Black Jack

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26 minutes ago, Ajax said:

Another one... the wind was light enough to trust "Frank" to drive the boat, so I was below, grabbing a cold drink, hence the ghost ship appearance.

T_Spinnakerb.jpg

Awesome pics, Ajax!

Makes spinnaker flying look easy..........

FB- Doug

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20 minutes ago, Ajax said:

I'm just glad you can't really see the paint! :(

good lines always win over paint :)

 

 

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2 hours ago, toolbar said:

Beautiful boat in front overtaken by us in the fast lane. :-)

Paul

IMG-20170629-WA0013.jpg

Now, Paul, the Faurby 424 is a nice boat. You should show some respect!

//J

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Bad Attitude, cold molded Carpenter 28

bad jpeg.jpg

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20 hours ago, IStream said:

Marry the hull, date the paint. 

Sound advice. Thanks!

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8 hours ago, Ed.M said:

Bad Attitude, cold molded Carpenter 28

bad jpeg.jpg

 

Awesome shot. Your sheeting angles look tight. Is she very close winded?

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We were experimenting with inhauler, little over done in this photo.

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2 minutes ago, Ed.M said:

We were experimenting with inhauler, little over done in this photo.

I misread that as "inhaler" and thought it explained everything.

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Here's my big orange spinnaker in 3kts true. Of course, as soon as I pulled out the phone for the shot the wind shifted and the clew sagged.

large.IMG_20170819_121756.jpg.7ea0a85950246f01d68dcc8ba4632ada.jpg

Reverse angle with my youngest enjoying the shade.

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Another couple of shots at the public doc in Olympia, WA.

large.IMG_20170824_080651.jpg.b9ab62e02541a4e34625e36c466306ea.jpglarge.IMG_20170823_112049.jpg.74043e214f4ed0f2e568a6b03a24564d.jpg

DDW, if you're reading this you'll be pleased to know they use recycled plastic bull rails at this dock. No splinters, but there are big lag bolts at each lap joint that'll do nice things to your lines if you get anywhere near them.

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5 minutes ago, IStream said:

DDW, if you're reading this you'll be pleased to know they use recycled plastic bull rails at this dock. No splinters, but there are big lag bolts at each lap joint that'll do nice things to your lines if you get anywhere near them.

Looking forward to the invention of glue in Canada?

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Looking good IStream!  Nice to see the big kite in use.  I always remember the cool bow sail locker/workshop/crew cabin in your boat.

Tomorrow I'm out for my first single handed race.  I was feeling a bit crazy and registered in the flying sails division, many of my dreams this week have been about failed solo spinnaker sets and douses. Hopefully all of that "practice" pays off and I do okay on the course.  I'm flying an asym with no pole and using our cruising #2 which doesn't require skirting, so it should be pretty easy. No furler though.

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Thanks, Alex! It's taken me a while to get good enough with the kite to feel even a little bit confident. I made a retractable sprit for my second anchor roller to get the sail outside of the pulpit, which helped. What didn't help was the fact that the retired halyards I'm using as sheets were 135 feet long. I finally trimmed all the excess length off the sheets and did the same for the tack line. The reduction in spaghetti really helps but I still have an issue with the sock hanging up on the clew as I try to raise it and it's high enough off the deck that I've got to lower the halyard to clear the jam, which is a PITA. Once I get that sorted out, you should be seeing a lot more orange on the water.

Good luck with the race tomorrow, I'm sure you'll have it in hand. As they say, slow is smooth and smooth is fast!

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1 minute ago, IStream said:

Thanks, Alex! It's taken me a while to get good enough with the kite to feel even a little bit confident. I made a retractable sprit for my second anchor roller to get the sail outside of the pulpit, which helped. What didn't help was the fact that the retired halyards I'm using as sheets were 135 feet long. I finally trimmed all the excess length off the sheets and did the same for the tack line. The reduction in spaghetti really helps but I still have an issue with the sock hanging up on the clew as I try to raise it and it's high enough off the deck that I've got to lower the halyard to clear the jam, which is a PITA. Once I get that sorted out, you should be seeing a lot more orange on the water.

Good luck with the race tomorrow, I'm sure you'll have it in hand. As they say, slow is smooth and smooth is fast!

And orange under the waterline is fast. Ooops.

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1 hour ago, IStream said:

I still have an issue with the sock hanging up on the clew as I try to raise it

On my asyms with socks (on different boats, but the socks and sails have all been by North) the sock was always cut pretty short so that the clew couldn't be in the sock. It sounds like yours is longer?  I've still had trouble with the sail bunching up in the sock and trying to go up with it, but I can grab the sheets and pull it out if that happens.  Everything on your boat is bigger enough that I can see it being frustrating.

Tomorrow should be fun.  I probably will skip the kite if the wind builds much above 10 and will be doing an early douse. I singlehanded with the kite a lot on my old boat (including with the pole), but not on this one.

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Speaking of spinnakers, here is the first photo I have of Gemini flying hers.  This is the 3/4 oz chute, and fortunately you can't see the ... ahem... multiple repairs from this distance. At least 3 Anarchists aboard.

DSC_2445.jpg

Getting ready to start. Of course I screwed up my decent position, screwed up the start, had to tack out of everyone's bad air into less favorable current, had bad genoa car position hence bad genoa trim, and finished 5th. But in this photo, we look almost ready to rock.

DSC_2424.jpg

DSC_2425.jpg

 

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Hey Kris Kringle!

Is that your Christmas on the cover of Good Old  Boat?

 

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On 8/21/2017 at 0:21 PM, Steam Flyer said:

Sorry, I couldn't decide which ones to show. These are in somewhat reverse chronological order, the Puffer which I currently own and sail for fun including the occasional race; 

post-30927-0-69932100-1448463061_thumb.jpg

the Santana 23D 'Blue Yonder' which I had for ~nine years and sold a while ago,

post-30927-0-82331400-1463836668_thumb.jpgpost-30927-0-68508900-1436101215_thumb.jpgpost-30927-0-37778700-1418523395_thumb.jpg

cruising with dog, in between PHRF races (he did not like sailing but loved to go anywhere I went)

post-30927-127176744791_thumb.jpg

More Santana 23D... for the record, we were NOT below doing bong hits during the pictured near-death roll

post-30927-011360700%201291642532_thumb.jpgpost-30927-1258949359_thumb.jpg

the Johnson 18 which I raced with Mrs Steam when we were both younger & the Lightning which I was racing when we met and which she learned spinnaker handling

post-30927-1252944172_thumb.jpgpost-30927-1252945124_thumb.jpg

So this represents close to 30 years of my sailing history, basically since I got out of the Navy and moved away from Florida. Goes back quite a bit further than the Internet so of course very little of it really happened 

;)

FB- Doug

Is that your lapstrake foam dinghy? I love that little design. Wish we had room on our decks for one, even if inflatables are more pragmatic.

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18 minutes ago, Diarmuid said:

Is that your lapstrake foam dinghy? I love that little design. Wish we had room on our decks for one, even if inflatables are more pragmatic.

Thanks! It's a cool little boat, we kept it when we sold the trawler. Use it for all sorts of waterfront tasks, it's looking a little beat-up these days but still very practical. It is like enough that Mrs Steam and I can easily lift it onto the cabin top, about 30lbs. And the engine starts, first pull, every time!

FB- Doug

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This is the first photo I have of my H-Boat, TONIC, under sail. It was taken yesterday, wind was a pretty steady 15 - 18 knots with higher gusts, me steering, my buddy Charlie as crew. On the way home, we hit 6.2 knots on a broad reach, still reefed.

FullSizeRender.thumb.jpg.3637c7f09fb70822c8bb4e8b183f8374.jpg

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2 hours ago, Bull City said:

This is the first photo I have of my H-Boat, TONIC, under sail. It was taken yesterday, wind was a pretty steady 15 - 18 knots with higher gusts, me steering, my buddy Charlie as crew. On the way home, we hit 6.2 knots on a broad reach, still reefed.

FullSizeRender.thumb.jpg.3637c7f09fb70822c8bb4e8b183f8374.jpg

Is that a British Seagull sticking off the back?? Other than that, a very pretty boat indeed, Bull. Congrats!

FB- Doug

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I'd say it's a torqueedo. Kinda think I see the orange prop

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Just now, Illegal Smile said:

Chasing Ajax around Thomas Point Light on a hot, light air day. 

IMG_1616.JPG

"Fox" told me he was out of practice on those dip pole gybes. :)

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5 hours ago, Bull City said:

This is the first photo I have of my H-Boat, TONIC, under sail. It was taken yesterday, wind was a pretty steady 15 - 18 knots with higher gusts, me steering, my buddy Charlie as crew. On the way home, we hit 6.2 knots on a broad reach, still reefed.

FullSizeRender.thumb.jpg.3637c7f09fb70822c8bb4e8b183f8374.jpg

That's just lovely. 

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Here are a couple of videos from VALIS, during the 2014 Pacific Cup.

Here, we are transferring diesel and our emergency rudder to Sweet Okole, who had dropped out of the race when they broke their rudder and were short on fuel:

 

 

And here we are a few days to go as we approach the Strait of Juan de Fuca.  Video by crewmember Lin:

 

 

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5 hours ago, Steam Flyer said:

Is that a British Seagull sticking off the back?? Other than that, a very pretty boat indeed, Bull. Congrats!

FB- Doug

 

2 hours ago, Sail4beer said:

I'd say it's a torqueedo. Kinda think I see the orange prop

It's a Torqeedo.

Years ago, I bought a British Seagull at a yard sale. Never got it to run. Sold it at a yard sale a few months later.

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1 hour ago, Bull City said:

Years ago, I bought a British Seagull at a yard sale. Never got it to run. Sold it at a yard sale a few months later.

Years ago I had a Seagull on a 21-ft day sailor on a Tomales Bay mooring.  The Seagull always ran, except when it didn't, or I ran out of gas/oil mix.  One time the boat broke free of its mooring, and my buddy and I found it a few days later while we were rowing my plywood dory up and down the bay searching.  The boat was laying on it's side among the rocks and sand, with the mast in the trees.  The Seagull had been soaked a few times by the rise and fall of the tides.  My buddy and I waited for high tide, and by heeling the boat over with the halyard (the boat had a 6-ft keel), we got it floating and past the rocks.  There was no hull damage other than a few scrapes.  I had forgotten to bring any sails.  But I had some gas on board, so I filled up the seagull's tank and wrapped the cord around the hub-thing and pulled.  And pulled.

It didn't start.  You were expecting something else?

The cockpit and cuddy were not self-bailing, so I had a poly boom tent on board and it did a pretty good job of keeping the rain mostly out.  We tacked one corner of the tarp at the bow, tied the jibsheet to another corner and hoisted it up with the jib halyard.  We left the extra corner flapping up in the air.  We had a glorious downwind sail in the moonlight to the "Golden Hinde" marina, which became the boats new home for several years.

And the Seagull?  I took it home, removed the spark plug and threw it in a trash can full of fresh water.  I drained and re-filled the water a few times, then let the Seagull air-dry.  It ran like a champ.  When I sold the boat the Seagull went with it, and for all I know it's still going strong.

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I've heard lots of stories like Valis's about Seagulls but every one I had any personal knowledge of was like Bull's. :D

Horrible things - they could well have been manufactured by Lucas.

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34 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

I've heard lots of stories like Valis's about Seagulls but every one I had any personal knowledge of was like Bull's. :D

Horrible things - they could well have been manufactured by Lucas.

Seagull, Lucas and Jaguar - the best english quality can offer. 

//J

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I had a seagull once that ran perfectly. Unless it was in the water when we never got it running once. Back in the shed, started first time. Piece of English shit. 

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I thought the Seagull would be a good back up for the Johnson 6 HP. I must have been mad.

seagull.thumb.jpg.12b8181a9c0991b807afd453f50d4fc7.jpg

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12 hours ago, valis said:

Here are a couple of videos from VALIS, during the 2014 Pacific Cup.

Here, we are transferring diesel and our emergency rudder to Sweet Okole, who had dropped out of the race when they broke their rudder and were short on fuel:

 

 

And here we are a few days to go as we approach the Strait of Juan de Fuca.  Video by crewmember Lin:

 

 

Cool vids and nice seamanship. In the second vid, I like the bridgedeck on your boat.

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9 hours ago, Jaramaz said:

Seagull, Lucas and Jaguar - the best english quality can offer. 

//J

Piss off - I drive a Jaguar XJR and it's the most wonderful and beautiful sedan I've ever driven.

 

 

Well, it will be when I pick it up from the shop later today.

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12 hours ago, valis said:

Here are a couple of videos from VALIS, during the 2014 Pacific Cup.

Here, we are transferring diesel and our emergency rudder to Sweet Okole, who had dropped out of the race when they broke their rudder and were short on fuel:

 

 

And here we are a few days to go as we approach the Strait of Juan de Fuca.  Video by crewmember Lin:

 

 

Very cool videos, thanks! Excellent bit of seamanship there, transferring fuel in heavy seas like that.

FB- Doug

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55 minutes ago, Steam Flyer said:

Very cool videos, thanks! Excellent bit of seamanship there, transferring fuel in heavy seas like that.

FB- Doug

Thanks!  We had no jerry cans on board, so I drained two one-gallon water bottles (not our emergency water or we would have been disqualified), and filled them using the diesel return line and the engine idling out of gear.  With the slow trickle of the return it took about ten minutes to fill each jug, me hanging upside down in the bilge holding the hose and jug.  We sent two jugs at a time, for a total of four gallons (of which Sweet Okole used almost all to get into port).  Now that I think of it, I suppose we could have been disqualified anyway, since we also transferred our emergency rudder.  They ultimately didn't need it as their jury-rig did (barely) hold up.

I got pretty frustrated as we were trying to rendezvous with them.  Once they asked for help, I plotted out an intercept course that would fall in behind them (since their actual speed was in question).  We would then catch up.  We sailed through the night on our new vector, and eventually saw a masthead tricolor way up ahead.  No radio contact on SSB or VHF.  We sailed closer and closer, still no contact.  As we were only two days out from Oahu, we were starting to see other Pac Cup boats, so I wasn't sure if that was them.  They were supposed to be watching for us and I still couldn't raise them.  This was about 4:00AM and I had been up for close to 24 hours, so I wasn't thinking too clearly.  I contacted Pac Cup race HQ on the radio and asked if there had been any communications from Okole.  No.  The unknown masthead light was still a couple of miles ahead of us, and I couldn't stay awake any longer, so I told our crew to keep sailing towards Kaneohe.

My alarm woke me up just in time to prepare for the morning position / status report (VALIS was also race communications boat).  We had sailed right by the mystery boat (per my fuzzy-headed instructions) and they were nowhere to be seen.  I was pissed at my crew (not their fault, they had just done what I had asked).  After SSB roll-call, Okole checked in late, and said they could still use the help.  I now had their lat/lon, so we turned upwind and sailed to the new intercept.  This is where the video starts.  The reason for Sweet Okole's radio silence is that they were using a hand-held VHF, it was down below, and their crew was even more wiped out than I had been.  Nobody heard my calls.  Oh well, it turned out OK, and I learned a lesson or two.

We got a time allowance for our assistance efforts and ended up tying in fourth place.  And we got a very nice "seamanship" award, which felt really good.  Coincidentally, a few days earlier the backup comms boat also diverted to render assistance to a fellow racer.  We both got seamanship awards.

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1 hour ago, Cruisin Loser said:

Cool vids and nice seamanship. In the second vid, I like the bridgedeck on your boat.

Thanks.  That bridgedeck is the same height as the coaming.  It requires a bit of contortion to squeeze under the dodger when going up or down, but a few times we've been pinned on our side after a spinnaker round-down broach, cockpit flooded and cushions floating away, portlights under water.  Or, having a wave crash aboard, filling the cockpit and washing the tethered crew into the lifelines.  Not a drop has come over the bridgedeck.  I like it too!

 

OK, maybe a drop or two.  But not a cup.

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29 minutes ago, valis said:

Thanks!  We had no jerry cans on board, so ...   ...   ... 

Coincidentally, a few days earlier the backup comms boat also diverted to render assistance to a fellow racer.  We both got seamanship awards.

That's cool. The -real- seamanship award is getting home, but it's nice when the officials recognize it.

We had a 'seamanship award' in our 420 races this weekend, a bunch of high school kids racing in ~20 kt winds and bigger chop than they are accustomed to on thier lakes; several capsizes of course but one boat stuck their mast in the mud very hard. Couldn't get it out and struggled for a long time; one of the other 420s instead of finishing they dropped off one crew to help and the skipper singlehanded the boat. It was good to see.

Rendezvous at sea is a whole 'nother seamanship challenge. Even with GPS and good comms, it's a darn big ocean out there. Well done, again!

FB- Doug

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3 hours ago, valis said:

Thanks.  That bridgedeck is the same height as the coaming.  It requires a bit of contortion to squeeze under the dodger when going up or down, but a few times we've been pinned on our side after a spinnaker round-down broach, cockpit flooded and cushions floating away, portlights under water.  Or, having a wave crash aboard, filling the cockpit and washing the tethered crew into the lifelines.  Not a drop has come over the bridgedeck.  I like it too!

 

OK, maybe a drop or two.  But not a cup.

Very practical feature for a boat that is actually used offshore, like yours. Not often seen in modern production boats.  

Congrats on the well-deserved Seamanship Award. I've got one, too, but for less impressive stuff.

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Interesting thing about that Sweet Okole encounter:  That boat has been around for a while -- she did very well in the 1977 SORC.  One of my crewmembers (you might hear his Arkansas accent in the video) had a poster of Sweet Okole on his bedroom wall when he was a child.  He was truly thrilled to meet her in person!

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I hope Photobucket are hung, drawn and quartered for their migration to an excessive charged service, there's holes all over the interweb of used to be pics of beautiful sailing boats. 

I thought I'd repost this one now that I've downloaded all my pics,

Not my optimal wind range....

 

Fusion_Biglap2016_zpshuz6erol.JPG

And another favourite

Fusion_Hammo2016_zpssbrcjfi0.thumb.JPG.1123428c64e218618351ea29a667310a.JPG

 

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4 hours ago, shaggybaxter said:

Not my optimal wind range....

 

Fusion_Biglap2016_zpshuz6erol.JPG

Love this shot.  I've been there and done that, but you do it with style!

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Thanks guys, in these conditions my only hope is there is a pickle dish for the best dressed loser. 

Last month we did a small offshore race. The start was a reach in 15-20kn and we romped away from most of the fleet, grinning like Chesire cats. Two hours later the wind dropped to sub 5 knots, and I watched in dismay all the bendytoys/jeanneau's appear over the horizon and sail past us like we were standing still :(

I can attest to how much difference skinny boats have in the light. Here's our normal light air crew positions trying to keep the arse out of the water.....

pogo1_zpsbhq0y0nr.JPG.edb93642656802900afdf3eb343201dc.JPG

  ...and this is the difference for the crew position once the wind goes above 15kn. We're running under full main and kite that day, it needed an extra knot of wind compared to normal to start planing, and we had 21 PoB (some are down below).

I'm the one in the centre looking a bit stressed, wonder why? 

  59af3b3ab9e2d_P1000143_zpszihtwr6g(1).thumb.JPG.9a9a1c521003a6bd197fbe90ff80acc5.JPG

 

   

  

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Because the only clothes I was wearing was a shirt, hat & socks?

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Scanas, that was ok in the pit, it was when you jumped on the foredeck to assist with the gybes that screwed with my head.

Edit: the socks did look comfy, new foredeck footwear?

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I was going for Tom Cruise in risky business but I forgot my jocks

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On 8/29/2017 at 9:15 AM, Sail4beer said:

Hey Kris Kringle!

Is that your Christmas on the cover of Good Old  Boat?

 

I know you may not have been around so I ask again...

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16 minutes ago, Sail4beer said:

I know you may not have been around so I ask again...

Yes it is! We have been off sailing for a couple of weeks. Here's that photo that was cropped for the cover. 

22418434551_7ff3a36928_h.jpg

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That's the shot! I always thought the magazine cover was a little small;)

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On 9/5/2017 at 8:10 PM, shaggybaxter said:

Thanks guys, in these conditions my only hope is there is a pickle dish for the best dressed loser. 

Last month we did a small offshore race. The start was a reach in 15-20kn and we romped away from most of the fleet, grinning like Chesire cats. Two hours later the wind dropped to sub 5 knots, and I watched in dismay all the bendytoys/jeanneau's appear over the horizon and sail past us like we were standing still :(

I can attest to how much difference skinny boats have in the light. Here's our normal light air crew positions trying to keep the arse out of the water.....

pogo1_zpsbhq0y0nr.JPG.edb93642656802900afdf3eb343201dc.JPG

  ...and this is the difference for the crew position once the wind goes above 15kn. We're running under full main and kite that day, it needed an extra knot of wind compared to normal to start planing, and we had 21 PoB (some are down below).

   

  

You do realize once the dogs are sent to the doghouse all the beer likely disappears?

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12 hours ago, Kris Cringle said:

Here's my son making the mistake of sailing home, to windward, in too much wind. He's watching his father making the mistake of sailing home,...in too much wind,...(sigh)...to windward. 

36931056981_e7235fffd8_h.jpg[/url]TT sailing home.  (1 of 1) by Tom Young, on Flickr

It's always upwind when it's time to go home.  Sometimes it feels like Groundhog Day.

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14 hours ago, Bryanjb said:

Not sure how to insert photos with the new software here, hmmm

Just copy and past the URL straight into the text box. It handles video equally well.

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Yesterday, windy. Off Buenos Aires. Frers-designed Roy 32. 

Staysail works well. 

IMG_1007.JPG

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Wow. How much wind?  It's still kind of wintery there, isn't it?

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Nothing makes fog more fun, than sailing in it. You know where you are thanks to GPS and you can hear other boats a mile away. Our circle of visibility(it moves with you), was about a hundred yards.

Good and safe in the light winds, about 5-6 knots, giving speeds of avg. 4 kts. You can hear things like a hydraulic winch on a fishing boat - clearly, pulling traps(oddly, the idling engine wasn't heard), from a mile away(I'm guessing - we have no radar).

Moisture drips from the sails and rigging, and even beads on your eyebrows. Flat water, good wind (my favorite wind speed), relaxing fog.  

The only annoyance was a MoBo (thanks Dylan), 'hunting us up'. Under sail, it's easy to know you're being hunted. You hear the engine far off, then it comes closer, stalking you. You've been spotted(maybe not well), on a screen, by the motorboat. Sitting in their cabin, engine rattling, they're senseless, deaf. 

But our radar image has to be explored by the MoBo, felt up I guess.

And then they start blatting a horn, at you! BLATT! Approaching engine sounds. BLATT!! Closer it comes. BLATT!!! Your mell, is destroyed....

I could tell it wasn't a serious MoBo. Their engine(s) weren't deep and throaty enough and the horn sounded like a 70's Chevy Impala. It was easy to see them long before they saw us. About 40 feet of 80's MoBo, cheap fog horn. Junk. 

Then they got their eyeful, 'it's just a sailboat', and left us alone. 

The only thing left is the annoyance of their wake. That quickly passes though, and you're alone again, in flat water and good winds, in the fog. 

37122575416_f07009cee0_h.jpg

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Wow, that is just like my last passage.  I just sailed (well, motored really) from Martha's Vineyard to Boston, and it was a complete white out the whole way.

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On September 11, 2017 at 6:47 AM, plenamar said:

Yesterday, windy. Off Buenos Aires. Frers-designed Roy 32. 

Staysail works well. 

IMG_1007.JPG

Nice Plenamar!

Now it makes sense why way back when you asked for pics of my Frers designed 31 ft. I'm inspired to get a decent pic now!

Great boat and I see some of the design/build clues.

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9 hours ago, MauiPunter said:

Wow, that is just like my last passage.  I just sailed (well, motored really) from Martha's Vineyard to Boston, and it was a complete white out the whole way.

I don't know if it's the same south of here, but I've seen more fog on Penobscot Bay this season than I usually see in 5 seasons. In September, fog is very rare. 

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12 hours ago, Kris Cringle said:

I don't know if it's the same south of here, but I've seen more fog on Penobscot Bay this season than I usually see in 5 seasons. In September, fog is very rare. 

Surprising amount of September fog up here in Novi too.

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2 hours ago, amphib44 said:

Not exactly sailing, but afloat nonetheless...

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That's a nice looking boat.  What is she?

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Here is my boat Appa "racing" in the PNW Wauquiez Rendezvous this year.  Had a shit start but had fun.  Just me, a buddy and my seven year old on board. 

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Sails by Alex with Ballard Sails.  Photos by Lee Youngblood

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Airfare (another Centurion 42) and I duking it out.  I should have tried hard to go over that middle boat.  Their dirt slowed us down just enough so Airfare could get us.

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31 minutes ago, Beer fueled Mayhem said:

Here is my boat Appa "racing" in the PNW Wauquiez Rendezvous this year.  Had a shit start but had fun.  Just me, a buddy and my seven year old on board. 

DSC_1845.thumb.jpg.9698ec68e923ae2fb1bc45057093f901.jpg

Sails by Alex with Ballard Sails.  Photos by Lee Youngblood

DSC_1847.thumb.jpg.4b056b58b4a7138f3e42d4f9e841ee1a.jpg

Airfare (another Centurion 42) and I duking it out.  I should have tried hard to go over that middle boat.  Their dirt slowed us down just enough so Airfare could get us.

DSC_1910.thumb.jpg.d2bbdd56dfbfca835964fe05ceb4fe35.jpg

DSCF8377.thumb.jpg.f60af54082b16f36c379f167a2b798ac.jpg

 

Gorgeous boat!

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6 hours ago, amphib44 said:

Thanks. It's a Bridges Point 24. A Joel White design.

Built by Brooklin? I'm in negotiations to own a Brooklin/Alden 48', whose present owner also has a Center Harbor 31, among his 8 or 9 boats.

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4 hours ago, bplipschitz said:

Me and the GF racing.

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Methinks it's a Flying Scot?

 

3 hours ago, chester said:

what kind of dingy is that?

 

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3 hours ago, Cruisin Loser said:

Built by Brooklin? I'm in negotiations to own a Brooklin/Alden 48', whose present owner also has a Center Harbor 31, among his 8 or 9 boats.

Built by Wade Dow back in 1988 to Joel's design. Joel's son Steve runs the boatyard. Their work is spectacular. 

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On 9/19/2017 at 4:26 PM, Jim in Halifax said:

Surprising amount of September fog up here in Novi too.

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Jim and Kris, those foggy photos are beautiful.

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large.21083222_1434207420007742_4111563269075885921_o.jpg.f49a14ed7ce041df6d95e96903128c16.jpg

Recent pic from a couple weeks ago. 

My wife sailing her Capri 18, with me on our C&C in the background. 

 

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Sailing on Lake Superior this summer with friends Bob and Ilona.

Soñadora loves this kind of weather. She's a hippo in ballet shoes.

 

 

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