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      Abbreviated rules   07/28/2017

      Underdawg did an excellent job of explaining the rules.  Here's the simplified version: Don't insinuate Pedo.  Warning and or timeout for a first offense.  PermaFlick for any subsequent offenses Don't out members.  See above for penalties.  Caveat:  if you have ever used your own real name or personal information here on the forums since, like, ever - it doesn't count and you are fair game. If you see spam posts, report it to the mods.  We do not hang out in every thread 24/7 If you see any of the above, report it to the mods by hitting the Report button in the offending post.   We do not take action for foul language, off-subject content, or abusive behavior unless it escalates to persistent stalking.  There may be times that we might warn someone or flick someone for something particularly egregious.  There is no standard, we will know it when we see it.  If you continually report things that do not fall into rules #1 or 2 above, you may very well get a timeout yourself for annoying the Mods with repeated whining.  Use your best judgement. Warnings, timeouts, suspensions and flicks are arbitrary and capricious.  Deal with it.  Welcome to anarchy.   If you are a newbie, there are unwritten rules to adhere to.  They will be explained to you soon enough.  
frozenhawaiian

what are your cruising plans for 2017?

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What is all this talk of tides, lobster pots and salt water? I think we have much to learn.

 

Out here it's crab trap buoys. The latest trick to avoid others harvesting them is to use black buoys and set them on short scope at low tide. Makes the fuckers really hard to spot when they are 2' under the surface.

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The boat on the left is the Hinckley Pilot my family bought when I was 15. The trimaran is my current boat. I've been sailing Maine since before the Pilot and never tire of it.

 

post-24720-0-15763100-1488069397_thumb.jpeg

 

Here's Round Pond a couple of summers ago-

 

post-24720-0-32638300-1488069512_thumb.jpg

 

Somebody's sweet boathouse- I dream of owning one of these.

 

post-24720-0-57347000-1488069827_thumb.jpg

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There is a second buoy attached to the main buoy. If you go between then, then you've caught the trap, and maybe the whole string. At times it can take a keen eye to see what's connected to what.

 

32272003374_d4e514756c_o.jpg

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I grew up in Maine. I love, love, love the Maine coast and sailing and the traditions and the sights, sounds and smells.

 

But the lobster buoys take almost all of the joy out of sailing there--at least with a multihull that has 2 daggerboards (vertical), 2 spade type rudders (essentially additional vertical leading edges) and two props. If I ever kept a boat in Maine to sail there, it would be a full keel, attached rudder, folding prop, boat.....

 

Hurricane Sound and the Swan's Island area, not to mention Muscongus Bay and the western entrance to the Fox Island Thoroughfare hold strong, negative images and memories in my mind.

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To identify toggled pots, look for one that is standing up, and another, down current, that looks lazy, just laying on it's side. Don't go between. You get good at it after a while.

 

There are rarely pots In the Eggemoggin Reach itself, they tend to be at either end. There are also very few in Blue Hill Bay, due to the depth.

 

Isle Au Haut has great hiking, and a swamp just south of "town" has one of the east coast's largest populations of carnivorous pitcher plants. In late summer, a hike or bike ride to the southeast part of the island is worth it for the acres of raspberries.

 

Everyone should bike the carriage trails of Acadia. The best access for sailors is Northeast Harbor. there is a bike rental shop about a block from the docks, and the entrance to Acadia National Park is perhaps a mile away. This is one of the most beautiful bike rides on earth. There is an enormous blueberry patch along the trail.

 

We were anchored at Merchants once and a Boy Scout troop was camping on the island that forms the harbor. Our young son dinghied in and joined them. he came back to the boat to get s'mores supplies for everyone, and announced he'd been invited to dinner. We heard laughter for hours as the kids had dinner, then s'mores and a joke-a-thon around the campfire. The scoutmasters and kids made sure he got launched and back safely to us, it was a magical night for a kid.

 

A similar thing happened at Holbrook Island Sanctuary. There was a group of scouts spending the night in the barn there, super nice folks. They invited Chris to join them for dinner and to spend the night. We brought his blankets and pillows, and contributed some hot chocolate. There was a tremendous thunderstorm that night, but the kids had a blast.

 

Cruising Maine when he was young was an unforgettable experience. We still love it now, but if you get a chance to do it when the kids are young, GO!

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I grew up in Maine. I love, love, love the Maine coast and sailing and the traditions and the sights, sounds and smells.

 

But the lobster buoys take almost all of the joy out of sailing there--at least with a multihull that has 2 daggerboards (vertical), 2 spade type rudders (essentially additional vertical leading edges) and two props. If I ever kept a boat in Maine to sail there, it would be a full keel, attached rudder, folding prop, boat.....

 

Hurricane Sound and the Swan's Island area, not to mention Muscongus Bay and the western entrance to the Fox Island Thoroughfare hold strong, negative images and memories in my mind.

My take is what you say: Some boats are stickier than others, when it comes to pot warp (the line connecting buoys and traps). The long keel - attached rudder is like a seal running through the warp (they never get caught).

 

But then some people with very sticky boats sail regularly on the coast of Maine and rarely get snagged. And some with long keels and attached rudders have regular run ins with catching warp.

 

I think the reason may be how they are sailing(or specifically-not sailing). Many cruisers come through the Maine coast covering vast areas (as cruisers often do). That means most of their miles are under power. The pot warp problem boaters report, is wrapping the prop shaft, calling a diver, etc.

 

It only takes one or two of those episodes for most people to run! I don't blame them at all, it's gonna happen with spinning props and the density of traps.

 

And a multi like you mention, with all the vertical edges and 2x's the props, I don't know how you do it!

 

Here's a local boat design (Stephens and Waring) blog post about a keel. I was glad to read that they do consider this problem when designing a boat below the water:

 

Lobster Pot Proof

 

There’s yet another interesting boat-nerd angle to Ginger’s keel: The angle of that keel. See the rake throughout these plans? This is not a retro-ode to early raked fin-keel designs. This is a critical adaptation to the reality of sailing in Maine: Lobster pots. We custom-formed this keel so the tackle from fishing gear trails smoothly over the keel, hull, rudder and off and away from the boat. We did give up performance by angling this structure. But those few feet per hour were nothing compared to being parked for untold hours unfouling a nasty lobster pot.

http://stephenswaring.com/marine-engineering-for-ups-why-my-keel-does-not-fall-off/

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To identify toggled pots, look for one that is standing up, and another, down current, that looks lazy, just laying on it's side. Don't go between. You get good at it after a while.

 

There are rarely pots In the Eggemoggin Reach itself, they tend to be at either end. There are also very few in Blue Hill Bay, due to the depth.

 

Isle Au Haut has great hiking, and a swamp just south of "town" has one of the east coast's largest populations of carnivorous pitcher plants. In late summer, a hike or bike ride to the southeast part of the island is worth it for the acres of raspberries.

 

Everyone should bike the carriage trails of Acadia. The best access for sailors is Northeast Harbor. there is a bike rental shop about a block from the docks, and the entrance to Acadia National Park is perhaps a mile away. This is one of the most beautiful bike rides on earth. There is an enormous blueberry patch along the trail.

 

We were anchored at Merchants once and a Boy Scout troop was camping on the island that forms the harbor. Our young son dinghied in and joined them. he came back to the boat to get s'mores supplies for everyone, and announced he'd been invited to dinner. We heard laughter for hours as the kids had dinner, then s'mores and a joke-a-thon around the campfire. The scoutmasters and kids made sure he got launched and back safely to us, it was a magical night for a kid.

 

A similar thing happened at Holbrook Island Sanctuary. There was a group of scouts spending the night in the barn there, super nice folks. They invited Chris to join them for dinner and to spend the night. We brought his blankets and pillows, and contributed some hot chocolate. There was a tremendous thunderstorm that night, but the kids had a blast.

 

Cruising Maine when he was young was an unforgettable experience. We still love it now, but if you get a chance to do it when the kids are young, GO!

That's a nice write up for sailing in Maine and how you don't let the buoys get you down.

 

I think it's all related. Fishing for centuries along this coast, is what has helped preserve, this coast. Most every town along the salt water has public water access due to fishing. And the access is as old as the towns themselves.

 

As recreational boating evolved along with the fishing industry, the public access was expanded - in many cases - to accommodate the public. We all own our mooring tackle, pay a couple hundred bucks to keep our boats and dinghies at the docks the many dinghy and public docks the town owns. We park our cars and trucks for free, as long as we want(I even store on the public landing for a very fair rate). Fishing keeps the costs down. Most of these guys (and girls these days), aren't rich.

 

In Rockport, we have a dozen or so active fishing boats. They have the best water in close to the docks (if you ever saw the lobstermen's dinghies, you'd know why).

 

I've gotten used to the local fishing, and many of the fishermen are friends. I think lobstering has preserved the public lands that surround my harbor and most other harbors on the coast of Maine. That makes the lobster buoys easier to swallow, for me.

 

The smell of bait baking on August-hot asphalt, mingled with the aroma of fresh varnish. That's Rockport. :)

 

19192088229_efb76d693b_h.jpg

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There is a second buoy attached to the main buoy. If you go between then, then you've caught the trap, and maybe the whole string. At times it can take a keen eye to see what's connected to what.

 

32272003374_d4e514756c_o.jpg

 

Especially when the tide is ripping and sucking some of the floats under water.

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To identify toggled pots, look for one that is standing up, and another, down current, that looks lazy, just laying on it's side. Don't go between. You get good at it after a while.

 

There are rarely pots In the Eggemoggin Reach itself, they tend to be at either end. There are also very few in Blue Hill Bay, due to the depth.

 

Isle Au Haut has great hiking, and a swamp just south of "town" has one of the east coast's largest populations of carnivorous pitcher plants. In late summer, a hike or bike ride to the southeast part of the island is worth it for the acres of raspberries.

 

Everyone should bike the carriage trails of Acadia. The best access for sailors is Northeast Harbor. there is a bike rental shop about a block from the docks, and the entrance to Acadia National Park is perhaps a mile away. This is one of the most beautiful bike rides on earth. There is an enormous blueberry patch along the trail.

 

We were anchored at Merchants once and a Boy Scout troop was camping on the island that forms the harbor. Our young son dinghied in and joined them. he came back to the boat to get s'mores supplies for everyone, and announced he'd been invited to dinner. We heard laughter for hours as the kids had dinner, then s'mores and a joke-a-thon around the campfire. The scoutmasters and kids made sure he got launched and back safely to us, it was a magical night for a kid.

 

A similar thing happened at Holbrook Island Sanctuary. There was a group of scouts spending the night in the barn there, super nice folks. They invited Chris to join them for dinner and to spend the night. We brought his blankets and pillows, and contributed some hot chocolate. There was a tremendous thunderstorm that night, but the kids had a blast.

 

Cruising Maine when he was young was an unforgettable experience. We still love it now, but if you get a chance to do it when the kids are young, GO!

 

You are killing me here with the great memories of Maine cruising. We're so far away from getting back to Maine some day.

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I grew up in Maine. I love, love, love the Maine coast and sailing and the traditions and the sights, sounds and smells.

 

But the lobster buoys take almost all of the joy out of sailing there--at least with a multihull that has 2 daggerboards (vertical), 2 spade type rudders (essentially additional vertical leading edges) and two props. If I ever kept a boat in Maine to sail there, it would be a full keel, attached rudder, folding prop, boat.....

 

Hurricane Sound and the Swan's Island area, not to mention Muscongus Bay and the western entrance to the Fox Island Thoroughfare hold strong, negative images and memories in my mind.

My take is what you say: Some boats are stickier than others, when it comes to pot warp (the line connecting buoys and traps). The long keel - attached rudder is like a seal running through the warp (they never get caught).

 

But then some people with very sticky boats sail regularly on the coast of Maine and rarely get snagged. And some with long keels and attached rudders have regular run ins with catching warp.

 

I think the reason may be how they are sailing(or specifically-not sailing). Many cruisers come through the Maine coast covering vast areas (as cruisers often do). That means most of their miles are under power. The pot warp problem boaters report, is wrapping the prop shaft, calling a diver, etc.

 

It only takes one or two of those episodes for most people to run! I don't blame them at all, it's gonna happen with spinning props and the density of traps.

 

And a multi like you mention, with all the vertical edges and 2x's the props, I don't know how you do it!

 

Here's a local boat design (Stephens and Waring) blog post about a keel. I was glad to read that they do consider this problem when designing a boat below the water:

 

Lobster Pot Proof

 

There’s yet another interesting boat-nerd angle to Ginger’s keel: The angle of that keel. See the rake throughout these plans? This is not a retro-ode to early raked fin-keel designs. This is a critical adaptation to the reality of sailing in Maine: Lobster pots. We custom-formed this keel so the tackle from fishing gear trails smoothly over the keel, hull, rudder and off and away from the boat. We did give up performance by angling this structure. But those few feet per hour were nothing compared to being parked for untold hours unfouling a nasty lobster pot.

http://stephenswaring.com/marine-engineering-for-ups-why-my-keel-does-not-fall-off/

 

 

 

 

There were times when I couldn't physically get between buoys with my 23' beam. I was (am) vigilant regarding trying to pass close to the down current side of buoys and avoid being set onto them or having my 'fins' pass over the catenary of the buoy lines for instance. Identifying buoys with their appropriate toggles is a challenge and once in a while I got it 'wrong'---that's when things would go south. Overall, the vigilance required to avoid the buoys was so high that much of the joy was lost. The PNW obstacles are nothing compared to Maine, but there, we've got dead heads, kelp paddies, logs, and occasionally some crab pots all mixed in with (probably) stronger currents on average. (plenty of exceptions to THAT rule too)

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Typical field in Muscongus - luckily not toggles. Depending on the season, I've found the pots can often approximately tell you where the deep and shallow water are - but not necessarily where the rocks are :D .

 

9384360982_fd877c178b_c.jpg

 

That does it. Maine is off my list. Twenty five foot beam and two motors, I wouldn't have a chance.

 

 

 

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Was going to do North Channel but I can't afford it ....wait! maybe I will start a go fund me site like others and I will go.

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Typical field in Muscongus - luckily not toggles. Depending on the season, I've found the pots can often approximately tell you where the deep and shallow water are - but not necessarily where the rocks are :D .

 

9384360982_fd877c178b_c.jpg

 

That does it. Maine is off my list. Twenty five foot beam and two motors, I wouldn't have a chance.

 

 

 

 

I saw all the pots in the picture and knew immediately...Muscungus! One of my favorite cruising grounds in Maine, largely because people are in a hurry to get further East or West. Also, Maine in general is great because of the fears many boaters have with fog, lobster pots and granite. Keeps the waters largely free of ugly boats being driven by yahoos. One only needs to sail just a bit further south to be surrounded. As far as the fog and granite go, modern GPS and radar systems have definitely taken a lot of the edge off of cruising in Maine, but still I find enough people are terrified enough of fog that they stay away.

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2017 should be eventful. I'll be filling a container here at the marina with my crap, crushing a Hartley Tasman that's beyond fixable, selling my Isuzu ELF truck and moving back into the VW Transporter. The rest of the year will be spent pursuing the impossible dream, an affordable multihull. I know you're out there somewhere in the world and I'm gonna find you ...

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-jTktixJHYk

Videos of the crushing? Please please ...

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Going to go the length of Lake Ontario. 50 Point in the west, to Gananoque on the St. Lawrence and return. About 400 miles round trip and then some extra for "meandering" . Stay a few days and then fight the west winds on the way back. Will probably put J. on a train home at some point if we are held up on the return. She only has 3 weeks to be out.

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I am seriously considering taking my new solo down the Missouri putting in at Lewiston Mt and seeing how far i can get in 3 weeks. working on a dolly for portage.

1.jpg

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I am seriously considering taking my new solo down the Missouri putting in at Lewiston Mt and seeing how far i can get in 3 weeks.

1.jpg

 

Venezuela?

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I am seriously considering taking my new solo down the Missouri putting in at Lewiston Mt and seeing how far i can get in 3 weeks.

1.jpg

 

Venezuela?

 

 

it was a stock photo. Waiting for boat. Plan right now is taking outboard off sailboat. It might be signaling a change in my own boat ownership direction. Used one in FL and went bone fishing. Was sold after a 1/2 day.

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We are currently in the process of completing a refit for Brigadoon in Port Townsend. Once I finish making the mast clean and shiny, we bolt the rest of it on, build the rig, rig the boat, and leave for Alaska and the rest in April.

 

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I plan to do some short trips around Puget Sound then in late July, head to Desolation Sound in British Columbia. We will of course enjoy the San Juan and Gulf island going up and coming home along with the BC Sunshine Coast.

 

A friend of mine and I turn 65 this fall and there is talk of a BVI charter to celebrate. Another friend and I are going to day sail together to confirm that we could cruise together on a more ambitious trip that our wives wouldn't care to do. If we work together the way we think we will we will do a trip next year.

 

Desolation in July is hopeless, wall-to-wall assholes. Go further, up to the Octopus Islands and past. Big Bay, on Stuart Island, is a great stop. The rapids keep the mouthbreathers away.

 

Too bad you think everyone is an asshole in Desolation Sound. While it is crowded for sure, I didn't find that to be the case last year when I was there in July. Are there some who are thoughtless? For sure. Wall to wall? Not from my perspective. There is no doubt that later in the year is less crowded, particularly in September. While I like less crowded anchorages I'll tolerate the crowds. After all they everyone is just trying to enjoy the arguably best cruising area in the US.

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I plan to do some short trips around Puget Sound then in late July, head to Desolation Sound in British Columbia. We will of course enjoy the San Juan and Gulf island going up and coming home along with the BC Sunshine Coast.

 

A friend of mine and I turn 65 this fall and there is talk of a BVI charter to celebrate. Another friend and I are going to day sail together to confirm that we could cruise together on a more ambitious trip that our wives wouldn't care to do. If we work together the way we think we will we will do a trip next year.

 

Desolation in July is hopeless, wall-to-wall assholes. Go further, up to the Octopus Islands and past. Big Bay, on Stuart Island, is a great stop. The rapids keep the mouthbreathers away.

 

Too bad you think everyone is an asshole in Desolation Sound. While it is crowded for sure, I didn't find that to be the case last year when I was there in July. Are there some who are thoughtless? For sure. Wall to wall? Not from my perspective. There is no doubt that later in the year is less crowded, particularly in September. While I like less crowded anchorages I'll tolerate the crowds. After all they everyone is just trying to enjoy the arguably best cruising area in the US.

 

 

Um...Desolation Sound is not in the US, thankfully. You will need your passport.

 

Last three times we went to Desolation we hit a couple of our favourite spots and they just weren't the same as they were 20 years ago. Crowded, noisy, and filled with idiots who thought 20 knots is a reasonable speed to drive their overpowered dinghies in an anchorage.

Melanie Cove in September, mid-week. 2 powerboats and a sailboat raft up in the middle of the cove, fire up a generator on deck and turn up the tunes to 11, keep it up until 2 AM. Assholes in my book.

It's not all assholes, several of the people on other boats commented very negatively about these clowns and remarked what a shithole Desolation was turning into. YMMV.

 

BTyTipy.jpg

 

We moved on to Octopus Islands. Much better, peace and quiet. Please stay in Desolation if you prefer the crowds and noise and smell.

 

pXjPXnT.jpg

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Sounds like the 1000 Islands in late July & early August, with the Quebec Navy out in full force and all of Ontario out on the water for the long weekend. We prefer to just pass through and return a couple of week later when all is much more quiet.

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I know we have a few hinckley owners on here, any of you planning on going to the hinckley owners rendezvous on nantucket? I'm thinking of sailing down from portland.

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Our plans have firmed up a bit, with Will's internship settling in.

 

Soon after we drop off the sails with the local Hood shop for repairs we're going to head up to the Pittwater for a while. We've also ordered a new Hydranet radial main, which should be ready by the end of April. Once we have that, we head North to the Whitsundays.

 

We're going to schedule my daughter to take the SAT in Mackey on June 6th, so that should put us somewhere up and around there by then. Will flies into Brisbane around July 23rd or so, and we'll fly him up to Hammo or around there somewhere. He's expressed an interest in returning to New Caledonia, so we'll probably kick around the Whitsundays and GBR with him for a couple of weeks, then sail to New Cal. Will goes back to school in September, we'll continue on back to NZ in October.

 

That's the rough plan as it stands now.

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BJ, you might want to dawdle on your way up the coast. Whitsundays got fucked pretty hard, even Mackay copped a pasting during Debbie. We are about to flood in Rockhampton/Yeppoon, but that will be cleared out in a few weeks. No infrastructure damage here. I would check how the marina area went in Mackay, and consider Bundaberg or Rockhampton as alternatives for your daughter's SAT. All three towns have cqu university campuses, which is, I assume, where the SAT test will be run. The bunker group off Gladstone and the Percy group off shoalwater bay are great places to spend some time, as is Pearl Bay in shoalwater, provided the army isn't blowing shit up.

 

A month or two longer might make your Whitsunday time a lot more comfortable.

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BJ, you might want to dawdle on your way up the coast. Whitsundays got fucked pretty hard, even Mackay copped a pasting during Debbie. We are about to flood in Rockhampton/Yeppoon, but that will be cleared out in a few weeks. No infrastructure damage here. I would check how the marina area went in Mackay, and consider Bundaberg or Rockhampton as alternatives for your daughter's SAT. All three towns have cqu university campuses, which is, I assume, where the SAT test will be run. The bunker group off Gladstone and the Percy group off shoalwater bay are great places to spend some time, as is Pearl Bay in shoalwater, provided the army isn't blowing shit up.

 

A month or two longer might make your Whitsunday time a lot more comfortable.

 

We'll be here for a while waiting almost a month for the new sail. And we won't sail straight up there, I can't see us arriving much before June.

 

There's not SAT's scheduled in Bundy or Rockhampton. Only Brisbane, Mackay and Cairns up Queensland way that I found.

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Just got back (ok, two weeks ago) from a week charter near Pensacola, FL. While it was cold there (50s daytime, two nights down to 38 or so), it wasn't the hellstorm the NE got. Me, the LFW, my son and his gf. Great fun had by all.

 

Got as far west as Orange Beach, sailed the Gulf side to P-cola and basically just took it easy. On the last day snagged a crab pot. The water is a little brisk in FL in March. . .

 

Prolly do a week (if we can swing it) in Lake Superior in Aug/Sept.

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I know we have a few hinckley owners on here, any of you planning on going to the hinckley owners rendezvous on nantucket? I'm thinking of sailing down from portland.

 

I inquired about that event a couple of years ago, and was told I'd likely be the only sailboat.

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I know we have a few hinckley owners on here, any of you planning on going to the hinckley owners rendezvous on nantucket? I'm thinking of sailing down from portland.

I inquired about that event a couple of years ago, and was told I'd likely be the only sailboat.

 

There was a Sabre rendevous in Rockland Maine a few years back. A friend went with his Sabre sailboat(34). I was on a mooring in the outer harbor.

 

A hellacious roar came around Owls Head and a half a dozen big power boats came blasting into the harbor - full wake speed. The leader (biggest), had good rock music blasting out of speakers. It was pretty early in the day, but I got on the bow and played air guitar. I couldn't help it.

 

A while later, I picked the dishes up off the cabin sole.

 

I spoke to my friend (Sabre 34 sailboat), after the Rendevous. He said it was a an odd affair, but fine. Food was good, etc.

 

But Sabre is motorboat centrist now. The few old Sabre sailboat owners were treated well, but sort of like that brother in law you see every 10 years, who's a little off,...

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That's the rough plan as it stands now.

We might see you on the way up the Australian coast.

 

We are in Newcastle right now anchored in the Stockton Channel next to a chemical plant.

 

Sounds bad but it isn't. Excellent holding, a stones throw to one of NSW's best surf beaches and a 15 min ride in the RIB to tie up in centre of the city.

 

Very relaxing after being in Sydney way too long. Any anchorage like this between New York and Panama would be jam packed with liveaboards and cruisers. In Australia we've got it to ourselves bar a near empty mooring field half a dozen moored boats.

 

My 17yo and 18yo girls are flying in from the US to Brisbane for six weeks each in June the July. The 18yo sat the SAT last year. We've got a 7 yo on board full-time.

 

Wifey has to go to Sydney for a dentist appointment Tuesday then weather looks OK for moving to Port Stephens in Wednesday.

 

If you want to avoid us steer clear of 13m white steel boats.

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Bermuda in June, then to Maine. If time, fog, and crew availability permit we may go to the Bras D'Or. If we get there in time, perhaps Newfoundland.

 

 

Do anything you can to get to Newfoundland. It is the most interesting place I have ever cruised and I cruised in a lot of places.

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We are a bit up in the air wrt our plans for this year. We are getting ready to put our Bristol on the market. Assuming we sell it fairly quickly our plan is to buy a new boat (considering a J/42 or Sabre 402 or ?). If we get it in time we will sail to the eastern Caribbean. Our plan is to keep the boat in the Caribbean for the next several winters, based in Grenada with trips north each winter and then back south before hurricane season. We also are likely to be delivering a new Tayana 54 from Taiwan to Hong Kong (on the owner's dime (or yuan)). He does not know how to sail and wants us to teach him how to sail and how to speak English so he can go cruising at some point. The boat has been done for some time but he has not had the time (or apparently the final payment) to move it to HK (he does not want to take it into China because of the enormous luxury goods duty that would be payable).

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That's the rough plan as it stands now.

We might see you on the way up the Australian coast.

 

We are in Newcastle right now anchored in the Stockton Channel next to a chemical plant.

 

Sounds bad but it isn't. Excellent holding, a stones throw to one of NSW's best surf beaches and a 15 min ride in the RIB to tie up in centre of the city.

 

Very relaxing after being in Sydney way too long. Any anchorage like this between New York and Panama would be jam packed with liveaboards and cruisers. In Australia we've got it to ourselves bar a near empty mooring field half a dozen moored boats.

 

My 17yo and 18yo girls are flying in from the US to Brisbane for six weeks each in June the July. The 18yo sat the SAT last year. We've got a 7 yo on board full-time.

 

Wifey has to go to Sydney for a dentist appointment Tuesday then weather looks OK for moving to Port Stephens in Wednesday.

 

If you want to avoid us steer clear of 13m white steel boats.

 

 

Quite the opposite, I'd love to cross paths. My 17 year old daughter would love company, too!

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I know we have a few hinckley owners on here, any of you planning on going to the hinckley owners rendezvous on nantucket? I'm thinking of sailing down from portland.

I inquired about that event a couple of years ago, and was told I'd likely be the only sailboat.

 

it's in nantucket this year, I'm trying to decide if I feel like sailing 2 days down to nantucket an then 2 days back afterwards, for the same amount of time I could go up to penobscot bay ann enjoy the best coastal cruising int he country.

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Good stuff. Both my girls are good eggs. See you out there somewhere.

 

Doesn't look like much wind at all for moving this week. We're planning to head to Pittwater, but I suspect it will be a motor slog if we try it before Friday.

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We had a good sail to Pittwater from Sydney last Thursday but the wind died on us a few hours into our trip to Newcastle.

 

They've got a good little maritime museum in Newcastle. Among other things lots of shipwreck memorials. I asked the attendant "What was the most common time of year for shipwrecks?" He said "April and May because when the winds were light the old sailing ships were driven ashore by the south easterly swell." Something to think about.

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We had a good sail to Pittwater from Sydney last Thursday but the wind died on us a few hours into our trip to Newcastle.

 

They've got a good little maritime museum in Newcastle. Among other things lots of shipwreck memorials. I asked the attendant "What was the most common time of year for shipwrecks?" He said "April and May because when the winds were light the old sailing ships were driven ashore by the south easterly swell." Something to think about.

 

You were in Sydney last week? Where were you?

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Selling the house in Auckland, giving the Sunfast 3600 back to the local Jeanneau agent (was given to me as a demo boat for the last 1.5 years), and heading up to Europe with the family ASAP to buy a boat and go full time cruising for a few years.

Plan is to cruise the the Med until October, head down to the Canaries and cross the Atlantic in November via the cape verdes. Probably to Barbados as the first port of call in the Caribbean. Stay in the Caribbean until April and head through the panama canal, Galapagos, Marquessas and French Polynesia before making our way quickly through the rest of the pacific to NZ by next November. Can do the western end of the pacific from NZ next season.

Something like that anyway. Only firm plans are to head to Europe ASAP but the real plan is to have no plan....

 

House almost ready to go on the market. Spent all easter so far painting the roof and the deck and heaps of other bits. First easter for as long as I can remember where we haven't been on a boat. New kitchen gets fitted later this week then it's time to finish the tidy up. Reckon we are about 3-4 weeks away from putting it on the market and cashing up.

 

Can't fucken wait.

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Most likely meet some Anarcists on the way too.

Will have 3 boys 5, 7 and 9 years old on board with us. So best to stay well clear unless you like noise.

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Most likely meet some Anarcists on the way too.

Will have 3 boys 5, 7 and 9 years old on board with us. So best to stay well clear unless you like noise.

 

They make excellent bait if you're willing to troll them. :)

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You were in Sydney last week? Where were you?

Off Birkenhead Point then Rose Bay.

 

We are just settling in to our second cruise. Last cruise was Duluth, MN to Colon, Panama.

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You were in Sydney last week? Where were you?

Off Birkenhead Point then Rose Bay.

 

We are just settling in to our second cruise. Last cruise was Duluth, MN to Colon, Panama.

 

 

How did you find Birkenhead? I couldn't decide who was a bigger group of douches - the people on land taking pictures of boats and calling Enforcement for imagined slights, or the rowers, who wanted the entire river to themselves...and called in Enforcement when they thought someone was encroaching on their "timed runs".

 

After two visits from harbour patrol in two days...when I was actually doing nothing wrong either time...it seemed like it wasn't worth the hassle.

 

The first visit was to tell me that I *might* be too close to the cable by the bridge (I didn't think we were) and to be very careful what I did on board because the people on land complained a lot and took pictures of anchored boats, and we should watch not to get in the way of the rowers. So we up anchored, moved further north and closer to shore snugged up near the moorings. The visit the next day was to inform me that the Rowing Club had actually called to formally complain about our location being in their way. As you know, there are no channel markers or buoys. If we'd moved any closer to the moorings we be risking running into them.

 

We've been in Rozelle for a while, but will be leaving in a few days.

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You were in Sydney last week? Where were you?

Off Birkenhead Point then Rose Bay.

 

We are just settling in to our second cruise. Last cruise was Duluth, MN to Colon, Panama.

 

 

How did you find Birkenhead? I couldn't decide who was a bigger group of douches - the people on land taking pictures of boats and calling Enforcement for imagined slights, or the rowers, who wanted the entire river to themselves...and called in Enforcement when they thought someone was encroaching on their "timed runs".

 

After two visits from harbour patrol in two days...when I was actually doing nothing wrong either time...it seemed like it wasn't worth the hassle.

 

The first visit was to tell me that I *might* be too close to the cable by the bridge (I didn't think we were) and to be very careful what I did on board because the people on land complained a lot and took pictures of anchored boats, and we should watch not to get in the way of the rowers. So we up anchored, moved further north and closer to shore snugged up near the moorings. The visit the next day was to inform me that the Rowing Club had actually called to formally complain about our location being in their way. As you know, there are no channel markers or buoys. If we'd moved any closer to the moorings we be risking running into them.

 

We've been in Rozelle for a while, but will be leaving in a few days.

 

Time to head up to Pittwater!

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Sounds like you are experiencing the real Sydney. Five million people jostling each other for some perceived advantage. It's great to visit, but a hard place to live.

 

Birkenhead Point is OK but it is heavily patrolled by water cops. We were on a $400/month mooring ball from Balmain Marine Centre (Jeremy 0438 002 918). People in the houses and apartments looking over the mooring fields and anchorage will report a boat if they perceive someone to be living aboard. If you are discreet and well groomed, no worries, but one scruffy guy hung out his laundry and was run out within two weeks.

 

In NSW living aboard is illegal so they have the law on their side.

 

That said, there are about a dozen liveaboards in the mooring field or adjacent marinas. One guy has been living on a ball for 30 years.

 

Access to services is excellent, and their are plenty of good places to tie up your dink.

 

The rowers tend to be private school types used to getting their own way. Better to stay off their radar unless you have time and money to fight them.

 

If you want to liveaboard at anchor in Sydney Harbour and not be hassled the best thing to do is move every week or two.

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Sounds like you are experiencing the real Sydney. Five million people jostling each other for some perceived advantage. It's great to visit, but a hard place to live.

 

 

One of the reasons why I don't live there any more, and plan never to do so again. Visiting is fine, I'll be up there for the winter, but not to live.

 

FKT

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Sounds like you are experiencing the real Sydney. Five million people jostling each other for some perceived advantage. It's great to visit, but a hard place to live.

 

One of the reasons why I don't live there any more, and plan never to do so again. Visiting is fine, I'll be up there for the winter, but not to live.

 

FKT

Yep, we are over it too.

 

A beautiful city slowly strangling itself with its own infrastructure failures.

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Sounds like you are experiencing the real Sydney. Five million people jostling each other for some perceived advantage. It's great to visit, but a hard place to live.

One of the reasons why I don't live there any more, and plan never to do so again. Visiting is fine, I'll be up there for the winter, but not to live.

 

FKT

Yep, we are over it too.

 

A beautiful city slowly strangling itself with its own infrastructure failures.

 

 

That's my take on it as well. If I didn't have family there I'd probably never go back.

 

I grew up in Sydney, mis-spent a lot of my teenage years in Pittwater, camping at Coasters Retreat, diving around Barrenjoey, fishing up Cowan Creek etc. Now it's such a PITA to drive & park that I try not to bother.

 

Fortunately for me, my Sydney house is in easy walking distance of the Parramatta River ferry service so that's how I travel about when I'm there.

 

FKT

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Sounds like you are experiencing the real Sydney. Five million people jostling each other for some perceived advantage. It's great to visit, but a hard place to live.

One of the reasons why I don't live there any more, and plan never to do so again. Visiting is fine, I'll be up there for the winter, but not to live.

 

FKT

Yep, we are over it too.

 

A beautiful city slowly strangling itself with its own infrastructure failures.

 

 

That's my take on it as well. If I didn't have family there I'd probably never go back.

 

I grew up in Sydney, mis-spent a lot of my teenage years in Pittwater, camping at Coasters Retreat, diving around Barrenjoey, fishing up Cowan Creek etc. Now it's such a PITA to drive & park that I try not to bother.

 

Fortunately for me, my Sydney house is in easy walking distance of the Parramatta River ferry service so that's how I travel about when I'm there.

 

FKT

 

If you live up here on the insular peninsular lots of people never really need to go over the bridge (the Narrabeen bridge) except to go to the airport.............

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Sounds like you are experiencing the real Sydney. Five million people jostling each other for some perceived advantage. It's great to visit, but a hard place to live.

 

Birkenhead Point is OK but it is heavily patrolled by water cops. We were on a $400/month mooring ball from Balmain Marine Centre (Jeremy 0438 002 918). People in the houses and apartments looking over the mooring fields and anchorage will report a boat if they perceive someone to be living aboard. If you are discreet and well groomed, no worries, but one scruffy guy hung out his laundry and was run out within two weeks.

 

In NSW living aboard is illegal so they have the law on their side.

 

That said, there are about a dozen liveaboards in the mooring field or adjacent marinas. One guy has been living on a ball for 30 years.

 

Access to services is excellent, and their are plenty of good places to tie up your dink.

 

The rowers tend to be private school types used to getting their own way. Better to stay off their radar unless you have time and money to fight them.

 

If you want to liveaboard at anchor in Sydney Harbour and not be hassled the best thing to do is move every week or two.

 

It's a very convenient spot with ready access to groceries, the bus, and walking distance to Whitworth's. We would have loved to stay around there.

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The rowers tend to be private school types used to getting their own way. Better to stay off their radar unless you have time and money to fight them.

The rowers are LOUD. Which isn't a problem most of the time. Except on the weekends.

 

Rozelle/Blackwater have buoyed off anchorage areas where we are contained. Not a problem, we've not had trouble finding a spot and it keeps us out of the way of traffic. This leaves pretty much the whole of the bay open for the rowers except three little corners.

 

So what do they do? Sometimes, instead of rowing out in the middle of the bay, they row right into the middle of the anchorage. I'm not sure why they do this instead of staying in the open water, but it's not really a problem most times.

 

Except when they do it before 7:00am on a Saturday or Sunday morning. Stop in the middle of a bunch of anchored boats with people sleeping on them. And continue with their screaming, yelling and cadence counting. Like it never occurred to them they are stopped in the middle of half a dozen boats and only a few meters away from people that are still asleep. That is an annoying way to be woken up early.

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Left Anacortes, WA a week or so ago on our way to Alaska. Plan is to be in Glacier Bay mid June with a return to the Gulf Islands in late September.

Heading into Princess Louisa in the next couple days. Guessing we will be just about the only ones there this time of year.

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Have the month of August off and heading up to the Octopus Islands and maybe the Broughtons. That is a lot to jam into 4 weeks though but never did the Broughtons. Might be worth it to jam up there. But we had a good time last year just in the San Juans sailing/drifting from place to place rather than motoring everywhere with a schedule. Had a brilliant sail through the Wasp Islands which wouldn't have happened if we were on a schedule. Like my dad says, "We are just going from one pile of rocks to the next. Might as well have fun getting there..."

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well my plans already changed...i lost my spring vacation last week due to the blizzard we had last month so we had to cancel; our trip to Puerto Rico....we rescheduled the flights to August and booked a 10 day Spanish Virgin Island bareboat can;t wait to go to Vieques and Culebra....:-)

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On January 28, 2017 at 4:31 AM, dylan winter said:

I am selling this for £7K in Scotland

 

davids-snap.jpg

 

 

and will be spending the money knocking this back into shape

 

 

Congratulations, really making some nice films.

 

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On ‎1‎/‎20‎/‎2017 at 3:45 PM, wristwister said:

I've got to be judicious on how I spend my precious vacation time, so other than day sails, overnighters and maybe a couple long weekends cruising in the San Juans, I get my one week long (9 days) cruise. In the past I've grabbed a couple buddies and leisurely cruised the San Juans and the Gulfs. Last year I did a solo trip through the gulfs, across the strait, and back. But this summer, probably June, I plan to go a little nuts. I'll round up a couple other masochists as crew, do round the clock sails up the strait of Georgia and back, and spend a few days bouncing around Desolation Sound in the middle. Wish me luck!

So I just got back from the above trip, but did it a bit differently than planned. Crew flaked out on me so I went solo, and I'm glad I did. The weather Gods smiled upon me, I had winds on the stern quarter the whole way north, made it all the way to Desolation Sound with a couple nights to explore there, then the wind clocked around 180 degrees and I had it on the stern quarter the whole way back. With the long days, perfect winds, and the occasional hoisting of the kite, I put in a few 60+ mile days, and pretty much the only times I fired up the old A4 was to get in and out of harbors. An absolutely fabulous trip, and Desolation is incredible, along with a few other highlights on the way up and back.

The irony is that after all that sailing through new territory without incident, on the way back I sunk my keel in the mud during a negative tide just a couple miles from my marina at Anacortes. Had to set a couple anchors and wait the tide out

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On 4/16/2017 at 9:59 PM, BooBoo said:

Selling the house in Auckland, giving the Sunfast 3600 back to the local Jeanneau agent (was given to me as a demo boat for the last 1.5 years), and heading up to Europe with the family ASAP to buy a boat and go full time cruising for a few years.

Plan is to cruise the the Med until October, head down to the Canaries and cross the Atlantic in November via the cape verdes. Probably to Barbados as the first port of call in the Caribbean. Stay in the Caribbean until April and head through the panama canal, Galapagos, Marquessas and French Polynesia before making our way quickly through the rest of the pacific to NZ by next November. Can do the western end of the pacific from NZ next season.

Something like that anyway. Only firm plans are to head to Europe ASAP but the real plan is to have no plan....

 

House almost ready to go on the market. Spent all easter so far painting the roof and the deck and heaps of other bits. First easter for as long as I can remember where we haven't been on a boat. New kitchen gets fitted later this week then it's time to finish the tidy up. Reckon we are about 3-4 weeks away from putting it on the market and cashing up.

 

Can't fucken wait.

If you can add a year to your itinerary, come on up the US East Coast after the winter in the Caribbean.  Take advantage of some of the suggestions on this thread.  Maybe even share a beer or a raft-up with some of us!  End your trip with a cruise through the Chesapeake in October, then jump back to the Caribbean in November to continue on your westabout trade wind sail back home to NZ...

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On 2017-6-15 at 8:58 AM, dylan winter said:

thanks

 

at 61 I am think I am just starting to get the hang of it

 

Dylan

 

 

Some things really are like life: by the time you get the hang of it, it's nearly over

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On 2017-6-26 at 9:18 AM, jewingiv said:

If you can add a year to your itinerary, come on up the US East Coast after the winter in the Caribbean.  Take advantage of some of the suggestions on this thread.  Maybe even share a beer or a raft-up with some of us!  End your trip with a cruise through the Chesapeake in October, then jump back to the Caribbean in November to continue on your westabout trade wind sail back home to NZ...

Yeah maybe but not sure the funds will hold out that long... House sold now (4 days on the market...) and we have just purchased a beneteau oceanis 50 in France. Survey happening on friday and relocating the whole family August 3rd. 

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Day cruising the Barnegat Bay this summer with the wife and 2 girls and hopefully get up to Massachusetts in late August and spend a week or two in the Vineyard area on our wooden cutter 

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I was going to go for my one cruise of the year this weekend, boat is loaded and ready. But instead, my mast step decided to collapse... Epoxy is almost as fun. 

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We finished a refit of Brigadoon in April and departed Port Townsend on the 29th. 

We've taken our time and made it to Prince Rupert, B.C. where we sit for a couple weeks, taking it easy. A friend arrives around the 20th and it's outside Vancouver Island, back to Port Townsend (and the Perry Rendezvous) before we head back out, turn left and see the rest of the world.

Read more about it here:

http://ourfreedomproject.blogspot.com/

 

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Just returned from 3 weeks in the San Juans, Gulf Islands, Vancouver and the Sunshine Coast. Our plan was to play all the disc golf courses in the islands. I think we made it to 9 of them and in talking to other players we learned there's even more scattered around. We also went to the Saturna Lamb BBQ in Winter Cove on July 1st. A great time before heading to Ganges for the Canada Day fireworks. I also highly recommend the 4th of July fireworks in Fishermen's Bay on Lopez, the best I've seen bar none. 

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On 2017-01-22 at 1:33 PM, Ishmael said:

I'll be doing a lot of single-handed cruising this summer since my child bride is still working. We're thinking of getting out to Barkley Sound again for a couple or three weeks, but it's all very weather-dependent. Last time we planned that we ended up north of Desolation Sound instead because there was two weeks of solid 30+ gales coming down the Strait of Juan de Fuca.

Same story this year. After a couple of days waiting in the Gulf Islands to see if Juan de Fuca would cooperate, we gave up and went north, as far as the Octopus Islands before returning south and doing the best parts of Desolation and the Discovery Islands. Best decision of the year; amazing weather and not as many people as feared. We got back on Saturday and I'm ready to go again.

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6 minutes ago, Ishmael said:

Same story this year. After a couple of days waiting in the Gulf Islands to see if Juan de Fuca would cooperate, we gave up and went north, as far as the Octopus Islands before returning south and doing the best parts of Desolation and the Discovery Islands. Best decision of the year; amazing weather and not as many people as feared. We got back on Saturday and I'm ready to go again.

Good to have you back. Ishmael.

I guess I was lucky with the weather for my trip to Barkley two years ago.  This year, I'll just go North and see where I end up.  

Leaving Saturday for two weeks afloat.

Steve

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