Black Jack

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I remember the number on the transom. My memory says it was just above the lower pintle.  Google suggests that there were a couple of locations. I just don't remember the number having a hin format..  But I am older than some....

There used to be a lot of old lasers with timber rails and boards sitting on the racks unused at my club.  No doubt they eventually went as landfill.

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We put our old timber trim beater on a cradle with a pivot just behind the centreboard, and used it to demonstrate tacks and gybes for the learn to sail kiddies. The hull was so soft that you could feel it moving through waves

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On 7/18/2017 at 5:46 PM, cbs said:

 

Honestly, at the moment that thing must be as unsatisfying as sailing a resort hobiecat.

...

I'm not sure what's unsatisfying about a resort Hobie.

Whether the Hobie (or Laser) is new and race-rigged or a tired beater doesn't really affect my satisfaction at all. At least, as long as nothing breaks. It is what it is. I get whatever performance I can out of it. That's satisfying.

But maybe I'm just easily entertained. I can even enjoy sailing a Sun Cat, so I must be!

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I had Bill Campbell's old 11589 as my first  laser. It was so long ago it might have had a timber mast like the dagger board and rudder. It was a fun boat and I spent years losing to the faster sailors. No regrets and no victories!

Belated thanks to Ian Bruce and Bruce Kirby for a great design and total game changer 

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14 hours ago, Uncooperative Tom said:

I'm not sure what's unsatisfying about a resort Hobie.

Whether the Hobie (or Laser) is new and race-rigged or a tired beater doesn't really affect my satisfaction at all. At least, as long as nothing breaks. It is what it is. I get whatever performance I can out of it. That's satisfying.

But maybe I'm just easily entertained. I can even enjoy sailing a Sun Cat, so I must be!

A slapped together, weather beaten, ill treated, sun damaged, poorly setup, always left salty resort cat with its soft coloured sails will always be disappointing compared to a tuned well maintained race boat.  Always.

 

The last resort cat I tried dropped its rig. :)

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23 minutes ago, cbs said:

A slapped together, weather beaten, ill treated, sun damaged, poorly setup, always left salty resort cat with its soft coloured sails will always be disappointing compared to a tuned well maintained race boat.  Always.

 

The last resort cat I tried dropped its rig. :)

Ocean Racing Anarchy and Dinghy Anarchy are just up the hall, to your right. The door you came in is labelled "Cruising Anarchy". We're a laid-back bunch.

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15 minutes ago, Jim in Halifax said:

Ocean Racing Anarchy and Dinghy Anarchy are just up the hall, to your right. The door you came in is labelled "Cruising Anarchy". We're a laid-back bunch.

So now you are telling me there are rules in this place?  Half the posts in CA are arguments about how fast their 4kntsb is...

 

If it counts, I haven't been on a start line in a few years :)

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58 minutes ago, cbs said:

A slapped together, weather beaten, ill treated, sun damaged, poorly setup, always left salty resort cat with its soft coloured sails will always be disappointing compared to a tuned well maintained race boat.  Always.

 

The last resort cat I tried dropped its rig. :)

If it drops its rig that would be disappointing.

But I disagree with the "always" thing. It's quite possible to take a beaten up old POS and beat someone's really nice race boat. I've done it and had it done to me, so I'm sure it happens. And it's quite satisfying if you're on one end of the equation...

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33 minutes ago, Uncooperative Tom said:

If it drops its rig that would be disappointing.

But I disagree with the "always" thing. It's quite possible to take a beaten up old POS and beat someone's really nice race boat. I've done it and had it done to me, so I'm sure it happens. And it's quite satisfying if you're on one end of the equation...

I bet your pos race boat wasn't borrowed from the local club med....

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Best regatta I ever sailed in was on resort cats - Hobie Waves, even.  From a beach vendor on Provo. I sailed every day I was there, and on the second to last night the locals invited me to race in their weekly regatta. Round robin format.  Push off the beach, sail the course, beach the boat and run up to the shack for a shot. No gun, but the smack of the glasses hitting the table.  Winner goes again, but doesn't keep winning for long. By the end, there were a lot of cross-boat piracy dives.  

Absolutely the most fun I've ever had racing!

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8 hours ago, cbs said:

I bet your pos race boat wasn't borrowed from the local club med....

No, nothing with anywhere near that high a budget nor that high a regard for appearance of the vessel. I'm afraid it was a Charlotte Harbor Community Sailing Center wreck of a Sunfish. The entire fleet has about the value of a used Hobie sail but we have fun.

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9 hours ago, cbs said:

So now you are telling me there are rules in this place?  Half the posts in CA are arguments about how fast their 4kntsb is...

 

If it counts, I haven't been on a start line in a few years :)

Me neither on the start line. And I do beleive that any time two boats are sailing the same direction within 10 boat lengths, there is some sort of racing going on. But I think WillP knows the difference between a racing Laser and a clapped-out cruising laser...and he was just enjoying being on the water with a sail. Which was my point. I can enjoy any boat with a sail; doesn't have to be a race boat.

I do thinking racing makes a sailor better, which also makes a cruiser a better sailor. Most of us here in CA have probably raced at one time or another...its just that we are into sailing for more laid-back reasons now. Except maybe Webb Chiles ;-)

 

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On 7/20/2017 at 9:39 PM, cbs said:

So now you are telling me there are rules in this place?  Half the posts in CA are arguments about how fast their 4kntsb is...

Haven't posted this one of my 4ksb in a while...

Iyt7H5f.jpg

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27 minutes ago, kdh said:

Haven't posted this one of my 4ksb in a while...

Iyt7H5f.jpg

...If a beautiful Hinckley 42 is a "4sb", there is simply no hope for the rest of us. -_-

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58 minutes ago, kdh said:

Haven't posted this one of my 4ksb in a while...

Iyt7H5f.jpg

That is British Aristocracy grade self deprecation. :D

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2 hours ago, kdh said:

Haven't posted this one of my 4ksb in a while...

Iyt7H5f.jpg

So, that is what Lollygagging is...

I'll have to Google that to be sure ;)

Foreguy eased...

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10 hours ago, Bob Perry said:

Nice shot kdh but why is the main deep reefed? Having a full main can really help several ways when the chute is up. You know that.

Good question, Bob. We were sailing deep and at that angle I've found the asymmetric stays full more readily and reliably without the full hoist main blanketing it.

As is clear we were cruising. We wanted to keep the chute from having to be tended by the foredeck, who wanted to read. We had a nice steady ride without an engine thrumming.

Thanks everyone for the compliments. The good people at Southwest Harbor do good work.

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kdh:

In that case I may have jibed the main, full main, and sailed the boat like it has a sym chute, the way we did in the old days. But then you might have needed a spin pole to keep the asym from collapsing.

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15 hours ago, Bob Perry said:

kdh:

In that case I may have jibed the main, full main, and sailed the boat like it has a sym chute, the way we did in the old days. But then you might have needed a spin pole to keep the asym from collapsing.

For me, the whole point of flying an asymetrical cruising spinnaker is to make off-the-wind life easy (as compared with the "old days sym chute"). Having a pole is not part of easy to me. Even the spinnaker sock can be a PITA sometimes, but its the only way I can solo sail my boat with the kite. I usually drop the main when sailing broad with the asym; it never occurred to me to reef the main. I'll have to try that when I have crew.

Solo under spinnaker.jpg

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The asym does make the pole easier than a sym kite, because you ditch the like early in the jibe and hook it up late.  It makes a big difference in running deep and is overall an ease win in my experience compared to flying without the pole.  If I didn't need to run deep I wouldn't use the pole.

I flew my cruising cut asym with the pole singlehanded a lot on my old 28' boat.  I'll probably get there on my new boat, but the kites are huge in comparison and I'm building comfort in using them shorthanded.

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I do it by just letting it fly all the way around the headstay and reeling it in on the other side.

Dead simple but it does mean extra knitting in the cockpit..

How is it easier if you have a pole to gybe as well? I don't see the difference from a sym.

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Jon:

It';s not the same as jibing a pole on a sym chute. You have to jibe the pole on a sym chute. With the tack line on the asym you can sail without the pole and add the pole when you feel like it.

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O/K, I see - a little less anxiety and activity. More like a whisker pole than a spinnaker pole.

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Jon:

Exactly. In fact given  that you would never reach with a pole on the asym you can go quite light on the pole for the asym. It's really just a whisker pole to be used near DDW and never will see the compressive loads that you get wtth pole on the headstay sym chute reaching.

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2 hours ago, Bob Perry said:

Asym is easier to jibe Jon.

Absolutely agree with you when talking monohulls and need for poles with the sym.  But on a multihull (for tradewind cruising) the sym can really pay off and is a snap to gybe (since no pole is needed).

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Interesting point. I have sailed on my pals turbo F-27 but we have never done DDW. Not sure he even has a sym chute. So Wes, you are saying you just sheet the sym chute to the amas? That would certainly simplify jibes.

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3 minutes ago, Bob Perry said:

Interesting point. I have sailed on my pals turbo F-27 but we have never done DDW. Not sure he even has a sym chute. So Wes, you are saying you just sheet the sym chute to the amas? That would certainly simplify jibes.

Yes, exactly.  We don't do that on our F27F except in cruising mode.  The boat make much better DDW VMG sailing hotter angles under asym.  But especially for larger blue water cruising cats less orientated to racing - and even on our F27F when looking for an easy peasy, autopilot chilax downwind delivery ride - we whip out the sym and run sheets (to the stern) and guys (to a turning block on each float bow) off each clew on the sym chute.  Auto drives and gybes are as simple as pie.  Usually don't even need to put down the drink, LOL.

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large.2016-08-20_09_44_24.jpg.607dc10f5454795737cb2b234af202b4.jpg

I sail my asym without main a lot.  Pure laziness.  In this shot both me and my friend were laying down in the cockpit with beers.  Sorry Bob, its one of yours, SAGA35.

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Saga 35 is a good little boat. No apology needed. What do you think of it?

So, you run dual tack lines, one off each bow? That sounds very efficient. A big, squatty shape sym chute should be easy to handle. Beats pole jibing.

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8 minutes ago, Bob Perry said:

Saga 35 is a good little boat. No apology needed. What do you think of it?

So, you run dual tack lines, one off each bow? That sounds very efficient. A big, squatty shape sym chute should be easy to handle. Beats pole jibing.

I love it.  Perfect boat for me.  Can't imagine what I would have otherwise, probably have to get something custom made.  I've been slowly replacing sails, which is making me love it more.

Really only fly the asym when we are pretty deep.  Too deep to not have the main chaffing on the spreaders, or there's not enough wind to prevent it from flopping around.  The asym is more stable and keeps us moving.  I never really jibe it, one tack line, one sheet.  Its pretty lazy sailing at that point.  If I had some able bodied crew, I'd probably be more aggressive.  I'm usually single-handing, or maybe some unskilled crew aboard. 

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1 hour ago, Bob Perry said:

So, you run dual tack lines, one off each bow? That sounds very efficient. A big, squatty shape sym chute should be easy to handle. Beats pole jibing.

Yes, exactly.  And dual sheets.  So simple and not a huge loss in DDW VMG either in moderate conditions. For sure beats pole gybing like you said.

Get your friend to look at Ian's on-line (Yahoo forum) F27 sailing manual (pg 10-12); its all described there if its not obvious from my description.  Get an old tired sym chute off any ~30 foot masthead rigged racing monohull (can usually get for close to free) and chances are its somewhat oversized and overbuilt for the lightweight multi and you can get a few years out of it.  Lock in Auto on N course, rig the awning, fire up the BBQ and tunes, and she will do 6 in S10 all day long, gybing through about 40 degree.  With the sym chute rigged like that she will do ~5 in 10 almost DDW without the main that but the racer in me don't want to admit doing it, LOL.  The cruiser in me was very happy though.  There is a pic but I ain't posting it and don't think the friend who has it, is on here (I hope).  :D

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Wess: My F-27 pal used to be a North sail maker. He pretty much just day sails his boat and keeps it on a mooring in front of his beach house on the next beach from ours. He frequently to single hand it and loves to race by my shack while I'm out mowing the lawn. Bastard! Not sure the sym chute thing would appeal t his style of sailing. He does very well racing the boat. Here he is zipping by the shack with his two daughters as crew.

Doug 1

 

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4 hours ago, Bob Perry said:

Wess: My F-27 pal used to be a North sail maker. He pretty much just day sails his boat and keeps it on a mooring in front of his beach house on the next beach from ours. He frequently to single hand it and loves to race by my shack while I'm out mowing the lawn. Bastard! Not sure the sym chute thing would appeal t his style of sailing. He does very well racing the boat. Here he is zipping by the shack with his two daughters as crew.

Doug 1

 

Laughing Bob... you know that ain't an F27 right?  Ian will be calling you!!  That is an F28!  Damn nice boat though...

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Bob - Few things besides the rig point to F28.  The sail emblem says F28 (but like you said she maybe has been re-rigged) but also the bowsprit appear to be carbon, rather than the alu bolt on sprits the F27s have.  Most importantly though is that she does not have an aft cabin and the outboard is hanging off the stern.  All those aspects point to an F28.

Which is faster than an F27 so you got that going for you too!

Come on, get him to try the sym chute trick for giggles and shits and post a pic.  I want somebody to share my shame, LOL.

PS - That is a great pic to also show how these boats tend to squat and really drag ass.  When racing (clearly they are just chillin) its so important to get weight forward (until the breeze really gets up and you are worried about burying a bow and pitch poling) to lift the ass and quiet that stern wake.

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Wess:

Doug races mostly double handed so I don't think weight  distribution is an issue. Sailing the boat I have never noticed it squatting but I haven't looked for it either. I'll watch for the the next time he cruises by. I will talk to him about a sym chute. But he does so well single handing with the asym that I think he may be hard to convince. Where we are I'd say the typical wind strength is 8 to 15 knots. Often less, so he reaches a lot.

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Bryanjb:

I have probably done far more dip pole jibes than  you can imagine. It's the way I learned to sail. I started end for ending poles on 40'er in the early '60's. Now that could be a challenge at times.

NIGHT RUNNER has a 22' J and I have jibed that pole many times.

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14 hours ago, Bryanjb said:

You guys act like swinging the pole through the fore triangle is a big deal?  It's not. 

Hey, I race monohulls too.  So on occasion, when forced, and under duress, I have gone forward and end for ended a few poles.  Even on a multihull believe it or not.  But generally on the multi it is so much easier to go poleless and just tack it to the bows.  The end for end pole gybe is not hard but I do have to stand up and put down my rum drink.  Not so when going poleless.  :P

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It seems to me that if you are single handing or double handing a boat over 35' any kind of pole jibing is a challenge. Doug Fryer ran twin poles on NIGHT RUNNER. Not always legal but effective.

Question:

Did any of you ever sail with a  pole that had a trumpet like bell outer end?

The sheet ran into the bell, then to a sheave at the inboard end and back out of the bell to the other side. This would have been around 1972. I sailed with it on a C&C Newport 41. The boat's name was CHAOS and that perfectly describes pretty much every pole jibe we did on that boat. Too much friction involved especially with any load applied.

Anybody remember those poles?

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On 2017-07-18 at 5:54 PM, SloopJonB said:

I lived in Bristol for a couple of years when I was a kid so I've seen Stonehenge a couple of times - not at the solstice though.

It was a lot smaller than I expected but I also saw where the stones were quarried - miles away. It's a bit like the Moai on Easter Island - how the hell did they move and erect them?

You might like this, Sloop.

 

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On 7/28/2017 at 5:40 PM, groundhog said:

You might like this, Sloop.

Very cool - thanks. That teeter totter jack process was interesting. That process could actually go pretty quickly if you had a bunch of people changing ends to provide the counterweight rather than humping stones back & forth.

P.S. - that guy is eccentric, not nuts. :D

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Nothing illegal about using two poles for jibing, it was standard practice for a period. Sailing with both poles attached to the clews IS illegal.

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On 7/28/2017 at 5:21 PM, Keysrock35 said:

I've posted before - but here are many of boats like mine sailing and thought it was a nice shot. We are 11166.

Image may contain: ocean, sky, outdoor and water

 

That does look like fun, and it looks like you're leading the pack! Which one are you on 11166?

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On 7/28/2017 at 5:21 PM, Keysrock35 said:

I've posted before - but here are many of boats like mine sailing and thought it was a nice shot. We are 11166.

Image may contain: ocean, sky, outdoor and water

 

This photo makes me happy. And jealous.

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Looks like the Canadian Navy comin'!

I enjoyed crewing on a C&C 36' back in the early 80's. Great boat; we always won too!!

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On ‎7‎/‎31‎/‎2017 at 10:58 AM, Bull City said:

That does look like fun, and it looks like you're leading the pack! Which one are you on 11166?

yes, 11166. A fun day indeed. Start of this year's PH Mackinac Race. 12 C&Cs on the line. Leading at this point but gave it up later...

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I think Bull was asking which person on the boat Keys was. 

Kinda like this:

36277869396_163c5dbb82_z.jpg

I'm the one in the yellow shirt. 

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It's a 100 meter superyacht, parked just upwind of the starting line..  Was there for a couple of weeks of beercans. 

Pretty interesting boat, there's a web site on it:

https://www.boatinternational.com/yachts/editorial-features/attessa-iv-the-masterful-rebuild-that-produced-a-superyacht-masterpiece--247

 

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8 minutes ago, Kirwan said:

It's a 100 meter superyacht, parked just upwind of the starting line..  Was there for a couple of weeks of beercans. 

Pretty interesting boat, there's a web site on it:

https://www.boatinternational.com/yachts/editorial-features/attessa-iv-the-masterful-rebuild-that-produced-a-superyacht-masterpiece--247

 

Sheesh!

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2 hours ago, sailronin said:

One of Dennis Washington's boats makes a nice backdrop...

FIFY

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14 hours ago, Bull City said:

Sheesh!

Excuuuuuuse me!

ok, an article on it. We didn't have time to admire the Chihuly.

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18 hours ago, Kirwan said:

I think Bull was asking which person on the boat Keys was. 

Kinda like this:

36277869396_163c5dbb82_z.jpg

I'm the one in the yellow shirt. 

He's probably the one with no shirt on

Its called Florida Keys formal wear

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Good guess, that is what that guy was doing. We had to send him for a "nap" within the first hour. You can't see me, I'm afraid. I'm driving on the low side... But 2 of the folks in the pic are also Keys's.

On ‎8‎/‎2‎/‎2017 at 1:38 PM, Sail4beer said:

Here he is yelling to the Captain to toss him another cold one

IMG_5130.JPG

 

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We had a guy like him on our boat for a Season. He'd get real drunk quick, his fake leg would fall off and we'd have to tuck him in 

Lived in Big Pine Key and Cudjoe for a couple of years, the best of times!

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Teaching my 6 year-old nephew (visiting from France) to sail. Reaching in the mighty Auray Punt. He's helming, I'm mainsheet trimmer.

V__84F7.jpg

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They had a guy taking pictures of us from a chopper this last weekend.   Again with the gold shirts. (on my opb)

i6rD2s40Nu6nWIxhC9ZeTHvs48Pu0gCCi6Wxh9mMSmq44UWIuS7f-aJd4KwnGY4uKwJMkC7LQBBWdspcEkk_tCdaSRtauZZnLQ8Xt09xMuX8dZKiMjygJPgp2Yg0sfBlm14-6oKM6Jo=w720-h480-no

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On 8/9/2017 at 4:07 PM, Not Me said:

RC got a good pic of us a couple weeks back... just wish I had washed the hull beforehand!

small.jpg

Cool, are you two-handing a J-24 with your girlfriend/wife? That's a great pic, and I salute you sir

FB- Doug

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A night sailor. 

It’s a calm night with little wind in the tranquil harbor.  I was just about to go into the vee-berth and open a good book when I saw distant running lights approaching. Not alerted by the typical engine rumble, curiously, I watched the tiny red and green lights through a port.  

A thin flashlight beam from onboard the approaching boat, briefly back lit up its sails. Some one is sailing into Pulpit Harbor in this pitch black night. 

The approaching running lights were steady, as they would be on a lightly heeled sailboat . Closer and closer, it came. Then I could just hear the boat, the faint gentle sound of it’s bow parting the glassy surface.

The bow lights grew larger and brighter, then suddenly a mirage like white hull and sails ghosts close by our stern. The soft sound of the hulls motion through the water is clear now. What a unique sound - sailing in the darkness. 

Then the sound falls off as it passes by and except for the small white stern bulb glowing, the boat disappears into the black, once more. I held my head out of the companionway so my ears could follow the boat deep into the harbor. Beautiful, the sounds were fading,… fading,… then all went silent again.

I couldn’t take photos in the darkness, so you’ll have to use your imagination. But here is the same boat, a 1950’s Sparkmen and Stevens Loki Yawl, sailing the same route out of the harbor, the next morning.

loki-1-1-of-1-jpg.139901

I know the guy(he sails out of my harbor). He sails more of his miles, than anybody I know.  

loki-2-1-of-1-jpg.139902

A motor sailing boat slowed down and gave them room. 

loki-3-1-of-1-jpg.139903

And away they go. We followed soon after, with a reef in the main.

loki-4-1-of-1-jpg.139905

There are benefits to sailing in and out of harbors, when the conditions are good (these were perfect). Raising, reefing, trimming, and then dousing and furling sails, is easier in a protected harbor. But mostly, I do it for the sheer joy. I think this couple does too. 

We never saw another boat (of many), sail in or out of the harbor over the weekend. Most of the cruisers (from S.NE) don't have the local knowledge you get living an hour away from a harbor like this.  Plus many cruising boats at times are support systems for a dormitory sized refrigerator. They need recharging after a night or two at anchor, and might as well power some miles. That's good with me. 

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Is Pulpit Harbor a dangerous place to sail into at night?  Is it well marked? Charts fairly up to date?

That sure is a beautiful scene.  Sailing on and off moorings and anchors is a joy.

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Not if you're familiar with it, Ajax. It's a big harbor and usually has plenty of room outside the moorings. I mostly see local boats sailing in and out of it, but it's still rare. 

Sometimes I go to these nearby places just for the sailing in and out. :) We go out for an overnight many times a season. I'm not looking for miles covered, but time under sail, to relax. 

Quite a few times, I've anchored in this little cove off Pulpit, and sailed in - and out - the next day. That's a great sail for me, in less than a mile. Here's a typical track: Starting from the left in Cabot Cove - sailing out DDW. We took this sail down into Pulpit and tacked out. There was plenty of room this day, we had plenty of safe space around other boats. 

36230275520_773c2a9b15_b.jpg

 

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16 hours ago, Kris Cringle said:

A night sailor. 

It’s a calm night with little wind in the tranquil harbor.  I was just about to go into the vee-berth and open a good book when I saw distant running lights approaching. Not alerted by the typical engine rumble, curiously, I watched the tiny red and green lights through a port.  

A thin flashlight beam from onboard the approaching boat, briefly back lit up its sails. Some one is sailing into Pulpit Harbor in this pitch black night. 

The approaching running lights were steady, as they would be on a lightly heeled sailboat . Closer and closer, it came. Then I could just hear the boat, the faint gentle sound of it’s bow parting the glassy surface.

The bow lights grew larger and brighter, then suddenly a mirage like white hull and sails ghosts close by our stern. The soft sound of the hulls motion through the water is clear now. What a unique sound - sailing in the darkness. 

Then the sound falls off as it passes by and except for the small white stern bulb glowing, the boat disappears into the black, once more. I held my head out of the companionway so my ears could follow the boat deep into the harbor. Beautiful, the sounds were fading,… fading,… then all went silent again.

I couldn’t take photos in the darkness, so you’ll have to use your imagination. But here is the same boat, a 1950’s Sparkmen and Stevens Loki Yawl, sailing the same route out of the harbor, the next morning.

loki-1-1-of-1-jpg.139901

I know the guy(he sails out of my harbor). He sails more of his miles, than anybody I know.  

loki-2-1-of-1-jpg.139902

A motor sailing boat slowed down and gave them room. 

loki-3-1-of-1-jpg.139903

And away they go. We followed soon after, with a reef in the main.

loki-4-1-of-1-jpg.139905

There are benefits to sailing in and out of harbors, when the conditions are good (these were perfect). Raising, reefing, trimming, and then dousing and furling sails, is easier in a protected harbor. But mostly, I do it for the sheer joy. I think this couple does too. 

We never saw another boat (of many), sail in or out of the harbor over the weekend. Most of the cruisers (from S.NE) don't have the local knowledge you get living an hour away from a harbor like this.  Plus many cruising boats at times are support systems for a dormitory sized refrigerator. They need recharging after a night or two at anchor, and might as well power some miles. That's good with me. 

What the hell are all those little bouys?  Rocks?  Must be hell sailing there. :P

Great pictures Chris!

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1 hour ago, Bryanjb said:

What the hell are all those little bouys?  Rocks?  Must be hell sailing there. :P

Great pictures Chris!

Bingo!  Those lobster buoys ARE sailing hell.  Especially for a multihull with vertical daggerboards and spade rudders.  (I've now got retractable outboards so I dropped my snag apparatus by 33%.  Of course, now I sail the PNW but if I ever were to have a boat in Maine again, it'd be full keel and attached rudder--like Toms!)

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On ‎8‎/‎14‎/‎2017 at 7:33 PM, Steam Flyer said:

Cool, are you two-handing a J-24 with your girlfriend/wife? That's a great pic, and I salute you sir

FB- Doug

Thanks Doug! and yes, I always double or singlehand when racing JAM. Hard to get crew in the middle of nowhere! (Cincinnati)

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Had to add this one that was taken recently.  I think it demonstrates the PNW at its finest.

Allelu off Padilla Bay copy.jpg

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