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ME109 "jet" (thanks CNN) found in Denmark

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Funny what memories stick. Learned it about 30 years ago. Our engineering tech responsible for our five-axis CNC was into restoring old planes. He invited a several of us to see the PT-13 he was almost through with and hit us with the question. Loved playing stump the engineers and winning.

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Funny what memories stick. Learned it about 30 years ago. Our engineering tech responsible for our five-axis CNC was into restoring old planes. He invited a several of us to see the PT-13 he was almost through with and hit us with the question. Loved playing stump the engineers and winning.

 

Here... trip out on this... I have already asked for a set of plans

 

replica5.jpg

 

http://p38assn.org/replica.htm

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How cool is that?

 

I thought it looked small.

 

What does it use for power?

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Yeah, you can scale them right down when you don't need all that armament, armor, ordinance, and combat radius. When nobody is shooting at you, priorities sure change.

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How cool is that?

 

I thought it looked small.

 

What does it use for power?

 

220-horsepower Continental engines... The Seminole I trained in had 180 HP and was a lot heavier... it moves along pretty good... couldn't imagine how this thing gets down the road.

 

Yeah, you can scale them right down when you don't need all that armament, armor, ordinance, and combat radius. When nobody is shooting at you, priorities sure change.

 

Yeah but do it when you're 70 years old... all I can say is

 

old-guys-rule-and-john-wayne-4.gif

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I wonder if they counter-rotate

It is only a small up charge.

 

edit - Upon close inspection of the photo it does look like righty lefty.

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How cool is that?

 

I thought it looked small.

 

What does it use for power?

 

220-horsepower Continental engines... The Seminole I trained in had 180 HP and was a lot heavier... it moves along pretty good... couldn't imagine how this thing gets down the road.

 

Yeah, you can scale them right down when you don't need all that armament, armor, ordinance, and combat radius. When nobody is shooting at you, priorities sure change.

 

Yeah but do it when you're 70 years old... all I can say is

 

old-guys-rule-and-john-wayne-4.gif

 

 

The scale P-38 rocks. I cannot believe the guy just learned to fly at 60 and jumped into something like this. Good on him!

 

I recall there was (Is??) a company in central FL somewhere that was doing a 2/3rd or 5/8ths whatever scale P-51 Mustang with a Chevy V-8 454 for the motor and supercharged IIRC. The performance stats were freaking impressive. I think it came pretty close to original for top and cruise speed. In the mid 300 kts at least. I salivated over that for a long time and came really close to pulling the trigger on one. I think they were around $100K with decent avionics at the time in the mid-90s and I just couldn't afford it on an jr 0-3's salary.

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That 38 is awesome. Nacra if you build one i'll make the trip to california to fly it!! (after you've test flown the shit out of it.... just sayin'....)

 

 

 


 

The scale P-38 rocks. I cannot believe the guy just learned to fly at 60 and jumped into something like this. Good on him!

 

I recall there was (Is??) a company in central FL somewhere that was doing a 2/3rd or 5/8ths whatever scale P-51 Mustang with a Chevy V-8 454 for the motor and supercharged IIRC. The performance stats were freaking impressive. I think it came pretty close to original for top and cruise speed. In the mid 300 kts at least. I salivated over that for a long time and came really close to pulling the trigger on one. I think they were around $100K with decent avionics at the time in the mid-90s and I just couldn't afford it on an jr 0-3's salary.

 

 

There are quite a few mustang replicas out there, most arent full scale. A couple have marine racing engines in them - which when you think about the water cooling is really kind of perfect... (not sure if they utilized the scoop for those or not). There's also a full scale turbine powered mustang replica - can't say i find it particularly interesting though - to be honest...

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That 38 is awesome. Nacra if you build one i'll make the trip to california to fly it!! (after you've test flown the shit out of it.... just sayin'....)

 

 

 

 

The scale P-38 rocks. I cannot believe the guy just learned to fly at 60 and jumped into something like this. Good on him!

 

I recall there was (Is??) a company in central FL somewhere that was doing a 2/3rd or 5/8ths whatever scale P-51 Mustang with a Chevy V-8 454 for the motor and supercharged IIRC. The performance stats were freaking impressive. I think it came pretty close to original for top and cruise speed. In the mid 300 kts at least. I salivated over that for a long time and came really close to pulling the trigger on one. I think they were around $100K with decent avionics at the time in the mid-90s and I just couldn't afford it on an jr 0-3's salary.

 

 

There are quite a few mustang replicas out there, most arent full scale. A couple have marine racing engines in them - which when you think about the water cooling is really kind of perfect... (not sure if they utilized the scoop for those or not). There's also a full scale turbine powered mustang replica - can't say i find it particularly interesting though - to be honest...

 

This isn't the same company, but an interesting product. I would rather buy one that someone has already built and test flown the shit out of out of.

 

http://www.titanaircraft.com/t-51d.php

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That 38 is awesome. Nacra if you build one i'll make the trip to california to fly it!! (after you've test flown the shit out of it.... just sayin'....)

 

 

 

 

The scale P-38 rocks. I cannot believe the guy just learned to fly at 60 and jumped into something like this. Good on him!

 

I recall there was (Is??) a company in central FL somewhere that was doing a 2/3rd or 5/8ths whatever scale P-51 Mustang with a Chevy V-8 454 for the motor and supercharged IIRC. The performance stats were freaking impressive. I think it came pretty close to original for top and cruise speed. In the mid 300 kts at least. I salivated over that for a long time and came really close to pulling the trigger on one. I think they were around $100K with decent avionics at the time in the mid-90s and I just couldn't afford it on an jr 0-3's salary.

 

 

There are quite a few mustang replicas out there, most arent full scale. A couple have marine racing engines in them - which when you think about the water cooling is really kind of perfect... (not sure if they utilized the scoop for those or not). There's also a full scale turbine powered mustang replica - can't say i find it particularly interesting though - to be honest...

 

This isn't the same company, but an interesting product. I would rather buy one that someone has already built and test flown the shit out of out of.

 

http://www.titanaircraft.com/t-51d.php

 

 

Stay away from those things if you didn't build it... or as you said, make sure they are well tested before flying...

 

My cousin's husband..

 

https://www.ntsb.gov/_layouts/ntsb.aviation/brief2.aspx?ev_id=20081009X21549&ntsbno=NYC08LA322&akey=1

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uncontrolled descent

 

Don't you just love bureaucratese?

 

My all time favourite is "The aircraft departed controlled flight and entered the ocean".

 

Sorry about your family loss.

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Sorry about your family loss.

 

Thanks.. but... I flew with him once.. Let's just say I wasn't surprised when the call came... upset yes, surprised no.

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Sorry about your family loss.

 

Thanks.. but... I flew with him once.. Let's just say I wasn't surprised when the call came... upset yes, surprised no.

 

 

Ah, there is that.

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uncontrolled descent

 

Don't you just love bureaucratese?

 

My all time favourite is "The aircraft departed controlled flight and entered the ocean".

 

Sorry about your family loss.

 

Yeah watching Sully during the NTSB scenes i heard the theater chuckle at some of the language they were using and all i could do was sit there and not yellout that they actually freaking talk that way...

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There are quite a few mustang replicas out there, most arent full scale. A couple have marine racing engines in them - which when you think about the water cooling is really kind of perfect... (not sure if they utilized the scoop for those or not). There's also a full scale turbine powered mustang replica - can't say i find it particularly interesting though - to be honest...

This isn't the same company, but an interesting product. I would rather buy one that someone has already built and test flown the shit out of out of.

 

http://www.titanaircraft.com/t-51d.php

 

 

Stay away from those things if you didn't build it... or as you said, make sure they are well tested before flying...

 

My cousin's husband..

 

https://www.ntsb.gov/_layouts/ntsb.aviation/brief2.aspx?ev_id=20081009X21549&ntsbno=NYC08LA322&akey=1

 

 

I figure if its made it 100hrs it's probably ok - and i would certainly have a qualified and objective third party inspect it and the build logs. Dream plane is a lancair 360 or legacy (since a mustang is obviously out...). The Titan 51 kind of scares me, my understanding is it started off as a very simple airplane that sort of resembled a mustang, and they just started putting bigger and bigger engines in it... Safety record is probably better than the lancair IV though...

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I think the Merlin was after the war - like when the Israelis flew them against the Arabs in '48.

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Why were the Brits selling those engines to Germany - which wasn't supposed to have an air force?

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Apparently traded for an aircraft. The me 109 was a development of the me 108. A single seat, fast touring aircraft couldn't possibly have any relationship to a war plane....

 

Wikipedia has the goss.

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Why were the Brits selling those engines to Germany - which wasn't supposed to have an air force?

 

The same reason many US companies were selling stuff to Germany... money! FFS Henry Ford was awarded a Knights Grand Cross or something like that from Hitler for his contributions to the Reicht...

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I think the Merlin was after the war - like when the Israelis flew them against the Arabs in '48.

The Israels flew Junkers Juno powered ones...https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Avia_S-199

 

The Merlin powered ones were mods done to ex Spanish Air Force 109s for the film the Battle of Britian...http://www.daveswarbirds.com/bob/109s.htm

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Due to licensing agreements from before the war, ALL of the participants employed the technology of Hamilton-Standard pitch control propellers, just to name one particular technology. The Soviets had been making Curtis-Wright radial designs since '35 or so, and Pratt&Whitney provided a design that BMW based the engine for the Fw190 on.

 

We won't even get into Rolls Royce selling an early jet engine to Russia right after the war - that turned up in the skies over Korea shortly thereafter.

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The Merlin powered ones were mods done to ex Spanish Air Force 109s for the film the Battle of Britian...http://www.daveswarbirds.com/bob/109s.htm

 

And they are now up for sale...

 

https://www.trade-a-plane.com/search?category_level1=Single+Engine+Piston&make=MESSERSCHMITT&model=ME+109&listing_id=2201584&s-type=aircraft

 

There was a rumor (hanger talk) afoot that there was an offer from a pretty well known celebrity to buy the whole lot for a donation to a local museum for restoration but they get to fly them.. but I see they are still for sale.

 

I wonder if they could get the boys in Stuttgart to make a few 605s' for the restoration...

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Pratt&Whitney provided a design that BMW based the engine for the Fw190 on.

 

 

Are you referring to the 801?

 

I thought this was a "ground up" design from the boys in Munich.

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Due to licensing agreements from before the war, ALL of the participants employed the technology of Hamilton-Standard pitch control propellers, just to name one particular technology. The Soviets had been making Curtis-Wright radial designs since '35 or so, and Pratt&Whitney provided a design that BMW based the engine for the Fw190 on.

 

We won't even get into Rolls Royce selling an early jet engine to Russia right after the war - that turned up in the skies over Korea shortly thereafter.

Apparently, the yanks were the first to develop a cast block and cylinder combo. The norm was cylinders screwed into a cast block. Rolls Royce copied it, and eventually developed the Merlin...

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and all you snow skiers out there...

 

Willey Messerschmidt had a design partner in the Bf 108 and Bf 109 - a guy named Lusser ( sp ? ) - who, after the war developed (invented, patented & manufactured) what you know as the modern toe-release binding.

 

By the way, the 108 is supposed to be a really slick little airplane

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said it before but this thread is a wealth of new information for me...

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I believe that the BMW 801 powerplant WAS an advanced design based on the earlier P & W radials built under license. I could be wrong. Their 132 was definitely based on the P & W Hornet they built in the mid-30s and the 801 was a further development of that.

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Okay, th'd drift is cool (especially when it reminds Americans that they were the Post-War era Chinese, merely copying other people's better idea's, usually poorly)

 

But back on topic,,,it was only later in life I realized I was spoiled, I grew up an airport brat hanging around the best flying air museum in North America at the time. We'd be doing air cadet marching drills on the tarmac, "ABOUUUUUUT FACE!", a Corsair or a Hurricane would do a 50' pass, it was great.

 

Okay, the 109's engine was an inverted V12, for one simple reason, it was smaller, less air resistance. Great idea in 1935, utterly unstoppable in 1940, by 1943 it was surpassed. The Merlin sounds great on the ground, but it is simply an inferior engine. The DB6xx was built designed for a supercharger, on the Merlin it was tacked on as an afterthought. The inverted V12 of the DB allowed ground crews higher than 5'5" to service parts Allied crews needed a ladder for. Plus in the air...a DB605 engine just sounds EVIL, the hairs on the back of my neck still stand up everytime I'm lucky enough to hear one.

 

I've heard Merlins at full chat, but everytime a four Merlined Lancaster is being chased by a DB 109 I stand up and grin at the scream. Just a hint at how spoiled I am, the only Battle Of Britain 109 Emil has been flying in my neck of the woods for years, along with a Lancaster.

 

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Oh yeah the B29 that was trying to be recovered was the Kee Bird, PBS make a docudrama about it. They weren't the original engines, they bought new Wasp's (yes, in the early 90's you could still buy factory fresh Double Wasp's, made in Montreal by P&W). Somewhere on YouTube or the interwebs I'm sure you can find the whole clusterfuck.

 

Edit -- It wasn't in the Canadian Arctic, it was in Greenland. Otherwise we might've billed the US, lol.

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Oh yeah the B29 that was trying to be recovered was the Kee Bird, PBS make a docudrama about it. They weren't the original engines, they bought new Wasp's (yes, in the early 90's you could still buy factory fresh Double Wasp's, made in Montreal by P&W). Somewhere on YouTube or the interwebs I'm sure you can find the whole clusterfuck.

 

Edit -- It wasn't in the Canadian Arctic, it was in Greenland. Otherwise we might've billed the US, lol.

B-29 = Wright R3350 not P&W R2800.

 

B-50 = P&W R4360

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Somebody's been to the Udvar Hazy !

 

Great museum - my favorite warbird is right at the entrance - that hanging Corsair.

 

The SR-71 that is Front and Center is pretty goddam impressive though. They have some really neat stuff there.

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Somebody's been to the Udvar Hazy !

 

Great museum - my favorite warbird is right at the entrance - that hanging Corsair.

 

The SR-71 that is Front and Center is pretty goddam impressive though. They have some really neat stuff there.

I like the walk past all the piston engines.

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Somebody's been to the Udvar Hazy !

 

Great museum - my favorite warbird is right at the entrance - that hanging Corsair.

 

The SR-71 that is Front and Center is pretty goddam impressive though. They have some really neat stuff there.

 

 

Yeupppp .. next time..

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At the risk of being accused of grave digging. I found a guy on youtube who does some interesting studies on WWII engines and airplane performance. 

Very well researched stuff. 

 

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On 12/27/2018 at 6:23 PM, Elegua said:

At the risk of being accused of grave digging. I found a guy on youtube who does some interesting studies on WWII engines and airplane performance. 

Very well researched stuff. 

 

Watched another one of that guys videos a while back about the different engine convolutions they went through with the 109, trying to find the right fuels etc to accomplish different goals. Definitely going to give that one you posted a watch!

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On 3/10/2017 at 3:53 PM, SloopJonB said:

 

 

6847964719_8f8c97457a_b.jpg

I will grant that this is SCARY complex & convoluted, but...

have you ever had a gander inside the cowling of where a modern airliner APU lives?

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1 minute ago, animeproblem said:

I will grant that this is SCARY complex & convoluted, but...

have you ever had a gander inside the cowling of where a modern airliner APU lives?

i prefer not to know... sort of like how i don't want to see the parts of the pig that go into making a hotdog - the less i know the better. 

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Good answer! And I have zero professional knowledge in that area (being a lowly Iron Worker), just what I was able to eyeball on the flight line at Paine Field when I was doing some sheet metal work, to put your mind at rest from what I saw...they test the living shit out of them, & just as well when you consider the number of things that little turbine is running!

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22 hours ago, animeproblem said:

I will grant that this is SCARY complex & convoluted, but...

have you ever had a gander inside the cowling of where a modern airliner APU lives?

Great vids. Just spent 3 hrs watching a few.

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On 3/14/2017 at 9:47 PM, nacradriver said:

 

If you already haven't; read Albert Speer's "Inside the Third Reich"..... some scary stuff.

Just ran into this old thread sorta by accident and thought I'd point out that, since you sorta cite Speer, you should be aware of the fact that his so-called memoirs or recollections in this book (German title: Erinnerungen) as well as his Spandau Diaries and numerous post-war interviews have not stood the test of critical historian research. Much of it is pure fiction, Speer working on his own legend and that of the Third Reich, one that many people liked to believe. He especially greatly exagerated the capacity of Gemany's war industry (and of course of his own role in that regard).

If you're interested in this history and able to read German (I am not aware of an English translation of this 2017 relase yet) I highly recommend Magnus Brechtken: Albert Speer - Eine deutsche Karriere.

I am not aware of a critical analysis of Mr. Galland's memoirs but I would not be surprised to hear that he too spun the myth of the brave German soldier defeated only by the incompetentence of the few Nazi leaders on top.

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1 hour ago, Der_Dude said:

Just ran into this old thread sorta by accident and thought I'd point out that, since you sorta cite Speer, you should be aware of the fact that his so-called memoirs or recollections in this book (German title: Erinnerungen) as well as his Spandau Diaries and numerous post-war interviews have not stood the test of critical historian research. Much of it is pure fiction, Speer working on his own legend and that of the Third Reich, one that many people liked to believe. He especially greatly exagerated the capacity of Gemany's war industry (and of course of his own role in that regard).

If you're interested in this history and able to read German (I am not aware of an English translation of this 2017 relase yet) I highly recommend Magnus Brechtken: Albert Speer - Eine deutsche Karriere.

I am not aware of a critical analysis of Mr. Galland's memoirs but I would not be surprised to hear that he too spun the myth of the brave German soldier defeated only by the incompetentence of the few Nazi leaders on top.

William Shirer's "Rise and Fall of the third Reich" is a pretty decent, if not a little bloated and slightly biased, look into the inner workings of the Nazi party from formation to dissolution.

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5 hours ago, Der_Dude said:

Just ran into this old thread sorta by accident and thought I'd point out that, since you sorta cite Speer, you should be aware of the fact that his so-called memoirs or recollections in this book (German title: Erinnerungen) as well as his Spandau Diaries and numerous post-war interviews have not stood the test of critical historian research. Much of it is pure fiction, Speer working on his own legend and that of the Third Reich, one that many people liked to believe. He especially greatly exagerated the capacity of Gemany's war industry (and of course of his own role in that regard).

If you're interested in this history and able to read German (I am not aware of an English translation of this 2017 relase yet) I highly recommend Magnus Brechtken: Albert Speer - Eine deutsche Karriere.

I am not aware of a critical analysis of Mr. Galland's memoirs but I would not be surprised to hear that he too spun the myth of the brave German soldier defeated only by the incompetentence of the few Nazi leaders on top.

Speer's book was just an expansion on his Nuremberg defence - "I was not part of the inner circle", "I didn't utilize slaves", "I was duped by naivete and dreams of glory".

All bullshit of course - he was simply an educated and sophisticated man lumped in with a bunch of gangster thugs so he could quite easily set himself apart. "I wasn't like those guys".

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On 3/11/2017 at 10:47 PM, Elegua said:

Meh, German quality really depends upon what part of the war you are talking about. Near the end things got pretty cheap and nasty. What they did have that we didn't was large forge presses to make larger one piece forging. Those big 50k ton presses that we built after the war was because of that.

 

The Germans also never developed reliable high powered engines above 2k hp - yes, very good supercharging, very tight tolerances, high piston speeds, MW50/50 injection...etc...

 

Personally, after looking at all the specialized fasteners and splines, I'd never want to have worked on one of those inverted V-12s on the Ostfront.

Cool video about those big presses: 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hpgK51w6uhk

On 3/13/2017 at 11:50 AM, SloopJonB said:

It was Hitler who demanded the 262 be a bomber.

 

My wife's uncle flew P-51's against them at the end. He said they could take them on because they could turn inside them - cut the corner. If the 262 pilots stood on it they could scoot away of course - 100+ MPH advantage but the P-51's weren't as out of the fight as one might imagine due to the tighter turning radius.

I was racing with an F15 pilot on an overnight race this past spring and we talked about the mechanics of a jet engaging a prop, his comment was despite the turning ability of a prop plane, if you're coming from above there's not much the prop plane could do. 

 

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In a more modern case, it didn't work out in favor of the prop plane even at low speed. 

 

 

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19 hours ago, Der_Dude said:

Just ran into this old thread sorta by accident and thought I'd point out that, since you sorta cite Speer, you should be aware of the fact that his so-called memoirs or recollections in this book (German title: Erinnerungen) as well as his Spandau Diaries and numerous post-war interviews have not stood the test of critical historian research. Much of it is pure fiction, Speer working on his own legend and that of the Third Reich, one that many people liked to believe. He especially greatly exagerated the capacity of Gemany's war industry (and of course of his own role in that regard).

If you're interested in this history and able to read German (I am not aware of an English translation of this 2017 relase yet) I highly recommend Magnus Brechtken: Albert Speer - Eine deutsche Karriere.

I am not aware of a critical analysis of Mr. Galland's memoirs but I would not be surprised to hear that he too spun the myth of the brave German soldier defeated only by the incompetentence of the few Nazi leaders on top.

Thanks....  I should be in Berlin sometime in late April...  I'll send ya a PM if I make the trip....  there is a great Greek restaurant across the street from the Intercontinental Hotel where I usually stay..  Dinner is on my if we get some sailing in...

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Thought this was cool, didn't know where to post it so here it is...

 

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58 minutes ago, hobot said:

Thought this was cool, didn't know where to post it so here it is..

thanxs hobot , I just went down a youtube worm hole for 57 mins ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,

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On 1/1/2019 at 6:27 PM, mustang__1 said:

I was racing with an F15 pilot on an overnight race this past spring and we talked about the mechanics of a jet engaging a prop, his comment was despite the turning ability of a prop plane, if you're coming from above there's not much the prop plane could do. 

Speed delta could easily have been 100 mph - so,  regardless of altitude - that makes one of them nearly standing still !   Of course that complicates gunnery - harder to get a lot of iron on the target with that closing speed,  and jets are notoriously 'slick'  (they don't slow down well)  this was a problem for the Me 262 pilot's main task - which was to shoot down bombers,  and addressed by using larger calibers.

The main vulnerability of the 262 - aside from weight of numbers,  was the delicate nature of the early axial-flow Jumo jet engines,  which flamed-out easily and had to be operated through the throttle range VERY CAREFULLY,  and took quite some time to come up on power.  Once they did,  of course there wasn't anything in the sky like them.

Where they proved most vulnerable was near their airfields - and even with heavy flak protection there, this is where they were often hunted - taking off and landing (Chuck Yeager discusses this)   Galland wrote that by war's end they had plenty of 262's but not the pilots to fly them - like much of the German war plan, the pilot development regime depended on a quick war...which didn't happen.

Although Frank Whittle had patented the (reverse-flow) jet engine,  development in Germany seems to have proceeded independently and was met with more acceptance than Whittle found - for,  although he WAS a genius  (he assessed by the mid-30's that the reciprocating engine had 'had it' in terms of power-to-weight development potential) -  he also suffered a couple breakdowns over the stress of bringing turbines to life.  At one point he even had to let his own patents lapse because he couldn't afford to renew it.  Lots of folks got rich off his invention,  him - not so much.   He wound up working in the US later in his life.  Reading about the development of the 'jet' engine you really get the impression that he got screwed.  At one point the 'powers that be' decided to pursue Axial-flow designs as well - along with Frank's reverse-flow work - but in a separate location - without even telling him !   Nice,  huh ?

 

 

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On 1/4/2019 at 10:20 PM, Great Red Shark said:

Speed delta could easily have been 100 mph - so,  regardless of altitude - that makes one of them nearly standing still !   Of course that complicates gunnery - harder to get a lot of iron on the target with that closing speed,  and jets are notoriously 'slick'  (they don't slow down well)  this was a problem for the Me 262 pilot's main task - which was to shoot down bombers,  and addressed by using larger calibers.

The main vulnerability of the 262 - aside from weight of numbers,  was the delicate nature of the early axial-flow Jumo jet engines,  which flamed-out easily and had to be operated through the throttle range VERY CAREFULLY,  and took quite some time to come up on power.  Once they did,  of course there wasn't anything in the sky like them.

Where they proved most vulnerable was near their airfields - and even with heavy flak protection there, this is where they were often hunted - taking off and landing (Chuck Yeager discusses this)   Galland wrote that by war's end they had plenty of 262's but not the pilots to fly them - like much of the German war plan, the pilot development regime depended on a quick war...which didn't happen.

Although Frank Whittle had patented the (reverse-flow) jet engine,  development in Germany seems to have proceeded independently and was met with more acceptance than Whittle found - for,  although he WAS a genius  (he assessed by the mid-30's that the reciprocating engine had 'had it' in terms of power-to-weight development potential) -  he also suffered a couple breakdowns over the stress of bringing turbines to life.  At one point he even had to let his own patents lapse because he couldn't afford to renew it.  Lots of folks got rich off his invention,  him - not so much.   He wound up working in the US later in his life.  Reading about the development of the 'jet' engine you really get the impression that he got screwed.  At one point the 'powers that be' decided to pursue Axial-flow designs as well - along with Frank's reverse-flow work - but in a separate location - without even telling him !   Nice,  huh ?

 

Check out the brain on Great Red Shark.....  good info... thanks

 

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