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Wooden boats thread

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Kim Holman - phwooaaahhh....

 

I had the hots for Whirlaway (below) so badly. I'm very glad I didn't have any money at the time! I'm happier where I am. 

0x0_159_39889952359c37ff8ba98c.jpg

I was almost as infatuated as I still am with Stilleto ("standing headroom for a bottle of gin")

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This one is a lot cruisier

1170x600_93_115115154959c37663d620a.jpg

And we still have our Stella (though not in commission)

SYH6-1024x768.jpg

 

 

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Just now, SloopJonB said:

Love the deep bulwarks.

Love the head sink. You don't see a lot of Royal Doulton sinks around here.

0x0_373_142293432559c3d1e608d48.JPG

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Be still my heart.

What is it? (I'm not on Faceplant.)

With a fin & spade underbody that would be my perfect boat.

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Same Sloop I don't need Skynet knowing my whereabouts either.

Miss Musette is a Holman 42.

Facebook link has oodles of photos just look to the left column on the FB page.

Timeline is 2015 so does anybody know if she has made it home to the sea?.

12278966_1215264601822357_4361294879446399421_n.jpg.ea9151df56564c4fc9d05e2b614d5178.jpg

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17 hours ago, rstone said:

 Believe a Eun Na Mara.

Designed by Iain Oughtred.

You've got it. And that must be some sort of Oughtred yole thing in the background?

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7 hours ago, Mr. Ed said:

yole

?? what is this, more precisely?  I have my guesses based on jolle / julle (swedish, of course;  jolle is more or less a dinghy whereas julle is a more specific lapstrake constructed boat. The folkboat is "inspired" by the julle, typically a julle is smaller then a folkboat).

//J

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I think yole and yawl are the same word - of Scandinavian origin. The influence of Scandinavian boats on British and Irish working boat design was of course widespread. I particularly like the clinker working boats which became known as Drontheims in the west of Ireland because they mirrored boats that came as deck cargo from Trondheim in Norway. 

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9 hours ago, Mr. Ed said:

I think yole and yawl are the same word - of Scandinavian origin.

yawl as well? I though that stemmed from the US but digging some in internet - yes, that's how it is. From the link offered by rstone (thanks! interesting boats) this is "jolle" and not "julle" - which of course has the same origin but now means different kinds of boats. Oh well ... what's in a name?

//J

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22 hours ago, Mr. Ed said:

I think yole and yawl are the same word - of Scandinavian origin. The influence of Scandinavian boats on British and Irish working boat design was of course widespread. I particularly like the clinker working boats which became known as Drontheims in the west of Ireland because they mirrored boats that came as deck cargo from Trondheim in Norway. 

Here is a look at some evolved dugout canoes from Martinique and Guadeloupe called 'Yoles'. I doubt there is any Scandinavian connection. Exciting to watch race, lots of crew gymnastics with those hiking poles!

 

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1 hour ago, five guys named moe said:

dscf2706_orig.jpg8696952_orig.jpg

VELELLA, designed by Tom Wylie and launched in Southern California in 1979. 

 

Interesting boat shame that they didn't install a better looking dodger.

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1 hour ago, Rasputin22 said:

Here is a look at some evolved dugout canoes from Martinique and Guadeloupe called 'Yoles'. I doubt there is any Scandinavian connection. Exciting to watch race, lots of crew gymnastics with those hiking poles!

 

Wow! Wonderful stuff. Fascinating to see big sprits like that. And it is the same word: ”Le terme, venu du norvégien «jol» (canot) attesté en français dès 1713 désigne une embarcation étroite”. Fucking Vikings: everywhere you turn  

 For a very different version of spritsails look at Thames barges. They evolved that way so that a small crew can handle a heavy sail - the sprit is permanently rigged and you only have the weight of the sail cloth to hoist and lower (to confuse things further the main sail is brailed up to the sprit so that to make sail you lower it). Another odd advantage is that you can fly the topsail without the main, which was apparently very handy around docks where the wind was very shredded lower down but you could catch a breeze up on high.

 

 

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My smaller version of a Sail Plan, based on the original Thames Barge. Been published  a long time ago.

 

900sail1.jpg

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26 minutes ago, Priscilla said:

A modern ode to this classic.

qtune.jpg.82d400e691fe6d498ff94ea66c6b8a5b.jpg

Quiet Tune is better looking than the 31's.  (not having the mast go through the cabin top helps the aesthetics).  But at least the 31's had/have a bit of a sit down cockpit.  These boats are for us 'old guys'  (altho obviously appreciated by any age).  Problem is, the Quiet Tune's cockpit was so shallow that sitting on the 'floor' makes getting up to tend a line an unpleasant experience for the legs.  The non self-bailing cockpits of the H-28 and H-23 are comfy but non self-bailing is viewed by many as akin to an off center companionway.  For those of us here in the 'upper left corner'  (SW corner for my buddies up north) self-bailing makes all the difference in rain management.

(PS. Cockpit covers suck)

My solution?  Scale it up 50% = even longer waterline, more room below, but still usually not full headroom, and a great cockpit

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13 minutes ago, Veeger said:

Quiet Tune is better looking than the 31's.  (not having the mast go through the cabin top helps the aesthetics).  But at least the 31's had/have a bit of a sit down cockpit.  These boats are for us 'old guys'  (altho obviously appreciated by any age).  Problem is, the Quiet Tune's cockpit was so shallow that sitting on the 'floor' makes getting up to tend a line an unpleasant experience for the legs.  The non self-bailing cockpits of the H-28 and H-23 are comfy but non self-bailing is viewed by many as akin to an off center companionway.  For those of us here in the 'upper left corner'  (SW corner for my buddies up north) self-bailing makes all the difference in rain management.

(PS. Cockpit covers suck)

My solution?  Scale it up 50% = even longer waterline, more room below, but still usually not full headroom, and a great cockpit

Some are not easily pleased.

Maybe a model would suit you better.

 

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'Fussy' is my middle name!  (but I would totally love that model!  How big is it?)

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Not sure of size but the non bailing ergonomically challenging cockpit of the original Quiet Tune should be of no trouble for you with a model.

 

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17 minutes ago, Priscilla said:

Not sure of size but the non bailing ergonomically challenging cockpit of the original Quiet Tune should be of no trouble for you with a model.

 

Your concern for my well being is duly noted and much appreciated! 

 

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On 12/31/2016 at 7:43 AM, Kris Cringle said:

I love wood. I live very close to a world class wooden boat builder that is always turning out new boats. They're presently engaged in building the hull of this 91'er. They work in both traditional plank on frame construction to modern methods. This hull is cold moulded on frames.

 

The term, 'wooden boat' isn't what it used to be.

 

31856156622_b9ff81bf61_h.jpg

Thank God.  We spent too many years displaying at the PTWBS being told “it’s not a wooden boat”.<_<

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3 hours ago, Priscilla said:

Some are not easily pleased.

Maybe a model would suit you better.

 

Mmmmmm, Quiet Tune....:wub:

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5 minutes ago, Amati said:

Thank God.  We spent too many years displaying at the PTWBS being told “it’s not a wooden boat”.<_<

There are specialized Luddites for every sort of advancement.

The plank on frame wooden boat people are some of the worst.

Frankly I think in their heart of hearts they regard anything more advanced than a log with some suspicion.

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On 8/31/2018 at 10:08 PM, Mr. Ed said:

That depends: the standing lug stays the same; the dipping lug gets moved round. 

And the standing lug starts looking pretty good after messing with a dipping lug.  (Paddles help when you are by yourself :))

And yes, this is the fabled dipping lug IC proa:

 

3EA2F7A4-F5B0-40B8-A90B-6A9ED8468BAA.jpeg

8EE6B380-978D-4176-BB96-FE21AE4FFE49.jpeg

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1 hour ago, Amati said:

And the standing lug starts looking pretty good after messing with a dipping lug.  (Paddles help when you are by yourself :))

And yes, this is the fabled dipping lug IC proa:

 

3EA2F7A4-F5B0-40B8-A90B-6A9ED8468BAA.jpeg

8EE6B380-978D-4176-BB96-FE21AE4FFE49.jpeg

Do you get to be in the boat at some point, or is it too scary/existential/wrong time of month, etc?

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38 minutes ago, Ishmael said:

Do you get to be in the boat at some point, or is it too scary/existential/wrong time of month, etc?

Ishmael, there is no ‘in’ there. The sail was so powerful that even when shunting/dipping in the wind you see in the pics, I had to sit out on the seat (notice the elbow on the seat in top pic).  The seat wasn’t long enough even in 8K TW, and I needed my feet on the gunwales to steer, so......

But it was a woodie :lol:, so hey!  Also, regarding the 6oz top wood (!) spar, there is something to the concept of vertical foot pounds-

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On 12/16/2018 at 1:51 AM, Mr. Ed said:

Wow! (Again)

did you ever build it? 

Hello Mr.Ed.

Not build. Quite a few interested people but probably too much to digest. I have tried many things with this boat. The simplest folding rig and sail plan that I can think of; to be handled by "A man and a boy" like the saying with the Thames barges.The simplest folding hull form (in metal): no separate keel, no transom; flush deck. I added fins, but not obligatory.

900RHP-04 (1).jpg

900RHP-01.jpg

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1 hour ago, Tanton Y_M said:

Hello Mr.Ed.

Not build. Quite a few interested people but probably too much to digest. I have tried many things with this boat. The simplest folding rig and sail plan that I can think of; to be handled by "A man and a boy" like the saying with the Thames barges.The simplest folding hull form (in metal): no separate keel, no transom; flush deck. I added fins, but not obligatory.

900RHP-04 (1).jpg

900RHP-01.jpg

Can’t see any wood, sure you’re not lost.

“Quite a few interested people but probably too much to digest”

Why exactly please continue.

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12 hours ago, Priscilla said:

Yup it’s a steal considering you could get a shoe box like this with some holes in it’s side.

 

52E68C8D-1486-4B01-AFE3-90CF78983A0F.jpeg

You sully this thread with a plastic fantastic replete with cockpit throw cushions?!

LFH is rolling over in his grave. (as is his Dad)

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I like this one of America winning the "Hundred Guineas Cup" at Cowes. (to become known as the America's Cup).

The mainsails are wing on wing and he has the nuance of the headsail struggling to find clean air behind them. He is a sailor no doubt.

Screen Shot 2018-12-19 at 10.29.38 am.png

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Definitely not a dry boat. The crew seems nonchalant about the prospect of being washed overboard.

Thelma (1).jpg

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21 hours ago, Priscilla said:

Yup it’s a steal considering you could get a shoe box like this with some holes in it’s side.

 

52E68C8D-1486-4B01-AFE3-90CF78983A0F.jpeg

Truth be told.... I'd take the Beneteau------UNLESS------I had a waterfront cottage with a deepwater dock out front on the coast of Maine.  PNW? Beneteau.  Maine coast? Center Harbor 31.    It really IS all about the waters you sail and the way you use your boat, that determines the best boat for a given owner.

Go ahead,  throw yer stones....

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Sorry I couldn't copy the pictures across, But if you scan down this link.

http://www.broadlandmemories.co.uk/1900to1949gallery3.html

 You'll see my clubs 1912 regatta and the following photo of a similar vintage. Sadly none of the competitors are still with us, but some of their children maybe and definately grandchildren. Most of the boats are still with us, sometimes still in the same families... Many of the big fleet are Yare and Bure one designs.

 I've crewed  at least one boat shown in the links

http://www.ybod.org.uk/

Still built today but mostly with a plastic hull

mixed-ods-horning-tif.jpg

 

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8 hours ago, Veeger said:

Truth be told.... I'd take the Beneteau------UNLESS------I had a waterfront cottage with a deepwater dock out front on the coast of Maine.  PNW? Beneteau.  Maine coast? Center Harbor 31.    It really IS all about the waters you sail and the way you use your boat, that determines the best boat for a given owner.

Go ahead,  throw yer stones....

just not at those hull windows!  :D

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3 minutes ago, Bob Perry said:

Imagine dragging that big, amidships, recessed window through the water. Brilliant!

No owner of that Beneteau is going to do that voluntarily while expecting 'top' performance.  The boat is big, wide and the guests wouldn't even be able to safely  move around down in the cabin without falling 6'-8' from one side to the other. That owner would have long since reduced sail or eliminated it and resorted to turning the key and heading for the nearest marina/harbor.  Their goal is not rail down sailing to weather in a breeze, therefore the recessed windows are a non-issue.  But once in the anchorage or marina, those windows provide a nice, daylight interior, 'just like home'. It's why they buy 'em.   (and why I'd buy one--if that was my top priority.  Realistically, it's also closer  to the reason the Admiral would want one and likely nix a 'real' wooden boat...  Welcome to my reality.  Beneteau 'gets' it.....sigh)

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Gee Veegs that's amazing. I'm impressed. I have no idea what the owners of those models are going to do. I'll stay at it. Maybe some day.

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I just got depressed 2 posts up. 

I’m going to my wooden boat now to cheer up. My wife likes ours- the plastic ones- not at all...

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2 hours ago, Bob Perry said:

Gee Veegs that's amazing. I'm impressed. I have no idea what the owners of those models are going to do. I'll stay at it. Maybe some day.

It wasn't hard.  It's what I WOULD do as an owner of that boat....   I just adjusted it to include all of 'em (cuz I could).  No prob, Bob.  Stick with me, I'm just 10 minutes from the Bett's yard when you pop up periodically.  I'm here to help!  :rolleyes:

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3 hours ago, Veeger said:

But once in the anchorage or marina, those windows provide a nice, daylight interior, 'just like home'. It's why they buy 'em.

Yup,just what you need on your yacht.

indoor out door flow.

Preapologies for the pic.

Patio needs a few plants though.

77726198-347A-46CF-A4C3-519F903B949D.jpeg.16c538bd2119bdc7c55a8ae2d8fb45bb.jpeg

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Does that really swing down and telescope out? Why the..

That’s photoshopped right?!

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5 minutes ago, Sail4beer said:

Does that really swing down and telescope out? Why the..

That’s photoshopped right?!

Not exactly sure how the patio gets stowed.

Must be a yoghurt pot boat owners intelligence test which I have failed miserably.

 

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Yup.

There they are and they could care less about us. 

Why didn’t they design something nice like the modern Italian designs in the Med?

 

CAFABD49-BA87-456F-B92C-AC28608B0FC6.jpeg

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1 hour ago, Priscilla said:

Yup,just what you need on your yacht.

indoor out door flow.

Preapologies for the pic.

Patio needs a few plants though.

77726198-347A-46CF-A4C3-519F903B949D.jpeg.16c538bd2119bdc7c55a8ae2d8fb45bb.jpeg

I like the look of that.  :D

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45 minutes ago, Sail4beer said:

Does that really swing down and telescope out? Why the..

That’s photoshopped right?!

The top part becomes the helm seat.

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7 hours ago, The Q said:

Sorry I couldn't copy the pictures across, But if you scan down this link.

http://www.broadlandmemories.co.uk/1900to1949gallery3.html

 You'll see my clubs 1912 regatta and the following photo of a similar vintage. Sadly none of the competitors are still with us, but some of their children maybe and definately grandchildren. Most of the boats are still with us, sometimes still in the same families... Many of the big fleet are Yare and Bure one designs.

 I've crewed  at least one boat shown in the links

http://www.ybod.org.uk/

Still built today but mostly with a plastic hull

mixed-ods-horning-tif.jpg

 

Another world another time.

I can just hear the accents as I look at those photos.

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Someday I want one of Al Mason's Ostkust's.  24 feet of perfection, IMHO.

 

Like, when I retire to Puget Sound, Port Townsend.

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17 minutes ago, Trickypig said:

These chaps look perfectly comfortable.

Screen Shot 2018-12-20 at 7.07.24 am.png

Nice. A couple of old friends sharing a toke and a glass around the toilet.

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2 minutes ago, Ishmael said:

Nice. A couple of old friends sharing a toke and a glass around the toilet.

It's a stove Ish... a stove

 

 

Although I think the coquettish chap is sitting on a bunk lid over the toilet.

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39 minutes ago, Ishmael said:
57 minutes ago, Trickypig said:

Screen Shot 2018-12-20 at 7.07.24 am.png

Nice. A couple of old friends sharing a toke and a glass around the toilet.

 

Reinforces my view that trying to spend any time in comfort in the cabin of a small boat, one needs to have entirely different standards. The fellow on the left will have at least one fastener head gouging his scalp, and the other guy is trying to not burn his elbow on the stove..... probably already has, by the way he's holding it funny.

The toilet is the least of issues, anybody who can cope with a medieval level of technology can have a tight-fitting lid. To practice small boat cruising, put your lawnmower under your dining room table. Now crawl under there with it. Comfy? Or, as noted by Ish, do bong hits until you are.

FB- Doug

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1 hour ago, Trickypig said:

It's a stove Ish... a stove

 

 

Although I think the coquettish chap is sitting on a bunk lid over the toilet.

And they are sitting IN a wine glass. 

These two fellows crossed the Atlantic in Sopranino, back in the days when men were men and yachting caps could be worn without irony.

AVL%20066%20w.jpg

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11 minutes ago, Trickypig said:

Ties, caps, whisky decanters and pipes. 

Now that's gentlemen's yachting.

The banjo is a bit of a sour note. Like Deliverance on the Solent.

3796d9dd10c8dc28edfc652f4bf10a05546d965b.jpeg

 

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16 minutes ago, Mr. Ed said:

649FF1F0-8BC5-4C08-AE76-CCD1E2F9933B.jpeg

Is there an unexpected link between affectionate sailors and pipe-smoking?

 

 

I just lost 10 mins to Google working this one out and I think it's a gay meme from another time.

It says "We will find a way to Berlin".  Berlin has an old tradition for gay men.

His shirt says "Lysistrata", a character from an Ancient Greek comedy. She convinces the women on both sides of a conflict to withhold sex from their men until the sides reach a peace treaty. 

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5 minutes ago, Trickypig said:

 

I just lost 10 mins to Google working this one out and I think it's a gay meme from another time.

It says "We will find a way to Berlin".  Berlin has an old tradition for gay men.

His shirt says "Lysistrata", a character from an Ancient Greek comedy. She convinces the women on both sides of a conflict to withhold sex from their men until the sides reach a peace treaty. 

Nope - Lysistrata was a motor torpedo boat (converted from a yacht I think) in the first war, and the post card is from my collection, and it's suggesting the road to Berlin (ie defeat of Germany) lies in the collaboration between Britain and France. It's a coincidence (I think) that it has a rude name.

These are some of the ruder pictures from Aubrey Beardsley's famous edition of it. Despite lots of boobs, this might be the first hard-on on SA.

Aubrey-Beardsley-Lysistrata-Defending-th

 

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2 hours ago, Ishmael said:

Nice. A couple of old friends sharing a toke and a glass around the toilet.

 

Reminds me of this old cartoon

2058601103_Hellashoretonight.thumb.jpg.ba6c4f96e9133f314cb584bbfae2c182.jpg

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A question for the wood specialists. I need to replace a short section of rub rail. I was told that it is Philippine Iron Wood also know as Mangkono, Xanthostemon verdugonianus. What I was told the builder fell the trees for this and was unable to float them out of the forest, had to go back in and pull them out with a tractor. This makes sense as the boat was built in Subic Bay. Back on point, I have not been able to source this wood and wonder what might make a suitable replacement or better a source for the iron wood. I would need about 3 feet ot 8/4 X 4"

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3 hours ago, Rasputin22 said:

 

Reminds me of this old cartoon

2058601103_Hellashoretonight.thumb.jpg.ba6c4f96e9133f314cb584bbfae2c182.jpg

The Gaff Rigged Yachtman by Darrell McClure

I have his book around here somewhere.....

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