. Fuel doesn't belong on the rail.

 

I think cruising boats should be like redneck pickup trucks are around here: a fuel tank in the bed that has its own pump, hose, and dispensing handle. OK, so sailboats don't have a bed. They have a bilge, which is a better place for fuel than the rail.

 

In a bouncy anchorage, I shouldn't have to transfer or manage pouring from a can. I should carry a hose to the dink, put the nozzle in the fuel tank, and pump. It should be possible to pour fuel into this tank from a can, there should be a water separator where it comes out, and the tank should have a drain that will get every last drop for cleaning.

 

Maybe one day your son or some other bright new star will make a cruising boat that contemplates the idea that cruisers might just have a dink and that dink might just need fuel. I remain hopeful!

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Another boat I previously owned, a CSY 44:

 

marialithbr.jpg

 

Carried twin 200 gallon water tanks and twin 50 gallon fuel tanks. I never saw the need to carry water or diesel in jugs.

 

But you see that red spot on the aft deck? And a couple more bits of red just aft of the windsurfer? Yes, gasoline for the dink. The one on the aft deck was usually lashed underneath the giant COTB structure but I guess we had it out to fuel the dink.

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Yes, long range yotts should have a vented deck box for dinghy fuel, like for gas bottles, shouldn't they . . .

Or electric outboards . . .

Or pulling and sailing tenders.

I've got one of those now . . . Wonder if we'll still carry an outboard? Hope not.

I seem to have lost the connective tissue of syntax that links ideas. Ah well.

Another unconnected idea: who's going to calculate the windage of those ratlines (ratpoles?) on DT's old boat. We have lots of them and I want to persuade Mrs. E that we only need them up one side of the mast, and if I was able to say that it's the equivalent of towing an anchor of x kilos she might listen to sense . . .

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That's the lazy runner for the staysail, it's tied off on the rail to keep it from swinging around. Our boat has inline spreaders so we need the runners to keep the mast in column with the staysail up.

 

I've been trying to get my parents to ditch the cans for years, with no success.

 

Keep trying but it's really a design problem. I bet if we asked for a show of hands from those who have carried fuel on the rail we'd get nearly everyone, including me.

 

 

Unfortunately there's no easy way to store dinghy fuel, or spare diesel, or spare just-in-case water down below that doesn't get underfoot when the boat is stopped. We can stick the blue jugs in the shower on passages, but the yellow and red ones are smelly and dangerous!

 

And we've actually used those jugs...all of them!

 

I think Will is determined to design a "hideaway jerry can locker" concept he can implement in a cruising yacht some day so the owners won't mess up his lines. Of course, most of us will still be like "MOAR JERRY CANS" and lash them on anyway once we've filled the hideaway lockers.

 

 

I understand the utility. I have carried cans on the rail too. It just makes me nutz. Fuel doesn't belong on the rail.

 

I think cruising boats should be like redneck pickup trucks are around here: a fuel tank in the bed that has its own pump, hose, and dispensing handle. OK, so sailboats don't have a bed. They have a bilge, which is a better place for fuel than the rail.

 

In a bouncy anchorage, I shouldn't have to transfer or manage pouring from a can. I should carry a hose to the dink, put the nozzle in the fuel tank, and pump. It should be possible to pour fuel into this tank from a can, there should be a water separator where it comes out, and the tank should have a drain that will get every last drop for cleaning.

 

Maybe one day your son or some other bright new star will make a cruising boat that contemplates the idea that cruisers might just have a dink and that dink might just need fuel. I remain hopeful!

 

 

I think the fundamental difficulty with dinghy fuel is the nature of gasoline. It's as dangerous as propane since the vapors are heavier than air, so you just can't keep it in the bilge if you are trying to avoid blowing your boat up by having a diesel engine in the first place. You need a second locker, like a propane locker, that is vented overboard. Or maybe a two part, "exploding crap" locker with dinghy fuel storage in one side and racks to secure standard propane tanks on the other. Hell, make it big enough to fit two x 20L jerry cans, so you can pull them out and take them to the gas station. With a pump/plumbing fitting that screws into one, and a hand pump/siphon hose that can reach down to the dinghy level. It doesn't have to be complicated, but it will take up space. Valuable interior space, or valuable giant cockpit space, both of which are so important to the dockside presentation of new vessels these days.

 

Refueling is not such a big deal with our 15HP engine with an external tank. That isn't so bad, we can move the tank on deck if it's too bumpy. But the 3.5 HP backup engine with the integral tank is a pain in the tuchas to refuel if there is any chop or bounce.

 

But the jerry cans...gotta have them. We did a complete refuel (891L of our 1,000L capacity) using jerry cans only in Trinidad. And that's how we got our water the last few months in Brisbane, too, since the river was way too chunky to make water...2x20L jugs, and 2x16L collapsible tanks at a time. And don't get me started on buying gas in the Tuamotus...

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I wish I could find some better pics of my parents old trailer sailer than the sales pictures. It was an 8.5m trailer boat, 1200kg fully rigged including fuel and sails, standing headroom, bunks for 5, shitter and a galley. Bullshit fast downhill.

 

With the light air kite up, somewhere north of 110m^2

â2_2.jpg

 

And with the smaller reacher up

1_3.jpg

 

We did have a smaller kite, a 38m^2 pink number called the nipple, but whenever we had it out there was no one willing to bring out a camera.

What's the design? I gather some kinda Beale based on the insignia & the articulated pole you mentioned in another thread. 1200kg seems very light for an older style boat.

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Yes, long range yotts should have a vented deck box for dinghy fuel, like for gas bottles, shouldn't they . . .

Or electric outboards . . .

Or pulling and sailing tenders.

I've got one of those now . . . Wonder if we'll still carry an outboard? Hope not.

I seem to have lost the connective tissue of syntax that links ideas. Ah well.

Another unconnected idea: who's going to calculate the windage of those ratlines (ratpoles?) on DT's old boat. We have lots of them and I want to persuade Mrs. E that we only need them up one side of the mast, and if I was able to say that it's the equivalent of towing an anchor of x kilos she might listen to sense . . .

 

There are times and places a planing dinghy...a fast dinghy...are really nice.

 

We've taken some long trips in the powered dinghy. Several miles across the lagoon in a coral atoll, for example, when we didn't want to move the big boat for a day trip. Snorkeling expeditions. Or refuelling/re-watering at places you can't fill up at the dock. Or places with big current, e.g. Opua, NZ or Brisbane, Australia - two places we've spent a lot of time with that routinely had 2+ knots of current during the tides. Rowing is a bitch in those conditions, and not practical for some of the above operations if you need to do them unless you time it really well.

 

Planing speed gives a lot more options about where you can anchor, and where you can explore once you're anchored. It's nice to be able to anchor a mile from the dinghy dock, instead of trying to jam it in the middle of everyone else to keep the trip in short. And it's nice to be able to use the dinghy like a car, to be able to take it places to explore and see things because you can cover a lot of water. Wind affords you more flexibility than oars, of course, but you sill have more limitations.

 

We have a sailing dink, pictures of it are in this thread. Will has literally sailed it over 1,000NM in the three+ years he cruised with us. But it fits one or two, and is not a practical way to do things like lay in serious groceries or supplies. It's not a work boat, it's a fun boat, though we have used it for work a few times. We just bought a backup engine for the big dinghy that also fits the Pudgy, and wow did the usefulness of that boat just shoot up.

 

It's not that you CAN'T do those things, but it's that you take a task which is pretty onerous and time consuming with a fast dinghy, and made it into a whole other level of time and effort to do. That manual refuelling with our jerry cans (we had five at the time...100L) took nine trips in the big dinghy, and we were too laden down with all that fuel to plane. We spread the nine trips over three days anyway, even with that, because we only spent a couple of hours a day on the task. About 15 minutes that time was spent zooming back to the fuel depot where we filled the jugs; it was a mile or so away. Rowing...with the currents there in Chauguaramus...would have taken a lot longer each way. And rowing a half mile across the river in Brisbane to get a load of water, dodging ferries and 2-4 knot currents while rowing? Find another way; there always is a way. But putting water from a tap directly into the jerry can on the floor of your dink is WAY easier than humping the 20L cans down the dock from the laundry room one at a time. A couple of the long term guys there had big bladders for their dinks, with electric pumps to lift the water.

 

Anyway, there certainly are people that long range cruise without powered dinghies. It's not something I'd like to try. Even a small outboard on a hard dinghy is a very different proposition than rowing.

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Another boat I previously owned, a CSY 44:

 

 

 

Carried twin 200 gallon water tanks and twin 50 gallon fuel tanks. I never saw the need to carry water or diesel in jugs.

 

But you see that red spot on the aft deck? And a couple more bits of red just aft of the windsurfer? Yes, gasoline for the dink. The one on the aft deck was usually lashed underneath the giant COTB structure but I guess we had it out to fuel the dink.

 

As mentioned, we've used the diesel jugs to refuel.

 

I don't really view them as emergency diesel for motoring. Rather, I view them as extra generator run time. The 80L of extra diesel we carry, if we ran the main and backup tank empty, gets me about 8-10 more days of recharging my batteries to keep sailing. It would only by me 8-12 more hours of engine time, maybe another 60-90 miles of motoring.

 

(Genset uses 1.4L/Hour at 50% load, which we rarely exceed. Engine sucks 10L/Hr @ "cruising speed" I think of 2300 RPM...which we rarely approach, but would move us around 8 - 8.5 if I could stand the black smoke)

 

Also, and this is a small but not unimportant consideration, we learned a lesson on the Mayday call we answered a few years ago. The ability to easily impart fuel and water to a stricken vessel is a nice capacity to have. We could have done a lot more for them if we'd been able to float them 10 gallons of gas. It's not a reason in and of itself to add cans to the rail, but it is another tick in the "PRO" column of the analysis.

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At the start of the 2010 ARC

Roman_20101121_9554-1.jpg

 

Half way there

 

B0001506-1.jpg

 

and at the finish

 

arc10-5052-1.jpg

 

Nice. Not jealous. Not jealous at all. Oh no.

 

Who was the schoonery thing behind you at the getgo?

 

(colon, bracket)

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That's the lazy runner for the staysail, it's tied off on the rail to keep it from swinging around. Our boat has inline spreaders so we need the runners to keep the mast in column with the staysail up.

 

I've been trying to get my parents to ditch the cans for years, with no success.

 

Keep trying but it's really a design problem. I bet if we asked for a show of hands from those who have carried fuel on the rail we'd get nearly everyone, including me.

 

 

Unfortunately there's no easy way to store dinghy fuel, or spare diesel, or spare just-in-case water down below that doesn't get underfoot when the boat is stopped. We can stick the blue jugs in the shower on passages, but the yellow and red ones are smelly and dangerous!

 

And we've actually used those jugs...all of them!

 

I think Will is determined to design a "hideaway jerry can locker" concept he can implement in a cruising yacht some day so the owners won't mess up his lines. Of course, most of us will still be like "MOAR JERRY CANS" and lash them on anyway once we've filled the hideaway lockers.

 

 

I understand the utility. I have carried cans on the rail too. It just makes me nutz. Fuel doesn't belong on the rail.

 

I think cruising boats should be like redneck pickup trucks are around here: a fuel tank in the bed that has its own pump, hose, and dispensing handle. OK, so sailboats don't have a bed. They have a bilge, which is a better place for fuel than the rail.

 

In a bouncy anchorage, I shouldn't have to transfer or manage pouring from a can. I should carry a hose to the dink, put the nozzle in the fuel tank, and pump. It should be possible to pour fuel into this tank from a can, there should be a water separator where it comes out, and the tank should have a drain that will get every last drop for cleaning.

 

Maybe one day your son or some other bright new star will make a cruising boat that contemplates the idea that cruisers might just have a dink and that dink might just need fuel. I remain hopeful!

 

 

I think the fundamental difficulty with dinghy fuel is the nature of gasoline. It's as dangerous as propane since the vapors are heavier than air, so you just can't keep it in the bilge if you are trying to avoid blowing your boat up by having a diesel engine in the first place. You need a second locker, like a propane locker, that is vented overboard. Or maybe a two part, "exploding crap" locker with dinghy fuel storage in one side and racks to secure standard propane tanks on the other. Hell, make it big enough to fit two x 20L jerry cans, so you can pull them out and take them to the gas station. With a pump/plumbing fitting that screws into one, and a hand pump/siphon hose that can reach down to the dinghy level. It doesn't have to be complicated, but it will take up space. Valuable interior space, or valuable giant cockpit space, both of which are so important to the dockside presentation of new vessels these days.

 

Refueling is not such a big deal with our 15HP engine with an external tank. That isn't so bad, we can move the tank on deck if it's too bumpy. But the 3.5 HP backup engine with the integral tank is a pain in the tuchas to refuel if there is any chop or bounce.

 

But the jerry cans...gotta have them. We did a complete refuel (891L of our 1,000L capacity) using jerry cans only in Trinidad. And that's how we got our water the last few months in Brisbane, too, since the river was way too chunky to make water...2x20L jugs, and 2x16L collapsible tanks at a time. And don't get me started on buying gas in the Tuamotus...

 

One way to remove a lot of the mess when using jerry cans is to have piece of hose that fits over the spout and is long enough to reach into the deck fitting while the can is just sitting there. You can then pick up the can and pour at will.

Easy peasy

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Newbie photo exercise

I'll see your Lake Harriet and raise you 235.P6270151a-1_zpsnkpidfsx.jpg

Well done!

 

 

 

I really should trade my Hunter 28 for one of the 25-26 foot Beneteaus.

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Newbie photo exercise

I'll see your Lake Harriet and raise you 235.P6270151a-1_zpsnkpidfsx.jpg

Well done!

 

 

 

I really should trade my Hunter 28 for one of the 25-26 foot Beneteaus.

 

yes you should ;-)

 

just kidding. I have three friends all have a Hunter 28. I has shoal keel....I like the deeper keel version better

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post-22256-0-47006100-1481909311_thumb.png An old picture of our Columbia 39 sailing in Port Townsend in the mid 90s. and on the hard in S.F for a new bottom

 

 

 

post-22256-0-07315600-1481909377_thumb.png

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None of the "big" boat under sail. But I got this of the Auray Punt (and crew executing a roll tack...)

post-47517-0-73072700-1481910653_thumb.jpg

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When I woke up this morning in Boston it was 5 degrees. Made me think of this sail on my last boat, a Dehler 37, in the Bahamas over 10 years ago.

 

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I wish I could find some better pics of my parents old trailer sailer than the sales pictures. It was an 8.5m trailer boat, 1200kg fully rigged including fuel and sails, standing headroom, bunks for 5, shitter and a galley. Bullshit fast downhill.

 

With the light air kite up, somewhere north of 110m^2

â2_2.jpg

 

And with the smaller reacher up

1_3.jpg

 

We did have a smaller kite, a 38m^2 pink number called the nipple, but whenever we had it out there was no one willing to bring out a camera.

What's the design? I gather some kinda Beale based on the insignia & the articulated pole you mentioned in another thread. 1200kg seems very light for an older style boat.
It is a stretched and tickled Beale 780, end grain balsa with glass and some carbon. 450kg bulb keel too. A carbon rig would have made a huge difference, it was a triple spreader aluminium monstrosity with an absolute spiderweb of standing rigging

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A couple more of my J35 in the Winter Vashon race, Dec 3, 2016. Puget Sound, Washington State.

 

post-4794-0-62275100-1482019799_thumb.jpg

post-4794-0-24720800-1482019823_thumb.jpg

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Certainly get rid of that chain and go to wire. That's a lot of weight right where you don;t want it.

 

That's a fabulous looking boat and it would look even better with a wire bobstay.

Better yet, Dyneema with a salty woven cover. 5/8" Amsteel would lift your boat.

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My boat, Carpenter 28, photo is previous owner, 2011

post-125246-0-24453800-1482026651_thumb.jpg

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My boat, Carpenter 28, photo is previous owner, 2011

attachicon.gifIMG_1187.jpg

That cupped transom is the first I think I have seen like that, very nice.

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Not sailing, but better pic of transom and spoon bow.post-125246-0-89120700-1482028820_thumb.jpgpost-125246-0-58445400-1482028822_thumb.jpg

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That's the lazy runner for the staysail, it's tied off on the rail to keep it from swinging around. Our boat has inline spreaders so we need the runners to keep the mast in column with the staysail up.

 

I've been trying to get my parents to ditch the cans for years, with no success.

 

Keep trying but it's really a design problem. I bet if we asked for a show of hands from those who have carried fuel on the rail we'd get nearly everyone, including me.

 

 

Unfortunately there's no easy way to store dinghy fuel, or spare diesel, or spare just-in-case water down below that doesn't get underfoot when the boat is stopped. We can stick the blue jugs in the shower on passages, but the yellow and red ones are smelly and dangerous!

 

And we've actually used those jugs...all of them!

 

I think Will is determined to design a "hideaway jerry can locker" concept he can implement in a cruising yacht some day so the owners won't mess up his lines. Of course, most of us will still be like "MOAR JERRY CANS" and lash them on anyway once we've filled the hideaway lockers.

 

 

I understand the utility. I have carried cans on the rail too. It just makes me nutz. Fuel doesn't belong on the rail.

 

I think cruising boats should be like redneck pickup trucks are around here: a fuel tank in the bed that has its own pump, hose, and dispensing handle. OK, so sailboats don't have a bed. They have a bilge, which is a better place for fuel than the rail.

 

In a bouncy anchorage, I shouldn't have to transfer or manage pouring from a can. I should carry a hose to the dink, put the nozzle in the fuel tank, and pump. It should be possible to pour fuel into this tank from a can, there should be a water separator where it comes out, and the tank should have a drain that will get every last drop for cleaning.

 

Maybe one day your son or some other bright new star will make a cruising boat that contemplates the idea that cruisers might just have a dink and that dink might just need fuel. I remain hopeful!

 

 

Our auto parts stores sell a 12V DC fuel pump, 7psi, for twenty bucks. No muss, on a rack, in clear plastic packaging.

It's the size of a coffee cup, weighs a few ounces, and drives 5/16" carb hoses.

The whole kit, wires hoses and fuel pump, would fit in a small stuff sack.

Would that do it?

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Not sailing, but better pic of transom and spoon bow.attachicon.gifboat side 2.jpgattachicon.gifboat stern.jpg

 

Interesting boat, the builder must have cursed the designer with all these curves around the bow! I love cold moulded boats, light strong, beautiful, environmentally friendly, it is a shame that there is so much labour involved in building them!

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Not sailing, but better pic of transom and spoon bow.attachicon.gifboat side 2.jpgattachicon.gifboat stern.jpg

 

Interesting boat, the builder must have cursed the designer with all these curves around the bow! I love cold moulded boats, light strong, beautiful, environmentally friendly, it is a shame that there is so much labour involved in building them!

 

In this case the designer, Vic Carpenter is also the builder.

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My boat, Carpenter 28, photo is previous owner, 2011

attachicon.gifIMG_1187.jpg

 

Is that Carpenter as in Vic Carpenter ? Not sure about the first name.

 

Yes, Vic Carpenter.

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Not sailing, but better pic of transom and spoon bow.attachicon.gifboat side 2.jpgattachicon.gifboat stern.jpg

 

Interesting boat, the builder must have cursed the designer with all these curves around the bow! I love cold moulded boats, light strong, beautiful, environmentally friendly, it is a shame that there is so much labour involved in building them!

 

In this case the designer, Vic Carpenter is also the builder.

 

I've checked his work on the internet, he was truly a master craftsman. People who can do the designing bit and the crafting bit so well are uncommon. His style was unique, it is hard to design boldly so well, I don't think that his fame has crossed the Atlantic.

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Speaking of boats from Ontario, here is Siren 286 sailing in our back yard during the restoration process:

 

post-117072-0-04766500-1482107637_thumb.jpg

 

Once it was on the water, my wife wanted to know when it would go faster:

 

post-117072-0-95099700-1482107876_thumb.jpg

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That's the lazy runner for the staysail, it's tied off on the rail to keep it from swinging around. Our boat has inline spreaders so we need the runners to keep the mast in column with the staysail up.

 

I've been trying to get my parents to ditch the cans for years, with no success.

 

Keep trying but it's really a design problem. I bet if we asked for a show of hands from those who have carried fuel on the rail we'd get nearly everyone, including me.

 

 

Unfortunately there's no easy way to store dinghy fuel, or spare diesel, or spare just-in-case water down below that doesn't get underfoot when the boat is stopped. We can stick the blue jugs in the shower on passages, but the yellow and red ones are smelly and dangerous!

 

And we've actually used those jugs...all of them!

 

I think Will is determined to design a "hideaway jerry can locker" concept he can implement in a cruising yacht some day so the owners won't mess up his lines. Of course, most of us will still be like "MOAR JERRY CANS" and lash them on anyway once we've filled the hideaway lockers.

 

 

I understand the utility. I have carried cans on the rail too. It just makes me nutz. Fuel doesn't belong on the rail.

 

I think cruising boats should be like redneck pickup trucks are around here: a fuel tank in the bed that has its own pump, hose, and dispensing handle. OK, so sailboats don't have a bed. They have a bilge, which is a better place for fuel than the rail.

 

In a bouncy anchorage, I shouldn't have to transfer or manage pouring from a can. I should carry a hose to the dink, put the nozzle in the fuel tank, and pump. It should be possible to pour fuel into this tank from a can, there should be a water separator where it comes out, and the tank should have a drain that will get every last drop for cleaning.

 

Maybe one day your son or some other bright new star will make a cruising boat that contemplates the idea that cruisers might just have a dink and that dink might just need fuel. I remain hopeful!

 

 

Our auto parts stores sell a 12V DC fuel pump, 7psi, for twenty bucks. No muss, on a rack, in clear plastic packaging.

It's the size of a coffee cup, weighs a few ounces, and drives 5/16" carb hoses.

The whole kit, wires hoses and fuel pump, would fit in a small stuff sack.

Would that do it?

 

 

12V DC fuel pump is a nice idea, if you have a battery in your dinghy. Otherwise you need to bring the tank up on deck, which really isn't much of a problem from there.

 

Of course, it still won't make the jerry cans less ugly.

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I understand the utility. I have carried cans on the rail too. It just makes me nutz. Fuel doesn't belong on the rail.

 

I think cruising boats should be like redneck pickup trucks are around here: a fuel tank in the bed that has its own pump, hose, and dispensing handle. OK, so sailboats don't have a bed. They have a bilge, which is a better place for fuel than the rail.

 

In a bouncy anchorage, I shouldn't have to transfer or manage pouring from a can. I should carry a hose to the dink, put the nozzle in the fuel tank, and pump. It should be possible to pour fuel into this tank from a can, there should be a water separator where it comes out, and the tank should have a drain that will get every last drop for cleaning.

 

Maybe one day your son or some other bright new star will make a cruising boat that contemplates the idea that cruisers might just have a dink and that dink might just need fuel. I remain hopeful!

 

 

I think the fundamental difficulty with dinghy fuel is the nature of gasoline. It's as dangerous as propane since the vapors are heavier than air, so you just can't keep it in the bilge if you are trying to avoid blowing your boat up by having a diesel engine in the first place. You need a second locker, like a propane locker, that is vented overboard. Or maybe a two part, "exploding crap" locker with dinghy fuel storage in one side and racks to secure standard propane tanks on the other. Hell, make it big enough to fit two x 20L jerry cans, so you can pull them out and take them to the gas station. With a pump/plumbing fitting that screws into one, and a hand pump/siphon hose that can reach down to the dinghy level. It doesn't have to be complicated, but it will take up space. Valuable interior space, or valuable giant cockpit space, both of which are so important to the dockside presentation of new vessels these days.

 

Refueling is not such a big deal with our 15HP engine with an external tank. That isn't so bad, we can move the tank on deck if it's too bumpy. But the 3.5 HP backup engine with the integral tank is a pain in the tuchas to refuel if there is any chop or bounce.

 

But the jerry cans...gotta have them. We did a complete refuel (891L of our 1,000L capacity) using jerry cans only in Trinidad. And that's how we got our water the last few months in Brisbane, too, since the river was way too chunky to make water...2x20L jugs, and 2x16L collapsible tanks at a time. And don't get me started on buying gas in the Tuamotus...

 

 

I've been on lots of powerboats that have a gasoline tank in the bilge. It's a well-developed technology and is safe if maintained.

 

But whether it's a built-in tank or a vented locker, you're right that fuel requires space.

 

I think that refusing to yield to that requirement until it's time to leave the dock and then solving it by lashing cans on deck is one of the dumber things that almost every sailor seems to do.

 

I see your point about needing cans anyway for places where the big boat can't approach a dock for fuel and water. Sounds like a first-worlder in the third world problem. I haven't encountered it.

 

And yes, jocal, those little fuel pumps are what I'm talking about. They make manual ones too and many rednecks turn their pickups into fuel stations for farm machines. You drive up, grab the hose, fill up, and go. Easy, no mess. At no point is a can necessary. A cruising boat could be a dinghy fuel station in the same way. Yes, you'd have to take precautions to avoid blowing yourself up, just like every gas-powered cruising boat. And no, this wouldn't eliminate all need for cans from everyone's life.

 

But I still hope some genius like young Will does it.

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I understand the utility. I have carried cans on the rail too. It just makes me nutz. Fuel doesn't belong on the rail.

 

I think cruising boats should be like redneck pickup trucks are around here: a fuel tank in the bed that has its own pump, hose, and dispensing handle. OK, so sailboats don't have a bed. They have a bilge, which is a better place for fuel than the rail.

 

In a bouncy anchorage, I shouldn't have to transfer or manage pouring from a can. I should carry a hose to the dink, put the nozzle in the fuel tank, and pump. It should be possible to pour fuel into this tank from a can, there should be a water separator where it comes out, and the tank should have a drain that will get every last drop for cleaning.

 

Maybe one day your son or some other bright new star will make a cruising boat that contemplates the idea that cruisers might just have a dink and that dink might just need fuel. I remain hopeful!

 

 

I think the fundamental difficulty with dinghy fuel is the nature of gasoline. It's as dangerous as propane since the vapors are heavier than air, so you just can't keep it in the bilge if you are trying to avoid blowing your boat up by having a diesel engine in the first place. You need a second locker, like a propane locker, that is vented overboard. Or maybe a two part, "exploding crap" locker with dinghy fuel storage in one side and racks to secure standard propane tanks on the other. Hell, make it big enough to fit two x 20L jerry cans, so you can pull them out and take them to the gas station. With a pump/plumbing fitting that screws into one, and a hand pump/siphon hose that can reach down to the dinghy level. It doesn't have to be complicated, but it will take up space. Valuable interior space, or valuable giant cockpit space, both of which are so important to the dockside presentation of new vessels these days.

 

Refueling is not such a big deal with our 15HP engine with an external tank. That isn't so bad, we can move the tank on deck if it's too bumpy. But the 3.5 HP backup engine with the integral tank is a pain in the tuchas to refuel if there is any chop or bounce.

 

But the jerry cans...gotta have them. We did a complete refuel (891L of our 1,000L capacity) using jerry cans only in Trinidad. And that's how we got our water the last few months in Brisbane, too, since the river was way too chunky to make water...2x20L jugs, and 2x16L collapsible tanks at a time. And don't get me started on buying gas in the Tuamotus...

 

 

I've been on lots of powerboats that have a gasoline tank in the bilge. It's a well-developed technology and is safe if maintained.

 

But whether it's a built-in tank or a vented locker, you're right that fuel requires space.

 

I think that refusing to yield to that requirement until it's time to leave the dock and then solving it by lashing cans on deck is one of the dumber things that almost every sailor seems to do.

 

I see your point about needing cans anyway for places where the big boat can't approach a dock for fuel and water. Sounds like a first-worlder in the third world problem. I haven't encountered it.

 

And yes, jocal, those little fuel pumps are what I'm talking about. They make manual ones too and many rednecks turn their pickups into fuel stations for farm machines. You drive up, grab the hose, fill up, and go. Easy, no mess. At no point is a can necessary. A cruising boat could be a dinghy fuel station in the same way. Yes, you'd have to take precautions to avoid blowing yourself up, just like every gas-powered cruising boat. And no, this wouldn't eliminate all need for cans from everyone's life.

 

But I still hope some genius like young Will does it.

 

 

It's less an issue of being able to approach a dock for fuel or water, but in some cases there actually not being any dock.

 

When we refueled in Savasavu, Fiji before returning to New Zealand there simply was no fuel dock anywhere. Since there is a substantial cruising presence there, some enterprising soul at a local gas station bought ten five gallon jugs of their own. They'd deliver them full along with ours to whatever dinghy dock you wished, so you could schlep them to your boat and fill up. Of course we didn't need our own for that.

 

Most recently it was Brisbane, a modern city of 2 million people where there were no watering facilities anywhere near the only moorings available. The moorings are about 10 miles up the Brisbane river, the nearest marina to re-water is seven miles down river.

 

It's more of a "my boat doesn't go back to a marina on Sunday" problem.

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IMG_4081_mhr_zpsfamonzwe.jpg

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Speaking of boats from Ontario, here is Siren 286 sailing in our back yard during the restoration process:

 

attachicon.gifbackyard sai.jpg

 

Once it was on the water, my wife wanted to know when it would go faster:

 

attachicon.giffaster!.jpg

My first job was building Sirens in Owen Sound , Ontario back in 1978, later we got a Sirius 28, the Sirens big brother (Sister?post-125246-0-19438300-1482188252_thumb.jpg)

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...

I see your point about needing cans anyway for places where the big boat can't approach a dock for fuel and water. Sounds like a first-worlder in the third world problem. I haven't encountered it.

 

And yes, jocal, those little fuel pumps are what I'm talking about. They make manual ones too and many rednecks turn their pickups into fuel stations for farm machines. You drive up, grab the hose, fill up, and go. Easy, no mess. At no point is a can necessary. A cruising boat could be a dinghy fuel station in the same way. Yes, you'd have to take precautions to avoid blowing yourself up, just like every gas-powered cruising boat. And no, this wouldn't eliminate all need for cans from everyone's life.

 

But I still hope some genius like young Will does it.

 

 

It's less an issue of being able to approach a dock for fuel or water, but in some cases there actually not being any dock.

 

When we refueled in Savasavu, Fiji before returning to New Zealand there simply was no fuel dock anywhere. Since there is a substantial cruising presence there, some enterprising soul at a local gas station bought ten five gallon jugs of their own. They'd deliver them full along with ours to whatever dinghy dock you wished, so you could schlep them to your boat and fill up. Of course we didn't need our own for that.

 

Most recently it was Brisbane, a modern city of 2 million people where there were no watering facilities anywhere near the only moorings available. The moorings are about 10 miles up the Brisbane river, the nearest marina to re-water is seven miles down river.

 

It's more of a "my boat doesn't go back to a marina on Sunday" problem.

 

 

Yeah, I see your point, as I said. I don't think even young Will is smart enough to solve your problem! ;)

 

But lots of us lead boring lives and we really don't need to carry cans on the rail because there are marinas all over the place. Yet we still carry cans on the rail. It makes me nutz. We should probably drop it.

 

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Speaking of boats from Ontario, here is Siren 286 sailing in our back yard during the restoration process:

 

attachicon.gifbackyard sai.jpg

 

Once it was on the water, my wife wanted to know when it would go faster:

 

attachicon.giffaster!.jpg

My first job was building Sirens in Owen Sound , Ontario back in 1978, later we got a Sirius 28, the Sirens big brother (Sister?attachicon.gifmarina sailing 003.jpg)

 

 

Ha. Did you build my Siren? I figure that it is from the early to mid 70s. My first job, after delivering newspapers, was building Laser masts at Performance Sailcraft. Jumped that ship after a couple of weeks and spent the rest of the summer building Challenger 24s. I learned a lot about gelcoat repair that summer.

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12814144_10154061283573809_9179586541840

 

The mighty Bandaloop sailing across FL Bay this spring.

Quite an adventure you and Zero had. Glad y'all were able to rally and finish.

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12814144_10154061283573809_9179586541840

 

The mighty Bandaloop sailing across FL Bay this spring.

Quite an adventure you and Zero had. Glad y'all were able to rally and finish.

 

+1

 

Enjoyed following that.

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All boats are interesting, just as all children are beautiful in their mother's eyes.

 

Loser: nice younger Hinckley, SW42?

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IMG_4081_mhr_zpsfamonzwe.jpg

I left that up on my screen for 1/2 an hour just to look at!

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Rafferty Rules a Ross 780 trailer yacht.

Raced and cruised in Auckland New Zealand

 

There is a wee video of us hitting around 16 knots under code zero on a 2 handed race

 

 

attachicon.gifIMG_0753.JPGattachicon.gif65936_315838188575797_5531921591666988151_n.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GRA23n0M53g

Another fav of mine, nice boat.

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Rafferty Rules a Ross 780 trailer yacht.

Raced and cruised in Auckland New Zealand

 

There is a wee video of us hitting around 16 knots under code zero on a 2 handed race

 

 

attachicon.gifIMG_0753.JPGattachicon.gif65936_315838188575797_5531921591666988151_n.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GRA23n0M53g

Another fav of mine, nice boat.

 

 

Agreed, the video was amazing!

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Newbie photo exercise

I'll see your Lake Harriet and raise you 235.P6270151a-1_zpsnkpidfsx.jpg

 

Well done!

 

 

I really should trade my Hunter 28 for one of the 25-26 foot Beneteaus.

 

While the beam gives decent volume, make sure you get the length you're really looking for. For several reasons many Benis are

not as LOA as they might seem.

 

Some count hung rudder as part of LOA, so

First 235 is really 21.5 Length of Hull

First 260 is really 24.5 Length of Hull

 

Some mess it up for marketing reasons.

First 36.7 is really 34.9 Length of Hull

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Ok, I found one sailing on the webswd_cascam_04_126.jpg

won't open for me

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I don't have any pictures of my boat from the outside, but it looks kinda like this (without the dodger)

 

at_sail.jpg

 

But I'm fine with this view:

 

carquinez%20beat_zpslbuarqge.jpg

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Ok, I found one sailing on the webswd_cascam_04_126.jpg

won't open for me

 

Hmmm weird. I downloaded it here and posted direct..

post-8073-1190442055_thumb.jpg

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Some classic Mull plastic in the form of a Santana 27. About this time next year (assuming no major surprises) we will be getting ready to celebrate her 50th birthday. The sailing photo is from a couple of years ago when she was racing on Puget Sound, rather successfully under her PO.

 

 

post-121970-0-31964400-1482257490_thumb.jpg

post-121970-0-51913900-1482257510_thumb.jpg

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ERRFinish1.jpgERR20112.jpgERR20113.jpg

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I don;t have many pictures of our boat sailing but here is our Ericson/Olson 911 on the Chesapeake. Picture taken by Ajax

post-16331-0-45255300-1482294181_thumb.jpg

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DSCN011815333_zpsnirc4lc4.jpg

 

Sadly, I'm the grey boat with the tan sail sucking hind tit.

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A shot during a race with the PO:

post-104690-0-20578700-1482295578_thumb.jpg

 

The day I launched her for the first season:

post-104690-0-50294100-1482295592_thumb.jpg

 

...and with the Clayton County Hellhound aboard:

post-104690-0-17963300-1482295603_thumb.jpg

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May 2016 in a Clubs race? I'm the lost looking one (do I go aft? or forward? aft? forward?)

Like a bowguy that just discovered he's stepped on an aso boat. Disgusted.

 

IMG_0207_zps42axjeqe.jpg

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Thanks! Looks like I'm not the only anarchist that still has his 90s vintage gay pride sails. Drift is a 1963 International 500 yawl built in Bremen, Germany of mahogany on oak. She's been well cared for, but, sadly, the upkeep is finally beginning to get old, so I'll be putting her on the market by spring.

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5935315_20160912095247776_1_XLARGE.jpg&w

 

 

This boat for sail (also in Maine) says it's an International 500 like yours, but it doesn't look the same at all, even taking into account the crap on both ends.

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ERRFinish1.jpgERR20112.jpgERR20113.jpg

Eggemoggin Reach Regatta?

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All boats are interesting, just as all children are beautiful in their mother's eyes.

 

Loser: nice younger Hinckley, SW42?

Yes, SW42. That pic was at the start of the 2015 Marion-Bermuda. This was at the start of the 2011 edition.

Sparky%20Marion%20Bermuda%20start%202_zp

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DSCN011815333_zpsnirc4lc4.jpg

 

Sadly, I'm the grey boat with the tan sail sucking hind tit.

Shellback racing. Cool!

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Newbie photo exercise

I'll see your Lake Harriet and raise you 235.

 

A couple miles further south, me on my Catalina 22 on Lake Nokomis with my 170 drifter in mid-tack.

Tag%20by%20JB_zpsmptt1iml.jpg

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May 2016 in a Clubs race? I'm the lost looking one (do I go aft? or forward? aft? forward?)

Like a bowguy that just discovered he's stepped on an aso boat. Disgusted.

 

IMG_0207_zps42axjeqe.jpg

Come on. Running the asym clew around the forestay is a FINE skill to master.

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It's not the most exciting shot but it shows my boat out for it's first race since I've owned it this past weekend. We are just drifting in this pic and messing with a pin that fell out of the mainsheet block.

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