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      Abbreviated rules   07/28/2017

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wristwister

What is it, PNW?

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Any of you locals know anything about this beast?

 

I was up in Anacortes moving my boat back to her slip and this monster came by, being towed into place by a couple dinghys. I asked the guys working her if it was a new boat and if it was built in Anacortes, yes on both counts. I'd estimate it to be around 80 feet. Can't say I'm enamored by her lines, but I'd give my left nut to take her through the islands for a week.

 

gallery_35769_392_5089.jpg

 

gallery_35769_392_42975.jpg

 

 

 

 

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It kind of looks like a J111 pumped up to 100 psi. Once loaded and on it's lines with the rig on it should look better, but still too much freeboard.

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It kind of looks like a J111 pumped up to 100 psi. Once loaded and on it's lines with the rig on it should look better, but still too much freeboard.

Raceboats don't need freeboard, fast passagemakers do.

 

I like it.

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How tall is the rig?

 

*edit*

http://www.jpdonovandesign.com/new_site/index.php/projects/current-projects/t4-project

 

From Sail Magazine:

"in Anacortes, Washington, White Knight Yachts is building an 87-footer to a Jim Donovan design. The new T4 cruiser-racer maxi, as its being called, will feature a lifting keel, hydraulic winches, a carbon rig, dual helms and an expansive teak deck."

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Wow Fantastic News That will be a Serious Beast in a Breeze

some serious tenacity to stay with the project through to completion with the various curve balls thrown at him

I would say a true renaissance man

 

post-3763-1254593097_thumb.jpg

 

image002.gif Yes Varan ..love the 20'+

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On its way to Canada, I wonder why????

 

 

........3rd world labor rates. :mellow:

Canadian Dollar 1 CAD = 0.763452 USD

 

 

And old world quality.

 

its been in Anacortes for 4+ years...... whats taken so long? its 9 months to build an open 60, or if you push hard something like Comanche.

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There's a finished Perry design sitting in a building in North Carolina thats never been splashed!

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Tbone is correct. That is the project that has been dragging on in Anacortes for the last few years. It's heading north to have the interior finished as I heard.

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On its way to Canada, I wonder why????

 

60 days is all you get in Washington before the tax man cometh.

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On its way to Canada, I wonder why????

60 days is all you get in Washington before the tax man cometh.

That 60 days starts after it has been commissioned and delivery to the owner has taken place,

Although I don't know the final closing status on this boat.

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I believe the owner completed this boat on his own. So the 60 days starts when it "enters the waters of the state of Washington".

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On its way to Canada, I wonder why????

 

60 days is all you get in Washington before the tax man cometh.

 

 

Yes, but you can also file for a 60 day extension-- one time, I think.

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Any of you locals know anything about this beast?

 

I was up in Anacortes moving my boat back to her slip and this monster came by, being towed into place by a couple dinghys. I asked the guys working her if it was a new boat and if it was built in Anacortes, yes on both counts. I'd estimate it to be around 80 feet. Can't say I'm enamored by her lines, but I'd give my left nut to take her through the islands for a week.

 

gallery_35769_392_5089.jpg

 

gallery_35769_392_42975.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

Good luck tacking her through any of the passes, or anchoring her in any of the scenic bays. She's be great offshore, in the bahamas or S.Pac. Useless in the SJI's.

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What are the handles on the starboard stern just above the waterline? Is that a suction cup device that is just on there temporarily?

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What are the handles on the starboard stern just above the waterline? Is that a suction cup device that is just on there temporarily?

 

Something to do with the rudders I would guess. Exactly what, IDK.

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Good luck tacking her through any of the passes, or anchoring her in any of the scenic bays. She's be great offshore, in the bahamas or S.Pac. Useless in the SJI's.

 

 

Useless? C'mon. Hardly. Sure you couldn't go through Mosquito Pass with that draft (not a big loss), but otherwise, where couldn't go in the SJI's that you can with a 40 footer and 7' draft. I can't think of any place. With a non-overlapping headsail you could doublehand that thing all over the SJI's. It would be a blast.

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Good luck tacking her through any of the passes, or anchoring her in any of the scenic bays. She's be great offshore, in the bahamas or S.Pac. Useless in the SJI's.

 

 

Useless? C'mon. Hardly. Sure you couldn't go through Mosquito Pass with that draft (not a big loss), but otherwise, where couldn't go in the SJI's that you can with a 40 footer and 7' draft. I can't think of any place. With a non-overlapping headsail you could doublehand that thing all over the SJI's. It would be a blast.

 

 

Yup,

 

A lot of boats do clang into rocks in PNW, but it's usually due to navigational errors.

 

I think i read somewhere in SA where Bob Perry said that for PNW, he likes boats with as much draft as possible - because draft is not an issue here..

 

MInd you, i'm just going by recollection - Bob may have something different to say about it.

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Good luck tacking her through any of the passes, or anchoring her in any of the scenic bays. She's be great offshore, in the bahamas or S.Pac. Useless in the SJI's.

 

 

Useless? C'mon. Hardly. Sure you couldn't go through Mosquito Pass with that draft (not a big loss), but otherwise, where couldn't go in the SJI's that you can with a 40 footer and 7' draft. I can't think of any place. With a non-overlapping headsail you could doublehand that thing all over the SJI's. It would be a blast.

 

 

Yup,

 

A lot of boats do clang into rocks in PNW, but it's usually due to navigational errors.

 

I think i read somewhere in SA where Bob Perry said that for PNW, he likes boats with as much draft as possible - because draft is not an issue here..

 

MInd you, i'm just going by recollection - Bob may have something different to say about it.

 

 

 

It's difficult enough with a 40'er getting around the Salish. Lack of winds and lots of boat traffic makes sailing a challenge. Multiply that by linear feet and you end up with a motorsailor instead of enjoyable passage. Most tacks last no more than fifteen minutes, if there is even wind.

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It's difficult enough with a 40'er getting around the Salish. Lack of winds and lots of boat traffic makes sailing a challenge. Multiply that by linear feet and you end up with a motorsailor instead of enjoyable passage. Most tacks last no more than fifteen minutes, if there is even wind.

 

 

 

It's quite easy to get around the Salish in a large boat properly designed for it. That would be one without sails and with a reliable diesel motor. Sails are relatively useless where there is no wind, unless you are in love with the romance of having them furled on the boom. I have seen such proper PNW vessels 175' long even up the Malibu Straights in Princess Louisa - mind you that would take some balls.

 

:)

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It's difficult enough with a 40'er getting around the Salish. Lack of winds and lots of boat traffic makes sailing a challenge. Multiply that by linear feet and you end up with a motorsailor instead of enjoyable passage. Most tacks last no more than fifteen minutes, if there is even wind.

 

 

 

It's quite easy to get around the Salish in a large boat properly designed for it. That would be one without sails and with a reliable diesel motor. Sails are relatively useless where there is no wind, unless you are in love with the romance of having them furled on the boom. I have seen such proper PNW vessels 175' long even up the Malibu Straights in Princess Louisa - mind you that would take some balls.

 

:)

 

 

You just got a bad year. Usually we get at least thirty days a year with wind in February alone.

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It's difficult enough with a 40'er getting around the Salish. Lack of winds and lots of boat traffic makes sailing a challenge. Multiply that by linear feet and you end up with a motorsailor instead of enjoyable passage. Most tacks last no more than fifteen minutes, if there is even wind.

 

 

 

It's quite easy to get around the Salish in a large boat properly designed for it. That would be one without sails and with a reliable diesel motor. Sails are relatively useless where there is no wind, unless you are in love with the romance of having them furled on the boom. I have seen such proper PNW vessels 175' long even up the Malibu Straights in Princess Louisa - mind you that would take some balls.

 

:)

 

 

You just got a bad year. Usually we get at least thirty days a year with wind in February alone.

 

 

 

I've had some great conditions in the Salish, but overall I found myself motoring more than sailing. Gotta catch the tides right getting across the Strait, or through the pass, or before the winds die. Let's not forget the usual encounter with aggressive ferry boat captains. I moved to San Diego and have been sailing a ton more due to the spectacular sailing conditions and infinite amount of sea room for long tacks. Instead of tacking a bazillion times to go north, I just stay on one tack until I'm a little more than half way there, then tack back. Wow. Easy.

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You just got a bad year. Usually we get at least thirty days a year with wind in February alone.

 

 

 

I guess that is my problem. Growing up and learning to sail on San Francisco Bay, I am used to 60 days of wind in February.

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It's difficult enough with a 40'er getting around the Salish. Lack of winds and lots of boat traffic makes sailing a challenge. Multiply that by linear feet and you end up with a motorsailor instead of enjoyable passage. Most tacks last no more than fifteen minutes, if there is even wind.

 

 

 

It's quite easy to get around the Salish in a large boat properly designed for it. That would be one without sails and with a reliable diesel motor. Sails are relatively useless where there is no wind, unless you are in love with the romance of having them furled on the boom. I have seen such proper PNW vessels 175' long even up the Malibu Straights in Princess Louisa - mind you that would take some balls.

 

:)

 

 

You just got a bad year. Usually we get at least thirty days a year with wind in February alone.

 

 

Ish,

 

That is a pretty good stat you provided about the winds on the Salish Sea! Who would have ever guessed they could be so consistent. That must be why a well designed sailboat for that area really needs a 182 deg AVS...

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I moved to San Diego and have been sailing a ton more due to the spectacular sailing conditions and infinite amount of sea room for long tacks. Instead of tacking a bazillion times to go north, I just stay on one tack until I'm a little more than half way there, then tack back. Wow. Easy.

 

I've wondered why the PNW produces superior sailors.

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Good luck tacking her through any of the passes, or anchoring her in any of the scenic bays. She's be great offshore, in the bahamas or S.Pac. Useless in the SJI's.

Useless? C'mon. Hardly. Sure you couldn't go through Mosquito Pass with that draft (not a big loss), but otherwise, where couldn't go in the SJI's that you can with a 40 footer and 7' draft. I can't think of any place. With a non-overlapping headsail you could doublehand that thing all over the SJI's. It would be a blast.

Yup,

 

A lot of boats do clang into rocks in PNW, but it's usually due to navigational errors.

 

I think i read somewhere in SA where Bob Perry said that for PNW, he likes boats with as much draft as possible - because draft is not an issue here..

 

MInd you, i'm just going by recollection - Bob may have something different to say about it.

 

It's difficult enough with a 40'er getting around the Salish. Lack of winds and lots of boat traffic makes sailing a challenge. Multiply that by linear feet and you end up with a motorsailor instead of enjoyable passage. Most tacks last no more than fifteen minutes, if there is even wind.

You'll spend far less time motoring this big boat than a typical 40' cruising boat. Far less.

 

Can't agree on the lack of wind and traffic making sailing a challenge. We sail the majority of the time. Helps to have a boat that sails well in light air.

 

15 minutes on one tack is a long time if you spend any time racing.

 

I guess we just see it differently. The boat would be a blast for us in the Salish. For you, maybe not.

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I moved to San Diego and have been sailing a ton more due to the spectacular sailing conditions and infinite amount of sea room for long tacks. Instead of tacking a bazillion times to go north, I just stay on one tack until I'm a little more than half way there, then tack back. Wow. Easy.

 

Too funny. We moved from the PNW to San Diego and found sailing in SD incredibly boring. Mostly light winds, large swell, and nowhere to go. You just sailed out until you got bored and then turned around. Much prefer the variety of passes and channels in the Salish. Lots of sail handling keeps it intersting.

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I moved to San Diego and have been sailing a ton more due to the spectacular sailing conditions and infinite amount of sea room for long tacks. Instead of tacking a bazillion times to go north, I just stay on one tack until I'm a little more than half way there, then tack back. Wow. Easy.

Too funny. We moved from the PNW to San Diego and found sailing in SD incredibly boring. Mostly light winds, large swell, and nowhere to go. You just sailed out until you got bored and then turned around. Much prefer the variety of passes and channels in the Salish. Lots of sail handling keeps it intersting.

 

 

 

...sounds like you got out of SD before your brain got bleached. :mellow:

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I moved to San Diego and have been sailing a ton more due to the spectacular sailing conditions and infinite amount of sea room for long tacks. Instead of tacking a bazillion times to go north, I just stay on one tack until I'm a little more than half way there, then tack back. Wow. Easy.

Too funny. We moved from the PNW to San Diego and found sailing in SD incredibly boring. Mostly light winds, large swell, and nowhere to go. You just sailed out until you got bored and then turned around. Much prefer the variety of passes and channels in the Salish. Lots of sail handling keeps it intersting.

 

 

 

https://www.instagram.com/p/BQ_E3z4BFe3/

 

https://www.instagram.com/p/BQtFtdIhy8v/

 

Yep super boring here.

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I've wondered why the PNW produces superior sailors.

 

 

Nobody can snoop out a little puff and take advantage of it like a PNW racer. I'm still way behind the learning curve on this. My strategy, if the good racers are all going in a weird direction that makes no sense to me, trust them and go there too.

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It's the new Trader!!!

 

I think 'new' is a bit of a stretch considering when this project got started. I'm amazed it even splashed and a lot of people got screwed over by FD on the way.

 

-Snap

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if the good racers are all going in a weird direction that makes no sense to me, trust them and go there too.

...and that *is* the one thing boring about racing in the Sound. The prevailing tactic for many boats seems to be "find someone named Buchan or McKee and follow them around the race course".

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That doesn't always work in tricky conditions. Look at the results from yesterday. I have to wonder how much racing you've done here to form that opinion.

 

I love the puzzle of racing here, even on frustrating light air days when I get a dnf. I still have a lot to learn out here.

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