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      Abbreviated rules   07/28/2017

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valis

Mental Boats

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Semi, I like that. Although the schooner rig will suffer a bit upwind, the bit of toe-in on the leeboards should at least reduce leeway a bit. Having the jib to back should help tacking. Low CE on the rig keeps heeling down, and the shorter booms of smaller sails will keep weather helm under control. I'd say that boat will sail reasonably well.

 

The spec was for the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers. I guess some cruising was suggested, but I think it's better suited for daysailing. There are plenty of strings to pull. The biggest issue I have is that to go forward from the helm, you have to over the house. Note the cargo hold just in front of the house. The spec called for bulky stuff and the portable toilet were to go there.

 

Bolger was very conservative about toe-in on leeboards. He thought too many people use too much, and suggested about 1 degree for this boat. I'm a sloppy carpenter, and I couldn't build a boat one degree of accuracy. This is one of several designs about which Bolger remarked that the deep rocker makes for quick turning.

 

As far as I know, this design never got beyond the proposal stage, as show. However, there is no reason to suppose I would know if it had.

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I know he was usually quite focused on what would work (and quite unconcerned with what was pretty) but I have to agree with RKoch on that boat. Anything more than a ripple under power would result in ventilation of the engine.

 

 

How fast do you think the 6hp engine was going to drive a 3350lb boat? On one hand, Bolger had more experience with these crude boat shapes than just about anyone. On the other hand, he did have a his share of problems, including on this own boat, Resolution.

 

In this case, it's a shanty boat. It's not meant to be a pleasure sailer; it only meant to be able to get around and not have to be towed if the shanty has to be relocated from, say, Stonington to Mystic. It's assumed you can pick your tide weather.

 

RKoch is a Right-Thinking Boatman, and therefore a target of the joke.

 

 

I think the 6 hp should be on a dink towing that barge, which shouldn't have a sailing rig either. It would start to make some sense to me as a barge.

 

If someone built one we'd have more info but I can't see anyone doing it.

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The spec was for the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers. I guess some cruising was suggested, but I think it's better suited for daysailing.

 

 

That area is known as 'the delta', and it is mostly a lot of channels formed by dykes built by the army corps of engineers, some of it quite shallow.

There isn't any fetch, so the water is pretty flat. But the narrow channels can mean a lot of tacking and gybing, so manuverability is important.

It's popular for 'cruising', but that translates into 'parking, fishing, swimming and drinking'.

I'd say the design might be a good horse for that course.

 

Ok, there are a couple of larger bays that do build up some chop, which can be worsened by tidal current. And you can get to the larger SF bay and beyond pretty easily.

 

bedroom1_zps852ec664.jpg

 

That's a place called "The Bedroom". I kept going.

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mostly a lot of channels formed by dykes built by the army corps of engineers

Well who built it? The dykes, or the ACOE? Talk about mental...

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How about "mental sailors". Going back in history there is evidence that Slocum did suffer from mental health in his later life, Moitessier lying about the storm off Cabo San Lucas, the Crowhurst ordeal in the Golden Globe, the fictional life of Tristan Jones.

Do you have favorite crazy people in the sailing Gotha?

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Yes, Tristan Jones! I enjoyed many of his books (apparently mostly fiction), but could not make myself finish reading "To Venture Further". It was just too creepy. It gave me the impression that Jones had a thing for young boys.

 

Wayward Sailor: In Search of the Real Tristan Jones was an eye-opening biography.

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Adrian Hayter. A painful read. At times I wanted to cheer for the guy, but his poor preparation and sailing skills left me furious. IDK if he was crazy, maybe he had depression. It was a difficult read.

 

Capt Voss was crazy.

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Hmm... I can't think of one I've read that wasn't a bit mental.

 

Becoming a fictional character sounds like an interesting retirement option. Might be difficult at ports of entry though.

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Another vote for Tristan Jones here.

 

The younger Webb Chiles had issues, I'm sure, especially around the time he sank Resurgam. He seems to have mellowed with age, like a good Scotch and seems to be a much happier man now.

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Adrian Hayter. A painful read. At times I wanted to cheer for the guy, but his poor preparation and sailing skills left me furious. IDK if he was crazy, maybe he had depression. It was a difficult read.

 

Capt Voss was crazy.

I agree. I think damaged by the war.

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Valis mentioned this, ahh, record attempt a few posts back. It's topping my rankings for current mental boats. Unless it's a hoax, the plan is to cross the Atlantic in a 3'6" "boat".

 

 

"Matt is set to begin his two- to three-month voyage in his little boat March 2017 and anticipates an average of 2.5kts. Though he’ll carry a full complement of navigational electronics, power generation, and emergency gear, he will eschew a support boat, as did all the previous record holders. For sustenance he will bring dehydrated meal packs, fishing gear, and a pair of desalinators."

 

-from http://www.allatsea.net/that-little-boats-going-where/

 

 

 

 

post-31152-0-03059500-1486327668_thumb.jpg

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Yes, Tristan Jones! I enjoyed many of his books (apparently mostly fiction), but could not make myself finish reading "To Venture Further". It was just too creepy. It gave me the impression that Jones had a thing for young boys.

 

Wayward Sailor: In Search of the Real Tristan Jones was an eye-opening biography.

 

 

You think?

 

The book was titled, "Wayward Sailor: In Search of the Real Tristan Jones." And Jones, apparently, was a complete fraud! Everything about him that was public knowledge either was exaggerated or an outright lie. That included his year of birth, his place of birth, his parentage, his sailing service in the Royal Navy and his ocean adventures.

Always regarded as a terrific storyteller, Jones seemingly employed imagination rather than adapting reality to the page.

From his introduction and in subsequent interviews, author Dalton seems more surprised than the rest of us.

"One accidentally discovered falsehood led inexorably to another and another," he wrote.

Jones claimed 345,000 miles under sail in boats shorter than 40 feet, said he crossed the Atlantic 19 times, nine of them solo, and that he was born at sea on his father's ship in 1924. Actually, just for starters, Dalton said, Jones had far less experience at sea, was born on land, never knew his father and was 5 years younger. Jones never faced that polar bear. He never sailed so far or experienced many of his wonderfully described adventures.

Dalton stitched together so many contrasting accounts from one-time crew members and official log books that it is beyond a shadow of doubt that Jones could not have been everywhere he said he went, nor done everything he said he did.

"Wayward Sailor" is amazing for its ability to unravel the web of lies and half-truths Jones concocted. It is fascinating as it probes Jones' motivations--fame and a desperate desire to rise from poverty.

For those of us who loved Tristan Jones' prose, we are sorry to see him debunked, although we are glad it comes after his death. More than that, we remain pleased that--true or not--he still had within him such terrific stories to entertain us.

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Fact is an optional element of travel writing: Bruce Chatwin's In Patagonia is based on a lying premise; the most famous scene in Patrick Leigh-Fermor's A time of Gifts involves riding across the Hungarian Steppes - the Steppes were there, but the horse was made up; Norman Lewis's books are magnificent accounts of his travels, and monstrously unreliable - a beautiful bit of writing describes a grenade attack in a Vietnamese market. The writing is so good you feel that you were there, which shows what a wonderful writer he is, for he wasn't there either.

 

The Welsh poet and artist David Jones wrote of that rare state, "where truth and fact combine".

 

I'm surprised no one has brought up Bill Tilman as a sailor of "mental boats". There's a bitter shitfight going on between his supporters and his decryers, both of whom have much evidence on their side. But he wasn't a fabricator in the way that the above are, and Tristan Jones is.

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Tilman wrote some great stories! Please don't tell me they were fiction!

Even Tristan Jones' advice is strange. In his book "One Hand for Yourself, One for the Ship: The Essentials of Single-Handed Sailing" he advocated keeping a fothering cloth permanently rigged to the bow, with deployment lines led aft.

 

(Fothering: Covering a leak in a ship with a sail containing rope fibres to prevent it from sinking after being damaged)

 

OK, not exactly a horrible idea, but where does that fall in the spectrum of likely critical problems?

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Bill Tillman is the reason all my boats have "Mischief" in their names

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Farley Mowat said it best when he was caught in some BS; "Never let the truth get in the way of a good story".

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Markus, you remember the Marijuana Hauler on N Dale Mabry?

Can't say that I do. Whereabouts on Dale Mabry?

I do remember the Mons Venus on Dale Mabry, along with The Seven Seas on Kennedy.

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Markus, you remember the Marijuana Hauler on N Dale Mabry?

Can't say that I do. Whereabouts on Dale Mabry?

I do remember the Mons Venus on Dale Mabry, along with The Seven Seas on Kennedy.

This was way north, where Dale Mabry went to two-lane. Time frame of '82-'85, pretty sure you were still around. Guy built a 75' shrimp boat in his front yard, bow hung over the highway...pic above very similar. After being rust-colored for several years, he painted it chrome yellow...I thought it was primer, but it turned out to be finish coat. A few weeks later in green 3' high letters down side was "Marijuana Hauler" and a big green leaf on bow. About that time I was giving Abbie Hoffman a ride to airport (your old Van BTW). Had time to kill so I took him by the Marijuana Hauler. He was howling with laughter, made me do several passes by.

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Imo Manry planned his trip pretty well, and seemed a fairly normal person.

 

 

But isn't that what they always say? "He seemed to be such a normal person!"

 

I suppose there's a fine line, and all that. Manry wrote a very nice book about his Tinkerbelle experience. "Father's Day" was another good story.

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Valis mentioned this, ahh, record attempt a few posts back. It's topping my rankings for current mental boats. Unless it's a hoax, the plan is to cross the Atlantic in a 3'6" "boat".

 

 

"Matt is set to begin his two- to three-month voyage in his little boat March 2017 and anticipates an average of 2.5kts. Though he’ll carry a full complement of navigational electronics, power generation, and emergency gear, he will eschew a support boat, as did all the previous record holders. For sustenance he will bring dehydrated meal packs, fishing gear, and a pair of desalinators."

 

-from http://www.allatsea.net/that-little-boats-going-where/

 

 

 

 

 

There's another pic of that tiny boat on his FB page that shows what's on the side better.

 

I know it well. It's a 15 gallon tank commonly used by rednecks to spray herbicide and stuff like that. The flat spot on it is where the motor goes.

 

On mine, the caps are vented. I guess they make solid caps too.

 

I never really viewed them as things that should be strapped to the side of an ocean-crossing vessel.

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Valis mentioned this, ahh, record attempt a few posts back. It's topping my rankings for current mental boats. Unless it's a hoax, the plan is to cross the Atlantic in a 3'6" "boat".

 

 

"Matt is set to begin his two- to three-month voyage in his little boat March 2017 and anticipates an average of 2.5kts. Though he’ll carry a full complement of navigational electronics, power generation, and emergency gear, he will eschew a support boat, as did all the previous record holders. For sustenance he will bring dehydrated meal packs, fishing gear, and a pair of desalinators."

 

-from http://www.allatsea.net/that-little-boats-going-where/

 

 

 

 

 

There's another pic of that tiny boat on his FB page that shows what's on the side better.

 

I know it well. It's a 15 gallon tank commonly used by rednecks to spray herbicide and stuff like that. The flat spot on it is where the motor goes.

 

On mine, the caps are vented. I guess they make solid caps too.

 

I never really viewed them as things that should be strapped to the side of an ocean-crossing vessel.

 

 

The mast must do double duty as a freekin snorkel.

Here's another image:

post-31152-0-54655400-1486485947_thumb.jpeg

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2QfkGyD.jpg

It's practically standing still now they've dropped ropes out of the nose of the ship; and (uh) they've been taken ahold of down on the field by a number of men. It's starting to rain again; it's... the rain had (uh) slacked up a little bit. The back motors of the ship are just holding it (uh) just enough to keep it from...It's burst into flames! Get this, Charlie; get this, Charlie! It's fire... and it's crashing! It's crashing terrible! Oh, my! Get out of the way, please! It's burning and bursting into flames and the... and it's falling on the mooring mast. And all the folks agree that this is terrible; this is the worst of the worst catastrophes in the world. Oh it's... [unintelligible] its flames... Crashing, oh! Four- or five-hundred feet into the sky and it... it's a terrific crash, ladies and gentlemen. It's smoke, and it's in flames now; and the frame is crashing to the ground, not quite to the mooring mast. Oh, the humanity! And all the passengers screaming around here. I told you; it – I can't even talk to people, their friends are on there! Ah! It's... it... it's a... ah! I... I can't talk, ladies and gentlemen. Honest: it's just laying there, mass of smoking wreckage. Ah! And everybody can hardly breathe and talk and the screaming. I... I... I'm sorry. Honest: I... I can hardly breathe. I... I'm going to step inside, where I cannot see it. Charlie, that's terrible. Ah, ah... I can't. Listen, folks; I... I'm gonna have to stop for a minute because I've lost my voice. This is the worst thing I've ever witnessed.

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You guys have it all wrong! That big aerodynamically-shaped balloon-like object isn't a dirigible. You may notice that it has no means of propulsion. Instead, it's there to keep the boat from sinking. It's a *heavy* boat (granite counters, ICBM missile, etc.), and the freeboard is already dangerously low. Without the extra positive air-buoyancy it would never stay afloat.

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I guess any submarine would fit here?Das_Boot.jpg

Das Boot, 1981

In the 80's into the 90's crewing on the Holland 41 Redeye, we would have a preseason crew meeting and watch Das Boot, because it closely reflected life on board an old IOR one-tonner.....

Oh yeah, Redeye was truly a "mental" boat.

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"Undaunted" turns back in first attempt

SAIL1-GOPR0428_67249612_177861092_696126

Undaunted – the 42-inch yacht still hoping to become the smallest boat ever to cross the Atlantic
Read more at Yachtingworld.com

 

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Undaunted didn't turn back, it turned around to do it in the harder direction.

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