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bhyde

Lake Oroville Dam - Stand Back

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Just pipped me to it. stay safe.

 

thought you left for good mr/mizz 666 - post on anything in any country

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For a state with water problems, that has to feel pretty ironic.

Stay safe!

 

it is yet in another way we have water problems

 

in the worst of the drought they dumped millions of gallons at a time up and down the coast "For Safety"

 

and like a boat that been splashed it's too late to do everything that Should have been done @ Low Tide

 

AND Much More Rain headed there way

 

One way or another when all this Rain quits Pouring Down "We'll be Short of Water"

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Giant Power Towers at risk next to spillway

 

who would put them there ?

 

Here is a story that Missed the Mark by a Lifetime

 

The Public is in No Danger !!!

 

http://sacramento.cbslocal.com/2017/02/10/maintenance-records-show-oroville-dam-spillway-previously-patched/

 

 

Maintenance Records Show Oroville Dam Spillway Previously Patched
February 10, 2017 5:23 PM By Drew Bollea

OROVILLE (CBS13) — Water continues to pour over the heavily damaged spillway at the Oroville Dam, as the lake level continues to rise towards the crest of the emergency spillway.

As of 5 p.m. on Friday, the dam was at 897.59 feet of its 900-foot capacity. The emergency spillway would kick if it reaches 901 feet. Inflows to the lake have dropped significantly, from nearly 180,000 cubic feet per second on Thursday night to just less than 116,000 on Friday.

The Department of Water Resources says it’s pushing 65,000 cubic feet of water per second through the damaged spillway. The erosion has tripled since Tuesday.

There may have been some warning signs from the past.

Problems at the Oroville spillway were known.

A picture shot by Lois Cameron from 2013 shows crews examining an issue around the area of the current hole.

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Credit: Lois Cameron

“There were some patches needed and so we made repairs and everything checked out,” said Kevin Dossey, a Senior Civil Engineer with the Department of Water Resources. “It looked like it would be able to hold, be able to pass water.”

Dossey says this sort of thing is routine.

“It’s common for spillways to develop a void because of the drainage systems under them,” said Dossey.

While everything may have appeared normal back in 2013, 2014, and 2015; what happened Tuesday when the earth gave way, is anything but.

“There wasn’t any evidence that anything more needed to be done,” said Dossey, “repairs were smooth and looked like they were good and secure.”

Engineers are forced to release water over the damaged spillway as it continues to eat away earth.

“At this flow right now we do not anticipate any water going over the emergency spillway,” said Eric See, a spokesperson with DWR.

With water inching towards the brim of the emergency spillway, crews are clearing the emergency spillway path just in case. They’re removing trees and debris.

Two high voltage power lines are also being removed by PG&E crews.

“We are taking the powerlines off the lines, they’ve already been deenergized and we’ll be disassembling the towers piece by piece,” said Paul Moreno, a PG&E spokesperson.

It would be the first time ever that water has gone over the emergency spillway, if the levels reach 900 feet.

Officials stressed that the dam is secure and unharmed.

“It’s not a flood event,” said See. “It’s not the kind of event that’s going to create flooding.”

The inspection reports in the last 3 years check out. Only referencing previous patchwork. By all indications the spillway was solid.

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Sadly predictable "leaky roof" problem. No urgency to fix until you can't.

 

State has steadfastly made other spending choices than maintaining infrastructure.

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Sadly predictable "leaky roof" problem. No urgency to fix until you can't.

 

State has steadfastly made other spending choices than maintaining infrastructure.

 

 

Bringing up hopes of Federal Aid

 

Kalifornia spends all its money on homeless Bums

 

is Burning bridges with Fed Gubermint

 

And now has 160,000 People removed from their Homes

 

wonder how the looters are doing tonight ??

 

This Especially if the 50' tall wall of water (or the whole Dam) wipes out all structures down stream

 

There will be Building Restrictions put in place trill everyone forgets in about 5 min

 

I'm Surprised in DAGO they don't build New Housing on the beach in the wet sand at Low Tide

 

I Really feel Bad about all those effected as Not much can be done to "Permanently FIX" the situation

 

This would be a Bad time for an EarthQuake

 

 

And WTF with a 900' Tall by 3000'+ Wide Dam made of Dirt :o

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Damn! That dam could be a damed shame.

 

 

All State offices should be built into Dam Spillways

 

they would be maintained

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dwr is a fucking mess of an agency and having worked with them the best description i can come up with is semi-competent. totally not surprised this one is getting away from them

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I really, really like the part where the power to control the dam is supplied by power lines run in the path of the overflow. (This is not an Armagedon movie script, this is real public sector engineering).

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dwr is a fucking mess of an agency and having worked with them the best description i can come up with is semi-competent. totally not surprised this one is getting away from them

Couldn't agree more. They routinely brought 3-5 Civil Engineers to a $250,000 project. Took months for design work of a rock weir to get fishies upstream. They seemed more concerned about the thickness of the file than results.

 

In other news, billions that could have been used to ensure dam safety were instead used to build a bridge that came in at 3x the original cost and a whole bunch more billions of Gov. Moonbeam's medium speed rail line from Fresno to Bakersfield (if you arent from California you ave to google those cities to find out where they are - that's how important they are).

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dwr is a fucking mess of an agency and having worked with them the best description i can come up with is semi-competent. totally not surprised this one is getting away from them

Couldn't agree more. They routinely brought 3-5 Civil Engineers to a $250,000 project. Took months for design work of a rock weir to get fishies upstream. They seemed more concerned about the thickness of the file than results.

 

In other news, billions that could have been used to ensure dam safety were instead used to build a bridge that came in at 3x the original cost and a whole bunch more billions of Gov. Moonbeam's medium speed rail line from Fresno to Bakersfield (if you arent Even if you are from California you have to google those cities to find out where they are - that's how important they are).

 

FIFY.

 

Take it out of their pensions...

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Where is Trumps $Trillion for infrastructure?

 

This is not a WPA project, it was a CVP C being for California... They made million$ from the water to the farms and electricity to the homes and business..... Why not take some of that money and reinvest in your infrastructure... mainly the tool that is making the money..

 

The knew of a possible failure in 2015 when they discovered "the" crack.... why was it not fixed then?

 

I hope this bites Jerry Brown in the ass...

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I was looking at that system since Friday. It's massive and Dry Shirt is monitoring it too for all Californians. Not looking good as the system hasn't even got there yet. More like late Tuesday and Wed. is the brunt of it. Unfortunately there are two lows right behind them - Fridayish? Might be just us (BC/WA) for the last ones but be aware.

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That boat launch parking lot he's flying over was underwater this morning.

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I would not sleep comfortably anywhere downstream again

 

That's a Liquid Glacier / Tsunami and NOT much will remain close to where it was once GAWD pulls the handle & Flushes it

 

Too bad we don't have a bunch of moonbeams Fast Rail cars to dump in the hole for ripwrap

 

where are 180,000 + people going to go now & for how long & then what ???

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That boat launch parking lot he's flying over was underwater this morning.

 

 

ad_234833698.jpg?quality=80&strip=all&st

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ok - so now i see it's just the spillway that is expected to fail - not the dam

 

i think earlier there was a chance of the dam failing

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ok - so now i see it's just the spillway that is expected to fail - not the dam

 

i think earlier there was a chance of the dam failing

 

Supposedly, erosion of a failed spillway back into the dam itself is a relatively common cause of failure of earthen dams. Hence the evacuation order.

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ok - so now i see it's just the spillway that is expected to fail - not the dam

 

i think earlier there was a chance of the dam failing

 

Supposedly, erosion of a failed spillway back into the dam itself is a relatively common cause of failure of earthen dams. Hence the evacuation order.

 

 

i read that

 

in this case it looks like the spillway is adjacent to the dam, not on like in some cases, but there is still a chance of damage

 

also, if i read correctly - a lot of the footage in the videos posted are not even the "main" spillway - they are actually the auxiliary spillway

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Where is Trumps $Trillion for infrastructure?

you can only tell someone so many times that he isn't your president before he starts to believe you.

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ok - so now i see it's just the spillway that is expected to fail - not the dam

 

i think earlier there was a chance of the dam failing

 

Supposedly, erosion of a failed spillway back into the dam itself is a relatively common cause of failure of earthen dams. Hence the evacuation order.

 

 

i read that

 

in this case it looks like the spillway is adjacent to the dam, not on like in some cases, but there is still a chance of damage

 

also, if i read correctly - a lot of the footage in the videos posted are not even the "main" spillway - they are actually the auxiliary spillway

 

 

Looking at the dam area from in front of the dam, the dam is the big V shaped critter to the extreme right of the pictures. Unlike some dam's there isn't a spillway internal with the dam itself. A spillway is a section of a dam with gates that can be shut or opened partially/fully to release water from behind the dam. For this dam, the spillway is the straight concrete section just to the left of the dam. Then....just a little further to the left and adjacent to the parking lot is the "emergency spillway" which is simply a wall set at the maximum height of the water desired behind the dam. Below that wall is just the planted hillside and some rocks. That is a gravity spillway meaning if the water level behind the dam exceeds the maximum allowable height (the height of the emergency spillway wall), excess water will simply flow over the wall and down the hill tumbling over the landscape. There are no gates or controls for that, it simply overflows the "basin" behind the damn at that place....I think it like 1000 yards long. Its kinda like the little hole in the side of your bathroom sink bowl. If you keep filling the basin, once it gets to the level of the hole or "emergency spillway wall", any further filling simply runs out the hole and down the drain....or in this case over the wall, down the hill and into the river and subsequent retarding basin below that. The dam was never in danger of breaking. In keeping with the design and operational specifications, when the water reached a certain level and continued to rise, they opened the spillway gates to keep the water level down but pretty quickly the water eroded a existing crack in the concrete spillway about 1/2 down into a big crater. That is the location on the lower spillway you see the water shooting back up into the air as it tries to flow through/into that hole that is getting larger. Now, I suppose if that hole were to really fail deeper and wider as the released water continues to erode it....it theoretically COULD erode back into the earthen dam itself or laterally across the face of the dam causing it to fail. To the left of that controlled/gated spillway is the water passively flowing over the stationary wall or "emergency spillway" and down the hill through the landscape. That could also be a problem if the water erodes the earthen structure behind it and compromises the integrity of the wall underneath.

 

So.........now the water has stopped rising and the combination of the water over the emergency spillway and the released water in the concrete spillway and the flow is over. So they closed the gates on the concrete spillway and the passive flow over the emergency spillway has stopped because the water is below the height of that wall. Now if you watch the news you'll see engineers checking out the hole in the concrete spillway and figuring out what to do before the next rain late this week. They will worry about the erosion back into the dam if they have to reopen the spillway gates to lower the water behind the dam with the new rain and runoff. Don't forget, all the rain the last month or two has saturated the ground so most of what falls is now runoff.

 

We have a number of earthen dams (none anywhere near that big though) in the area I worked with significant development and population below the dam and have contingency plans similar to what I have described above for a variety of failures. There is even a point where without any dam or spillway failure, the rate of release in order to keep ahead of the fill rate from rain and runoff, in order to keep the dam from failing exceeds the ability of the downstream drainage system and retarding basins to handle and flooding will still occur. The idea in managing it is better to have slow flowing flooding from intentional releases in some areas than hang on and have a catastrophic failure that sends a 30 foot wall of water and debris racing downhill/downstream.

 

We were close on one dam once during my career. The projections were not pretty.

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then there is this gem in my city: http://www.morganhilltimes.com/news/community/anderson-retrofit-project-cost-jumps-to-m/article_dd839be8-ddbd-11e6-a4ee-afd954bf88ad.html

 

where they built it on top of a fault.

 

currently nearly full, which is higher than the target of 65%

The link didn't work.

I found the Dam on Google Earth. Sure is a load of development below that dam....

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now, the newscasters get all hot and bothered with this type of story - but sounds like the worse case is that the water again breaches the emergency spillway, that gets eroded and basically it's top gets pulled further and further down, letting more and more water come. So the 200k people evac is due to that spillway eroding and basically becoming a new river channel - bypassing the main dam. Damn.

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now, the newscasters get all hot and bothered with this type of story - but sounds like the worse case is that the water again breaches the emergency spillway, that gets eroded and basically it's top gets pulled further and further down, letting more and more water come. So the 200k people evac is due to that spillway eroding and basically becoming a new river channel - bypassing the main dam. Damn.

Your'e pretty much right on. I don't think anyone believes the erosion will weaken the main dam. I'm told most of the current concern is focused on the emergency spillway. Apparently some pretty good erosion below the emergency spillway concrete wall happened during the passive overflow. The legitimate concern is if the wall is sufficiently undermined and fails partially or all, then the rate of sudden uncontrolled passive release could be unbelievable and quickly overwhelm downstream flood control infrastructure. If the wall is say....30 feet high and fails at once then the release is 30 feet of water across the whole basin behind the dam through a 1000' wide opening. That would be an "oh my" moment.

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now, the newscasters get all hot and bothered with this type of story - but sounds like the worse case is that the water again breaches the emergency spillway, that gets eroded and basically it's top gets pulled further and further down, letting more and more water come. So the 200k people evac is due to that spillway eroding and basically becoming a new river channel - bypassing the main dam. Damn.

Your'e pretty much right on. I don't think anyone believes the erosion will weaken the main dam. I'm told most of the current concern is focused on the emergency spillway. Apparently some pretty good erosion below the emergency spillway concrete wall happened during the passive overflow. The legitimate concern is if the wall is sufficiently undermined and fails partially or all, then the rate of sudden uncontrolled passive release could be unbelievable and quickly overwhelm downstream flood control infrastructure. If the wall is say....30 feet high and fails at once then the release is 30 feet of water across the whole basin behind the dam through a 1000' wide opening. That would be an "oh my" moment.

 

 

 

A wall of water 30' Tall and 1,000' Long and 10' wide would be devastating ripping its way to the ocean

 

BUT a 30' Tall by 1,000' Wide Flow Non Stop till the Lake is down 30'

 

AND More as soon as the Rain starts again is for me Unimaginable !!

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Oroville Dam

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
It has been suggested that 2017 Oroville Dam crisis be merged into this article. (Discuss) Proposed since February 2017. Oroville Dam 220px-OrovilleDam.jpg
200px-Relief_map_of_California.png
8px-Red_pog.svg.png
Oroville Dam
Country United States Location Oroville, California Coordinates 39°32′20″N121°29′08″WCoordinates: 39°32′20″N 121°29′08″W Purpose Water supply, flood control, power Status Operational Construction began 1961 Opening date May 4, 1968 Owner(s) California Department of Water Resources Dam and spillways Type of dam Zoned Earthfill Impounds Feather River Height (foundation) 770 ft (234.7 m)[1] Length 6,920 ft (2,109.2 m)[1] Dam volume 77,619,000 cu yd (59,344,000 m3) Spillway type Service, 8x gate-controlled Spillway capacity 250,000 cu ft/s (7,100 m3/s) Reservoir Creates Lake Oroville Total capacity 3,537,577 acre·ft (4.363537 km3)[2] Inactive capacity 29,600 acre·ft (0.0365 km3)[3]Catchment area 3,607 sq mi (9,340 km2)[2] Surface area 15,805 acres (6,396 ha)[2] Normal elevation 901 ft (274.6 m) (spillway crest)[4] Power station Hydraulic head 615 ft (187.5 m)[5] Turbines 3x conventional
3x pump-generators Installed capacity 819 MW[5] Annual generation 1,490 GWh[6]Website
Oroville Dam

Oroville Dam is an earthfill embankment dam on the Feather River east of the city of Oroville, California, in the United States. At 770 feet (234.7 m) high, it is the tallest dam in the U.S.[7] and serves mainly for water supply, hydroelectricity generation and flood control. The dam impounds Lake Oroville, the second largest man-made lake in the state of California, capable of storing more than 3.5 million acre-feet (4.4 km3),[8] and is located in the Sierra Nevada foothills east of the Sacramento Valley.

Built by the California Department of Water Resources (DWR), Oroville Dam is one of the key features of the California State Water Project (SWP), one of two major projects passed that set up California's statewide water system. Construction was initiated in 1961, and despite numerous difficulties encountered during its construction, including multiple floods and a major train wreck on the rail line used to transport materials to the dam site, the embankment was topped out in 1967 and the entire project was ready for use in 1968. The dam began to generate electricity after completion of the Edward Hyatt Pump-Generating Plant, then the country's largest underground power station.

Since its completion in 1968, the Oroville Dam has allocated the flow of the Feather River from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta into the State Water Project's California Aqueduct, which provides a major supply of water for irrigation in the San Joaquin Valley as well as municipal and industrial water supplies to coastal Southern California, and has prevented large amounts of flood damage to the area – more than $1.3 billion between the years of 1987 and 1999.[9]The dam has confined fish migration up the Feather River and the controlled flow of the river as a result of the Oroville Dam has affected riparian habitat. Multiple aims at trying to counter the dam's impacts on anadromous fish have included the construction of a salmon/steelhead incubator on the river which began shortly after the dam was completed.

After heavy rains in February 2017, an anticipated failure of the auxiliary spillway resulted in the mass evacuation of people living or working in the river basin.

 

 

History Planning

In 1935, work began on the Central Valley Project (CVP), a federal water project that would develop the Sacramento and San Joaquin river systems for irrigation of the highly fertile Central Valley. However, after the end of World War II in 1945, the state experienced an economic boom that led to rapid urban and commercial growth in the central and southern portions of the state, and it became clear that California's economy could not depend solely on a state water system geared primarily towards agriculture. A new study of California's water supplies by the Division of Water Resources (now California Department of Water Resources, DWR) was carried out under an act of the California State Legislature in 1945.[10]

In 1951, California State Engineer A.D. Edmonston proposed the Feather River Project, the direct predecessor to the SWP, which included a major dam on the Feather River at Oroville, and aqueducts and pumping plants to transfer stored water to destinations in central and southern California. The proposed project was strongly opposed by voters in Northern California and parts of Southern California that received water from the Colorado River, but was supported by other Southern Californians and San Joaquin Valley farmers. However, major flooding in the 1950s prompted the 1957 passage of an emergency flood-control bill that provided sufficient funding for construction for a dam at Oroville – regardless of whether it would become part of the SWP.[10][11]

Construction

Groundbreaking on the dam site occurred in May 1957 with the relocation of the Western Pacific Railroad tracks that ran through the Feather River canyon. The Burns-Porter Act, which authorized the SWP, was not passed until November 8, 1960 – and only by a slim margin.[10][11] Engineer Donald Thayer of the DWR was commissioned to design and head construction of Oroville Dam, and the primary work contract was awarded to Oro Dam Constructors Inc., a joint venture led by Oman Construction Co.[12]

Two concrete-lined diversion tunnels, each 4,400 feet (1,341.1 m) long and 35 feet (10.7 m) in diameter, were excavated to channel the Feather River around the dam site. One of the tunnels was located at river level and would carry normal water flows, while the second one would only be used during floods.[13] In May 1963, workers poured the last of 252,000 cubic yards (193,000 m3) of concrete that comprised the 128 feet (39.0 m) high cofferdam, which would protect the construction site from floods. This structure would later serve as an impervious core for the completed dam. With the cofferdam in place, an 11-mile (18 km) rail line was constructed to move earth and rock to the dam site. An average of 120 train cars ran along the line each hour, transporting fill that was mainly excavated from enormous piles of hydraulic mining debris that were washed down by the Feather River after the California Gold Rush.[14]

On December 22, 1964, disaster nearly struck when the Feather River, after days of heavy rain, reached a peak flow of 250,000 cubic feet per second (7,100 m3/s) above the Oroville Dam site. The water rose behind the partially completed embankment dam and nearly overtopped it, while a maximum of 157,000 cubic feet per second (4,400 m3/s) poured from the diversion tunnels. This Christmas flood of 1964 was one of the most disastrous floods on record in Northern California, but the incomplete dam was able to reduce the peak flow of the Feather River by nearly 40 percent, averting massive amounts of damage to the area.[15][16] Ten months later, four men died in a tragic accident on the construction rail line. On October 7, 1965, two 40-car work trains, one fully loaded and the other empty, collided head-on at a tunnel entrance, igniting 10,000 US gallons (38,000 l) of diesel fuel, completely destroying the two locomotives. The burning fuel from the collision started a forest fire that burned 100 acres (40 ha) before it could be extinguished. The crash delayed construction of the Dam by a week while the train wreckage was cleared.[17]

Oroville Dam was designed to withstand the strongest possible earthquake for the region, and was fitted with hundreds of instruments that serve to measure water pressure and settlement of the earth fill used in its construction, earning it the nickname "the dam that talks back".[18] (It is believed that a MW 5.7 earthquake in the Oroville area in 1975 was caused by induced seismicity from the weight of the Oroville Dam and reservoir itself on a local fault line.[19]) The embankment was finally topped out on October 6, 1967, with the last of 155 million tons (140.6 million t) of material that took over 40,000 train trips to transport.[14] On May 4, 1968, Oroville Dam was officially dedicated by the state of California. Among the notable figures present were California governor Ronald Reagan, who spoke,[20][21][22]Chief Justice (formerly California governor) Earl Warren, Senator Thomas Kuchel, and California Representative Harold T. "Bizz" Johnson.[23] The dedication was accompanied by a week of festivities in nearby Oroville, attended by nearly 50,000 people.[24]

2005 dam re-licensing

On October 17, 2005 three environmental groups filed a motion with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission urging federal officials to require that the dam’s emergency spillway be armored with concrete, rather than remain as an earthen spillway and that it did not meet modern safety standards. "In the event of extreme rain and flooding, fast-rising water would overwhelm the main concrete spillway, then flow down the emergency spillway, and that could cause heavy erosion that would create flooding for communities downstream, but also could cause a failure, known as 'loss of crest control.'" FERC and water agencies responsible for the cost of the upgrades said it was unnecessary and concerns were overblown.[25][26]

In 2006, a senior civil engineer sent a memo to his managers stating “The emergency spillway meets FERC’s engineering guidelines for an emergency spillway,” and that “The guidelines specify that during a rare flood event, it is acceptable for the emergency spillway to sustain significant damage."[27]

Spillway inspections

The spillway cracked in 2013. A Senior Civil Engineer with the Department of Water Resources was interviewed by the Sacramento Bee and explained, “It’s common for spillways to develop a void because of the drainage systems under them” and “There were some patches needed and so we made repairs and everything checked out.”[28]

In July 2015, the state Division of Safety of Dams inspected the dam visually "from some distance."[29]

2017 spillway failure
This section documents a current event. Information may change rapidly as the event progresses, and initial news reports may be unreliable. The last updates to this section may not reflect the most current information. (February 2017)(Learn how and when to remove this template message)
220px-Oroville_dam.jpg
Partial view of the spillway structure next to Oroville Dam with the main service spillway (right) and emergency spillway (left) (2008)
Initial spillway damage

After a period of heavy rain, on February 7, 2017, during ongoing flood control release of about 50,000 cubic feet per second (1,400 m3/s), a crater appeared in the Oroville Dam spillway.[30] High inflows to Lake Oroville forced dam operators to continue using the damaged spillway, causing additional damage. By February 10, the spillway hole had grown to 300 feet (91.4 m) wide, 500 feet (152.4 m) long and 45 feet (13.7 m) deep.[31] Meanwhile, debris from the crater in the main spillway was carried downstream, and caused damage to the Feather River Fish Hatchery due to high turbidity.[32] State workers began evacuating fish and eggs from the hatchery in an attempt to mitigate the damage.[33][34]

Although engineers had hoped that using the damaged spillway could drain the lake enough to avoid use of the auxiliary spillway,[35] they were forced to reduce its discharge from 65,000 cu ft/s (1,800 m3/s) to 55,000 cu ft/s (1,600 m3/s) due to potential damage to power lines.[36][37]

Emergency spillway use and evacuation

Measures were taken to prepare the emergency spillway – officially known as the auxiliary spillway – for use for the first time. On February 10, 2017, power transmission lines were moved, and workers began clear-cutting trees on the hillside below the auxiliary spillway.[38]

Shortly after 8:00 am on February 11, 2017, the auxiliary spillway began carrying water for the first time since the dam's construction in 1968.[39] Because the spillway was a separate structure from the dam, officials stated that there was no danger of the main embankment being breached, and evacuation of Oroville itself was not considered at that time, as officials stated that there was no threat to public safety. Once the lake rose to the level of the auxiliary spillway top, an uncontrolled overflow that topped out at 12,600 cu ft/s (360 m3/s)[40][41] began, and water flowed directly onto the earthen hillside below the concrete crest of the auxiliary spillway.

On February 12, 2017, evacuation was ordered for those in low-lying areas along the Feather River Basin in Butte, Yuba and Sutter counties, due to an anticipated failure of the auxiliary spillway.[42] Specifically, erosion on the hillside was growing uphill toward the concrete lip of the auxiliary spillway, leading to the fear that it would collapse. A failure of the concrete top of the spillway would allow up to 30 feet (9.1 m) vertical of Lake Oroville through the gap in an uncontrolled deluge.[43] The flow over the main spillway was increased to 100,000 cu ft/s (2,800 m3/s) to try to slow the erosion of the auxiliary spillway.[44]

By 8 p.m. on the evening of February 12, the increased flow had successfully lowered the water level to below the auxiliary spillway top, causing the auxiliary spillway to stop overflowing. However, evacuation orders were not rescinded. The stop in water flow allowed the erosion there to be hastily inspected and stabilized with boulders.[43] Engineers worried that the damage would be transferred to the main spillway, not only making future repairs more expensive, but also that the damage to the main spillway could grow uphill to the point that it endangered the main spillway gates, leaving no safe way to release water. The extent of such damage was unknown, hidden by water spray and darkness; it was expected to be assessed on the morning of the 13th.[43]

By February 13, 188,000 people in the vicinity were reported evacuated.[45]

Operations Hydro-electricity
220px-Oroville.jpg
Aerial view showing Lake Oroville (right), Oroville Dam (bottom right), and Thermalito Forebay (center, bottom)

Construction of the underground Edward Hyatt Pump-Generating Plant was finished shortly after the completion of Oroville Dam. At the time, it was the largest underground power station in the United States,[14] with three 132 megawatt (MW) conventional turbines and three 141 MW pump-generators for a total installed capacity of 819 MW.[5] The Hyatt Powerplant is capable of pumping water back into Lake Oroville when surplus power is available. The pump-generators at Hyatt can lift up to 5,610 cubic feet per second (159 m3/s) into Lake Oroville (with a net consumption of 519 MW), while the six turbines combined utilize a flow of 16,950 cubic feet per second (480 m3/s) at maximum generation.[46]

Since 1969, the Hyatt plant has worked in tandem with an extensive pumped-storage operation comprising two offstream reservoirs west of Oroville. These two facilities are collectively known as the Oroville-Thermalito Complex.[47] Water is diverted into the upper Thermalito reservoir (Thermalito Forebay) via the Thermalito Diversion Dam on the Feather River. During periods of off-peak power use, surplus energy generated at Hyatt is used to lift water from Thermalito's lower reservoir (the Thermalito Afterbay) to the forebay, which releases water back into the afterbay to generate up to 114 MW of power at times of high demand.[48] The Hyatt and Thermalito plants produce an average of 2.2 billion kilowatt hours (KWh) of electricity each year, about half of the total power produced by the SWP's eight hydroelectric facilities.[49][50]

Irrigation

Water released from Oroville Dam travels down the Feather River before joining with the Sacramento River, eventually reaching the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, where the SWP's California Aqueduct diverts the freshwater for transport to the arid San Joaquin Valley and Southern California. Oroville-Thermalito hydroelectric facilities furnish about one-third of the power necessary to drive the pumps that lift the water in the aqueduct from the delta into the valley, and then from the valley over the Tehachapi Mountains into coastal southern California.[50][51] Water and power from the dam contributes to the irrigation of 755,000 acres (306,000 ha) in the arid San Joaquin Valley Westside and municipal supplies to some 25 million people.[52]

Flood control

During the winter and early spring, Lake Oroville is required to have at least 750,000 acre feet (0.93 km3), or a fifth of the reservoir's storage capacity, available for flood control.[53] The dam is operated to maintain an objective flood-control release of 150,000 cubic feet per second (4,200 m3/s), which may be further reduced during large storms when flows below the Feather's confluence with the Yuba River exceed 300,000 cubic feet per second (8,500 m3/s).[54] In the particularly devastating flood of 1997 inflows to the reservoir hit more than 331,000 cubic feet per second (9,400 m3/s), but dam operators managed to limit the outflow to 160,000 cubic feet per second (4,500 m3/s), sparing large regions of the Sacramento Valley from flooding.[55][56]

Feather River Fish Hatchery

Oroville Dam completely blocks the anadromous migrations of Chinook salmon and steelhead trout in the Feather River. In 1967, in an effort to compensate for lost habitat, the DWR and the California Department of Fish and Game completed the Feather River Fish Hatchery.[57] The Fish Barrier Dam, built in 1962, intercepts salmon and trout before they reach the base of the impassable Thermalito Diversion Dam and forces them to swim up a fish ladder to the hatchery, which is located on the north bank of the Feather River. The hatchery produces 450,000 trout smolt to stock in the river each year, along with 10 million salmon smolt.[58] The salmon smolt are released in two runs, with 20% for the spring run and 80% for the fall run. This facility has been successful enough that there is concern that salmon of hatchery stock are out-competing remaining wild salmon in the Feather River system.[59][60]

See also

 

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You would be surprised how many earthen dams are built all over the state many right next to or in fairly populated areas.

 

There was a place out in Santa Clarita area we used to got dirt bike riding way back when.... now there is nothing but McMansions and strip malls there..

 

One day we came across the huge concrete blocks in the middle of nowhere... Got home that night and told my neighbor about it and he told me it was probably from the St. Francis damn when it failed in the 20's.... It killed over 400 people. This chalked up to be considered one of the worst American civil engineering disasters of the 20th century and the end of Mulholland's career.

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1951-68 State Water Project to Move Water South Around Delta Centered on Oroville Dam



1951-60%20SWP%20d%20CA%20Delta%20South%21951-60%20SWP%20a%20CA%20State%20Water%21951-60%20SWP%20h%20CA%20Oroville%20Dam%


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If Lake MI fluctuates so much, what makes people think they can control levels on a relatively small body of water?

It goes up and down pretty fast. That's why I have a seawall and boulders buried under 20' of sand. Until it's not.

 

Haven't seen the wall since the '80's. My upper retainer is somewhere in the rocks. I'll see that wall again someday.

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Holy crap!!

 

Would somebody find out if Woody is gonna make us take a test tomorrow please?

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earlier today i read that the danger had (mostly) passed - has that changed?

2017044_2330rb.jpg

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Holy crap!!

 

Would somebody find out if Woody is gonna make us take a test tomorrow please?

 

 

I got a copy of the test from the guys at Delta House.. Here are a few of them...

 

1.) How many bong loads does Woody do in a day?

 

A.) 1

 

B.) 5

 

C.) Lost count

 

D.) Who cares... he is whacked out anyway.

 

2.) What is the average bust of the girls in Woody's photos?

 

A.) 36

 

B.) 34

 

C.) 38

 

D.) Doesn't matter they're fake anyway.

 

E.) They're Couger hooters.... run!!!!

 

3.) Woody has mastered what language?

 

A.) Rwingrish

 

B.) Woodinese

 

C.) Snagleese

 

D.) None, he didn't get past 7th grade English

 

Keep it up Woodman... this is a valuable service to the community...

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This is coming on like the San-O nuke failure and closing. Like....'we couldn't test the emergency spillway'...yadda, yadda.

 

Holy hell, the DWR is praying that rain coming this week is cold Nor'easter and goes to snow. Otherwise, Pineapple Express warm stuff and this prolly gets way worse in a hurry. Sorry for all those folks who trusted DWR would get this figured out.

 

Just wow.

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Anyone want to guess who the gov of Ca. was during construction? Talk about sins of the father...

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This is coming on like the San-O nuke failure and closing. Like....'we couldn't test the emergency spillway'...yadda, yadda.

 

Holy hell, the DWR is praying that rain coming this week is cold Nor'easter and goes to snow. Otherwise, Pineapple Express warm stuff and this prolly gets way worse in a hurry. Sorry for all those folks who trusted DWR would get this figured out.

 

Just wow.

 

Sorry - the next system is coming straight out of Hawaii. In the south coast of BC and PNW of WA we have gone from freezing temperatures and snow in very short period time; a couple of days - tops. The artic flow from the interior is gone.

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Anyone want to guess who the gov of Ca. was during construction? Talk about sins of the father...

 

Pat Brown... but the way the Rachelle Mad-Cow painted the picture, you would think it was all Ron Reagan's fault...

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Anyone want to guess who the gov of Ca. was during construction? Talk about sins of the father...

 

You giving Goodwin Knight a pass because he was a Republican? Or just because he was there for planning only?

You've had 50 years of governance - both party's - and you piss it away a little bit at a time no matter who's in office. Wake the fuck up.

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Anyone want to guess who the gov of Ca. was during construction? Talk about sins of the father...

 

You giving Goodwin Knight a pass because he was a Republican? Or just because he was there for planning only?

You've had 50 years of governance - both party's - and you piss it away a little bit at a time no matter who's in office. Wake the fuck up.

 

 

Down Cujo, just amused that any shortcuts that were taken during the construction phase happened under the aegis of the current governator's father.

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sorry, just get grumpy at the finger pointing over shared resources and shared problems that preclude solutions, and pretty much have for 20 years, leading to California being a life hostile dump imo.

 

 

looking at pictures elsewhere it looks like the bedrock the emergency spillway was on was weaker than thought and moving towards the emergency spillway faster than thought, hence possible failure. As they were reinforcing the side of the main spillway next to the emergency spillway with rock and concrete, likely they were worried about that failing.

 

and while the dam might not "fail" an uncontrolled release of 10' of water would likely cause the levee system down stream to fail. Or portions there of.

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I just checked a comment I heard that it is the highest dam in the USA.

 

That fucker is 50% taller than the Grand Coulee dam. It's a monster.

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View from my deck, Yolo Bypass is flooded in the far distance, never have seen it this large in the 35 years I've been watching it. Folsom Lake in the foreground has been going up and down like a yoyo, full in this shot, barely visible the day before. Buildings in downtown Sacramento show the water behind them. It will be a big lake if Oroville fails.

16700266_1019947384804227_77205797782378

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View from my deck, Yolo Bypass is flooded in the far distance, never have seen it this large in the 35 years I've been watching it. Folsom Lake in the foreground has been going up and down like a yoyo, full in this shot, barely visible the day before. Buildings in downtown Sacramento show the water behind them. It will be a big lake if Oroville fails.

 

 

We can only hope... maybe enough water moves, we can crack off the rest of the state..

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You would be surprised how many earthen dams are built all over the state many right next to or in fairly populated areas.

I grew up downstream from an earthen dam, I'll take that over a deep concrete dam, with all that hydraulic pressure. I read Cadillac Desert, I think one of the points of Reisner was that the Army Corps of Engineers eventually moved into earthen dams because their chance for catastrophic failure was less.

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Anyone want to guess who the gov of Ca. was during construction? Talk about sins of the father...

You giving Goodwin Knight a pass because he was a Republican? Or just because he was there for planning only?

You've had 50 years of governance - both party's - and you piss it away a little bit at a time no matter who's in office. Wake the fuck up.

It's very, very difficult to keep dams properly maintained when that funds weren't sufficiently allocated. Western water had fifty years of good reliability because of all the failures before that.

 

Now we'll start to reallocate to dam maintenance. But it's less a political fault than the nature of squeaky wheels using up the grease.

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You would be surprised how many earthen dams are built all over the state many right next to or in fairly populated areas.

I grew up downstream from an earthen dam, I'll take that over a deep concrete dam, with all that hydraulic pressure. I read Cadillac Desert, I think one of the points of Reisner was that the Army Corps of Engineers eventually moved into earthen dams because their chance for catastrophic failure was less.

 

 

Katrina failed concrete drainage canal floodwall dams in the City. Earthen dams along the river, held.

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You would be surprised how many earthen dams are built all over the state many right next to or in fairly populated areas.

I grew up downstream from an earthen dam, I'll take that over a deep concrete dam, with all that hydraulic pressure. I read Cadillac Desert, I think one of the points of Reisner was that the Army Corps of Engineers eventually moved into earthen dams because their chance for catastrophic failure was less.

 

 

Katrina failed concrete drainage canal floodwall dams in the City. Earthen dams along the river, held.

 

 

Which is exactly why this one is an issue. It's not the earthen dam that's the problem. It's the concrete "emergency spillway" weir that's having it's substructure washed out, and unless the water's landing zone is loaded with rip-rap, it will fail - with some bad results. Lots of rain and snow-melt yet to happen, so I don't see any of those evacuees going home any time soon.

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You would be surprised how many earthen dams are built all over the state many right next to or in fairly populated areas.

I grew up downstream from an earthen dam, I'll take that over a deep concrete dam, with all that hydraulic pressure. I read Cadillac Desert, I think one of the points of Reisner was that the Army Corps of Engineers eventually moved into earthen dams because their chance for catastrophic failure was less.

Katrina failed concrete drainage canal floodwall dams in the City. Earthen dams along the river, held.

I didn't know that, I thought that the problem was neglected infrastructure. They knew that levee was riddled with nutria dens, but it hadn't failed so it got low priority on maintenance. But you say that those held?

 

One of the pretty cool retrofits after Katrina was they ran giant pizza cutter looking machines to the top of the levee and sliced trenches vertically into the earth, then filled it with concrete. They then let the ground water leache in from the bottom, added water on top and then mixed it with that pizza cutter thing. It hardens in place with an earthen form.

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Holy crap!!

 

Would somebody find out if Woody is gonna make us take a test tomorrow please?

I'm pretty sure his Mom helped him with his science fair project...

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Calling evacuations is a colossal pain. Been part of the discussion many times. Made the call myself a handful of times. Let's just say hindsight is always 20/20 and you can't make everybody happy. Never had to deal with one this big! Wow!

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Not sure I understand why they are letting people return. The weather starting late tonight and early tomorrow looks pretty bad. Several days of rain, heavy at times, with fairly warm temperatures preventing snow accumulation at lower elevations. Highway 80 and 50 both have active mudslides indicating saturation conditions throughout most of the western Sierras. Glad I don't have to make that call.

 

I'll be in Truckee tomorrow. Hopefully the rain will be lighter than predicted. Yuck!

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The ground is severely saturated, immediate runoff. Will be an interesting weekend.

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This is a chance for people to pack up things that can't be replaced

 

As well as things needed to get by and possibly start over elsewhere

 

Roads Should be full of moving vans

 

People have been givin a chance to go back

 

No one said the Danger is Over for any spefic timeframe

 

This is a realtime horror movie

 

I hope people figure out who couldn't leave the first time

 

and get them relocated out of harms way

 

And YES this has really bothered me to think about all those helpless people

 

This is far from the end of the story

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Puts an interesting perspective on emergency preparedness, when you might have to move livestock, not just pets

 

Most folks with livestock are pretty good at it. At least in Cal where rural areas get evacuated from time to time because of brushfires. There is a certain size where evacuation just does not happen though. For instance, you can evacuate a couple or even a handful of family horses etc by yourself and most do. They actually have a pretty good group that all helps each other by showing up in the impacted areas with their own trailers etc and they have agreements with one another for hauling/housing. It usually goes pretty smooth with the occasional unprepared person that needs to be plugged into the animal control system for assistance in locating resources that will/can help....for exorbitant fees of course.

 

Now big numbers.........say cattle in the 50-100 or larger herd size. They just are not going to get evacuated. Usually they leave them in a meadow in a large pen and hope for the best (if there is sufficient setback from the brush) or just turn them loose and figure the cattle will figure it out themselves and then round them up afterwards. Really the choice depends on the vegetation and countryside. I have actually made a protective stand with a firing operation (ya'll would call it "backfiring") in a meadow like area with about 50 cattle in a pen. It got pretty dicey but we got it done. The cattle were pretty freaked out as the fire approached and I was worried they'd bust out of the pen and bolt but they did not. Just lots of mooing and running in circles in the pen.

 

Once we had a brushfire run onto a very rural exotic animal "zoo" with lions and tigers and bears oh my etc in big cages. The fire didn't hit very hard so it was easy but there wasn't gonna be any evacuation of that place..............

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Looks like the repair is coming along nicely. From the video, it looks like they have been able to drop the lake level at least 10 feet using the main spillway. Using helicopters to haul rock! Man that's expensive, but under the circumstances, a lot cheaper than the alternative.

 

http://www.krcrtv.com/news/local/butte/oroville-emergency-spillway-repairs-could-be-complete-weds/334788238

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Anyone want to guess who the gov of Ca. was during construction? Talk about sins of the father...

 

You giving Goodwin Knight a pass because he was a Republican? Or just because he was there for planning only?

You've had 50 years of governance - both party's - and you piss it away a little bit at a time no matter who's in office. Wake the fuck up.

 

 

 

The Oroville Dam has been a ticking time bomb for years. Governor Jerry Brown just put out his $100 billion 'wish list' of infrastructure projects, but the Oroville Dam is wasn't even mentioned in it. Most of the projects on the list involve transportation-related projects such as highways, bridges, rail, or transit. Oroville is the state's second-largest reservoir and experts have been warning about its failure for years. But Jerry Brown would rather pay attention to and spend money on High Speed Rail and fighting immigration law rather than spend money on fixing our water infrastructure. Our wet years are cyclical, this kind of thing will happen again.

 

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Anyone want to guess who the gov of Ca. was during construction? Talk about sins of the father...

 

You giving Goodwin Knight a pass because he was a Republican? Or just because he was there for planning only?

You've had 50 years of governance - both party's - and you piss it away a little bit at a time no matter who's in office. Wake the fuck up.

 

 

 

The Oroville Dam has been a ticking time bomb for years. Governor Jerry Brown just put out his $100 billion 'wish list' of infrastructure projects, but the Oroville Dam is wasn't even mentioned in it. Most of the projects on the list involve transportation-related projects such as highways, bridges, rail, or transit. Oroville is the state's second-largest reservoir and experts have been warning about its failure for years. But Jerry Brown would rather pay attention to and spend money on High Speed Rail and fighting immigration law rather than spend money on fixing our water infrastructure. Our wet years are cyclical, this kind of thing will happen again.

 

 

 

 

Not the first they have heard of the potential problem.........but infrastructure repairs don't get you the warm fuzzy feeling/feedback that our elected officials crave.

 

http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2017-02-14/activists-warned-officials-about-oroville-dam-12-years-ago-nobody-listened

 

 

Three environmental groups — the Friends of the River, the Sierra Club and the South Yuba Citizens League — filed a motion with the federal government on Oct. 17, 2005, as part of Oroville Dam’s relicensing process, urging federal officials to require that the dam’s emergency spillway be armored with concrete, rather than remain as an earthen hillside.”

 

The environmental groups’ 2005 filing with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission expressed concern over the exact situation at risk of unfolding now. They warned that in the “event of extreme rain and flooding, fast-rising water would overwhelm the main concrete spillway, then flow down the emergency spillway, and that could cause heavy erosion that would create flooding for communities downstream, but also could cause a failure, known as ‘loss of crest control.’”

 

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Anyone want to guess who the gov of Ca. was during construction? Talk about sins of the father...

 

You giving Goodwin Knight a pass because he was a Republican? Or just because he was there for planning only?

You've had 50 years of governance - both party's - and you piss it away a little bit at a time no matter who's in office. Wake the fuck up.

 

 

 

The Oroville Dam has been a ticking time bomb for years. Governor Jerry Brown just put out his $100 billion 'wish list' of infrastructure projects, but the Oroville Dam is wasn't even mentioned in it. Most of the projects on the list involve transportation-related projects such as highways, bridges, rail, or transit. Oroville is the state's second-largest reservoir and experts have been warning about its failure for years. But Jerry Brown would rather pay attention to and spend money on High Speed Rail and fighting immigration law rather than spend money on fixing our water infrastructure. Our wet years are cyclical, this kind of thing will happen again.

 

 

 

 

Why budget for something, when you can let it become a major problem and then beg the Fed's for money?

 

16640863_840653712741885_440196155440193

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