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      Underdawg did an excellent job of explaining the rules.  Here's the simplified version: Don't insinuate Pedo.  Warning and or timeout for a first offense.  PermaFlick for any subsequent offenses Don't out members.  See above for penalties.  Caveat:  if you have ever used your own real name or personal information here on the forums since, like, ever - it doesn't count and you are fair game. If you see spam posts, report it to the mods.  We do not hang out in every thread 24/7 If you see any of the above, report it to the mods by hitting the Report button in the offending post.   We do not take action for foul language, off-subject content, or abusive behavior unless it escalates to persistent stalking.  There may be times that we might warn someone or flick someone for something particularly egregious.  There is no standard, we will know it when we see it.  If you continually report things that do not fall into rules #1 or 2 above, you may very well get a timeout yourself for annoying the Mods with repeated whining.  Use your best judgement. Warnings, timeouts, suspensions and flicks are arbitrary and capricious.  Deal with it.  Welcome to anarchy.   If you are a newbie, there are unwritten rules to adhere to.  They will be explained to you soon enough.  
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Wet Spreaders

Long books, series and sagas

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I just finished all The Expanse books. I wrapped up Pandora's Star and its partner recently. I also finished The Name of the Wind and its companion and the whole of the Iron Druid series.

 

I have an international flight coming up on United and I require something engaging to keep my mind off the potential beating I might attract for requesting an extra bag of peanuts or non-domestic beer. I need a book that's complicated, thick or part of a long series. Based on the list above, you can probably tell I like scifi and fantasy, but I can tolerate adventures and I really like historical fiction (Mongoliad, Empire Rising...). But I read fast so the bottom line is "thick".

 

Who's been reading something hefty lately?

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Robert Jordans "Wheel of Time" series is an exceptional work in that genre and will take you forever. Terry Brooks Shanarra of course. Dean Koontz Odd Thomas Series. Tad Williams Memory Sorrow and Thorn series.

 

I am currently reading Bill Bryson's "A Short History of Everything". Its science rather than science fiction but its superb.

 

Am also reading a McPherson book on Lincoln that is really good called "Tried by War" but you don't mention history so I'll not elaborate on that one.

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And if you haven't read Game of Thrones yet, that's about 20 lbs of paperback for your carry on. But it's a great read, and far more in depth than the series. Of course, unlike the TV show, with the books you'll have to imagine all the boobage ourself.

 

Second the Tad Williams stuff, just gave that a re-read recently. He's started a second trilogy set some years later, I think the first book might be out.

 

The first three Dune books were pretty fantastic, though I started losing interest in the later ones. Same for Terry Goodkind's "Sword of Truth" - Wizard's First Rule is phenomenal, 2nd & 3rd books were OK, and they peter out more later.

 

If you like historical fiction then there are several other series out there along the lines of the Hornblower & Aubrey series (which if you haven't read you might try), like the Kydd books by Julian Stockwin.

 

It's tough to recommend something without knowing what you've already read.

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Can't help with lengthy sci fi or fantasy but a couple good thick books are Harlot's Ghost by Norman Mailer. CIA at the height of the Cold War. The Right Stuff by Tom Wolfe. Underworld by Don DeLillo. A good detective series is Bosch by Michael Conley.

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Anything by Greg Iles is a bona fide page burner but in particular I'd recommend his Natchez Burning Trilogy, the third volume of which has just been published last month. Like Gresham, they are all rooted in the mystery and history of the deep south. Unlike Gresham, this stuff will grab your heart and make you want to join the SPLC. Painfully intense to read. Be prepared to battle your spouse over these if you read them on holiday.

 

I just bought Mississippi Burning for my wife's birthday and we're both struggling to not crack it now, but want to wait till next holiday in June.Tough noogies on her if I grab it first on the first night out.

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The Patrick O'Brian novels are a decent series for sailors, and will consume a LOT of time. I recommend trying to get them at the library, as buying them can get pricey if you go through the whole series. Skim or skip the land-based elements, though. Dull as dirt. Always itching to get back to sea.

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I'll second thee Natchez burning trilogy, the wife is reading Mississippi Burning and at the rate she's going I'll get around to it on holidays in July.... I enjoyed Neal Stephenson's Cryptnomicon. Have you read the Chronicles of Thomas Covenant by Stephen Donaldson?

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I enjoyed Neal Stephenson's Cryptnomicon.

this, and everything he wrote before it. After that it's only good as an ambien substitute.

 

a wild card, if you like the west, Wallace Stegner, in particular Angle of Repose. Well written, thick, reasonably quick read.

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You guys call yourselves sailors and haven't even mentioned the Hornblowers?

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Man, it's been a long time but you might consider Carlos Castaneda's first three books.

 

The Teachings of Don Juan

A Separate Reallity

Journey to Ixtlan

 

Some pretty profound stuff in there.

 

"an enigma wrapped in a mystery wrapped in a tortilla"

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Angle of repose is one of the best books I've ever read.

 

every word of the patrick obrien series is good

 

churchills memiors after ww2 are facinating

 

conneleys bosch series and spinoffs are excellent

 

lawrence blocks matt scudder series is good

 

henning mankells wallender books are all diamonds

 

Rankins detective rebus books

 

childs reacher books are fluffy but fun

 

tana french has a series with a female dectective

 

Richard morgan has a series with a character called takeshi kovacs which is cool

 

John sanfords lucas davenport series is fun in the reacher kind of way

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Stephen King, Dark Tower series.

 

WL

 

Stole my suggestion. Blaine the Train still gives me nightmares. I don't really know why.

"Blaine is a pain and that is the truth."

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If we talking classics, T.H. White's The Once and Future King is a stellar Arthurian fantasy. Re-read it last year. Still good.....and thick.

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In the historical novel genre

Ken Follett

Pillars of the Earth Trilogy

James clavell

Shogun series

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You guys call yourselves sailors and haven't even mentioned the Hornblowers?

 

Look upthread...

 

Also, Raymond E. Feist - start with Magician and work your way through all his books. Some great fantasy there, multi generational stories sometimes spread out in interconnected books. They're broken down in to "sagas" or groups of related books that may be separated by years. But you want to go in order, because someone who is a kid in one group of books may be an adult in the next, and an elder statesman in the next.

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Also Stephen R. Donaldson -

 

The Thomas Covenant series (ten books; I've not read The Last Chronicles, which is the final tetralogy, so I can't speak to it) - this is Fantasy. Covenant is kind of an anti-hero and can be a pretty dark guy.

The Gap Cycle (five books) - SciFi, sometimes dark and a tad perverse but still good.

Mordant's Need (two books) - Fantasy; I liked these a lot.

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If SciFi/Space Operas your thing, Kevin H. Anderson's Saga of Seven Suns is a good read. It's more space opera than hard SciFi, but entertaining nonetheless.

 

William Gibson's Sprawl Trilogy (Neuromancer, Count Zero, Mona Lisa Overdrive) and his Bridge trilogy (Virtual Light, Idoru, All Tomorrow's Parties) are all good reads. They aren't TRILOGIES like the Lord of the Rings or Memory, Sorry & Thorn, where it's one solid story that happens to be split into three books that you really need to finish. But rather three loosely connected books which share some, but not all characters in the same general future setting. You can pick one of them up and read it and not feel the story is incomplete or a cliffhanger.

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More in the historical fiction category, anything by Wilbur Smith. Start with River God, but be prepared for a sleepless night as you won't be able to put it down.

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The deliberately misnamed Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy "Trilogy" consists of six books, five written by Adams: The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy (1979), The Restaurant at the End of the Universe (1980), Life, the Universe and Everything (1982), So Long, and Thanks for All the Fish (1984) and Mostly Harmless (1992). On 16 September 2008 it was announced that Irish author Eoin Colfer was to pen a sixth book. The book, entitled And Another Thing..., was published in October 2009, on the 30th anniversary of the publication of the original novel.

 

A great "trilogy" that goes well with Irish whiskey and a joint......

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Early Feist is good, but the later stuff starts to wander and preach.

David Eddings - good stories, dry humour. Two 5 book series in one world, two 3 book series in another.

Dark tower is great, but I made the mistake of reading it before he was done writing.

 

Chronicles of Thomas Covenant are a decent read but very dark.

One of the coldest lines I have ever read:

How do you hurt someone who has lost everything? Give them something back, broken.

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Stephen King, Dark Tower series.

 

WL

 

This^^

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Start with Dune.

It's all downhill from there.

A pure masterpiece, re-readable forever.

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Stephen King, Dark Tower series.

 

WL

 

Stole my suggestion. Blaine the Train still gives me nightmares. I don't really know why.

"Blaine is a pain and that is the truth."

 

 

You, me, Stephen Hawkins, and anyone else in fear of rogue AI......

 

WL

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The Recognitions, William Gatis, for the literary elite. Not an easy read, but one of the great unrecognised great works.

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There's a book called "The Bible". It's full of great tales, and it's pretty much science fiction, with an historical bent. Make sure you get both the old, and new testaments..... Very important..... If you also get the companion books, called the "Quran", and the "Tanakh", you'll get a pretty good read.

Or on the other hand, you could get the "Tripitaka"............

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You guys call yourselves sailors and haven't even mentioned the Hornblowers?

Eggsactly. I prefer C.S. Forester over O'Brian myself although that might be sacrilegious to some. But there is Sam Llewellyn too: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sam_Llewellyn. Read almost all of them and if you haven't seen the "sailing thrillers" find them if you are looking for a series. He''ll never get a Nobel Prize for literature but good fun read when out cruising.

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I enjoyed Neal Stephenson's Cryptnomicon.

this, and everything he wrote before it. After that it's only good as an ambien substitute.

 

a wild card, if you like the west, Wallace Stegner, in particular Angle of Repose. Well written, thick, reasonably quick read.

 

The Baroque Cycle is my favorite of everything he's written and is certainly long.

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If you are a fan of the movie of play "Les Miserables", all 1500 pages of the book are very good.

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Trouble with Reacher is, the guy has no sense of humor at all. If he can't kill it or fuck it, he just kills it anyway.

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Anything by Greg Iles is a bona fide page burner but in particular I'd recommend his Natchez Burning Trilogy, the third volume of which has just been published last month. Like Gresham, they are all rooted in the mystery and history of the deep south. Unlike Gresham, this stuff will grab your heart and make you want to join the SPLC. Painfully intense to read. Be prepared to battle your spouse over these if you read them on holiday.

 

I just bought Mississippi Burning for my wife's birthday and we're both struggling to not crack it now, but want to wait till next holiday in June.Tough noogies on her if I grab it first on the first night out.

This......I'm 291 pages in to Mississippi burning 700+ Pages can't stop reading. The penn cage character is great and Greg does a great job telling a story

 

I would also reccomend Vince Flynn. His Mitch rap character is great. If you are into anti terrorism type stories. Think jack Ryan from Tom Clancy but more badass

 

Andy weir. He wrote "the Martian". Matt Damon movie, book was much better than movie

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Raymond Chandler - the Phillip Marlowe books. They were current when they were written but now are historical. They perfectly capture their era and you can absolutely feel the dust in your mouth and the heat of the L.A. sun.

 

Lots of great, hard boiled dialogue too - "There might be trouble" - "Trouble is my business".

 

“From 30 feet away she looked like a lot of class. From 10 feet away she looked like something made up to be seen from 30 feet away.”

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Edward Whittemore has an interesting quartet series dealing with the history of Jerusalem and the middle east. Mixes historical facts with some bizarre twists. One of the characters for instance is seemingly based on Sir Richard Burton, the 19th century explorer; and the true bible is the writings of on an imbecile translating a blind beggars tales. Strange books but very interesting. The first two books, Sinai Tapestry and Jerusalem Poker are the preferred of the 4.

 

The Stepford trilogy by Robertson Davies is another series to consider. They can get complex at times, but never drag.

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Raymond Chandler - the Phillip Marlowe books. They were current when they were written but now are historical. They perfectly capture their era and you can absolutely feel the dust in your mouth and the heat of the L.A. sun.

 

Lots of great, hard boiled dialogue too - "There might be trouble" - "Trouble is my business".

 

“From 30 feet away she looked like a lot of class. From 10 feet away she looked like something made up to be seen from 30 feet away.”

 

+1 I recently discovered these. Very well written. Available as legal free downloads.

 

Back to the historical fiction, I have plowed through a stack of Thomas Hardy in the past year or two: Tess of the d'Urbervilles, Far from the Madding Crowd, Mayor of Casterbridge, etc. Also legally available as free downloads.

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In the historical novel genre

Ken Follett

Pillars of the Earth Trilogy

James clavell

Shogun series

Yes and yes.

 

 

 

Start with Dune.

It's all downhill from there.

A pure masterpiece, re-readable forever.

I am not a fan of science fiction but I have read all of the Dune books starting in the mid '70s. When I was in college at the time, after I had read the original trilogy, I had a tee shirt made at the campus book store, with iron on letters. On the front it said; Paul Muad'Dib Lives, an on the back, Stilgar. Amazingly, after the original author Frank Herbert died, his son Brian Herbert and Kevin Anderson took over the series and their efforts are indistinguishable from the originals in my opinion. The 1984 film, Dune, sucked however.

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Start with Dune.

It's all downhill from there.

A pure masterpiece, re-readable forever.

 

The first book was OK, but it was a slog to get through the whole series of that beast.

 

Asimov's Foundation Trilogy was a classic of that genre. Arthur Clark's books are quite good too

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Man, it's been a long time but you might consider Carlos Castaneda's first three books.

 

The Teachings of Don Juan

A Separate Reallity

Journey to Ixtlan

 

Some pretty profound stuff in there.

 

"an enigma wrapped in a mystery wrapped in a tortilla"

 

Wow, that brought back some memories. Went with a chick who kinda sorta made me read that stuff over several months. She believed it was real. That's one where the writing and story telling get better as it goes on, as opposed to Herbert's Dune, perhaps. A lot of "series" are but attempts to extend one good book with garbage but that Casteneda stuff it was the other way around. His best work comes after several. His end, and the end of his tiny but suicidally devoted cult is a sad tale which robs much from the books. A gifted writer of very hard to explain concepts, nonetheless.

 

I still think one of his chapters in one of those books "The Death Defiers" is hands down the best ghost story I've ever read. Unfortunately it is highly likely it would be incomprehensible to anyone who had not read all the stuff that he explained about that world first though. Hair raising stuff.

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Man, it's been a long time but you might consider Carlos Castaneda's first three books.

 

The Teachings of Don Juan

A Separate Reallity

Journey to Ixtlan

 

Some pretty profound stuff in there.

 

"an enigma wrapped in a mystery wrapped in a tortilla"[/size]

 

Wow, that brought back some memories. Went with a chick who kinda sorta made me read that stuff over several months. She believed it was real. That's one where the writing and story telling get better as it goes on, as opposed to Herbert's Dune, perhaps. A lot of "series" are but attempts to extend one good book with garbage but that Casteneda stuff it was the other way around. His best work comes after several. His end, and the end of his tiny but suicidally devoted cult is a sad tale which robs much from the books. A gifted writer of very hard to explain concepts, nonetheless.

 

I still think one of his chapters in one of those books "The Death Defiers" is hands down the best ghost story I've ever read. Unfortunately it is highly likely it would be incomprehensible to anyone who had not read all the stuff that he explained about that world first though. Hair raising stuff.

I put down The Teachings of Don Juan......paused and said....huh?

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Raymond Chandler - the Phillip Marlowe books. They were current when they were written but now are historical. They perfectly capture their era and you can absolutely feel the dust in your mouth and the heat of the L.A. sun.

 

Lots of great, hard boiled dialogue too - "There might be trouble" - "Trouble is my business".

 

“From 30 feet away she looked like a lot of class. From 10 feet away she looked like something made up to be seen from 30 feet away.”

 

I'm right in the middle of The Big Sleep right now. The movie plays it pretty close to the book.

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Raymond Chandler - the Phillip Marlowe books. They were current when they were written but now are historical. They perfectly capture their era and you can absolutely feel the dust in your mouth and the heat of the L.A. sun.

 

Lots of great, hard boiled dialogue too - "There might be trouble" - "Trouble is my business".

 

“From 30 feet away she looked like a lot of class. From 10 feet away she looked like something made up to be seen from 30 feet away.”

 

Got a link for those? I just picked up a three book collection in a single volume, and have forgetten how much I've come to despise big books after years of happy Kindle use.

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Early Feist is good, but the later stuff starts to wander and preach.

David Eddings - good stories, dry humour. Two 5 book series in one world, two 3 book series in another.

Dark tower is great, but I made the mistake of reading it before he was done writing.

 

Chronicles of Thomas Covenant are a decent read but very dark.

One of the coldest lines I have ever read:

How do you hurt someone who has lost everything? Give them something back, broken.

 

Thomas Covenant can be a right bitter asshole, no doubt, and he's not very likeable. It's a good read, but you feel a bit through the wringer at the end. Same with his "Gap" books; there's almost no one truly likeable by the end and it's diastrubing, but still quite good.

 

I've not read much of the newer Feist stuff in the last decade and a half.

 

I've read the Riftwar Saga, the Empire Trilogy, Krondor's Son's and the Serpentwar Saga. I've not seen the wandering and preaching bit in those, but it's been over 15 years probably since I've read anything new by him.

 

Feist is an interesting guy, he has maxed out his 5,000 facebook friend limit with his fans, and readily interacts with his fan base there. He's pretty approachable.

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Lots of good suggestions above

 

+1 on the Game of Thrones books, too.

 

The Follett books, mentioned above (starting with Pillars of the Earth).

 

In the same genre, some of the early Jeffrey Archer (Kane and Abel, Prodigal Daughter, As the Crow Flies...)

 

And in historical fiction, I really like the Camulod series by Jack Whyte (SkyStone, Singing Sword... I think there are 10 of them)

 

Bernard Cornwell is also a good read.

 

And if you want twisty, Ludlum.

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Man, it's been a long time but you might consider Carlos Castaneda's first three books.

 

The Teachings of Don Juan

A Separate Reallity

Journey to Ixtlan

 

Some pretty profound stuff in there.

 

"an enigma wrapped in a mystery wrapped in a tortilla"

 

Wow, that brought back some memories. Went with a chick who kinda sorta made me read that stuff over several months. She believed it was real. That's one where the writing and story telling get better as it goes on, as opposed to Herbert's Dune, perhaps. A lot of "series" are but attempts to extend one good book with garbage but that Casteneda stuff it was the other way around. His best work comes after several. His end, and the end of his tiny but suicidally devoted cult is a sad tale which robs much from the books. A gifted writer of very hard to explain concepts, nonetheless.

 

I still think one of his chapters in one of those books "The Death Defiers" is hands down the best ghost story I've ever read. Unfortunately it is highly likely it would be incomprehensible to anyone who had not read all the stuff that he explained about that world first though. Hair raising stuff.

 

 

 

I read these three books back in the late 70's with a fair bit of skepticism but I did enjoy them.

 

Then it all faded into the past with all the other flotsam of the era and never really thought about the guy after that.

 

I HAD NO IDEA HE WAS THAT MUCH OF A SCHMUCK :huh:

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London- Edward Rutherford. Historical fiction at the top level and about 1200 pages. Rutherford is the English James Michener.

Dragonlance chronicles- Margaret Weis and Tracy Hickman. Fantasy and a good 900 pages if you can get all three of the original series in one book.

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Raymond Chandler - the Phillip Marlowe books. They were current when they were written but now are historical. They perfectly capture their era and you can absolutely feel the dust in your mouth and the heat of the L.A. sun.

 

Lots of great, hard boiled dialogue too - "There might be trouble" - "Trouble is my business".

 

“From 30 feet away she looked like a lot of class. From 10 feet away she looked like something made up to be seen from 30 feet away.”

 

Got a link for those? I just picked up a three book collection in a single volume, and have forgetten how much I've come to despise big books after years of happy Kindle use.

 

If you licke RC, youde licke Dashelle Hammette to. Same grittey depictiones of lives on ragedey edges.

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Edit: Also Bernard Cornwell has six different series of historical fiction that were all really good . . . the Sharpe series being my favorite.

I like the Saxon series -The Last Kingdom et al. The story of Alfred the Great, and uniting England.

 

There's the Flashman series by George MacDonald Fraser. His story of serving in Burma in the war Quartered safe out here is worth finding for those who like that sort of thing.

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Lots of good suggestions above

 

+1 on the Game of Thrones books, too.

 

The Follett books, mentioned above (starting with Pillars of the Earth).

 

In the same genre, some of the early Jeffrey Archer (Kane and Abel, Prodigal Daughter, As the Crow Flies...)

 

And in historical fiction, I really like the Camulod series by Jack Whyte (SkyStone, Singing Sword... I think there are 10 of them)

 

Bernard Cornwell is also a good read.

 

And if you want twisty, Ludlum.

 

I liked Ken Follett's spy stuff (e.g. Eye of the Needle, Key to Rebecca, etc.) more than the Pillars of the Earth stuff. I read that one because I like Follett, but I thought it was rather slow and was never interested in reading any more in that series.

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Raymond Chandler - the Phillip Marlowe books. They were current when they were written but now are historical. They perfectly capture their era and you can absolutely feel the dust in your mouth and the heat of the L.A. sun.

 

Lots of great, hard boiled dialogue too - "There might be trouble" - "Trouble is my business".

 

“From 30 feet away she looked like a lot of class. From 10 feet away she looked like something made up to be seen from 30 feet away.”

 

Got a link for those? I just picked up a three book collection in a single volume, and have forgetten how much I've come to despise big books after years of happy Kindle use.

 

If you licke RC, youde licke Dashelle Hammette to. Same grittey depictiones of lives on ragedey edges.

 

 

I've read some Hammett as well, yes. Good stuff.

 

We watched The Maltese Falcon and The Big Sleep back to back once. I supposed we were on a bit of a Bogey tear since we also watched the African Queen. Interesting how Marlowe is a likeable kind of guy and Sam Spade is a bit of an opportunistic dick, and Bogart did such a great job with both of them.

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If you liked the Peter F. Hamilton books, just keep going. There's five more books in the Commonwealth, spread out over several thousand years but with some recurring characters.

The Dreaming Void

The Evolutionary Void

The Temporal Void

The Abyss Beyond Dreams

A Night Without Stars

 

Historical fiction, check out The Terror by Dan Simmons, about the lost Franklin expedition to the Arctic

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Love Raymond Chandler! "She was a blond that would make a bishop kick a hole in a stain-glassed window." "He was about as inconspicuous as a tarantula on an angel food cake."

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Raymond Chandler - the Phillip Marlowe books. They were current when they were written but now are historical. They perfectly capture their era and you can absolutely feel the dust in your mouth and the heat of the L.A. sun.

 

Lots of great, hard boiled dialogue too - "There might be trouble" - "Trouble is my business".

 

“From 30 feet away she looked like a lot of class. From 10 feet away she looked like something made up to be seen from 30 feet away.”

 

I'm right in the middle of The Big Sleep right now. The movie plays it pretty close to the book.

 

 

Which movie? Bogart or Mitchum? Moving the setting to London was odd and added nothing to the story.

 

Mitchum did a great version of Farewell My Lovely.

 

I always thought Powers Boothe did a great job of Marlowe - he looked the closest to my imagining of the character.

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Raymond Chandler - the Phillip Marlowe books. They were current when they were written but now are historical. They perfectly capture their era and you can absolutely feel the dust in your mouth and the heat of the L.A. sun.

 

Lots of great, hard boiled dialogue too - "There might be trouble" - "Trouble is my business".

 

“From 30 feet away she looked like a lot of class. From 10 feet away she looked like something made up to be seen from 30 feet away.”

 

Got a link for those? I just picked up a three book collection in a single volume, and have forgetten how much I've come to despise big books after years of happy Kindle use.

 

 

Nope, sorry.

 

I prefer books by far for entertainment reading although I certainly recognize the advantages of Kindle on a boat.

 

Prefer screens by far for tech and reference reading.

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Raymond Chandler - the Phillip Marlowe books. They were current when they were written but now are historical. They perfectly capture their era and you can absolutely feel the dust in your mouth and the heat of the L.A. sun.

 

Lots of great, hard boiled dialogue too - "There might be trouble" - "Trouble is my business".

 

“From 30 feet away she looked like a lot of class. From 10 feet away she looked like something made up to be seen from 30 feet away.”

 

Got a link for those? I just picked up a three book collection in a single volume, and have forgetten how much I've come to despise big books after years of happy Kindle use.

Nope, sorry.

 

I prefer books by far for entertainment reading although I certainly recognize the advantages of Kindle on a boat.

 

Prefer screens by far for tech and reference reading.

BJ, long as you have reasonable broadband.....or even "wide but not broad" band.....the App "OverDrive" allows checkout of eBooks to your tablet or laptop from most US libraries for free. Some (like mine) require you come to the library and get a library card and then everything else is online (which obviously wouldn't work for you) but a buddy of mine said his library did the whole thing including issuance of library card on-line. The county library I use has an excellent choice of titles.

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I prefer books by far for entertainment reading

I generally do, too, except that I have dozens (and dozens) of books on my "stack", plus dozens (and dozens) of favorites I might want to read again, and the only way I can be sure I have a book that'll suit my mood of the moment is to have a lot of them handy.

 

For the most part, that means kindle (or, more specifically, kindle app on an ipad mini). I've got something upwards of 1000 books at my fingertips at any moment, everything from Mark Twain to Neal Stephenson. Makes up for the tactile pleasure of an actual book. Mostly.

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Randy Wayne White, The Doc Ford series, Sanibel, on the water.

 

John B Macdonald, Travis McGee, life on a houseboat, ancient, a Bertram sportfish cost $25,000.

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John D.

 

Ancient is right - McGee fought in Korea - still good fun macho reads.

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I prefer books by far for entertainment reading

I generally do, too, except that I have dozens (and dozens) of books on my "stack", plus dozens (and dozens) of favorites I might want to read again, and the only way I can be sure I have a book that'll suit my mood of the moment is to have a lot of them handy.

 

For the most part, that means kindle (or, more specifically, kindle app on an ipad mini). I've got something upwards of 1000 books at my fingertips at any moment, everything from Mark Twain to Neal Stephenson. Makes up for the tactile pleasure of an actual book. Mostly.

 

 

I have some books......special ones that I keep to page through from time to time for the beauty and tactile feel of a book. I have a number of them that I received from my father after he passed with priceless underlining and notations made by him in his familiar handwriting in the margins of his thoughts/impressions throughout the books. As I read and re-read them, I have added my own highlighting and notations of my thoughts in my own handwriting in the margins as well. I will pass those books to my son when I shuffle off this mortal coil.

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Man, it's been a long time but you might consider Carlos Castaneda's first three books.

 

The Teachings of Don Juan

A Separate Reallity

Journey to Ixtlan

 

Some pretty profound stuff in there.

 

"an enigma wrapped in a mystery wrapped in a tortilla"

 

Wow, that brought back some memories. Went with a chick who kinda sorta made me read that stuff over several months. She believed it was real. That's one where the writing and story telling get better as it goes on, as opposed to Herbert's Dune, perhaps. A lot of "series" are but attempts to extend one good book with garbage but that Casteneda stuff it was the other way around. His best work comes after several. His end, and the end of his tiny but suicidally devoted cult is a sad tale which robs much from the books. A gifted writer of very hard to explain concepts, nonetheless.

 

I still think one of his chapters in one of those books "The Death Defiers" is hands down the best ghost story I've ever read. Unfortunately it is highly likely it would be incomprehensible to anyone who had not read all the stuff that he explained about that world first though. Hair raising stuff.

 

 

 

I read these three books back in the late 70's with a fair bit of skepticism but I did enjoy them.

 

Then it all faded into the past with all the other flotsam of the era and never really thought about the guy after that.

 

I HAD NO IDEA HE WAS THAT MUCH OF A SCHMUCK :huh:

 

 

If you only read those you missed just about all the really interesting stuff. He was still had some notion of being an anthropologist for the first two, but when profs began asking tp see his oft cited field notes...ahem... he chucked all that and did JTI. That one was only the beginning of his science-fiction voice. The ones following that is where he unleashed his incredible imagination. Fascinating even when you know it's all made up.

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Raymond Chandler - the Phillip Marlowe books. They were current when they were written but now are historical. They perfectly capture their era and you can absolutely feel the dust in your mouth and the heat of the L.A. sun.

 

Lots of great, hard boiled dialogue too - "There might be trouble" - "Trouble is my business".

 

“From 30 feet away she looked like a lot of class. From 10 feet away she looked like something made up to be seen from 30 feet away.”

 

Got a link for those? I just picked up a three book collection in a single volume, and have forgetten how much I've come to despise big books after years of happy Kindle use.

 

 

Lots of books here, including Chandler...https://archive.org/search.php?query=philip%20marlowe∧[]=mediatype%3A%22texts%22

 

And here, the grandpappy of electronic free books...https://www.gutenberg.org/

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Raymond Chandler - the Phillip Marlowe books. They were current when they were written but now are historical. They perfectly capture their era and you can absolutely feel the dust in your mouth and the heat of the L.A. sun.

 

Lots of great, hard boiled dialogue too - "There might be trouble" - "Trouble is my business".

 

From 30 feet away she looked like a lot of class. From 10 feet away she looked like something made up to be seen from 30 feet away.

 

Got a link for those? I just picked up a three book collection in a single volume, and have forgetten how much I've come to despise big books after years of happy Kindle use.

Nope, sorry.

 

I prefer books by far for entertainment reading although I certainly recognize the advantages of Kindle on a boat.

 

Prefer screens by far for tech and reference reading.

BJ, long as you have reasonable broadband.....or even "wide but not broad" band.....the App "OverDrive" allows checkout of eBooks to your tablet or laptop from most US libraries for free. Some (like mine) require you come to the library and get a library card and then everything else is online (which obviously wouldn't work for you) but a buddy of mine said his library did the whole thing including issuance of library card on-line. The county library I use has an excellent choice of titles.

We did that for years with our old library after we left. Tne oir house finally sold...though we still own investment real estate in the town I didnt feel as comfortable squawking when they required new cards and a visit.

 

Good program though, our new library in FL may get there sone day.

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I prefer books by far for entertainment reading

I generally do, too, except that I have dozens (and dozens) of books on my "stack", plus dozens (and dozens) of favorites I might want to read again, and the only way I can be sure I have a book that'll suit my mood of the moment is to have a lot of them handy.

 

For the most part, that means kindle (or, more specifically, kindle app on an ipad mini). I've got something upwards of 1000 books at my fingertips at any moment, everything from Mark Twain to Neal Stephenson. Makes up for the tactile pleasure of an actual book. Mostly.

Books don't give me tactile pleasure at all.

 

They are heavy and bulky. They dont stay open if you out the down. They lose your page if you drop them. You have to have light pointing AT the book.

 

The Kindle is lightweight, backlit, has a huge library on it, can be propped easily on its cover for reading while your hands are both in use. And if you keep it connected it will save your place across devices. So if I dont bring it with me i can still bring up whatever I'm reading on my phone and it will keep up.

 

I moved to a kindle years ago and never looked back. The only thing I don't like is it has sucked the joy out of browsing in book stores.

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I prefer books by far for entertainment reading

I generally do, too, except that I have dozens (and dozens) of books on my "stack", plus dozens (and dozens) of favorites I might want to read again, and the only way I can be sure I have a book that'll suit my mood of the moment is to have a lot of them handy.

 

For the most part, that means kindle (or, more specifically, kindle app on an ipad mini). I've got something upwards of 1000 books at my fingertips at any moment, everything from Mark Twain to Neal Stephenson. Makes up for the tactile pleasure of an actual book. Mostly.

 

 

I have some books......special ones that I keep to page through from time to time for the beauty and tactile feel of a book. I have a number of them that I received from my father after he passed with priceless underlining and notations made by him in his familiar handwriting in the margins of his thoughts/impressions throughout the books. As I read and re-read them, I have added my own highlighting and notations of my thoughts in my own handwriting in the margins as well. I will pass those books to my son when I shuffle off this mortal coil.

 

 

Sitting by the fire with a good Kindle just doesn't have the same soul does it?

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I prefer books by far for entertainment reading

I generally do, too, except that I have dozens (and dozens) of books on my "stack", plus dozens (and dozens) of favorites I might want to read again, and the only way I can be sure I have a book that'll suit my mood of the moment is to have a lot of them handy.

 

For the most part, that means kindle (or, more specifically, kindle app on an ipad mini). I've got something upwards of 1000 books at my fingertips at any moment, everything from Mark Twain to Neal Stephenson. Makes up for the tactile pleasure of an actual book. Mostly.

 

 

I have some books......special ones that I keep to page through from time to time for the beauty and tactile feel of a book. I have a number of them that I received from my father after he passed with priceless underlining and notations made by him in his familiar handwriting in the margins of his thoughts/impressions throughout the books. As I read and re-read them, I have added my own highlighting and notations of my thoughts in my own handwriting in the margins as well. I will pass those books to my son when I shuffle off this mortal coil.

 

 

Sitting by the fire with a good Kindle just doesn't have the same soul does it?

 

 

It is SO much more convenient.....especially for traveling. But............it does not have the same soul. Its a trade off. I still have my small wall of books.....and always will.

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Historical fiction:

Outlander series Diana Gabaldon

 

Not long books but good series:

Cadfeal series Ellis Peters

 

Murder mysteries:

A Great Deliverance (Lynnley series) Elisabeth George

 

Not fat books but good series

Sanibel Flats (Doc Ford series) by Randy Wayne White

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Bernard Cornwell's Richard Sharpe series. British infantry in the Napoleonic Era.

The man wields the English language like his personal rapier. Very enjoyable.

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They're not fat (although there is a lot of them). Scott card's Ender series. The new prequels are pretty good and the "shadow" series is better than the Ender sequels which got a bit preachy.

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I prefer books by far for entertainment reading

I generally do, too, except that I have dozens (and dozens) of books on my "stack", plus dozens (and dozens) of favorites I might want to read again, and the only way I can be sure I have a book that'll suit my mood of the moment is to have a lot of them handy.

 

For the most part, that means kindle (or, more specifically, kindle app on an ipad mini). I've got something upwards of 1000 books at my fingertips at any moment, everything from Mark Twain to Neal Stephenson. Makes up for the tactile pleasure of an actual book. Mostly.

 

 

I have some books......special ones that I keep to page through from time to time for the beauty and tactile feel of a book. I have a number of them that I received from my father after he passed with priceless underlining and notations made by him in his familiar handwriting in the margins of his thoughts/impressions throughout the books. As I read and re-read them, I have added my own highlighting and notations of my thoughts in my own handwriting in the margins as well. I will pass those books to my son when I shuffle off this mortal coil.

 

 

Sitting by the fire with a good Kindle just doesn't have the same soul does it?

 

 

Sure it does. The book is is the words and the ideas, not the media it is printed on. That is ephemeral and meaningless.

 

And clumsy and inconvenient if it happens to be paper.

 

Luddites.

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If you are a fan of the movie of play "Les Miserables", all 1500 pages of the book are very good.

Any of Victor Hugo books are good, and thick.

 

I second Game of Thrones, thick and complex.

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Going back to your comment about "name of the wind". Rothfuss and Martin have pretty much cured me of starting to read series before its complete.

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Edit: Also Bernard Cornwell has six different series of historical fiction that were all really good . . . the Sharpe series being my favorite.

I like the Saxon series -The Last Kingdom et al. The story of Alfred the Great, and uniting England.

 

There's the Flashman series by George MacDonald Fraser. His story of serving in Burma in the war Quartered safe out here is worth finding for those who like that sort of thing.

 

 

Think I must have all Cornwell's books always a favourite of mine. What do you think of the BBC series by the way? I think it's pretty good.

 

Another cracker is Simon Scarrow's Macro & Cato Roman series (and his Napoleonic set of 4 is pretty good too)

 

CJ Sansom's Shardlake series is excellent as a medieval hoodunit

 

Lindsay Davis' Falco series is also an excellent hoodunit set in Rome

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I prefer books by far for entertainment reading

 

I generally do, too, except that I have dozens (and dozens) of books on my "stack", plus dozens (and dozens) of favorites I might want to read again, and the only way I can be sure I have a book that'll suit my mood of the moment is to have a lot of them handy.

For the most part, that means kindle (or, more specifically, kindle app on an ipad mini). I've got something upwards of 1000 books at my fingertips at any moment, everything from Mark Twain to Neal Stephenson. Makes up for the tactile pleasure of an actual book. Mostly.

I have some books......special ones that I keep to page through from time to time for the beauty and tactile feel of a book. I have a number of them that I received from my father after he passed with priceless underlining and notations made by him in his familiar handwriting in the margins of his thoughts/impressions throughout the books. As I read and re-read them, I have added my own highlighting and notations of my thoughts in my own handwriting in the margins as well. I will pass those books to my son when I shuffle off this mortal coil.

Sitting by the fire with a good Kindle just doesn't have the same soul does it?

Sure it does. The book is is the words and the ideas, not the media it is printed on. That is ephemeral and meaningless.

 

And clumsy and inconvenient if it happens to be paper.

 

Luddites.

One thing I have noticed is the real cumbersome often difficult process of reading and often desiring to refer to an illustration somewhere else in the book, then getting back to your reading point. This is especially difficult when the illustrations are either grouped together at the end of the book thus killing the "sync to farthest page" function, or in the body of the book and referred to several times as the book drives on. I also find the expression of my place in the book as "position 13,789 out of 56,921" instead of pages absolutely silly. That is truly a PIA when discussing the book either in a group or classroom setting. "Turn to page 122 and pick up the conversation at the third paragraph"......um.....what "position" is that?

 

eBook use is still a huge advantage that I'm thrilled to have....and I'd guess around 90% of my books are eBooks or Audible book that all fit onto my 1.5 pound iPad Pro....but they are not perfect.

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I prefer books by far for entertainment reading

I generally do, too, except that I have dozens (and dozens) of books on my "stack", plus dozens (and dozens) of favorites I might want to read again, and the