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    • UnderDawg

      A Few Simple Rules   05/22/2017

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frozenhawaiian

what are your cruising plans for 2017?

174 posts in this topic

whats everyone got planned?

I charter with my boat int he summers so I'm limited to the occasional 2, sometimes 3 day trip but I'd like to do a longer trip in the fall here on the maine coast, also considering taking the boat south for the winter.

 

how bout the rest of you?

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Still sorta vague.

 

Currently we're in Sydney. Long term, we're trying to decide whether to turn left or right from Oz. But shorter term, we're waiting to see how #1 son's internship plans for the summer turn out. Kids in his program at SSU usually do an internship between 2nd and 3rd year, and his location next May - September is TBD. The programs usually run 2-6 weeks, though could be longer, but we'll likely get him with us for a bit.

 

If he finds something in Oceania, we'll go meet up with him so he can stay with us while he does the internship; if it's Oz then we'll go North and cruise the East Coast and so on. If it's in NZ, we'll meet him there then freeze our arses off until he is done with it, then sail someplace warm for a bit; probably back to New Caledonia.

 

If his internship is in the UK or the US, we'll sail North from Sydney, then probably pop out to the tropics in May/June or so, then probably return to NZ, assuming we're doing the "turn right" option and are starting to work our back back to the US. We'll probably have Will catch up with us for a month of two when his internship is done.

 

If we "turn left" and decide to finish the circumnavigation, I imagine we'll be sailing north up the coast of Oz and around to Darwin. Who the hell knows on that one.

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I am currently downsizing trying to get to Florida. I have to be out of Florida by April or pay a chunk of tax. At Key Largo, I will decide to either go to the Bahamas or continue up the east coast, if my papers don't decide for me. I can do the Bahamas next winter if I continue up the east coast. I would like to get up to Chesapeake for the summer/ fall.

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We will do our usual 3 week trip to Lake Ontario and the 1000 Islands. The twist this year will be that, for the first time, ever, our girls will probably not be with us for the whole trip. our eldest is planning on moving out this summer and the younger one hopes to find a summer job that will let her take a vacation. Time will tell. Either way we will have a great time. Spending time on the boat with my better half is always a bonus

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I plan to work on the boat, new fuel tanks, radar, instruments, water heater. Contract new standing rigging. Who gets to sail?

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I am currently downsizing trying to get to Florida. I have to be out of Florida by April or pay a chunk of tax. At Key Largo, I will decide to either go to the Bahamas or continue up the east coast, if my papers don't decide for me. I can do the Bahamas next winter if I continue up the east coast. I would like to get up to Chesapeake for the summer/ fall.

 

Question: How do you prove that you left Florida waters long enough to avoid the tax? Do you provide a new address? A GPS track? A photo of your boat trapped in ice?

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My plans certainly don't compare with BJ's but my fantasy is two, week long trips- First trip in the southern bay, second trip around the northern bay.

 

First trip:

-Oxford

-Solomon's Island

-St. Mary's River

-St. George's Creek

-Smith Island

 

Second trip:

- St. Michael's

- Rock Hall

- Chestertown(?)

- Stillpond Creek or the Sassafras River

- Baltimore(?)

 

This is all with racing and weekend overnights throughout the season.

 

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I am currently downsizing trying to get to Florida. I have to be out of Florida by April or pay a chunk of tax. At Key Largo, I will decide to either go to the Bahamas or continue up the east coast, if my papers don't decide for me. I can do the Bahamas next winter if I continue up the east coast. I would like to get up to Chesapeake for the summer/ fall.

 

Question: How do you prove that you left Florida waters long enough to avoid the tax? Do you provide a new address? A GPS track? A photo of your boat trapped in ice?

I have to get a reciept and have the vendor include the hull #, vessel name, etc. It is the mailed to the Flordia dept. The vendor info must be out of state and include the date.

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5 years in a row I have done a 3 week trip out into Long Island sound to either Block Island or Newport....getting bored of this and may need to take a year off from this .....i may just do a few weekends during the Jr. sailing program I run and then travel with the honey to Italy for 2 weeks this August.....maybe try to find some anarchist to take us out sailing somewhere ;-)

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Left Georgetown, SC this morning headed south to the Miami Boat Show next month then shortly after that the boat gets shipped to the PNW. Lots of good summertime cruising in BC and Puget Sound...

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Wherever I go in New England it will be in September. Better weather, warm water, cool nights, wind, cheaper facilities, less crowds and no Budweiser (pick your swill) fueled 2:00am cacophony (think Block Island).

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Wherever I go in New England it will be in September. Better weather, warm water, cool nights, wind, cheaper facilities, less crowds and no Budweiser (pick your swill) fueled 2:00am cacophony (think Block Island).

sorry I'm a loud drunk ;-)

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I am currently downsizing trying to get to Florida. I have to be out of Florida by April or pay a chunk of tax. At Key Largo, I will decide to either go to the Bahamas or continue up the east coast, if my papers don't decide for me. I can do the Bahamas next winter if I continue up the east coast. I would like to get up to Chesapeake for the summer/ fall.

 

Question: How do you prove that you left Florida waters long enough to avoid the tax? Do you provide a new address? A GPS track? A photo of your boat trapped in ice?

 

 

Buy fuel for it somewhere else, send in copy of the receipt with FL's "Yup, I left" paperwork.

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5 years in a row I have done a 3 week trip out into Long Island sound to either Block Island or Newport....getting bored of this and may need to take a year off from this .....i may just do a few weekends during the Jr. sailing program I run and then travel with the honey to Italy for 2 weeks this August.....maybe try to find some anarchist to take us out sailing somewhere ;-)

 

It's not too much further to Cuttyhunk and the Vineyard!

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Bermuda. Back to where my wife was born.

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how bout the rest of you?

 

I'm hoping to repeat some of what I did last summer: cruise for two weeks around the San Juan Islands with the Cow Bay Regatta smack in the middle. It was really fun to be cruising as a couple and then have a bunch of our friends come meet us to race the boat for a few days, then go back to the quiet of casual cruising. It also made the delivery less of a chore when we had a week in each direction.

 

I highly recommend this for any other Seattle sailors. Cow Bay was a great event, it's rare to have wind and heat like that at the same time around here.

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I've got to be judicious on how I spend my precious vacation time, so other than day sails, overnighters and maybe a couple long weekends cruising in the San Juans, I get my one week long (9 days) cruise. In the past I've grabbed a couple buddies and leisurely cruised the San Juans and the Gulfs. Last year I did a solo trip through the gulfs, across the strait, and back. But this summer, probably June, I plan to go a little nuts. I'll round up a couple other masochists as crew, do round the clock sails up the strait of Georgia and back, and spend a few days bouncing around Desolation Sound in the middle. Wish me luck!

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Whitsunday's at Easter with the whole family, 10 including kids, hopefully it doesn't rain since there will be a few sleeping on deck.

Also looking at an overnight to the island on the contender, no wife no kids, peace

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My missus went and got a proper job so we have temporarily parked up in Tahiti to work in New Zealand for a bit. We plan on going back to the boat mid-year (ish) to bring her a bit further west; Tonga or Fiji perhaps then I'll go back early summer and bring her to NZ. Time for some TLC then.

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The refit should be done next month, then 2 months of shakedown around St Martin, then all going well off to Panama then Japan by July.

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2017 Cruising plans: Coastal, Penobscot Bay, under sail. Looking forward to not going too far and exploring another layer of the water and coast around here. It's good when you realize what it is you like about sailing.

 

 

32273003781_cd7d132256_h.jpg

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The refit should be done next month, then 2 months of shakedown around St Martin, then all going well off to Panama then Japan by July.

 

Ambitious! We pored over Cornell looking for ways to get to Japan that made sense from where we were. From NZ at the time it seemed like a lot of ducking, dodging and spinning to get through various areas prevailing winds and storm seasons that you had to time just so. It seems if you do get there, there's not a long season before weather risk sets in...and most of the trips out are unpleasant.

 

At least that was our take based on the common cruising routes. Tough to say without actually going there, but it doesn't seem like a place a lot of cruisers frequent.

 

What are your plans once there? I'd love to go sometime, but it's not likely for us.

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BJ I've heard that the inside of Japan is stunning to cruise. Protected waters, lots of little islands and temples. We started looking into it when we were aiming for the Melbourne Osaka race a while back. That would probably be the time to do it too, they usually get by storm free

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Bermuda in June, then to Maine. If time, fog, and crew availability permit we may go to the Bras D'Or. If we get there in time, perhaps Newfoundland.

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I'll be doing a lot of single-handed cruising this summer since my child bride is still working. We're thinking of getting out to Barkley Sound again for a couple or three weeks, but it's all very weather-dependent. Last time we planned that we ended up north of Desolation Sound instead because there was two weeks of solid 30+ gales coming down the Strait of Juan de Fuca.

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5 years in a row I have done a 3 week trip out into Long Island sound to either Block Island or Newport....getting bored of this and may need to take a year off from this .....i may just do a few weekends during the Jr. sailing program I run and then travel with the honey to Italy for 2 weeks this August.....maybe try to find some anarchist to take us out sailing somewhere ;-)

 

It's not too much further to Cuttyhunk and the Vineyard!

 

looks like Vineyard/Cuttyhunk may be the ticket....or possibly Nantucket (have friends who live there)

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Hoping for an early single handed trip

- Rock Hall

- Still Pond or Sassafras River

- Havre De Grace

- Middle River

Back to Baltimore

 

My wife and I are hoping to do 10 days in August

- Magothy River

- St Michaels

- Wye River

- Maybe Rock Hall

 

And yes..I know about August on the Chesapeake but I have the whole month off.

 

For those going to Baltimore, big changes at Anchorage Marina. New manager, they've redone a lot of docks and supposedly there will be people to help with lines this year. Full disclosure: I own a slip there.

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5 years in a row I have done a 3 week trip out into Long Island sound to either Block Island or Newport....getting bored of this and may need to take a year off from this .....i may just do a few weekends during the Jr. sailing program I run and then travel with the honey to Italy for 2 weeks this August.....maybe try to find some anarchist to take us out sailing somewhere ;-)

 

It's not too much further to Cuttyhunk and the Vineyard!

 

looks like Vineyard/Cuttyhunk may be the ticket....or possibly Nantucket (have friends who live there)

 

 

All those are nice places. If your draft isn't too bad, Menemsha is nice on the Vineyard, and the closest stop off. In a southerly you can anchor in the bight and take the dink into the cove for Oyster Happy Hour...

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BJ I've heard that the inside of Japan is stunning to cruise. Protected waters, lots of little islands and temples. We started looking into it when we were aiming for the Melbourne Osaka race a while back. That would probably be the time to do it too, they usually get by storm free

Everybody I have talked to who has cruised there raves about it. Definitely on our radar.

 

BJ don't be blinded by Cornell.. at the risk of starting a war: he only repackages old news.. The Admiralty's Sailing routes of the world is a good base (older than Cornell granted but climate change isn't that fast) and all you need in book form. Get online for real up to date wind roses etc.. Understand what is going on and do your own homework... You'll only meet sheeple if you follow Cornell :)

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The refit should be done next month, then 2 months of shakedown around St Martin, then all going well off to Panama then Japan by July.

Ambitious! We pored over Cornell looking for ways to get to Japan that made sense from where we were. From NZ at the time it seemed like a lot of ducking, dodging and spinning to get through various areas prevailing winds and storm seasons that you had to time just so. It seems if you do get there, there's not a long season before weather risk sets in...and most of the trips out are unpleasant.

 

At least that was our take based on the common cruising routes. Tough to say without actually going there, but it doesn't seem like a place a lot of cruisers frequent.

 

What are your plans once there? I'd love to go sometime, but it's not likely for us.

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2017 Cruising plans: Coastal, Penobscot Bay, under sail. Looking forward to not going too far and exploring another layer of the water and coast around here. It's good when you realize what it is you like about sailing.

 

 

 

 

 

Kris, I'm 67 and have been cruising the coast of Maine since I was 11, and have not and will not ever tire of it- I'm still going to places I haven't been. Your pictures often capture a soft summer day in Maine perfectly and there is nothing finer. This year I'm hoping to get my little boat to Newfoundland, if my co-owner's health permits and maybe if not. I'm lucky that I can cover the 800 miles to Baddeck pretty quickly- 20 knot average and note the max- nothing like a Tundra for passage making.

 

post-24720-0-24716800-1485360532_thumb.png

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OK, before reality checks in and starts taking days from us, here goes with the plan:

Use the spring long weekend holidays to deliver the boat from the East Coast of England to Cork. The first week of June ambling along the south cost of Ireland, with aged mum and in-laws, get them on a plane back to blighty and have the next three weeks wandering as far north on the West of Ireland without a destination in mind, but hoping to visit the Boffins and Arrans and such stuff, then getting the boat to Dartmouth to join in a regatta which goes off to Guernsey and then to Lesardrieux and Paimpol, to be locked in on the Quatorze Juillet. We did this two years ago, and it was as cool as anything, through the entrance with pipe bands and people lined up and cheering.

 

Few plans survive contact with the enemy, however, so let's see how much of it get's done.

 

Here's a vid of 2015's locking in

 

https://youtu.be/UjXsauY__uk

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Plenty of day trips in Narragansett Bay and Cuttyhunk. Our two week cruise will start in Stamford, CT. Plan is to deliver the boat there the weekend before so we cruise East. Stops so far are Northport, Port Jefferson, Mattituck, Greenport, Montauk and Block Island.

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The refit should be done next month, then 2 months of shakedown around St Martin, then all going well off to Panama then Japan by July.

Ambitious! We pored over Cornell looking for ways to get to Japan that made sense from where we were. From NZ at the time it seemed like a lot of ducking, dodging and spinning to get through various areas prevailing winds and storm seasons that you had to time just so. It seems if you do get there, there's not a long season before weather risk sets in...and most of the trips out are unpleasant.

 

At least that was our take based on the common cruising routes. Tough to say without actually going there, but it doesn't seem like a place a lot of cruisers frequent.

 

What are your plans once there? I'd love to go sometime, but it's not likely for us.

 

 

Cruising around the inland sea and Okinawa for a while at least. I live in northern Japan and looking forward to discover what it has to offer for cruisers - a lot I expect. Got to get the boat here first :-)

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The refit should be done next month, then 2 months of shakedown around St Martin, then all going well off to Panama then Japan by July.

Ambitious! We pored over Cornell looking for ways to get to Japan that made sense from where we were. From NZ at the time it seemed like a lot of ducking, dodging and spinning to get through various areas prevailing winds and storm seasons that you had to time just so. It seems if you do get there, there's not a long season before weather risk sets in...and most of the trips out are unpleasant.

 

At least that was our take based on the common cruising routes. Tough to say without actually going there, but it doesn't seem like a place a lot of cruisers frequent.

 

What are your plans once there? I'd love to go sometime, but it's not likely for us.

Cruising around the inland sea and Okinawa for a while at least. I live in northern Japan and looking forward to discover what it has to offer for cruisers - a lot I expect. Got to get the boat here first :-)

Fascinating. Is there much in the way of cruising guides, facilities for yotts and so on?

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The refit should be done next month, then 2 months of shakedown around St Martin, then all going well off to Panama then Japan by July.

Ambitious! We pored over Cornell looking for ways to get to Japan that made sense from where we were. From NZ at the time it seemed like a lot of ducking, dodging and spinning to get through various areas prevailing winds and storm seasons that you had to time just so. It seems if you do get there, there's not a long season before weather risk sets in...and most of the trips out are unpleasant.

 

At least that was our take based on the common cruising routes. Tough to say without actually going there, but it doesn't seem like a place a lot of cruisers frequent.

 

What are your plans once there? I'd love to go sometime, but it's not likely for us.

Cruising around the inland sea and Okinawa for a while at least. I live in northern Japan and looking forward to discover what it has to offer for cruisers - a lot I expect. Got to get the boat here first :-)

Fascinating. Is there much in the way of cruising guides, facilities for yotts and so on?

 

 

Haven't found a cruising guide - the rest is what I am going to find out :-)

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Survive. I'm in the Keys and these muthafukkahs are absolutely batshit crazy. I'll take the bugs in the Glades any day

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I think things just opened up for me, but in a sad way.

 

My old dog was my primary impediment to sailing. He really hated the boat and the water and I rarely had anyone willing to watch him so that I could go sailing.

His heart finally gave out on Sunday, so Monday morning I put him to sleep. It absolutely gutted me.

 

I'm trying to look at the upside, which is more social availability and an ability to sail, limited only by my vacation balance. I still feel a little guilty though.

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The refit should be done next month, then 2 months of shakedown around St Martin, then all going well off to Panama then Japan by July.

 

Ambitious! We pored over Cornell looking for ways to get to Japan that made sense from where we were. From NZ at the time it seemed like a lot of ducking, dodging and spinning to get through various areas prevailing winds and storm seasons that you had to time just so. It seems if you do get there, there's not a long season before weather risk sets in...and most of the trips out are unpleasant.

 

At least that was our take based on the common cruising routes. Tough to say without actually going there, but it doesn't seem like a place a lot of cruisers frequent.

 

What are your plans once there? I'd love to go sometime, but it's not likely for us.

 

 

Friends skipped Japan but did Brisbane to Sitka nonstop. 2 folks on an Alden 55 with tons of frozen and fresh storage. Timed their departure to avoid both southern and northern hemisphere cyclone seasons. IIRC, it did pretty much coincide with Mel-OS timing. No reason you couldn't turn left along that route.

 

So you can do it but can't visit places on the way.

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I think things just opened up for me, but in a sad way.

 

My old dog was my primary impediment to sailing. He really hated the boat and the water and I rarely had anyone willing to watch him so that I could go sailing.

His heart finally gave out on Sunday, so Monday morning I put him to sleep. It absolutely gutted me.

 

I'm trying to look at the upside, which is more social availability and an ability to sail, limited only by my vacation balance. I still feel a little guilty though.

Sorry to hear about your dog, Ajax. The hurt is still pretty fresh, just give it some time and the guilt will diminish

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Sorry, Ajax. Bear in mind that you were good enough to your pup that you gave your time to care for him. Don't feel bad.

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I think things just opened up for me, but in a sad way.

 

My old dog was my primary impediment to sailing. He really hated the boat and the water and I rarely had anyone willing to watch him so that I could go sailing.

His heart finally gave out on Sunday, so Monday morning I put him to sleep. It absolutely gutted me.

 

I'm trying to look at the upside, which is more social availability and an ability to sail, limited only by my vacation balance. I still feel a little guilty though.

 

Sorry to hear that. Always a heart breaking thing.

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The refit should be done next month, then 2 months of shakedown around St Martin, then all going well off to Panama then Japan by July.

Ambitious! We pored over Cornell looking for ways to get to Japan that made sense from where we were. From NZ at the time it seemed like a lot of ducking, dodging and spinning to get through various areas prevailing winds and storm seasons that you had to time just so. It seems if you do get there, there's not a long season before weather risk sets in...and most of the trips out are unpleasant.

 

At least that was our take based on the common cruising routes. Tough to say without actually going there, but it doesn't seem like a place a lot of cruisers frequent.

 

What are your plans once there? I'd love to go sometime, but it's not likely for us.

 

 

Cruising around the inland sea and Okinawa for a while at least. I live in northern Japan and looking forward to discover what it has to offer for cruisers - a lot I expect. Got to get the boat here first :-)

 

 

Well that certainly is one reason to sail there!

 

You need to write up what you find. There isn't much info at all about cruising Japan, which makes it daunting.

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California Delta.

 

Which is getting a nice flush this year.

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California Delta.

 

Which is getting a nice flush this year.

I'm hoping to go that way as well. Problem is making enough time to really relax and enjoy it.

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Our no plan-plan is to head out of PT in the spring when all the work is done April ish is my guess, we keep meeting awesome people helping things along so we are going with the flow. We will make our way north and lap Vancouver island if that's what makes sense with a ballpark return to the San Juans in late July. Do a Schooner regatta then start heading down the coast and more than likely do the HaHa. Most likely head up into the sea of Cortez then who knows. Trying to sort out old charts we have accumulated, most people don't want to take the time to update but it seems like we can find a home for them have about a 8" high single fold pile on the salon table sorted to BC Wa Ca Ak Mx Med and South Pac. The memories come back when you pull one out with old plots and the excitement is always there looking at any of them....

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The refit should be done next month, then 2 months of shakedown around St Martin, then all going well off to Panama then Japan by July.

Ambitious! We pored over Cornell looking for ways to get to Japan that made sense from where we were. From NZ at the time it seemed like a lot of ducking, dodging and spinning to get through various areas prevailing winds and storm seasons that you had to time just so. It seems if you do get there, there's not a long season before weather risk sets in...and most of the trips out are unpleasant.

 

At least that was our take based on the common cruising routes. Tough to say without actually going there, but it doesn't seem like a place a lot of cruisers frequent.

 

What are your plans once there? I'd love to go sometime, but it's not likely for us.

 

 

Cruising around the inland sea and Okinawa for a while at least. I live in northern Japan and looking forward to discover what it has to offer for cruisers - a lot I expect. Got to get the boat here first :-)

 

 

Well that certainly is one reason to sail there!

 

You need to write up what you find. There isn't much info at all about cruising Japan, which makes it daunting.

 

 

For sure. I never see articles or photos about sailing in Japan. Show us what you've got!

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Our no plan-plan is to head out of PT in the spring when all the work is done April ish is my guess, we keep meeting awesome people helping things along so we are going with the flow. We will make our way north and lap Vancouver island if that's what makes sense with a ballpark return to the San Juans in late July. Do a Schooner regatta then start heading down the coast and more than likely do the HaHa. Most likely head up into the sea of Cortez then who knows. Trying to sort out old charts we have accumulated, most people don't want to take the time to update but it seems like we can find a home for them have about a 8" high single fold pile on the salon table sorted to BC Wa Ca Ak Mx Med and South Pac. The memories come back when you pull one out with old plots and the excitement is always there looking at any of them....

See you in the Ha Ha!

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California Delta.

 

Which is getting a nice flush this year.

I'm hoping to go that way as well. Problem is making enough time to really relax and enjoy it.

 

 

I think I'll stage the boat in Owl Harbor - so I can do some long weekends in addition to Stockton SailCamp

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I dunno. Might do what I did last summer. 5 to 6 days a row where it wasn't busy during the week at our outstations. A 7 day stint. Then a 9 day stint just after Labour Day. The cruising is so good here so you don't need to go for an epic voyage on your holidays. Maybe this year if the S.O. gets away from the shop and hang around Jervis Inlet and Nelson Is. race. Perhaps wonder up to Pendrell Sound where the water temp. is up in the high 70's. Not bad prawning too with spot prawns the size of a small African country.

 

You really don't have to go far to escape city life. No roads there and no electricity unless you make it yourself. First spot is about an hour and a half motor from the club. Second 3 to 3 1/2 hours depending of current and weather. Friggin' paradise really.

 

post-1185-0-23040600-1485558519_thumb.jpg

 

post-1185-0-58880000-1485558532_thumb.jpg

 

post-1185-0-51092100-1485558547_thumb.jpg

 

And oh ya. The crabbing ain't bad either.

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I dunno. Might do what I did last summer. 5 to 6 days a row where it wasn't busy during the week at our outstations. A 7 day stint. Then a 9 day stint just after Labour Day. The cruising is so good here so you don't need to go for an epic voyage on your holidays. Maybe this year if the S.O. gets away from the shop and hang around Jervis Inlet and Nelson Is. race. Perhaps wonder up to Pendrell Sound where the water temp. is up in the high 70's. Not bad prawning too with spot prawns the size of a small African country.

 

You really don't have to go far to escape city life. No roads there and no electricity unless you make it yourself. First spot is about an hour and a half motor from the club. Second 3 to 3 1/2 hours depending of current and weather. Friggin' paradise really.

 

001 (800x536).jpg

 

File0571 (800x536).jpg

 

File0273 (800x536).jpg

 

And oh ya. The crabbing ain't bad either.

Nice pots. Who makes them? Do you buoy and leave them them or drop them off the side of the boat?

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W have finally left the BVIs and are now in St. Martin. Just bought some pain au chocolate from someone passing around the anchorage selling them from their dinghy. Yummm. Hope to make it as far S as Grenada in March or so. Need to be home (MA) by end of June. I can already tel it will be tough to go back to the real world.

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I am selling this for £7K in Scotland

 

davids-snap.jpg

 

 

and will be spending the money knocking this back into shape

 

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I dunno. Might do what I did last summer. 5 to 6 days a row where it wasn't busy during the week at our outstations. A 7 day stint. Then a 9 day stint just after Labour Day. The cruising is so good here so you don't need to go for an epic voyage on your holidays. Maybe this year if the S.O. gets away from the shop and hang around Jervis Inlet and Nelson Is. race. Perhaps wonder up to Pendrell Sound where the water temp. is up in the high 70's. Not bad prawning too with spot prawns the size of a small African country.

 

You really don't have to go far to escape city life. No roads there and no electricity unless you make it yourself. First spot is about an hour and a half motor from the club. Second 3 to 3 1/2 hours depending of current and weather. Friggin' paradise really.

 

001 (800x536).jpg

 

File0571 (800x536).jpg

 

File0273 (800x536).jpg

 

And oh ya. The crabbing ain't bad either.

Nice pots. Who makes them? Do you buoy and leave them them or drop them off the side of the boat?

 

We buoy them out as where the crabs are as it's 100' or more. It's my morning row out there and once again before happy hour. I didn't think that Dungies would be that deep but a powerboat buddy scoped the place out over a couple of years (catching "anything" is an obsession with him) and he found them when we were just getting rock crab (too small and hard). Scoped out a prawn hole too.

 

The trap is the Jolly Good Crab/Prawn Trap: http://www.jollygoodtrap.com/ It's a localish guy meaning Duncan, BC and he doesn't retail but I had Big Dave at Martin Marine bring them in for the local guys. It works for prawns too and for whatever reason, after using it for a season, there is no question I'm getting better catches with it. It folds down flat very easily and put it in a locker or dinghy. I real like stuff that actually works and that would be it.

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W have finally left the BVIs and are now in St. Martin. Just bought some pain au chocolate from someone passing around the anchorage selling them from their dinghy. Yummm. Hope to make it as far S as Grenada in March or so. Need to be home (MA) by end of June. I can already tel it will be tough to go back to the real world.

 

Damn you... Damn you.

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W have finally left the BVIs and are now in St. Martin. Just bought some pain au chocolate from someone passing around the anchorage selling them from their dinghy. Yummm. Hope to make it as far S as Grenada in March or so. Need to be home (MA) by end of June. I can already tel it will be tough to go back to the real world.

 

Have you found Sarafina yet over in Marigot? Still one of the best all around french bakeries we've found in the French territories from St. Martin to New Caledonia. Though we found one in New Cal that gives it a run, but it's definitely better on average than anything else we found in the Caribbean or French Polynesia.

 

Grenada is far off from there. If you only have 4-5 months you will have to blow through the intervening islands. There's a lot to see. We did SXM to Grenada on a similar pace, in hindsight I wish we'd taken more time in a few places.

 

Are you sailing back to MA? Or is this a charter boat or something you are leaving down there?

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Plenty of day trips in Narragansett Bay and Cuttyhunk. Our two week cruise will start in Stamford, CT. Plan is to deliver the boat there the weekend before so we cruise East. Stops so far are Northport, Port Jefferson, Mattituck, Greenport, Montauk and Block Island.

Will - let me know if you need help positioning Mystere to Stamford for the cruise. If my schedule supports the dates... assuming I'm not racing Vento Solare that weekend, I can help you.

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W have finally left the BVIs and are now in St. Martin. Just bought some pain au chocolate from someone passing around the anchorage selling them from their dinghy. Yummm. Hope to make it as far S as Grenada in March or so. Need to be home (MA) by end of June. I can already tel it will be tough to go back to the real world.

 

Have you found Sarafina yet over in Marigot? Still one of the best all around french bakeries we've found in the French territories from St. Martin to New Caledonia. Though we found one in New Cal that gives it a run, but it's definitely better on average than anything else we found in the Caribbean or French Polynesia.

 

Grenada is far off from there. If you only have 4-5 months you will have to blow through the intervening islands. There's a lot to see. We did SXM to Grenada on a similar pace, in hindsight I wish we'd taken more time in a few places.

 

Are you sailing back to MA? Or is this a charter boat or something you are leaving down there?

Will check out Sarafina.

 

We are on our own boat and will be sailing back. I know we will likely miss a lot given our timetable, but we gots how much time we gots. Several people we have talked to have mentioned Dominca and Grenada as favorites and from reading about them they appeal to us. Seem more about being able to meet local people and do things ashore than seem other islands.

 

BJ what were your favorites in this little corner of the sea?

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Barkley sound or North of desolation...

Last year it was supposed to be telegraph cove, Alert bay area. But we ended up doing vet runs with a sick dog. back and forth to vancouver.

 

oceaneer

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We're leaving Sydney in May and heading north. Wifey needs to be back on a boat before she goes postal.

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Barkley sound or North of desolation...

Last year it was supposed to be telegraph cove, Alert bay area. But we ended up doing vet runs with a sick dog. back and forth to vancouver.

 

oceaneer

 

My sympathies. I just went through all that.

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W have finally left the BVIs and are now in St. Martin. Just bought some pain au chocolate from someone passing around the anchorage selling them from their dinghy. Yummm. Hope to make it as far S as Grenada in March or so. Need to be home (MA) by end of June. I can already tel it will be tough to go back to the real world.

Have you found Sarafina yet over in Marigot? Still one of the best all around french bakeries we've found in the French territories from St. Martin to New Caledonia. Though we found one in New Cal that gives it a run, but it's definitely better on average than anything else we found in the Caribbean or French Polynesia.

 

Grenada is far off from there. If you only have 4-5 months you will have to blow through the intervening islands. There's a lot to see. We did SXM to Grenada on a similar pace, in hindsight I wish we'd taken more time in a few places.

 

Are you sailing back to MA? Or is this a charter boat or something you are leaving down there?

Will check out Sarafina.

 

We are on our own boat and will be sailing back. I know we will likely miss a lot given our timetable, but we gots how much time we gots. Several people we have talked to have mentioned Dominca and Grenada as favorites and from reading about them they appeal to us. Seem more about being able to meet local people and do things ashore than seem other islands.

 

BJ what were your favorites in this little corner of the sea?

 

 

Tough call, with short time.

 

Dominica is a cool place, and if I was choosing between either/or Dominica and Grenada for say, a week or two I'd pick Dominica. It's one of the most poor islands in the Caribbean. It runs on a "boat boy" culture in the anchorages, but in Portsmouth it's well run, organized, the guys are vetted and trained and they provide security in the anchorage. In Dominica you can easily arrange a lot of tours through your boat boy. That is pretty much the way to see things, and there is a lot of cool stuff to see.

 

Grenada takes you much farther South. It's more populous, with things like a bus service that is more reliable, and not nearly as poor or rural as Dominica. Cruisers gravitate there to get out of hurricane season, and I found the cruising community and the support for it to be a much bigger draw than the island itself. Not that the island isn't cool and appealing; it is and there is plenty to do there. It's better setup as a place to stay for a while, with better provisioning options, etc. You're on your own for things like arranging tours and the like, though cars can be rented and taxis hired for that stuff. It's a nice place with much to recommend it, but it wasn't among our favorites. We headed there for hurricane season, like lots of cruisers. Some go to Trinidad; we did eventually and we wished we'd move there much earlier since we liked it much more than Grenada

 

One favorite place is hard to pin down. I must say we had a stronger preference for the French islands over the ex-English islands. France still supports their territories and possessions, and it is evident in the standard of living of the people on the islands. They feel more relaxed, and there is far less pressure to relieve you of your tourist dollars then there is in a place like St. Lucia, where you will generally be afforded multiple opportunities per day to buy various things wherever you go. And the food tends to be MUCH better, though prices will be higher. YMMV - we speak some French and loved Deshaies on Guadeloupe; we spent a week or so there and were reluctant to leave. We have some friends that went there with no French, little understanding of the culture, and perhaps slightly skewed expectations, who absolutely hated it and left after a day. For better or worse, the French islands have a lot of European presence on them because they are part of France. The natural beauty is still there, though one of the shopping malls in Fort de France in Martinique could have come straight from Paris, and Martinique has a thoroughly modern bus system.

 

The ex-English islands are independent, and enjoy a considerably lower standard of living as a result. They have their own distinctive culture and are very friendly and welcoming. To a point; there are a lot of people on islands like St. Lucia that are always "on the make", they've got something they're selling, or want you to do that will cost you money, etc. It is occasionally uncomfortable, like the rather creepy looking guy in Rodney Bay, St. Lucia that was always hanging around one of the dinghy docks asking for money to "watch your dinghy." Since we chained ours up, my only real concern was that he'd take a piss in it if I didn't pay him. But other people on those islands are fine, there just seems to be a few more operators. If you are an obvious tourist, they will glom on to you. Food on the English islands is so-so, unless you spend a lot to go to a place that is catered towards tourists specifically. For example some of the restaurants around the marinas or cruise ship docks will provide a more typical dining experience. You can get a cheap local dinner and it will be decent, but nothing to get too excited about in most cases unless you love "provision" (boiled local root vegetable things). We didn't find many local dining experiences that were so amazing they needed to be repeated with any frequency on the ex-English islands. Antique actually had some of the better Caribbean restaurants we came across in the English Harbour/Falmouth area.

 

These islands also have public transportation, but it tends to be a little more...ad hoc. What we referred to as the "mad Rasta buses" are very common - generally a van on a set route that tears along the windy roads at high speed while blasting reggae, soca, or on rare occasions, rap. They can get quite...cozy...especially at the end of the school day. In Grenada I once counted 23 people on a van that a rational person would swear could seat a dozen.

 

If you get to St. Vincent & the Grenadines, I'd suggest you bypass St. Vincent and clear in at Bequia. Delightful place, worth a couple of days. From there go to the Tobago Keys and the couple of islands around there...not much on those islands, but they are good places to stage into the keys from. You'll pay by the day for a permit to be in the Tobago Keys, but it is one of the most spectacular spots in the Caribbean. If you're headed South from there, I'd maybe time it so you arrive at Union Island in the AM to clear out, then move on to Grenada, clearing in at Carriacou on the same day. Union Island is...OK...but there's not a lot there IMHO and they've had some issues.

 

One thing you might want to do is check the Carnivale schedules for the various islands. Many of them have them, and it can be a fun time to be there. We caught it in Marigot, and in Grenada.

 

I've got tons and tons of entries on the Caribbean in the blog; follow the link in my sig line.

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W have finally left the BVIs and are now in St. Martin. Just bought some pain au chocolate from someone passing around the anchorage selling them from their dinghy. Yummm. Hope to make it as far S as Grenada in March or so. Need to be home (MA) by end of June. I can already tel it will be tough to go back to the real world.

Have you found Sarafina yet over in Marigot? Still one of the best all around french bakeries we've found in the French territories from St. Martin to New Caledonia. Though we found one in New Cal that gives it a run, but it's definitely better on average than anything else we found in the Caribbean or French Polynesia.

 

Grenada is far off from there. If you only have 4-5 months you will have to blow through the intervening islands. There's a lot to see. We did SXM to Grenada on a similar pace, in hindsight I wish we'd taken more time in a few places.

 

Are you sailing back to MA? Or is this a charter boat or something you are leaving down there?

Will check out Sarafina.

 

We are on our own boat and will be sailing back. I know we will likely miss a lot given our timetable, but we gots how much time we gots. Several people we have talked to have mentioned Dominca and Grenada as favorites and from reading about them they appeal to us. Seem more about being able to meet local people and do things ashore than seem other islands.

 

BJ what were your favorites in this little corner of the sea?

Tough call, with short time.

 

Dominica is a cool place, and if I was choosing between either/or Dominica and Grenada for say, a week or two I'd pick Dominica. It's one of the most poor islands in the Caribbean. It runs on a "boat boy" culture in the anchorages, but in Portsmouth it's well run, organized, the guys are vetted and trained and they provide security in the anchorage. In Dominica you can easily arrange a lot of tours through your boat boy. That is pretty much the way to see things, and there is a lot of cool stuff to see.

 

Grenada takes you much farther South. It's more populous, with things like a bus service that is more reliable, and not nearly as poor or rural as Dominica. Cruisers gravitate there to get out of hurricane season, and I found the cruising community and the support for it to be a much bigger draw than the island itself. Not that the island isn't cool and appealing; it is and there is plenty to do there. It's better setup as a place to stay for a while, with better provisioning options, etc. You're on your own for things like arranging tours and the like, though cars can be rented and taxis hired for that stuff. It's a nice place with much to recommend it, but it wasn't among our favorites. We headed there for hurricane season, like lots of cruisers. Some go to Trinidad; we did eventually and we wished we'd move there much earlier since we liked it much more than Grenada

 

One favorite place is hard to pin down. I must say we had a stronger preference for the French islands over the ex-English islands. France still supports their territories and possessions, and it is evident in the standard of living of the people on the islands. They feel more relaxed, and there is far less pressure to relieve you of your tourist dollars then there is in a place like St. Lucia, where you will generally be afforded multiple opportunities per day to buy various things wherever you go. And the food tends to be MUCH better, though prices will be higher. YMMV - we speak some French and loved Deshaies on Guadeloupe; we spent a week or so there and were reluctant to leave. We have some friends that went there with no French, little understanding of the culture, and perhaps slightly skewed expectations, who absolutely hated it and left after a day. For better or worse, the French islands have a lot of European presence on them because they are part of France. The natural beauty is still there, though one of the shopping malls in Fort de France in Martinique could have come straight from Paris, and Martinique has a thoroughly modern bus system.

 

The ex-English islands are independent, and enjoy a considerably lower standard of living as a result. They have their own distinctive culture and are very friendly and welcoming. To a point; there are a lot of people on islands like St. Lucia that are always "on the make", they've got something they're selling, or want you to do that will cost you money, etc. It is occasionally uncomfortable, like the rather creepy looking guy in Rodney Bay, St. Lucia that was always hanging around one of the dinghy docks asking for money to "watch your dinghy." Since we chained ours up, my only real concern was that he'd take a piss in it if I didn't pay him. But other people on those islands are fine, there just seems to be a few more operators. If you are an obvious tourist, they will glom on to you. Food on the English islands is so-so, unless you spend a lot to go to a place that is catered towards tourists specifically. For example some of the restaurants around the marinas or cruise ship docks will provide a more typical dining experience. You can get a cheap local dinner and it will be decent, but nothing to get too excited about in most cases unless you love "provision" (boiled local root vegetable things). We didn't find many local dining experiences that were so amazing they needed to be repeated with any frequency on the ex-English islands. Antique actually had some of the better Caribbean restaurants we came across in the English Harbour/Falmouth area.

 

These islands also have public transportation, but it tends to be a little more...ad hoc. What we referred to as the "mad Rasta buses" are very common - generally a van on a set route that tears along the windy roads at high speed while blasting reggae, soca, or on rare occasions, rap. They can get quite...cozy...especially at the end of the school day. In Grenada I once counted 23 people on a van that a rational person would swear could seat a dozen.

 

If you get to St. Vincent & the Grenadines, I'd suggest you bypass St. Vincent and clear in at Bequia. Delightful place, worth a couple of days. From there go to the Tobago Keys and the couple of islands around there...not much on those islands, but they are good places to stage into the keys from. You'll pay by the day for a permit to be in the Tobago Keys, but it is one of the most spectacular spots in the Caribbean. If you're headed South from there, I'd maybe time it so you arrive at Union Island in the AM to clear out, then move on to Grenada, clearing in at Carriacou on the same day. Union Island is...OK...but there's not a lot there IMHO and they've had some issues.

 

One thing you might want to do is check the Carnivale schedules for the various islands. Many of them have them, and it can be a fun time to be there. We caught it in Marigot, and in Grenada.

 

I've got tons and tons of entries on the Caribbean in the blog; follow the link in my sig line.

Nice post. Thanks for taking the time.

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Sadly none, but don't feel sorry for me. Just back from 6 weeks kitesurfing in Cape Town. Can't beat that.

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We are shooting for two weeks in the North Channel in August, launching in Rogers City and Alpena then crossing over to Meldrum Bay to meet up with my folks and some friends.

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I have bought a large sheet of steel and am looking at how to weld vids on Youtube. I am gunna fold that sucker up into the rough shape of a boat and head to Cuba. Then I am going to stick it up on a reef and drink rum in the sun and post on here. You pussies can just sit in your cubicles and wish you were me.

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Don't forget to pack the Pad Thai recipie, the Oscilloscope and the Cello.

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Cruise locally and 1000 Islands area with Dylan's attitude.

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W have finally left the BVIs and are now in St. Martin. Just bought some pain au chocolate from someone passing around the anchorage selling them from their dinghy. Yummm. Hope to make it as far S as Grenada in March or so. Need to be home (MA) by end of June. I can already tel it will be tough to go back to the real world.

Have you found Sarafina yet over in Marigot? Still one of the best all around french bakeries we've found in the French territories from St. Martin to New Caledonia. Though we found one in New Cal that gives it a run, but it's definitely better on average than anything else we found in the Caribbean or French Polynesia.

 

Grenada is far off from there. If you only have 4-5 months you will have to blow through the intervening islands. There's a lot to see. We did SXM to Grenada on a similar pace, in hindsight I wish we'd taken more time in a few places.

 

Are you sailing back to MA? Or is this a charter boat or something you are leaving down there?

Will check out Sarafina.

 

We are on our own boat and will be sailing back. I know we will likely miss a lot given our timetable, but we gots how much time we gots. Several people we have talked to have mentioned Dominca and Grenada as favorites and from reading about them they appeal to us. Seem more about being able to meet local people and do things ashore than seem other islands.

 

BJ what were your favorites in this little corner of the sea?

 

 

Tough call, with short time.

 

Dominica is a cool place, and if I was choosing between either/or Dominica and Grenada for say, a week or two I'd pick Dominica. It's one of the most poor islands in the Caribbean. It runs on a "boat boy" culture in the anchorages, but in Portsmouth it's well run, organized, the guys are vetted and trained and they provide security in the anchorage. In Dominica you can easily arrange a lot of tours through your boat boy. That is pretty much the way to see things, and there is a lot of cool stuff to see.

 

Grenada takes you much farther South. It's more populous, with things like a bus service that is more reliable, and not nearly as poor or rural as Dominica. Cruisers gravitate there to get out of hurricane season, and I found the cruising community and the support for it to be a much bigger draw than the island itself. Not that the island isn't cool and appealing; it is and there is plenty to do there. It's better setup as a place to stay for a while, with better provisioning options, etc. You're on your own for things like arranging tours and the like, though cars can be rented and taxis hired for that stuff. It's a nice place with much to recommend it, but it wasn't among our favorites. We headed there for hurricane season, like lots of cruisers. Some go to Trinidad; we did eventually and we wished we'd move there much earlier since we liked it much more than Grenada

 

One favorite place is hard to pin down. I must say we had a stronger preference for the French islands over the ex-English islands. France still supports their territories and possessions, and it is evident in the standard of living of the people on the islands. They feel more relaxed, and there is far less pressure to relieve you of your tourist dollars then there is in a place like St. Lucia, where you will generally be afforded multiple opportunities per day to buy various things wherever you go. And the food tends to be MUCH better, though prices will be higher. YMMV - we speak some French and loved Deshaies on Guadeloupe; we spent a week or so there and were reluctant to leave. We have some friends that went there with no French, little understanding of the culture, and perhaps slightly skewed expectations, who absolutely hated it and left after a day. For better or worse, the French islands have a lot of European presence on them because they are part of France. The natural beauty is still there, though one of the shopping malls in Fort de France in Martinique could have come straight from Paris, and Martinique has a thoroughly modern bus system.

 

The ex-English islands are independent, and enjoy a considerably lower standard of living as a result. They have their own distinctive culture and are very friendly and welcoming. To a point; there are a lot of people on islands like St. Lucia that are always "on the make", they've got something they're selling, or want you to do that will cost you money, etc. It is occasionally uncomfortable, like the rather creepy looking guy in Rodney Bay, St. Lucia that was always hanging around one of the dinghy docks asking for money to "watch your dinghy." Since we chained ours up, my only real concern was that he'd take a piss in it if I didn't pay him. But other people on those islands are fine, there just seems to be a few more operators. If you are an obvious tourist, they will glom on to you. Food on the English islands is so-so, unless you spend a lot to go to a place that is catered towards tourists specifically. For example some of the restaurants around the marinas or cruise ship docks will provide a more typical dining experience. You can get a cheap local dinner and it will be decent, but nothing to get too excited about in most cases unless you love "provision" (boiled local root vegetable things). We didn't find many local dining experiences that were so amazing they needed to be repeated with any frequency on the ex-English islands. Antique actually had some of the better Caribbean restaurants we came across in the English Harbour/Falmouth area.

 

These islands also have public transportation, but it tends to be a little more...ad hoc. What we referred to as the "mad Rasta buses" are very common - generally a van on a set route that tears along the windy roads at high speed while blasting reggae, soca, or on rare occasions, rap. They can get quite...cozy...especially at the end of the school day. In Grenada I once counted 23 people on a van that a rational person would swear could seat a dozen.

 

If you get to St. Vincent & the Grenadines, I'd suggest you bypass St. Vincent and clear in at Bequia. Delightful place, worth a couple of days. From there go to the Tobago Keys and the couple of islands around there...not much on those islands, but they are good places to stage into the keys from. You'll pay by the day for a permit to be in the Tobago Keys, but it is one of the most spectacular spots in the Caribbean. If you're headed South from there, I'd maybe time it so you arrive at Union Island in the AM to clear out, then move on to Grenada, clearing in at Carriacou on the same day. Union Island is...OK...but there's not a lot there IMHO and they've had some issues.

 

One thing you might want to do is check the Carnivale schedules for the various islands. Many of them have them, and it can be a fun time to be there. We caught it in Marigot, and in Grenada.

 

I've got tons and tons of entries on the Caribbean in the blog; follow the link in my sig line.

 

Thanks for that! Now in St Bart's awaiting the start of Superbowl. Lovely place, not real cruiser friendly. Great food! Give the kids a pain au chocolat and everyone is happy.

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W have finally left the BVIs and are now in St. Martin. Just bought some pain au chocolate from someone passing around the anchorage selling them from their dinghy. Yummm. Hope to make it as far S as Grenada in March or so. Need to be home (MA) by end of June. I can already tel it will be tough to go back to the real world.

Have you found Sarafina yet over in Marigot? Still one of the best all around french bakeries we've found in the French territories from St. Martin to New Caledonia. Though we found one in New Cal that gives it a run, but it's definitely better on average than anything else we found in the Caribbean or French Polynesia.

 

Grenada is far off from there. If you only have 4-5 months you will have to blow through the intervening islands. There's a lot to see. We did SXM to Grenada on a similar pace, in hindsight I wish we'd taken more time in a few places.

 

Are you sailing back to MA? Or is this a charter boat or something you are leaving down there?

 

Will check out Sarafina.

 

We are on our own boat and will be sailing back. I know we will likely miss a lot given our timetable, but we gots how much time we gots. Several people we have talked to have mentioned Dominca and Grenada as favorites and from reading about them they appeal to us. Seem more about being able to meet local people and do things ashore than seem other islands.

 

BJ what were your favorites in this little corner of the sea?

 

Tough call, with short time.

 

Dominica is a cool place, and if I was choosing between either/or Dominica and Grenada for say, a week or two I'd pick Dominica. It's one of the most poor islands in the Caribbean. It runs on a "boat boy" culture in the anchorages, but in Portsmouth it's well run, organized, the guys are vetted and trained and they provide security in the anchorage. In Dominica you can easily arrange a lot of tours through your boat boy. That is pretty much the way to see things, and there is a lot of cool stuff to see.

 

Grenada takes you much farther South. It's more populous, with things like a bus service that is more reliable, and not nearly as poor or rural as Dominica. Cruisers gravitate there to get out of hurricane season, and I found the cruising community and the support for it to be a much bigger draw than the island itself. Not that the island isn't cool and appealing; it is and there is plenty to do there. It's better setup as a place to stay for a while, with better provisioning options, etc. You're on your own for things like arranging tours and the like, though cars can be rented and taxis hired for that stuff. It's a nice place with much to recommend it, but it wasn't among our favorites. We headed there for hurricane season, like lots of cruisers. Some go to Trinidad; we did eventually and we wished we'd move there much earlier since we liked it much more than Grenada

 

One favorite place is hard to pin down. I must say we had a stronger preference for the French islands over the ex-English islands. France still supports their territories and possessions, and it is evident in the standard of living of the people on the islands. They feel more relaxed, and there is far less pressure to relieve you of your tourist dollars then there is in a place like St. Lucia, where you will generally be afforded multiple opportunities per day to buy various things wherever you go. And the food tends to be MUCH better, though prices will be higher. YMMV - we speak some French and loved Deshaies on Guadeloupe; we spent a week or so there and were reluctant to leave. We have some friends that went there with no French, little understanding of the culture, and perhaps slightly skewed expectations, who absolutely hated it and left after a day. For better or worse, the French islands have a lot of European presence on them because they are part of France. The natural beauty is still there, though one of the shopping malls in Fort de France in Martinique could have come straight from Paris, and Martinique has a thoroughly modern bus system.

 

The ex-English islands are independent, and enjoy a considerably lower standard of living as a result. They have their own distinctive culture and are very friendly and welcoming. To a point; there are a lot of people on islands like St. Lucia that are always "on the make", they've got something they're selling, or want you to do that will cost you money, etc. It is occasionally uncomfortable, like the rather creepy looking guy in Rodney Bay, St. Lucia that was always hanging around one of the dinghy docks asking for money to "watch your dinghy." Since we chained ours up, my only real concern was that he'd take a piss in it if I didn't pay him. But other people on those islands are fine, there just seems to be a few more operators. If you are an obvious tourist, they will glom on to you. Food on the English islands is so-so, unless you spend a lot to go to a place that is catered towards tourists specifically. For example some of the restaurants around the marinas or cruise ship docks will provide a more typical dining experience. You can get a cheap local dinner and it will be decent, but nothing to get too excited about in most cases unless you love "provision" (boiled local root vegetable things). We didn't find many local dining experiences that were so amazing they needed to be repeated with any frequency on the ex-English islands. Antique actually had some of the better Caribbean restaurants we came across in the English Harbour/Falmouth area.

 

These islands also have public transportation, but it tends to be a little more...ad hoc. What we referred to as the "mad Rasta buses" are very common - generally a van on a set route that tears along the windy roads at high speed while blasting reggae, soca, or on rare occasions, rap. They can get quite...cozy...especially at the end of the school day. In Grenada I once counted 23 people on a van that a rational person would swear could seat a dozen.

 

If you get to St. Vincent & the Grenadines, I'd suggest you bypass St. Vincent and clear in at Bequia. Delightful place, worth a couple of days. From there go to the Tobago Keys and the couple of islands around there...not much on those islands, but they are good places to stage into the keys from. You'll pay by the day for a permit to be in the Tobago Keys, but it is one of the most spectacular spots in the Caribbean. If you're headed South from there, I'd maybe time it so you arrive at Union Island in the AM to clear out, then move on to Grenada, clearing in at Carriacou on the same day. Union Island is...OK...but there's not a lot there IMHO and they've had some issues.

 

One thing you might want to do is check the Carnivale schedules for the various islands. Many of them have them, and it can be a fun time to be there. We caught it in Marigot, and in Grenada.

 

I've got tons and tons of entries on the Caribbean in the blog; follow the link in my sig line.

 

Thanks for that! Now in St Bart's awaiting the start of Superbowl. Lovely place, not real cruiser friendly. Great food! Give the kids a pain au chocolat and everyone is happy.

 

 

We passed on St. Bart's - to us, it didn't look cruiser friendly or particularly affordable.

 

Statia - or St. Eustatius - nearby St. Barts is a nice stop. A little off the main track of the cruise ship/charter crowd. We liked it a lot, but it's probably not more than a few days stay.

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No major plans this summer. I'm a cruiser wannabe, but my reality is that of a mundane day-sailor. I'm going to try to do again this season what I did last year and roll my work schedule back to 3 days per week, but that still leaves some week nights and weekends messed up when I'm on call. So overall we end up spending >50% of our time on the boat all season, which is nice. Plans are shaping up as such:

  • Continue teaching my wife to sail her little Capri and get her to where she's comfortable single-handing it.
  • Lots of days and nights on the boat
  • Hopefully get to see fireworks over the harbor again on the 4th, if I'm not working it this year
  • Continue challenging myself single-handling
  • Get out to Stellwagen and hunt whales
  • Maybe a long weekend with the wife in Boston Harbor
  • P-Town maybe, but more likely this won't happen until next season.

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ZZ,

 

P-Town is about 45 miles on a reach with pretty smooth water on a lot of days. I would think that would be pretty doable on a long weekend. Do you have an autopilot?

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ZZ,

 

P-Town is about 45 miles on a reach with pretty smooth water on a lot of days. I would think that would be pretty doable on a long weekend. Do you have an autopilot?

 

No AP, but that really isn't the issue, I can drive all day; 30-50 miles is an average, casual out-and-back single-handed daysail for me. it's really just a matter of time for multi-day trips.

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I am currently downsizing trying to get to Florida. I have to be out of Florida by April or pay a chunk of tax. At Key Largo, I will decide to either go to the Bahamas or continue up the east coast, if my papers don't decide for me. I can do the Bahamas next winter if I continue up the east coast. I would like to get up to Chesapeake for the summer/ fall.

 

Question: How do you prove that you left Florida waters long enough to avoid the tax? Do you provide a new address? A GPS track? A photo of your boat trapped in ice?

 

 

We did it by purchasing fuel and renting a slip, (in our case in Isla Mujeres, but any non Florida fuel dock/marina will do) with the receipts setting out the boat name and documentation no. Then send them, or better copies, to Revenue Florida.

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Up the Eastern Shore of Novi, maybe as far as the Bras d'Ors...haven't been up that way for far too long.

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Up the Eastern Shore of Novi, maybe as far as the Bras d'Ors...haven't been up that way for far too long.

Did that the other way last fall, Baddeck to Brooklin, Me, the slow way. It was beautiful.

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I plan to do some short trips around Puget Sound then in late July, head to Desolation Sound in British Columbia. We will of course enjoy the San Juan and Gulf island going up and coming home along with the BC Sunshine Coast.

 

A friend of mine and I turn 65 this fall and there is talk of a BVI charter to celebrate. Another friend and I are going to day sail together to confirm that we could cruise together on a more ambitious trip that our wives wouldn't care to do. If we work together the way we think we will we will do a trip next year.

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I plan to do some short trips around Puget Sound then in late July, head to Desolation Sound in British Columbia. We will of course enjoy the San Juan and Gulf island going up and coming home along with the BC Sunshine Coast.

 

A friend of mine and I turn 65 this fall and there is talk of a BVI charter to celebrate. Another friend and I are going to day sail together to confirm that we could cruise together on a more ambitious trip that our wives wouldn't care to do. If we work together the way we think we will we will do a trip next year.

 

Desolation in July is hopeless, wall-to-wall assholes. Go further, up to the Octopus Islands and past. Big Bay, on Stuart Island, is a great stop. The rapids keep the mouthbreathers away.

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I am currently downsizing trying to get to Florida. I have to be out of Florida by April or pay a chunk of tax. At Key Largo, I will decide to either go to the Bahamas or continue up the east coast, if my papers don't decide for me. I can do the Bahamas next winter if I continue up the east coast. I would like to get up to Chesapeake for the summer/ fall.

 

Question: How do you prove that you left Florida waters long enough to avoid the tax? Do you provide a new address? A GPS track? A photo of your boat trapped in ice?

 

 

We did it by purchasing fuel and renting a slip, (in our case in Isla Mujeres, but any non Florida fuel dock/marina will do) with the receipts setting out the boat name and documentation no. Then send them, or better copies, to Revenue Florida.

 

 

We did the same when we got our boat back to our club in RI. Sent a copy of the fuel receipt with the FL paperwork.

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2017 should be eventful. I'll be filling a container here at the marina with my crap, crushing a Hartley Tasman that's beyond fixable, selling my Isuzu ELF truck and moving back into the VW Transporter. The rest of the year will be spent pursuing the impossible dream, an affordable multihull. I know you're out there somewhere in the world and I'm gonna find you ...

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-jTktixJHYk

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Digital photo software keeps a log for me (I'm too lazy). As I take photos nearly everyday I'm on the boat, I stumble on my typical, 'day in the life of a coastal sailor' often in my files: Typical overnight sail.

 

First shot, rowing out to the boat (on the starboard side),... pause (reminisce, no doubt),... and take a pic of 23' Stonehorse with a family onboard, towing a 9'6" Dyer dinghy. Good family kit.

 

32242402734_b84f1534b8_h.jpg

 

A couple hours later(the sun!), I take the camera out again. 1:15pm, comfortably sailing off the wind through islands (5-6 miles from home).

 

32931783782_8f4f8d3088_h.jpg

 

The sailing is very good; I take another shot 15 minutes later (now on the wind), in about the same place.

 

33046088626_f801e8f01c_h.jpg

 

An hour later (2:30pm-anchored for the night), my photo is taken(rigging the dinghy). We're about to go sailing, again. I had the luxury of time that day(I notice paint on my forearm-so typical of my life).

 

32242342714_e5a04378b4_h.jpg

 

Hours later, a walk on shore at dusk, in a typical local anchorage.

 

33046088716_951ba01611_h.jpg

 

 

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Up the Eastern Shore of Novi, maybe as far as the Bras d'Ors...haven't been up that way for far too long.

 

How difficult/hazardous is it to sail up that way? It's on my list as soon as I replace the standing rigging on this new-to-me boat.

What's the best time of year?

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Ajax, I did the trip the other way last fall, Started in the Bras D'Or, cruised the coast, ended up in Brooklin, Maine. Short answer is it's coastal sailing with lots of good, small anchorages. Like Maine, summer fog can be plentiful. Towards fall that lessens, but you get more weather fronts coming through. Nothing particularly difficult or hazardous, and the beauty is well worth it. September was beautiful, I would/will do it again in a heartbeat.

 

As I recall you still have a barely used Taft and Rindlaub cruising guide to the Maine coast.

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CL- How long did that take you? (Granted, that you weren't in a hurry and probably made plenty of stops along the way)

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Up the Eastern Shore of Novi, maybe as far as the Bras d'Ors...haven't been up that way for far too long.

 

How difficult/hazardous is it to sail up that way? It's on my list as soon as I replace the standing rigging on this new-to-me boat.

What's the best time of year?

 

The longest sail and sometimes the toughest part is across the Gulf of Maine. After that, cruising the Atlantic coast of Nova Scotia is much like sailing in Maine but even less crowded. PM me and I will send you a link to a great cruising guide.

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KC - we sail some of the same waters. After 4 years, I still haven't scratched the surface of just the area from Muscongus Bay to Mt Desert. This Winter I climbed Mt Cadillac and realized I could see most of my cruising playground.

 

31463213983_f6009b5d52_z.jpg

 

We don't make huge progress, mostly because we sail regardless of wind conditions and instead end up where we end up. Here we are against the tide going DDW in the Eggemoggin making a screaming 1-2kts SOG.

 

20066038684_8ba3de6a98_z.jpg

 

20054458123_8f13151531_z.jpg

 

And I love how the weather changes. The morning started like this..

20663463996_042f5b5596_z.jpg

 

But you can end up in some nice spots

 

20615674186_05ef645441_z.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

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I have cruised Maine from Mt. Desert Island down as far as Rockland and it certainly is beautiful. I loved gunkholing Eggemoggin Reach and Vinalhaven. But the lobster pots drove me crazy and I swore I would install a shaft cutter before going back to Maine. Up here, the lobster season runs December to May, so there is very little worry about fishing gear during the regular sailing season

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Kris & Elegua: Thank you for posting those pics. They brought back a lot of great memories of a week spent on the schooner Stephen Taber, about 12 years ago. I will have to go and dig up some of those pictures.

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Ajax,

 

We took 9 days. could have done it in 5 with ease. Could have done in 20. Due to a rotating thingy in the Atlantic, we ran over to Maine after Port Mouton, then spent a few days there before dropping off the boat.

 

Jim, Nova Scotia is, IMO, much much easier sailing because of the lack of traps. I have a shaft cutter, but you still have to watch for the suckers, and some places are just carpeted.

 

Baddeck was beautiful. Everywhere we went was beautiful. Rogues Roost was the only place we saw other boats, but it was a holiday. Super nice people.

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The interesting thing is how traps disappear at night.

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KC - we sail some of the same waters. After 4 years, I still haven't scratched the surface of just the area from Muscongus Bay to Mt Desert. This Winter I climbed Mt Cadillac and realized I could see most of my cruising playground.

 

31463213983_f6009b5d52_z.jpg

 

We don't make huge progress, mostly because we sail regardless of wind conditions and instead end up where we end up. Here we are against the tide going DDW in the Eggemoggin making a screaming 1-2kts SOG.

 

20066038684_8ba3de6a98_z.jpg

 

20054458123_8f13151531_z.jpg

 

And I love how the weather changes. The morning started like this..

20663463996_042f5b5596_z.jpg

 

But you can end up in some nice spots

 

20615674186_05ef645441_z.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

Nice shots! Is that last one the Tory Islands on the Eggemoggin? Your family reminds me of ours, just a few years ago. Your's look at ease on the water. Our kids would complain when we would start the motor!

 

We've been sailing this area for 16 years and I still haven't run out of new places to sail and explore. Having sailed the coast from Canada to the Bahamas, I think this area has a very rare combination of water and coast, ideal for sailing.

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KC - we sail some of the same waters. After 4 years, I still haven't scratched the surface of just the area from Muscongus Bay to Mt Desert. This Winter I climbed Mt Cadillac and realized I could see most of my cruising playground.

 

31463213983_f6009b5d52_z.jpg

 

We don't make huge progress, mostly because we sail regardless of wind conditions and instead end up where we end up. Here we are against the tide going DDW in the Eggemoggin making a screaming 1-2kts SOG.

 

20066038684_8ba3de6a98_z.jpg

 

20054458123_8f13151531_z.jpg

 

And I love how the weather changes. The morning started like this..

20663463996_042f5b5596_z.jpg

 

But you can end up in some nice spots

 

20615674186_05ef645441_z.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

Nice shots! Is that last one the Tory Islands on the Eggemoggin? Your family reminds me of ours, just a few years ago. Your's look at ease on the water. Our kids would complain when we would start the motor!

 

We've been sailing this area for 16 years and I still haven't run out of new places to sail and explore. Having sailed the coast from Canada to the Bahamas, I think this area has a very rare combination of water and coast, ideal for sailing.

 

 

Thanks! These are not half as nice as yours....I'm always very impressed at the skill of your photography. And of course, you have a very photogenic boat. These cruises are the one time a year where we get 2 or so weeks just together with no outside interruptions.

 

That photo is from Ram Island looking towards Holbrook Island in Castine.

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I have cruised Maine from Mt. Desert Island down as far as Rockland and it certainly is beautiful. I loved gunkholing Eggemoggin Reach and Vinalhaven. But the lobster pots drove me crazy and I swore I would install a shaft cutter before going back to Maine. Up here, the lobster season runs December to May, so there is very little worry about fishing gear during the regular sailing season

 

We've done two Maine cruises. Neither one was long enough, and I look forward to returning some day.

 

I got nervous about the bridge at Eggemoggin with my air draft. Vinalhaven was very cool. We have a shaft cutter...while I felt bad when it happened, we had one day with ripping tide that was burying the floats where we caught and escaped three traps on the way to Frenchboro. It was windless and smooth as glass, or we would have been sailing. Never caught a pot sailing...

 

 

_MG_8221.jpg

 

_MG_8139.jpg

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Sigh. Clean up the boat and soon put it up for sale in Mexico. Ship our crap back to Vancouver, fly home. Rent a place until boat the sells. Use proceeds of sale as a down payment for a small apartment in Vancouver.

 

Go back to work at same N.A. firm as 8 years ago. Had to promise to stick around and not go sailing around world again.

 

There is a moratorium on buying another boat until old boat sells + 3 months...

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Grim reality. Thanks for all the second-hand freedom.

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Sigh. Clean up the boat and soon put it up for sale in Mexico. Ship our crap back to Vancouver, fly home. Rent a place until boat the sells. Use proceeds of sale as a down payment for a small apartment in Vancouver.

 

Go back to work at same N.A. firm as 8 years ago. Had to promise to stick around and not go sailing around world again.

 

There is a moratorium on buying another boat until old boat sells + 3 months...

 

That still beats never having done it at all.

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I have cruised Maine from Mt. Desert Island down as far as Rockland and it certainly is beautiful. I loved gunkholing Eggemoggin Reach and Vinalhaven. But the lobster pots drove me crazy and I swore I would install a shaft cutter before going back to Maine. Up here, the lobster season runs December to May, so there is very little worry about fishing gear during the regular sailing season

 

We've done two Maine cruises. Neither one was long enough, and I look forward to returning some day.

 

I got nervous about the bridge at Eggemoggin with my air draft. Vinalhaven was very cool. We have a shaft cutter...while I felt bad when it happened, we had one day with ripping tide that was burying the floats where we caught and escaped three traps on the way to Frenchboro. It was windless and smooth as glass, or we would have been sailing. Never caught a pot sailing...

 

 

 

The area around Swan's Island is the worst in the Penobscot Bay and MDI area. We don't often hook pot warp with our attached rudder, but we have a few times over many years and I'd guess 50% took place not too far from Swan's Island.

 

The lobstermen overdo it in that area. The trap concentration is double most areas. And what do the lobsters care? The same number will get hauled regardless of trap density (my opinion). They go to the nearest trap for the bait. You can put them all in one, or put them all in 50 traps,... They're working twice as hard for the same amount of $. They just can't sort out who's entitled to 'our' resource.

 

We've caught maybe 6-8 warps over 15 seasons, while under sail. Usually it's just the centerboard - crank it up, off. But we also will catch a prop blade that's in an aperture, which is mystifying. They have all come off by getting onto the other tack.

 

Here's the worst culprit, the dreaded toggle at HW. You can just see the eddy it creates up current of the main buoy. But this is in winds less than 5 knots. With any wind and wave, their invisible at this point. The more time you spend sailing the less of an issue they become.

 

As ELUGA mentions, we're sailing at 2-3 knots against a 1-2 knots current in this pic.

 

 

30282960865_365c0bf520_h.jpg

 

I like light air sailing like this. There's enough wind to keep the sails drawing - even though with the current - our COG is nearly,...nothing.

 

I remember this moment, last season: We had sailed off our anchor that morning(Merchants Islands), in light air. The very light wind caused us to tack on a close reach, outside the regular channels, places we had never sailed through. We sailed for about 3 hours (that was enough), and were close to a place we'd anchor for the night. The current finally won and we lowered sails and motored the last mile.

 

We anchored off Marshall Island, a place we'd never anchored. The only boat for miles, and no one on shore.

 

32723893540_bdb0f34b21_h.jpg

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Wonderful photo!

 

That's about my average as well. Well, my son tends to catch them, and for me they tend to slide off. He says luck, I says skill :D. Though I have a p-strut, I've never had one catch on the prop....maybe I shouldn't have said that...

 

Typical field in Muscongus - luckily not toggles. Depending on the season, I've found the pots can often approximately tell you where the deep and shallow water are - but not necessarily where the rocks are :D .

 

9384360982_fd877c178b_c.jpg

 

Everything in Merchant's row is a treasure.

 

20454102170_0e141b44b6_c.jpg

 

 

 

 

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Typical field in Muscongus - luckily not toggles. Depending on the season, I've found the pots can often approximately tell you where the deep and shallow water are - but not necessarily where the rocks are :D .

 

9384360982_fd877c178b_c.jpg

 

 

For a few years, we kept our (then) boat in Boothbay. We commuted to it from Vermont (where we lived then) for a couple of years. With limited time because of the travel - young kids, we only got into Muscongus Bay a few times. When we had time, we usually headed beyond it. There's a lot of great places to sail in Muscongus, that we never saw, I regret.

 

Having started in Casco for a couple of seasons, then to the Sheepscot - onto Boothbay - then finally to Penobscot Bay where we moved, I can hardly believe how much of the coast of Maine we didn't see, along the way.

 

Merchants Row and the islands in that area, are still my favorite spot on all of the east coast of the US.

 

 

 

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