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      Abbreviated rules   07/28/2017

      Underdawg did an excellent job of explaining the rules.  Here's the simplified version: Don't insinuate Pedo.  Warning and or timeout for a first offense.  PermaFlick for any subsequent offenses Don't out members.  See above for penalties.  Caveat:  if you have ever used your own real name or personal information here on the forums since, like, ever - it doesn't count and you are fair game. If you see spam posts, report it to the mods.  We do not hang out in every thread 24/7 If you see any of the above, report it to the mods by hitting the Report button in the offending post.   We do not take action for foul language, off-subject content, or abusive behavior unless it escalates to persistent stalking.  There may be times that we might warn someone or flick someone for something particularly egregious.  There is no standard, we will know it when we see it.  If you continually report things that do not fall into rules #1 or 2 above, you may very well get a timeout yourself for annoying the Mods with repeated whining.  Use your best judgement. Warnings, timeouts, suspensions and flicks are arbitrary and capricious.  Deal with it.  Welcome to anarchy.   If you are a newbie, there are unwritten rules to adhere to.  They will be explained to you soon enough.  
Presuming Ed

New 6 metre. Much like a hippo.

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First new boat in 17 years, world must be running out of classics to rebuild. Don't see shapes like that much anymore. Good racing, though.

 

999c95_cfca18f39f224f2e89603c17fab2c66c~

 

https://www.6metre.com/news

 

17 years after Juliane Hempels Kontrapunkt a new 6Metre is on the way! After a dynamic fleet building in Spain in the last two years, where several boats went south, Mauricio Sánchez-Bella informed us about the latest development. Star naval architect Juan K was involved in the design process, and if you look at his outstanding designs in last years it will be fascinationg to see who he construed the old formula. We are in contact with Maurizio and he will soon give us more informations.

Here first picture of the hull.

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Fast or slow is only part of it.

Meter boats have a formula with a lot of factors that has to come out to the class number, 6 in this case, 12 for the old AC boats. The bustle may allow another feature that allows more speed than the bustle loses. Maybe a deeper keel or more sail area or ???

A good math major on staff is good for maximizing meter boats ;)

I don't know nuthin', but... that distorted bustle doesn't look fast.

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IIRC length is measured between girths. There's a lot of displacement, bustle helps pushing some aft to increase Cp and speed. S&S tank tested them extensively leading up to Intrepid, besides real life testing in the RORC One-tonners he did.

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First new boat in 17 years, world must be running out of classics to rebuild. Don't see shapes like that much anymore. Good racing, though.

 

999c95_cfca18f39f224f2e89603c17fab2c66c~

 

https://www.6metre.com/news

 

17 years after Juliane Hempels Kontrapunkt a new 6Metre is on the way! After a dynamic fleet building in Spain in the last two years, where several boats went south, Mauricio Sánchez-Bella informed us about the latest development. Star naval architect Juan K was involved in the design process, and if you look at his outstanding designs in last years it will be fascinationg to see who he construed the old formula. We are in contact with Maurizio and he will soon give us more informations.

Here first picture of the hull.

 

And people talk about IOR boats being distorted

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First new boat in 17 years, world must be running out of classics to rebuild. Don't see shapes like that much anymore. Good racing, though.

 

999c95_cfca18f39f224f2e89603c17fab2c66c~

 

https://www.6metre.com/news

 

17 years after Juliane Hempels Kontrapunkt a new 6Metre is on the way! After a dynamic fleet building in Spain in the last two years, where several boats went south, Mauricio Sánchez-Bella informed us about the latest development. Star naval architect Juan K was involved in the design process, and if you look at his outstanding designs in last years it will be fascinationg to see who he construed the old formula. We are in contact with Maurizio and he will soon give us more informations.

Here first picture of the hull.

And people talk about IOR boats being distorted
Trying to make the Rule think the boat is short, while trying to make the water think the boat is long. Sometimes it works, sometimes not.

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Imagine spending so much money to go so slow. How many boats will they get a the 6 metre worlds?

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Imagine spending so much money to go so slow. How many boats will they get a the 6 metre worlds?

While I have similar questions, there are 25 signed up so far and I've apparently agreed to sail in it.

 

Yikes.

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6 meters are cool. Absolute speed not necessary with good tactical racing. Sounds like a blast.

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6 meters are cool. Absolute speed not necessary with good tactical racing. Sounds like a blast.

Definitely its Gentleman racing, lots of fun!

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Imagine spending so much money to go so slow. How many boats will they get a the 6 metre worlds?

 

While I have similar questions, there are 25 signed up so far and I've apparently agreed to sail in it.

 

Yikes.

25 is a pretty good fleet. When you compare racing 6 metres to smilier sporting events like Penny farthing bike races, the numbers are pretty good.

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The 'speed' thing is highly over-rated...

Yep. Popular classes like Lightnings, Scots, Snipes, and Sunfish have good close racing despite not being latest fastest designs. A 45 minute race is a 45 minute race...doesn't matter how much distance it covers.

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Imagine spending so much money to go so slow. How many boats will they get a the 6 metre worlds?

While I have similar questions, there are 25 signed up so far and I've apparently agreed to sail in it.

 

Yikes.

25 is a pretty good fleet. When you compare racing 6 metres to smilier sporting events like Penny farthing bike races, the numbers are pretty good.

2015 Six Meter Worlds

 

Open Divison: 19 boats

 

Classic Divison: 23 boats

 

https://6metreworlds.com/results/

 

Two starts each race. Open first followed by Classic in five minutes.

 

Minimum 5 to 8 races each division

 

http://www.snt-voile.org/media/si_gbr_6mji__2015__055661700_1153_21052015.pdf

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Imagine spending so much money to go so slow. How many boats will they get a the 6 metre worlds?

While I have similar questions, there are 25 signed up so far and I've apparently agreed to sail in it.

 

Yikes.

25 is a pretty good fleet. When you compare racing 6 metres to smilier sporting events like Penny farthing bike races, the numbers are pretty good.
2015 Six Meter Worlds

 

Open Class: 19 boats

 

Classic Class: 23 boats

 

https://6metreworlds.com/results/

That's a lot more boats than those America's Cup thingies.

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The 'speed' thing is highly over-rated...

Yep. Popular classes like Lightnings, Scots, Snipes, and Sunfish have good close racing despite not being latest fastest designs. A 45 minute race is a 45 minute race...doesn't matter how much distance it covers.

Until someone gets Juan K to design them a new 300k sunfish...

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The 'speed' thing is highly over-rated...

 

i prefer nordic skiing to alpine skiing

 

the 6m is a cool class - very high-end events in europe..,

 

but most people here would disapprove because of the way they are ruining sailing: you have to wear a blazer to some of the social events!

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It is lucky for fat chicks that some guys prefer bangin, well fat chicks.

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.

 

...wow,,no secondguessing what comes off Jaunky's draftingboard.

 

 

 

 

........let's dream for a moment that the twin tipped turd is fast,,,,

 

.......what happens to 6m's from there!!?? :mellow:

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Well the old ones still race in the classic class and can ignore this boat and the new ones will eventually look like this if they want to win or someone will make an even faster shape or maybe it sucks and there are no more. It *is* a development rule after all ;)

.

 

...wow,,no secondguessing what comes off Jaunky's draftingboard.

 

 

 

 

........let's dream for a moment that the twin tipped turd is fast,,,,

 

.......what happens to 6m's from there!!?? :mellow:

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Nothing too unusual going on with the stern - pretty typical of a modern 6mR. Designers in this class like to push as much underwater volume as far aft as possible.

 

Bow is atypical for a 6. Either very short overhang or maybe none at all, i.e. a destroyer bow. No sign of a chin or "bow bustle" which almost all modern ones have. Likely a trick of the light, but it almost looks like it has something like spray rails - although if so then certainly not there for that purpose.

 

For those who think these are slow, yeah they are never going to plane, but there aren't too many boats that can touch these in light air.

 

We used to enjoy beating up on 2 Tons in light air in the old 6 (built in the '50s) and we could hang with a J/36 up to maybe 12 kts.

 

In the first race of a regatta, the 2 Tons (about a half dozen of them) let us have the pin -within a few minutes we had "crossed" the entire fleet without having thrown in a tack. They didn't make the same mistake the second day.

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Nothing too unusual going on with the stern - pretty typical of a modern 6mR. Designers in this class like to push as much underwater volume as far aft as possible.

 

Bow is atypical for a 6. Either very short overhang or maybe none at all, i.e. a destroyer bow. No sign of a chin or "bow bustle" which almost all modern ones have. Likely a trick of the light, but it almost looks like it has something like spray rails - although if so then certainly not there for that purpose.

 

For those who think these are slow, yeah they are never going to plane, but there aren't too many boats that can touch these in light air.

 

We used to enjoy beating up on 2 Tons in light air in the old 6 (built in the '50s) and we could hang with a J/36 up to maybe 12 kts.

 

In the first race of a regatta, the 2 Tons (about a half dozen of them) let us have the pin -within a few minutes we had "crossed" the entire fleet without having thrown in a tack. They didn't make the same mistake the second day.

2-tonners are faster than a J-36, so something is a little odd here.

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Nothing too unusual going on with the stern - pretty typical of a modern 6mR. Designers in this class like to push as much underwater volume as far aft as possible.

 

Bow is atypical for a 6. Either very short overhang or maybe none at all, i.e. a destroyer bow. No sign of a chin or "bow bustle" which almost all modern ones have. Likely a trick of the light, but it almost looks like it has something like spray rails - although if so then certainly not there for that purpose.

 

For those who think these are slow, yeah they are never going to plane, but there aren't too many boats that can touch these in light air.

 

We used to enjoy beating up on 2 Tons in light air in the old 6 (built in the '50s) and we could hang with a J/36 up to maybe 12 kts.

 

In the first race of a regatta, the 2 Tons (about a half dozen of them) let us have the pin -within a few minutes we had "crossed" the entire fleet without having thrown in a tack. They didn't make the same mistake the second day.

2-tonners are faster than a J-36, so something is a little odd here.

 

 

Not really. I never said a J/36 was faster than a 2 Ton.

 

I said the old 6 was faster than a J/36 up to 12 kts. The 2 Tons walked away from us in 12, but they also owed us some 30 secs/mile

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Nothing too unusual going on with the stern - pretty typical of a modern 6mR. Designers in this class like to push as much underwater volume as far aft as possible.

 

Bow is atypical for a 6. Either very short overhang or maybe none at all, i.e. a destroyer bow. No sign of a chin or "bow bustle" which almost all modern ones have. Likely a trick of the light, but it almost looks like it has something like spray rails - although if so then certainly not there for that purpose.

 

For those who think these are slow, yeah they are never going to plane, but there aren't too many boats that can touch these in light air.

 

We used to enjoy beating up on 2 Tons in light air in the old 6 (built in the '50s) and we could hang with a J/36 up to maybe 12 kts.

 

In the first race of a regatta, the 2 Tons (about a half dozen of them) let us have the pin -within a few minutes we had "crossed" the entire fleet without having thrown in a tack. They didn't make the same mistake the second day.

Hard to tell from the angle, but it appears the stern is pretty flat, and the after topsides have tumble home. Bow is def unusual, I see those 'spray rail' things too. It might work...who knows, until it hits the race course?

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Jesus Christ Brit, even a turd is tapered at both ends...

 

Brit wasn't too far off with Mariner in a lot of regards. He had the bow bustle which is pretty standard on any 6mR built since the early to mid 80's - not sure why it never caught on with the 12's. Maybe they were a bit behind the curve. I always liked how Mariner's keel was delineated from the underbody. He definitely pushed immersed volume aft - a bit too extremely though with the fastback stern, which was obviously a huge miss-step. It was interesting that she went in for a buttectomy and came out quite quick post surgery and actually began winning races - but it was too little too late.

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I can't see how there won't be massive amounts of drag in the huge hollow by the skeg...

 

 

.......''worked fine in the test tank'' :mellow:

JuanK-600x398.jpg

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I can't see how there won't be massive amounts of drag in the huge hollow by the skeg...

That's what I see, too...

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Interesting that it's a Juan K, very interesting shape around the bow...reverse on the stem there?

 

Not just the reverse stem(?) - but there is distinct hollow in the forefoot - so not a bow bustle as seen on Hollom style metre designs - but definitely a hollow to exploit the measured waterline versus actual immersed and heeled waterline.

 

Interested to see what treatment the keel & rudder have. I am sure that JuanK will have breathed some uniqueness there or elsewhere.....

 

Definitely one to follow.

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I can't see how there won't be massive amounts of drag in the huge hollow by the skeg...

That's what I see, too...

 

 

There's a whole fleet of 6 mRs of varying vintage at Shelter Island these days. I took a few photos of Blade (Howlett) last summer. You can see that the stern of the Juan K 6 isn't that much different than Blade (which is one of the faster 6mRs) In fact all of the modern 6mRs have a similar stern treatment. In the bow photo of Blade you can see the notch or bow bustle. Shd also had her bow redone although I heard it was done as a repair after a collision and not for rating purposes - but it does give her a bit of a later generation IACC boat look.

post-12572-0-68090400-1488532910_thumb.jpg

post-12572-0-57625600-1488532924_thumb.jpg

post-12572-0-04232100-1488533227_thumb.jpg

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Can anybody find pics of the 6 design Juan did 8-10 years ago? The one with the aft cockpit position - most of the crew stationed behind the helm?

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I can't see how there won't be massive amounts of drag in the huge hollow by the skeg...

That's what I see, too...

 

 

The problem is displacement. Where to put it?

 

Given a boat of X length, you make it faster by making it lighter.

 

Given a boat of Y displacement, you make it faster by making it longer.

 

Given a boat of X length and Y displacement (both slightly fungible, but only slightly) where are you going to put that displacement within the length given?

 

Yeah, it's a water dozer but is it slightly faster than all the other water dozers in it's class?

 

The 6s are beautiful boats and I am really glad to see the class doing well.

 

FB- Doug

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I can't see how there won't be massive amounts of drag in the huge hollow by the skeg...

That's what I see, too...

 

 

The problem is displacement. Where to put it?

 

Given a boat of X length, you make it faster by making it lighter.

 

Given a boat of Y displacement, you make it faster by making it longer.

 

Given a boat of X length and Y displacement (both slightly fungible, but only slightly) where are you going to put that displacement within the length given?

 

Yeah, it's a water dozer but is it slightly faster than all the other water dozers in it's class?

 

The old 6s are beautiful boats and I am really glad to see the class doing well.

 

FB- Doug

 

 

FIFY

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I can't see how there won't be massive amounts of drag in the huge hollow by the skeg...

That's what I see, too...

The problem is displacement. Where to put it?

 

Given a boat of X length, you make it faster by making it lighter.

 

Given a boat of Y displacement, you make it faster by making it longer.

 

Given a boat of X length and Y displacement (both slightly fungible, but only slightly) where are you going to put that displacement within the length given?

 

Yeah, it's a water dozer but is it slightly faster than all the other water dozers in it's class?

 

The old 6s are beautiful boats and I am really glad to see the class doing well.

 

FB- Doug

FIFY

Have to agree, the new boats lack the elegance of the old boats...but they're still pretty cool. It'll be very interesting to see how the JuanK boat sails.

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You can see that the stern of the Juan K 6 isn't that much different than Blade (which is one of the faster 6mRs)

I don't doubt that it is a clever manipulation of the shape to get an optimized blend of speed and rating within the 6m measurement framework.

 

I'm just saying that - from an empirical perspective - water doesn't generally like being tortured like that.

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You can see that the stern of the Juan K 6 isn't that much different than Blade (which is one of the faster 6mRs)

I don't doubt that it is a clever manipulation of the shape to get an optimized blend of speed and rating within the 6m measurement framework.

 

I'm just saying that - from an empirical perspective - water doesn't generally like being tortured like that.

Well, water would also like to see the boat 6' longer...but like haiku, there's a formula it has to fit within.

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6 meters are cool. Absolute speed not necessary with good tactical racing. Sounds like a blast.

sssshhhhhhhhhhhh your mouth!!!.... the AC might get a hold of this novel approach to sailing!

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A few more photos of a couple of modern 6 mRs being unloaded in Van last year: St. Francis X and Blade.

 

The stern of the Juan K design is remarkably similar to St Francis X IMO. Very flat stern with not a hint of deadrise.

 

Like it or not, for a 9,000 lb (or so) boat restricted to 6' beam and roughly 23' LWL - this IS the shape of speed

 

Personally, I prefer the shape of the modern 6 to the old ones - although I will grant they have an elegant look to them.

 

Blade is actually a real stunner in the water - very cool looking boat.

post-12572-0-10889900-1488569592_thumb.jpg

post-12572-0-33408500-1488569599_thumb.jpg

post-12572-0-45350100-1488569607_thumb.jpg

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That's what I mean. We will still have them to look at after the other classic classes like the 6m have been butchered

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The best looking 6Metres in the world sail in Sanxenxo on the west coast of spain.

 

Just google - 6m Sanxenxo images

 

I have some great shots, havjng been on board them, but uploding photos here is so difficult.

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uploding photos here is so difficult.

 

So don't upload them; just point to them.

 

Like this:

[img=http://nauticacanaria.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/M6-3.jpg]

M6-3.jpg

 

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i like the meter classes. Luckily i sail with an owner who has a classic 6 and a classic 8 (both Fife's). Personally, i like the lines of the 8's better. the freeboard of the 6's is always a little high to my eye to be really pleasing.

I think it is cool that something new is being produced. Will be interesting to see how she goes!

 

the 5.5's do a lot of new builds, but they don;t work to the same rating rule anymore so the ideas are not directly copyable.

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i like the meter classes. Luckily i sail with an owner who has a classic 6 and a classic 8 (both Fife's). Personally, i like the lines of the 8's better. the freeboard of the 6's is always a little high to my eye to be really pleasing.

I think it is cool that something new is being produced. Will be interesting to see how she goes!

 

the 5.5's do a lot of new builds, but they don;t work to the same rating rule anymore so the ideas are not directly copyable.

As far back as I can recall, at least early to mid 60s, 5.5s operated under a slightly different formula. They've always used jibs instead of genoas, have a much lighter displacement, and permitted spinnakers with some hellacious mid-girths.

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i like the meter classes. Luckily i sail with an owner who has a classic 6 and a classic 8 (both Fife's). Personally, i like the lines of the 8's better. the freeboard of the 6's is always a little high to my eye to be really pleasing.

I think it is cool that something new is being produced. Will be interesting to see how she goes!

 

the 5.5's do a lot of new builds, but they don;t work to the same rating rule anymore so the ideas are not directly copyable.

As far back as I can recall, at least early to mid 60s, 5.5s operated under a slightly different formula. They've always used jibs instead of genoas, have a much lighter displacement, and permitted spinnakers with some hellacious mid-girths.

 

 

that's what I meant the ideas of the 5.5 are not directly copyable due to not using the same rating rule.

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Jesus Christ Brit, even a turd is tapered at both ends...

Brit wasn't too far off with Mariner in a lot of regards. He had the bow bustle which is pretty standard on any 6mR built since the early to mid 80's - not sure why it never caught on with the 12's. Maybe they were a bit behind the curve. I always liked how Mariner's keel was delineated from the underbody. He definitely pushed immersed volume aft - a bit too extremely though with the fastback stern, which was obviously a huge miss-step. It was interesting that she went in for a buttectomy and came out quite quick post surgery and actually began winning races - but it was too little too late.

 

Mariner was actually fast with the stepped transom. Problem was it was limited to the average conditions that the boat would experience in the trials and cup races were she to advance. When windspeeds were higher or lower than that average, and not by a large amount, she would dog. Watching her sail against Valiant, her wooden trial horse, Mariner would rise up, take off and sail away from Valiant. The windspeed would dropped a couple of knots and she would sit back down or if the breeze built too much a larger vortex would develop and Valiant would sail on by.

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Judging by the pretty computer image in #36, I'm wondering if he's using the shape by the bustle, which I'm guessing is in an area of rapidly slowing velocity, to bump up the prismatic as hull speed increases, and any flow discontinuities that result are basically squished into submission by the high pressure underneath the flat run aft. The bustle looks killer at low speed. Might be using the Kutta condition at the bustle on the high pressure side at higher hull speeds to not slow down so much, keeping the flow on the low pressure sided faster and not as likely to lose its grip?

 

I'm trying to figure out the shelf at the bow, how much does it edit the flow at different speeds, reinforcing laminar conditions just a little longer before the flow is tripped and reattached- maybe messing depth of the change of the velocity gradient immediately by the hull?

 

Fascinating stuff. But I have a flu the flu shot didn't cover.......

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Jesus Christ Brit, even a turd is tapered at both ends...

Brit wasn't too far off with Mariner in a lot of regards. He had the bow bustle which is pretty standard on any 6mR built since the early to mid 80's - not sure why it never caught on with the 12's. Maybe they were a bit behind the curve. I always liked how Mariner's keel was delineated from the underbody. He definitely pushed immersed volume aft - a bit too extremely though with the fastback stern, which was obviously a huge miss-step. It was interesting that she went in for a buttectomy and came out quite quick post surgery and actually began winning races - but it was too little too late.

 

Mariner was actually fast with the stepped transom. Problem was it was limited to the average conditions that the boat would experience in the trials and cup races were she to advance. When windspeeds were higher or lower than that average, and not by a large amount, she would dog. Watching her sail against Valiant, her wooden trial horse, Mariner would rise up, take off and sail away from Valiant. The windspeed would dropped a couple of knots and she would sit back down or if the breeze built too much a larger vortex would develop and Valiant would sail on by.

 

 

That may well be true - but IIRC Brit convinced the syndicate to have stern steps added to Valiant as well , although perhaps not quite so extreme. In any event, once that was done, her value as a trial horse - or at least as a known speed index was lost.

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Judging by the pretty computer image in #36, I'm wondering if he's using the shape by the bustle, which I'm guessing is in an area of rapidly slowing velocity, to bump up the prismatic as hull speed increases, and any flow discontinuities that result are basically squished into submission by the high pressure underneath the flat run aft. The bustle looks killer at low speed. Might be using the Kutta condition at the bustle on the high pressure side at higher hull speeds to not slow down so much, keeping the flow on the low pressure sided faster and not as likely to lose its grip?

 

I'm trying to figure out the shelf at the bow, how much does it edit the flow at different speeds, reinforcing laminar conditions just a little longer before the flow is tripped and reattached- maybe messing depth of the change of the velocity gradient immediately by the hull?

 

Fascinating stuff. But I have a flu the flu shot didn't cover.......

 

Nothing unusual with the stern. In post #47 there are a couple of good photos of the stern of St. Francis X from a similar angle (although right side up) as she is being unloaded - I don't see much difference between the two.

 

The bow does look unusual and not just because of the reverse stem - but it may just be the light. In the 6mR rule, no hollows are allowed above the waterline at the bow, so if there are any, it would have to be below.

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Judging by the pretty computer image in #36, I'm wondering if he's using the shape by the bustle, which I'm guessing is in an area of rapidly slowing velocity, to bump up the prismatic as hull speed increases, and any flow discontinuities that result are basically squished into submission by the high pressure underneath the flat run aft. The bustle looks killer at low speed. Might be using the Kutta condition at the bustle on the high pressure side at higher hull speeds to not slow down so much, keeping the flow on the low pressure sided faster and not as likely to lose its grip?

 

I'm trying to figure out the shelf at the bow, how much does it edit the flow at different speeds, reinforcing laminar conditions just a little longer before the flow is tripped and reattached- maybe messing depth of the change of the velocity gradient immediately by the hull?

 

Fascinating stuff. But I have a flu the flu shot didn't cover.......

 

Nothing unusual with the stern. In post #47 there are a couple of good photos of the stern of St. Francis X from a similar angle (although right side up) as she is being unloaded - I don't see much difference between the two.

 

The bow does look unusual and not just because of the reverse stem - but it may just be the light. In the 6mR rule, no hollows are allowed above the waterline at the bow, so if there are any, it would have to be below.

 

Looks like the new one has an almost planar fold at the bustle (light angle?), no longitudinal bulge at the bottom of the bustle.

 

the local re at the new boat's bustle must be, um, interesting.

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Jesus Christ Brit, even a turd is tapered at both ends...

Brit wasn't too far off with Mariner in a lot of regards. He had the bow bustle which is pretty standard on any 6mR built since the early to mid 80's - not sure why it never caught on with the 12's. Maybe they were a bit behind the curve. I always liked how Mariner's keel was delineated from the underbody. He definitely pushed immersed volume aft - a bit too extremely though with the fastback stern, which was obviously a huge miss-step. It was interesting that she went in for a buttectomy and came out quite quick post surgery and actually began winning races - but it was too little too late.

 

Mariner was actually fast with the stepped transom. Problem was it was limited to the average conditions that the boat would experience in the trials and cup races were she to advance. When windspeeds were higher or lower than that average, and not by a large amount, she would dog. Watching her sail against Valiant, her wooden trial horse, Mariner would rise up, take off and sail away from Valiant. The windspeed would dropped a couple of knots and she would sit back down or if the breeze built too much a larger vortex would develop and Valiant would sail on by.

 

 

That may well be true - but IIRC Brit convinced the syndicate to have stern steps added to Valiant as well , although perhaps not quite so extreme. In any event, once that was done, her value as a trial horse - or at least as a known speed index was lost.

 

 

Valiant was a dog too - IIRC she was Olin's only failure in 12's

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Assuming this puppy will be at World's this year... it will be interesting to see how it goes against the established moderns. I'll be there and will most likely be doing some reports.

 

-Snap

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8 hours ago, Snapper said:

Assuming this puppy will be at World's this year... it will be interesting to see how it goes against the established moderns. I'll be there and will most likely be doing some reports.

 

-Snap

Excellent- looking foraward to it.... and pics!

This hull (to my eye) isn't really anything new, just a bit more extreme than what 12-Meter hulls were evolving towards.

FB- Doug

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13 hours ago, USA 236 said:

Any advantage to the wheel or owner preference?

King Juan Carlos is not in very good shape, I'm thinking not changing sides on tacks would be a good reason to choose the wheel...

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Apparently the new fruit has a stainless steel rudder. A little bird told me , they are shipping KC 10 to Vancouver for the contest and not the new boat. Go figure.

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