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Wooden boats thread

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I love wooden boats, I think that it is a really appropriate material to build boats, it adds lightness and beauty if done well, and

 

I will start with a 1970s one :

 

R%C3%A9novation%20France%20-%20copyright

 

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Wood is also the material of choice for dreamers.

 

The first 6.50 to sail round the world on the vendée globe course :

 

165%2016S%203.jpg

 

yachtmen will find this one ugly but one needs shelter to go there.

 

In it is previous life, it was flush deck with a better look and fairly succesful at racing the mini (finished 4th once after a 2nd place during the first leg)

165.jpg

 

I could go on and on but I know that pretty impressive wooden boats have been built across the pond, I am hoping to learn stuff...

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I learned to sail on the Tech Dinghy. The original 1935 design by MIT professor George Owen was in wood. It was built by the Herreshoff company for the opening of the MIT sailing pavilion - the start of collegiate sailing in the US. Here is a video of the wooden fleet sailing in 1945:

 

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I love wood. I live very close to a world class wooden boat builder that is always turning out new boats. They're presently engaged in building the hull of this 91'er. They work in both traditional plank on frame construction to modern methods. This hull is cold moulded on frames.

 

The term, 'wooden boat' isn't what it used to be.

 

31856156622_b9ff81bf61_h.jpg

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@Kris wooden boat can indeed mean many things.

 

Carved in a trunk, plank on frame, clinker, cold moulded, tortured plywood and strip planking are all worth discussing IMHO.

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Rogue Wave, 60' trimaran by Dick Newick

rogue-int2-l.jpg

RogueWave.jpg


Rogue Wave circa 1978 (image by Polly Brown). This Dick Newick-designed 60' trimaran was built for Phil Weld by the Gougeon Brothers with WEST SYSTEM epoxy. Phil had planned to race Rogue Wave in the 1980 OSTAR, but a rule change cost him that opportunity. However, he did go on to win the 1980 OSTAR aboard another trimaran, Moxie, also designed by Dick Newick, and built with WEST SYSTEM Epoxy [and wood!] by Walter Greene.


That's Dick Newick in yellow, riding the starboard ama bow.

 

onroguebow-l.jpg

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I have owned a number of wooden boats. Traditional plank on frame, double planked on frame, lap strake on frames, plywood, hot molded veneers, cold molded veneers, sheathed strip planked, strip planked with veneers........

 

I currently own and enjoy four wooden boats. I guess I am a fan of wood as a boat building material.

 

Please post pictures of wooden boats, I love looking at them!

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Vic Carpenter designed and built some beautiful cold molded boats. Sorry can't post any pictures.

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Vic Carpenter designed and built some beautiful cold molded boats. Sorry can't post any pictures.

1974 Vic Carpenter 28post-125246-0-45307900-1483205091_thumb.jpg

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Wild Horses - a 76 foot W boat.

 

IMG_20151029_104320.jpg

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I don't recall ever meeting anyone who didn't like wood boats.

 

Owning one is another matter entirely. :D

 

Or should I say being owned by one?

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I have owned a number of wooden boats. Traditional plank on frame, double planked on frame, lap strake on frames, plywood, hot molded veneers, cold molded veneers, sheathed strip planked, strip planked with veneers........

 

I currently own and enjoy four wooden boats. I guess I am a fan of wood as a boat building material.

 

Please post pictures of wooden boats, I love looking at them!

Do you have details on the yacht? Looks beautiful!

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I have owned a number of wooden boats. Traditional plank on frame, double planked on frame, lap strake on frames, plywood, hot molded veneers, cold molded veneers, sheathed strip planked, strip planked with veneers........

 

I currently own and enjoy four wooden boats. I guess I am a fan of wood as a boat building material.

 

Please post pictures of wooden boats, I love looking at them!

Do you have details on the yacht? Looks beautiful!

 

 

Here's some reading material for the new year :)

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I do like wood boats. I’ve owned both FG and wood boats, and I have to say I have been more bonded to the wood ones- and not just because of the glue. I find wood a more pleasing material to work with. I have had since the ’70’s a molded wood Finn- I believe it’s US # 11, from 1954. It was stolen from a yacht harbor in CA, lost for 15 years, and recovered. Needs some restoration now but very repairable.

 

I built a cold molded peapod type rowboat almost 40 years ago and took it up camp cruising to Desolation Sound, for two weeks it was the only human powered craft I saw- this was before the kayaking explosion.

About 10 years ago I designed and built a light rowing boat for use on Lake Washington, it’s edge glued 3/16” cypress sheathed with kevlar. It’s been great and peaceful exercise- at least in winter when the skiers are off the water.

27673766415_ba5640d641_z.jpg

Currently involved with restoring a 1970 S&S design, a one tonner built in NZ of cold molded kauri, resorcinol glued. A very solid boat I’m still figuring out. Lots of work ahead.

25596875954_f0f7dd31f3_z.jpg

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Vic Carpenter designed and built some beautiful cold molded boats. Sorry can't post any pictures.

1974 Vic Carpenter 28attachicon.gif20161012_172141.jpg

 

 

I wouild definitely like to see one of these Vic Carpenter boats in real. They look amazing.

 

@Oceanconcepts as long as there are people willing to look after a wooden boat, it's got life ahead. The best 1960s French plywood boats are outliving their GRP counterparts. Your rowing boat is beautiful as an ex rower I am enviuous!

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I have owned a number of wooden boats. Traditional plank on frame, double planked on frame, lap strake on frames, plywood, hot molded veneers, cold molded veneers, sheathed strip planked, strip planked with veneers........

 

I currently own and enjoy four wooden boats. I guess I am a fan of wood as a boat building material.

 

Please post pictures of wooden boats, I love looking at them!

 

I think it is safe to say that if a boat has been owned by Kim, it is a nice one!

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About 10 years ago I designed and built a light rowing boat for use on Lake Washington, it’s edge glued 3/16” cypress sheathed with kevlar. It’s been great and peaceful exercise- at least in winter when the skiers are off the water.

 

27673766415_ba5640d641_z.jpg

Gorgeous!

 

This is Pacific proa JZERRO by Russell Brown, under construction in Port Townsend, 1992:

 

jzerro-leepod-l.jpgjzerro-int-l.jpg

 

ama_stringers.jpg

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Yeah, as an ex rower I am envious of this rowing boat Oceanconcepts.

 

By edge glued, do you mean strip planking or something else?

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Another Vic Carpenter boat. Look at that beautifully inlaid transom.

 

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I have owned a number of wooden boats. Traditional plank on frame, double planked on frame, lap strake on frames, plywood, hot molded veneers, cold molded veneers, sheathed strip planked, strip planked with veneers........

 

I currently own and enjoy four wooden boats. I guess I am a fan of wood as a boat building material.

 

Please post pictures of wooden boats, I love looking at them!

Kim, I'm sure you've mentioned #3 before but I must've missed it. What is it?

 

Happy New Year!

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Gorgeous!

 

This is Pacific proa JZERRO by Russell Brown, under construction in Port Townsend, 1992:

 

jzerro-leepod-l.jpgjzerro-int-l.jpg

 

ama_stringers.jpg

Proa, The main hull construction seems interesting, it looks like it is plywood but there is no chine...

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Vic Carpenter designed and built some beautiful cold molded boats. Sorry can't post any pictures.

Well, with that name this is something to be expected, doesn't it?

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Yeah, as an ex rower I am envious of this rowing boat Oceanconcepts.

 

By edge glued, do you mean strip planking or something else?

 

The construction was an experiment. I set up moulds that were separate for the top and bottom sections of the hull. I made the bottom section using solid foam, and shaped it as you would shape a surfboard. I wanted it to be able to sit upright on the dock or in the water and be self-bailing through a box that held a removable skeg. There is a floor and the bottom section is floatation. The planks are a single layer about 3/16" X about 2.5"and are splined as in caravel construction, but with no frames extending above the floor. Frames below are thin plywood embedded in the foam. I think of strip planking as being thicker relative to width, but I guess you could call it that. It was really easy, I just shaped the edges of the planks to fit with a block plane. Then the whole thing was covered with kevlar and epoxy. I figured if you can build a canoe out of kevlar alone, I should be able to get away with this very thin wood plus kevlar. Using a Piantedosi Row Wing keeps strain off the gunnels. The sides just make it so you are sitting inside, rather than on, the boat, and provide some protection.

 

31885693182_8b14a9ce10_z.jpg

 

It seems to have worked, it's very rigid and has been durable for beaching, etc. I did put on protective metal strips and caps at the ends, made from scrap titanium from the old, much lamented Boeing surplus store. It's nowhere near as light as a true shell, about 80 lb for just under 20' length and 29" beam, but much more comfortable- and safer- for year round rowing. If I did it again I would change some things that would lighten the boat and simplify the construction, after all, experiments are for learning. I'm happy with the overall shape and performance. I put a lot of miles on it in the first five years, back and forth on the lake, but a back injury sidelined me and I'm just now getting ready to start rowing again. Really miss those early mornings with the eagles coming down to have a look at me.

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I have owned a number of wooden boats. Traditional plank on frame, double planked on frame, lap strake on frames, plywood, hot molded veneers, cold molded veneers, sheathed strip planked, strip planked with veneers........

I currently own and enjoy four wooden boats. I guess I am a fan of wood as a boat building material.

Please post pictures of wooden boats, I love looking at them!

Kim, I'm sure you've mentioned #3 before but I must've missed it. What is it?

Happy New Year!

Do you mean the blue veneer covered strip planked Hadlock 23 designed by Paul Gartside for the Northwest School of Wooden Boatbuilding or the 21' white double ended lapstrake St. Lawrence River Skiff I found in a garage and restored?

post-8115-0-92079100-1483303760_thumb.jpg

post-8115-0-41036200-1483303793_thumb.jpg

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Yeah, as an ex rower I am envious of this rowing boat Oceanconcepts.

 

By edge glued, do you mean strip planking or something else?

The construction was an experiment. I set up moulds that were separate for the top and bottom sections of the hull. I made the bottom section using solid foam, and shaped it as you would shape a surfboard. I wanted it to be able to sit upright on the dock or in the water and be self-bailing through a box that held a removable skeg. There is a floor and the bottom section is floatation. The planks are a single layer about 3/16" X about 2.5"and are splined as in caravel construction, but with no frames extending above the floor. Frames below are thin plywood embedded in the foam. I think of strip planking as being thicker relative to width, but I guess you could call it that. It was really easy, I just shaped the edges of the planks to fit with a block plane. Then the whole thing was covered with kevlar and epoxy. I figured if you can build a canoe out of kevlar alone, I should be able to get away with this very thin wood plus kevlar. Using a Piantedosi Row Wing keeps strain off the gunnels. The sides just make it so you are sitting inside, rather than on, the boat, and provide some protection.

 

31885693182_8b14a9ce10_z.jpg

 

It seems to have worked, it's very rigid and has been durable for beaching, etc. I did put on protective metal strips and caps at the ends, made from scrap titanium from the old, much lamented Boeing surplus store. It's nowhere near as light as a true shell, about 80 lb for just under 20' length and 29" beam, but much more comfortable- and safer- for year round rowing. If I did it again I would change some things that would lighten the boat and simplify the construction, after all, experiments are for learning. I'm happy with the overall shape and performance. I put a lot of miles on it in the first five years, back and forth on the lake, but a back injury sidelined me and I'm just now getting ready to start rowing again. Really miss those early mornings with the eagles coming down to have a look at me.

 

That's very creative and well done, woodworking is nice, it lets people express their creativity, it must be so nice when you realise that the boat actually meets your goals!

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I have owned a number of wooden boats. Traditional plank on frame, double planked on frame, lap strake on frames, plywood, hot molded veneers, cold molded veneers, sheathed strip planked, strip planked with veneers........

I currently own and enjoy four wooden boats. I guess I am a fan of wood as a boat building material.

Please post pictures of wooden boats, I love looking at them!

Kim, I'm sure you've mentioned #3 before but I must've missed it. What is it?

Happy New Year!

Do you mean the blue veneer covered strip planked Hadlock 23 designed by Paul Gartside for the Northwest School of Wooden Boatbuilding or the 21' white double ended lapstrake St. Lawrence River Skiff I found in a garage and restored?

The Hadlock 23. She's a beaut.

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About 10 years ago I designed and built a light rowing boat for use on Lake Washington, it’s edge glued 3/16” cypress sheathed with kevlar. It’s been great and peaceful exercise- at least in winter when the skiers are off the water.

27673766415_ba5640d641_z.jpg

That is a lovely boat. I row a 26' single. I wondered how stable your boat is?

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I have owned a number of wooden boats. Traditional plank on frame, double planked on frame, lap strake on frames, plywood, hot molded veneers, cold molded veneers, sheathed strip planked, strip planked with veneers........

I currently own and enjoy four wooden boats. I guess I am a fan of wood as a boat building material.

Please post pictures of wooden boats, I love looking at them!

Kim, I'm sure you've mentioned #3 before but I must've missed it. What is it?

Happy New Year!

Do you mean the blue veneer covered strip planked Hadlock 23 designed by Paul Gartside for the Northwest School of Wooden Boatbuilding or the 21' white double ended lapstrake St. Lawrence River Skiff I found in a garage and restored?

The Hadlock 23. She's a beaut.

Currently my favorite powerboat.

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post-104690-0-97336600-1483323077_thumb.jpg

 

Currently either my favorite or least favorite wooden boat, can't decide. :)

 

Started her last January in the basement, my first attempt at any kind of intensive woodworking project.

 

If I can get a couple of snow days this winter to prep for paint an varnish she'll be our tender come spring.

 

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[url=http://forums.sailinganarchy.com/index.php?app=core&module=attach&section=attach&attach_rel_module=post&attach_id=233888]IMG_0877.jpg[/url

Currently either my favorite or least favorite wooden boat, can't decide. :)

 

Started her last January in the basement, my first attempt at any kind of intensive woodworking project.

 

If I can get a couple of snow days this winter to prep for paint an varnish she'll be our tender come spring.

 

A beauty! Well done!

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4 mm Okume.

0HCV4fg.jpg

 

Conventional construction with chine log, sheer clamp, etc. No fiberglass.

3k0y1nI.jpg

 

Mated to a lightplane of Wood/Fabric construction.

xtvNSQ3.jpg

 

Wood proved to be an exceptional material for this project. I challenge anyone to name another amphibious plane (of any material,) that can fly 2 adults off glassy water and cruise at 65 mph - on 46 HORSEPOWER.

dYJnp0l.jpg

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About 10 years ago I designed and built a light rowing boat for use on Lake Washington, it’s edge glued 3/16” cypress sheathed with kevlar. It’s been great and peaceful exercise- at least in winter when the skiers are off the water.

27673766415_ba5640d641_z.jpg

That is a lovely boat. I row a 26' single. I wondered how stable your boat is?

 

 

It's much more stable than a Bay 24 single shell I also have, but not exactly a casual rower. You won't spend too much time hanging out without the oars extended at least a bit. Once I get out on the water I feel much more stable than the shell, important to me as I was rowing all year long, many times with ice in or around the boat, so staying dry was a priority. I've fallen out of the shell more than a few times, but not from this boat- so far.

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Calling cold-molded a wooden boat is stretching it.

 

Calling this trolling is an understatement.

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Calling cold-molded a wooden boat is stretching it.

 

Calling this trolling is an understatement.

 

 

Calling that a post is an over-statement.

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4 mm Okume.

0HCV4fg.jpg

 

Conventional construction with chine log, sheer clamp, etc. No fiberglass.

3k0y1nI.jpg

 

Mated to a lightplane of Wood/Fabric construction.

xtvNSQ3.jpg

 

Wood proved to be an exceptional material for this project. I challenge anyone to name another amphibious plane (of any material,) that can fly 2 adults off glassy water and cruise at 65 mph - on 46 HORSEPOWER.

dYJnp0l.jpg

 

The lattice work aft seems intricate, you must have spent hours and hours building it. I am biased because I use it professionally but wood is indeed a fantastic material when you use it for the right purpose.

You seem to be able to build about anything with your hands. Hat off.

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Lattice work was pretty strait forward. Lots of repetition. Time to build the plane was 1200 hours over 20 months.

 

Floats were a separate project that took about a year to design and build.

 

Steve

 

w15TmiX.jpg

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I love woodboats, for some reason to me they just have so much more personality than fiberglass. this is my baby.

11377079_659953294149663_801674865801287

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Beautiful work, Panope! Let's see 1200 hours @ $100/hr = $120 K plus materials. Not a bad use of your time depending on your hourly rate. Pride in the work is priceless.

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Grey, I just like making shit.

 

My hourly rate-of-pay back in the mid-1990's was $15/hour.

 

Steve

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Best thing about wooden boats is they are cheap to get or purchase. No doubt they can be beautiful peices of floating craftsmanship. The changing of sailing generations and the disconnect from the sailing world enables those who love them access to just a generation ago would have been more difficult.

 

a new strip planked or cold molded boat that are being currently made are quite desirable. They are also beyond most of the general boat owning population More interestingly is the fact these boats are being bought by older sailors who fainally can have someting specia of thier own. On the other hand - the 550i sports boat made of plywood, glass and carbon keep the self builders in the wooden boat genre. Not many other wooden boats have been picked up by the general public. I suspect the general demise of wooden boats will happen in the next 20 years as sailing gets beyond most folks and access to sailing declines.

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Best thing about wooden boats is they are cheap to get or purchase. No doubt they can be beautiful peices of floating craftsmanship. The changing of sailing generations and the disconnect from the sailing world enables those who love them access to just a generation ago would have been more difficult.

 

a new strip planked or cold molded boat that are being currently made are quite desirable. They are also beyond most of the general boat owning population More interestingly is the fact these boats are being bought by older sailors who fainally can have someting specia of thier own. On the other hand - the 550i sports boat made of plywood, glass and carbon keep the self builders in the wooden boat genre. Not many other wooden boats have been picked up by the general public. I suspect the general demise of wooden boats will happen in the next 20 years as sailing gets beyond most folks and access to sailing declines.

 

 

Wooden boat are best for dreamers. I know of several wooden beauties which look like they came out of the bottle for sale that are capible of great cruises that can be had for under 20k. Why wait to buy a plastic boat that cuts into your wallet, lacks the style you'd want when you arrive and delays your life's adventure.

 

300px-Spaulding_buoyantgirl.jpg

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"Wood proved to be an exceptional material for this project. I challenge anyone to name another amphibious plane (of any material,) that can fly 2 adults off glassy water and cruise at 65 mph - on 46 HORSEPOWER".

 

This is what many people never get about wood, that it can be better than any other material, even today. To engineer and build this plane with composites would take a monster budget and might not be any lighter or any more reliable. Before you jump on me for my comments, find another plane that can do what Panope's plane could do that wasn't built out of wood.

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Out of curiosity, given the amount of effort involved, what drove the decision to build such a small plane?

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Best thing about wooden boats is they are cheap to get or purchase. No doubt they can be beautiful peices of floating craftsmanship. The changing of sailing generations and the disconnect from the sailing world enables those who love them access to just a generation ago would have been more difficult.

 

a new strip planked or cold molded boat that are being currently made are quite desirable. They are also beyond most of the general boat owning population More interestingly is the fact these boats are being bought by older sailors who fainally can have someting specia of thier own. On the other hand - the 550i sports boat made of plywood, glass and carbon keep the self builders in the wooden boat genre. Not many other wooden boats have been picked up by the general public. I suspect the general demise of wooden boats will happen in the next 20 years as sailing gets beyond most folks and access to sailing declines.

as a millenial (27) who also owns a wood boat I have to disagree. 30 years ago they were saying the same thing about wooden boats yet here we are, wooden boats still abound. the numerous wooden boat shows around the country each year draw larger and larger crowds and the wooden boat yards still manage to carry on both building new boats but also bringing in old wooden boats to be rebuilt and given a new lease on life. hell here in maine alone there's the rollins yard, brooklin boat yard, rockport marine, boothbay harbor shipyard (currently refitting the 152ft Ernestina morrisey) , artisan boatworks, lyman morse (currently building a 65 foot cold molded sloop) hogdon yachts (the yard that built Comanche) still have full capability to build wooden boats. the landing school and wooden boat school still teach all of the traditional wooden boat building skills to young students eager to keep the traditions alive. this is just here in maine, and I know for a fact there are more yards that I forgot about. Massachusetts has many wooden boat yards as well, gannon and benjamin chief among them, as does Connecticut, Rhode Island, New York etc. etc. etc. no. the world of wooden boats isn't going anywhere.

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Out of curiosity, given the amount of effort involved, what drove the decision to build such a small plane?

 

1- Money. Small/lighter plane = less money to build and operate.

 

2- Minimalism. I tend to choose the smallest/simplest thing that will do the job safely (houses, cars, boats, etc.)

 

I did not know it at the time (I was not yet a pilot when I began construction), but a very light plane will quickly teach a pilot things that a heavy plane will mask (just like with boats).

 

I suppose one could argue that the float-plane is not that small. After-all, it has almost twice the wingspan as the Pitts Special (that I did not build).

 

So much for my attempts at minimalism. At least the hangar is not too large.........

epS4ION.jpg

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Best thing about wooden boats is they are cheap to get or purchase. No doubt they can be beautiful peices of floating craftsmanship. The changing of sailing generations and the disconnect from the sailing world enables those who love them access to just a generation ago would have been more difficult.

 

a new strip planked or cold molded boat that are being currently made are quite desirable. They are also beyond most of the general boat owning population More interestingly is the fact these boats are being bought by older sailors who fainally can have someting specia of thier own. On the other hand - the 550i sports boat made of plywood, glass and carbon keep the self builders in the wooden boat genre. Not many other wooden boats have been picked up by the general public. I suspect the general demise of wooden boats will happen in the next 20 years as sailing gets beyond most folks and access to sailing declines.

 

Having recently purchased a well found 39’ wooden boat of modern (cold molded) construction with no major problems for about the price of a decent late model used car, I can vouch for the fact that they are not only for the wealthy- I’m certainly not in that class. I think the relevant distinction is more between production builds, where many costs can be amortized over a number of hulls, and one-off construction. One off new boats, of any material, tend to be built by the well to do or by dedicated and skilled do-it-yourselfers. GRP is very amenable to cost savings in production, wood generally less so. It’s probably a fuzzy distinction with exceptions, my old hot molded Finn was a “production” boat 60 years ago, but generally composites and molds make production economies easier. That advantage is less with one off or small volume.

I’ve been hearing of the demise of wood boats for more than 50 years now, and to the extent it’s true I think it happened long ago. I don’t know of any true production builders of wood boats. but in the realm of the custom builds, it’s still a vibrant scene, and the material is still good for custom builds- more so with modern methods.

 

A lot comes down to imponderables of aesthetics and taste- personally I love well designed boats of any material, but wood rings my bell a bit more and I find it more pleasing and easier to work with.

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Best thing about wooden boats is they are cheap to get or purchase. No doubt they can be beautiful pieces of floating craftsmanship. The changing of sailing generations and the disconnect from the sailing world enables those who love them access to just a generation ago would have been more difficult.

 

a new strip planked or cold molded boat that are being currently made are quite desirable. They are also beyond most of the general boat owning population More interestingly is the fact these boats are being bought by older sailors who finally can have something special of their own. On the other hand - the 550i sports boat made of plywood, glass and carbon keep the self builders in the wooden boat genre. Not many other wooden boats have been picked up by the general public. I suspect the general demise of wooden boats will happen in the next 20 years as sailing gets beyond most folks and access to sailing declines.

as a millennial (27) who also owns a wood boat I have to disagree. 30 years ago they were saying the same thing about wooden boats yet here we are, wooden boats still abound. the numerous wooden boat shows around the country each year draw larger and larger crowds and the wooden boat yards still manage to carry on both building new boats but also bringing in old wooden boats to be rebuilt and given a new lease on life. hell here in Maine alone there's the rollins yard, brooklin boat yard, rockport marine, boothbay harbor shipyard (currently refitting the 152ft Ernestina morrisey) , artisan boatworks, Lyman morse (currently building a 65 foot cold molded sloop) hogdon yachts (the yard that built Comanche) still have full capability to build wooden boats. the landing school and wooden boat school still teach all of the traditional wooden boat building skills to young students eager to keep the traditions alive. this is just here in maine, and I know for a fact there are more yards that I forgot about. Massachusetts has many wooden boat yards as well, Gannon and Benjamin chief among them, as does Connecticut, Rhode Island, New York etc. etc. etc. no. the world of wooden boats isn't going anywhere.

 

 

You are pretty optimistic and more unicorn than you would like to believe. I am glad you are able to have a wooden boat as not many your age want one. Sailing in general is in decline. I have seen the demographics firsthand and understand where the waning current interest is for these boats. Folks like fine craftsman Gannon and Benjamin who build and restore boats for wealthy folks not the scrappy or plucky millenials like yourself. Lyman Morse used to have a waiting list to build new boats but no more and much of their capacity to build more is more idle than productive nowadays. You can count on your hands quality new traditional builds here on nearly two hands when it used to be dozen a few years ago. While it is true there are good wooden boat schools - the fact that there are fewer boats being made - the training of shipwrights for paid work/new builds in turn will be less as demands dwindles. At 27 you unfortunately missed the largest rush to the dumpster for several thousand wooden boats in north america with the end of the golden age of middle class sailboat ownership and the do it yourself generation of people who made thier own larger wooden vessels. As most wooden boat owners (myself included) are also aware that many yards no longer accept wooden boats being hauled, many marinas refusing slips to them and harder to find general insurance to cover them which further adds to this sad fact of decline.

 

I understand the merits of a well founded cold molded boat - in my opinion I own one of the best ever made. To make the one i have would cost more than 1/2 million dollars if you used the same materials, technics and craftsmanship. I know I could purchase a beautiful new fiberglass J boat of the same size and with carbon sails for 1/3 less. The cost of that 65' one Morse is making is a prime example of what i am suggesting. The ability to buy a used at a great value a fine example of where the market is compared to other choices. We are lucky in this time when we recognized that these great wooden boats - cold molded, strip planked or even quality restored traditional boats now are available to us at such comparative bargains.

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I just bought this. I'm probably representative of an age that, after 20 years of fast things on land and water, now just wants to take in the sights and smells with a dash of style. I suspect I'm not alone.

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Out of curiosity, given the amount of effort involved, what drove the decision to build such a small plane?

 

1- Money. Small/lighter plane = less money to build and operate.

 

2- Minimalism. I tend to choose the smallest/simplest thing that will do the job safely (houses, cars, boats, etc.)

 

I did not know it at the time (I was not yet a pilot when I began construction), but a very light plane will quickly teach a pilot things that a heavy plane will mask (just like with boats).

 

I suppose one could argue that the float-plane is not that small. After-all, it has almost twice the wingspan as the Pitts Special (that I did not build).

 

So much for my attempts at minimalism. At least the hangar is not too large.........

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Panope: Your hangar reminds me of the National Air and Space museum in DC.

 

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That is stunning, Panope.

My dad had a wee 172 on floats and I loved those adventures.

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Out of curiosity, given the amount of effort involved, what drove the decision to build such a small plane?

 

1- Money. Small/lighter plane = less money to build and operate.

 

2- Minimalism. I tend to choose the smallest/simplest thing that will do the job safely (houses, cars, boats, etc.)

 

I did not know it at the time (I was not yet a pilot when I began construction), but a very light plane will quickly teach a pilot things that a heavy plane will mask (just like with boats).

 

I suppose one could argue that the float-plane is not that small. After-all, it has almost twice the wingspan as the Pitts Special (that I did not build).

 

So much for my attempts at minimalism. At least the hangar is not too large.........

epS4ION.jpg

 

 

What a shed full of toys!

 

The big one reminds me of this one :

 

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Lovely, Steve. You've just upped the man-cave definition. Was the seaplane the only one of the planes you actually built yourself?

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kinardly, Yes. 1964.

 

Ed. Yes. The Pitts (red biplane) was built by a man in California in 1969 (The year I was born). The two planes on the floor are factory built.

 

The plywood runabout was built by my father in 1967.

 

The yellow thing leaning up against the back wall is a Glen-L 10 that I built as a young teenager.

 

Hey, look at that - we drifted back on topic.

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You win the man-cave competition going away. Lotsa toys, built by the family (not just bought). Only thing I don't see is the Lazy boy & the refridge

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Panope, I live in the same town that you do and I think we need to meet. I need some lightweight anchor advice for an upcoming R2AK and you may be interested to see what's going on in my shop. How do you suggest we make contact?

Russell

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Longy,

 

The fridge is in the back corner. I used to have a couch but it was attracting too many "tourists" and I could not get work done.

 

About the man cave: My passion for aviation has all but died. I no longer "hang out" at the airport. I have been slowly downsizing for the past 8 years. I used to own a much larger hangar, more planes, cars, motorcycles etc. The Chevrolet in the picture was sold last year. Next on the block should be the Pitts Special, however, recent developments with my primary flying gig might result in the sale of the Bonanza fairly soon.

 

Ideally, I'll get down to just the seaplane and my wife's Cessna 150 (the tan plane in the back) that she uses as a commuter. Then, the hangar can be sold or part traded for a smaller, not so nice one.

 

There is no need to mourn any of this. I embrace change and am always looking forward to the next 'thing'.

 

Steve

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Panope, I live in the same town that you do and I think we need to meet. I need some lightweight anchor advice for an upcoming R2AK and you may be interested to see what's going on in my shop. How do you suggest we make contact?

Russell

 

Sounds good Russell, I've heard lots of great things about you and would very much like to meet. I'll send you a Private Message with my contact info.

 

Steve

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Here's a wooden boat for you:

 

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And another, somewhat smaller:

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Panope, I live in the same town that you do and I think we need to meet. I need some lightweight anchor advice for an upcoming R2AK and you may be interested to see what's going on in my shop. How do you suggest we make contact?

Russell

 

Sounds good Russell, I've heard lots of great things about you and would very much like to meet. I'll send you a Private Message with my contact info.

 

Steve

I can't believe you two don't know each other. Given both of your considerable talents you should get together and share ideas.

Dynamite!!

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Russel Brown....R2AK!!

 

There better be a thread with build pics.....

+1, Mr Brown.

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Anyone ever notice how wooden boats seem to fit into the environment better than boats of other materials?

 

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Much as the 700 white clorox bottles rolling horribly on their moorings while playing Jimmy Buffet music too loudly at the Catalina Isthmus fit perfectly into theirs.

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This is my wooden boat, which i designed and built myself four years ago. It is a joy to row and just looking at.

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Much as I love wooden boats, owning two of them was enough for me. One was an old wooden Thistle, the other was an Eichenlaub Star boat, beautiful boats but the work to sail ratio wasn't great.

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Much as I love wooden boats, owning two of them was enough for me. One was an old wooden Thistle, the other was an Eichenlaub Star boat, beautiful boats but the work to sail ratio wasn't great.

 

Modern wooden boats aren't that bad.

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It is strip planked WRC, sheated inside, out epoxy glass. Keel, transom and coamings mahogany which made it a little heavier. All in all she weighs about 80 Lb.

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They have been busy in Bristol at the underfall yard

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I love the craftmanship.

 

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Nice project, looks like it's sitting pretty high on its lines. 

Any comments about that?

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20 minutes ago, mad said:

Nice project, looks like it's sitting pretty high on its lines. 

Any comments about that?

Can't see much from this angle but looks level to me. Bristol pilot cutter have some internal ballast, you would be pretty stupid to lift it up the ladder whereas it can be taken down from the quay after while the boat is fitted out.

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Oops, duplicated post. 

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Not sure if this the appropriate spot for this post.  I'm looking for people with a Joel White peapod.  I bought one a few months ago and learning to sail on it. 

I'd like to chat with people with experience about tuning the sail.  Adding a vang perhaps?  How they have the lines set up.  Just anything to help me along. 

Thanks

John 

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I don't own a peapod, but I would say that sail needs a lot more tension all around.

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Here’s today’s wooden boat update from the East Coast. 

I launched Horse Chicks Monday.

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Silent Maid. 33’ with a new 65’ Marconi rig. The sail plan was drawn In 1924 and finally built.

Shakedown cruise Monday

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Thanks! Edit. Silent Maid is not mine or my work. It is beautiful and the hull varnished.

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