• Announcements

    • Zapata

      Abbreviated rules   07/28/2017

      Underdawg did an excellent job of explaining the rules.  Here's the simplified version: Don't insinuate Pedo.  Warning and or timeout for a first offense.  PermaFlick for any subsequent offenses Don't out members.  See above for penalties.  Caveat:  if you have ever used your own real name or personal information here on the forums since, like, ever - it doesn't count and you are fair game. If you see spam posts, report it to the mods.  We do not hang out in every thread 24/7 If you see any of the above, report it to the mods by hitting the Report button in the offending post.   We do not take action for foul language, off-subject content, or abusive behavior unless it escalates to persistent stalking.  There may be times that we might warn someone or flick someone for something particularly egregious.  There is no standard, we will know it when we see it.  If you continually report things that do not fall into rules #1 or 2 above, you may very well get a timeout yourself for annoying the Mods with repeated whining.  Use your best judgement. Warnings, timeouts, suspensions and flicks are arbitrary and capricious.  Deal with it.  Welcome to anarchy.   If you are a newbie, there are unwritten rules to adhere to.  They will be explained to you soon enough.  
Rail Meat

Marblehead to Halifax 2017

Recommended Posts

Dragon is entered for her second run at this east coast classic. After a long drift in the fog in 2013, I am hoping for a bit of breeze this time around.

 

As I have done in a couple of races in the past, I am auctioning off the fourth and final crew spot to whomever shows the most generosity to Rocking the Boat. These guys provide after school programing to the kids of Hunts Point. Teaching boat building, sailing, STEM projects and counseling - they are doing great things for a community that deserves great things.

 

Unlike prior times where attendance at the Whitehall Awards was required to bid, the auction has been augmented with on-line bidding. Head over to www.rockingtheboat.org or go straight to the bidding page.

 

Stand watches, eat freeze dried, shit in a bucket.... it don't get any better than this!

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This thread is dead quiet...

Is anyone going besides Rail Meat and me????? :o

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And another edition goes by that I will not be doing. See you all in Halifax!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm doin it for the first time this year... bucket list checkoff

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm in on Siren.

Booked a flight home for Weds Eve and really hoping to jump on an earlier flight, didn't wanna risk it though...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

BnG, who you racing with? Would love to raise a glass when you're here. I'll definitely be around RNSYS on Thursday. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm going on Hafa Adai - J109. It will be my second, looking forward to it! Be happy to say hello to any other Anarchists there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

RM do you have your lucky punter (charity donator) on board for this race?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can someone help me understand the pleasantries of this race?   I only hear.."no wind", "fog" and "you end up in colder climes".

I must be missing something...

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sometimes there are thunderstorms and rain too. A certain infamous black boat also found various sea mammals. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On Thursday, June 29, 2017 at 0:31 AM, DtM said:

RM do you have your lucky punter (charity donator) on board for this race?

No one bud, so I am giving an 18 year old nipper the opportunity. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If only I lived in the US.  Damn.

And good on you for supporting the younger ones.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Am doing it on our J120 Deviation.

This makes my 13th or 14th run of this, seen lots over those races. This one should have a full moon, which might be fun.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, Stu McCrea said:

Am doing it on our J120 Deviation.

This makes my 13th or 14th run of this, seen lots over those races. This one should have a full moon, which might be fun.

Ha.  If only we can see it through the fog.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/26/2017 at 7:47 PM, NautiGirl said:

BnG, who you racing with? Would love to raise a glass when you're here. I'll definitely be around RNSYS on Thursday. 

Swan 56 Apollo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎7‎/‎2‎/‎2017 at 10:07 PM, Rail Meat said:

Ha.  If only we can see it through the fog.

That can be very true, but not every race is as foggy as they say. Full moon the 9th, so should get one night without fog.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/3/2017 at 2:55 AM, Bump-n-Grind said:

Swan 56 Apollo

You will at least have a comfortable race!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lots of boats on the way down according to the tracker.

Harrier, Sea Smoke, Sail La Vie, Magic Buss, Dogsled and a few others.

Oh look there is a Vagrant on the way out the Harbour.

Lost

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, lostonsat said:

Lots of boats on the way down according to the tracker.

Harrier, Sea Smoke, Sail La Vie, Magic Buss, Dogsled and a few others.

Oh look there is a Vagrant on the way out the Harbour.

Lost

 

If you look again you'll see Vagrant on her way back into the harbour. She was heading the other way (PEI) so Gumby could teach sailing with SoldierOn. Apparently, she is experiencing technical difficulties so heading home. Fucking boats.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So the weather models are very divergent for winds next Monday and Tuesday in the Gulf of Maine. European Model shows front gets through race course Monday leading to light SW-W-NW and even N-NE winds. GFS model shows moderate SW winds . Thoughts?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, gesail1 said:

So the weather models are very divergent for winds next Monday and Tuesday in the Gulf of Maine. European Model shows front gets through race course Monday leading to light SW-W-NW and even N-NE winds. GFS model shows moderate SW winds . Thoughts?

If you don't assume it's the better of the models leading up to race day, you'll end up dreading the race. It's still probably too early to tell, but if anyone isn't hoping for the GFS to pan out, they're the definition of a masochist...

I'm gonna sit here pretending that the GFS is the only model available and hype myself up for a quick ride. You do you!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Murphness said:

If you don't assume it's the better of the models leading up to race day, you'll end up dreading the race. It's still probably too early to tell, but if anyone isn't hoping for the GFS to pan out, they're the definition of a masochist...

I'm gonna sit here pretending that the GFS is the only model available and hype myself up for a quick ride. You do you!

Model accuracy has been problematic with anything over 72hrs for some reason this year.

Sadly if the current consensus holds true, it will become a waterline parade of sail race, which is nice but would be nice to see some tactical bits.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, Murphness said:

I'm gonna sit here pretending that the GFS is the only model available and hype myself up for a quick ride. You do you!

Me too!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/5/2017 at 8:36 AM, NautiGirl said:

You will at least have a comfortable race!

quite!

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Starting to be a bit of consensus in the models now. The Euro is actually looking decent thankfully.

Either way, it's better than being at work. Looking forward to unplugging and catching up with the crew after a season off due to new kid. If I get 3 hours of sleep off watch I'll be sleeping better too...

Flight home on Weds evening, but if anyone is in before then, lets grab a beer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Did anyone catch the name of the guy who did the weather briefing today?  It was easily the most useful one I have ever attended.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Watched the start from shore (unfortunately), and they are having a beautiful day with breeze.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

9 to 12 knots from SW.  Deep running, fetching Brazil Rock 220 miles down the track.  Boat is moving well, spent the afternoon  so far clawing our way through the fleet thst started before us.    Just about to get through all but IRC 1 

 

Magic Bus is moving particularly well.

We are going 4 up for this one. Great team..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sounds like it was a pretty great race.  Exciting to watch Toothface and Dragon fight it out. 

Cruising life is fun, but nothing beats a good ocean race!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
30 minutes ago, NautiGirl said:

Sounds like it was a pretty great race.  Exciting to watch Toothface and Dragon fight it out. 

Cruising life is fun, but nothing beats a good ocean race!

staying at an airbnb in Halifax ...

so where's a good place to go for dinner?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
27 minutes ago, Bump-n-Grind said:

staying at an airbnb in Halifax ...

so where's a good place to go for dinner?

The Stubborn Goat, The Black Sheep, ( gastro pubs), The Wooden Monkey, or for more upscale, try The Bicycle Thief. Have fun!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Shoalcove said:

The Stubborn Goat, The Black Sheep, ( gastro pubs), The Wooden Monkey, or for more upscale, try The Bicycle Thief. Have fun!

 

If you're looking for lower-scale, Mezza on Barrington has unbeatable shawarma plates, and Burrito Jax higher on Duke has great burritos.

The Ardmore is always reliable for breakfast too!

 

HW

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Shoalcove said:

The Stubborn Goat, The Black Sheep, ( gastro pubs), The Wooden Monkey, or for more upscale, try The Bicycle Thief. Have fun!

went to the Bike Thief.. wow.. great meal

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Bump-n-Grind said:

went to the Bike Thief.. wow.. great meal

 

Sorry I didn't see your earlier post.

Good race?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, NautiGirl said:

Sorry I didn't see your earlier post.

Good race?

Very uneventful lol. Last 20 hours were painful on the big swan. But all in all good race

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
40 minutes ago, Bump-n-Grind said:

Very uneventful lol. Last 20 hours were painful on the big swan. But all in all good race

How long are you sticking around for?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great to see Actaea winning. Not many venues where a 60+ yr old design can win.  Credit to Mike and Connie on a good program and a great race. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/11/2017 at 4:59 PM, NautiGirl said:

Sounds like it was a pretty great race.  Exciting to watch Toothface and Dragon fight it out. 

Cruising life is fun, but nothing beats a good ocean race!

Were you on the quarantine dock at RNSYS?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That was an awesome race. 15-22 knots on one gybe. Got real soft when we turned left, but we were able to power through with the Code 0. I think we averaged 10 or 11 knots the whole way up. Champagne sailing!

I think it's prudent to make that my first and only M-H race! One more ticked off the bucket list...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
25 minutes ago, Murphness said:

Were you on the quarantine dock at RNSYS?

I was very careful not to walk past the yellow flags.:P

But yes, I was there to meet Dragon when she finished with cold beers and food and help ferry the crew to their accommodations. 

I feel very strongly that every long passage should end with someone waiting for you with beer and food on the dock. :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There was a blond lady there catching our lines early Tuesday. Thought it may have been you!

Re: beer greeting, wtf? We were all convinced we'd at least get a bottle of champagne to pass around. Not much better than that first sip of beer after a passage! Maybe you can encourage them to give a case to each boat upon finish for the next iteration :)

Good onya for taking care of Dragon!

Cheers,

Murphness

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
37 minutes ago, Murphness said:

There was a blond lady there catching our lines early Tuesday. Thought it may have been you!

Re: beer greeting, wtf? We were all convinced we'd at least get a bottle of champagne to pass around. Not much better than that first sip of beer after a passage! Maybe you can encourage them to give a case to each boat upon finish for the next iteration :)

Good onya for taking care of Dragon!

Cheers,

Murphness

They used to do that. Not sure when it stopped or why. I did post race inspections back in 2007 I think, and every boat received a case of beer. Obviously went by the wayside sometime in the last 10 years. I've always appreciated and been impressed by the reception in St. Pierre at the end of that race (champagne, food, a host family whicking your laundry away and returning it the next day washed and folded) so I like to reciprocate when possible for "come from aways".

Rail Meat thanked me with some sweet Dragon swag, so I think I got the better end of the deal.

Will you be around tonight?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, NautiGirl said:

They used to do that. Not sure when it stopped or why. I did post race inspections back in 2007 I think, and every boat received a case of beer. Obviously went by the wayside sometime in the last 10 years. I've always appreciated and been impressed by the reception in St. Pierre at the end of that race (champagne, food, a host family whicking your laundry away and returning it the next day washed and folded) so I like to reciprocate when possible for "come from aways".

Rail Meat thanked me with some sweet Dragon swag, so I think I got the better end of the deal.

Will you be around tonight?

I snuck out Weds morning. No clue how I made my 820 flight but the last thing I remember was sitting at a black jack table at the casino around 3am. I went to the office today and found a garbled outlook meeting reminder that must have been an attempt at setting an alarm. Good times!

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On Wednesday, July 12, 2017 at 11:58 AM, NautiGirl said:

How long are you sticking around for?

Leaving Friday morning :(

Wish I could stay a bit longer but we're on a schedule. Off to Nantucket 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, Murphness said:

I snuck out Weds morning. No clue how I made my 820 flight but the last thing I remember was sitting at a black jack table at the casino around 3am. I went to the office today and found a garbled outlook meeting reminder that must have been an attempt at setting an alarm. Good times!

 

That. Is. Awesome!

Glad you had a good time here. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Bump-n-Grind said:

Leaving Friday morning :(

Wish I could stay a bit longer but we're on a schedule. Off to Nantucket 

 

Unfortunate we didn't get to raise a glass. :(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Indeed

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Shear Beauty

In the category of better late than never, I finally found some time to cobble together a recap.

Sunday the 9th dawned as forecast, sunny and warm and with a 10 knot westerly blowing down in Boston harbor where we had docked Dragon for a few days prior to the race.  The proximity to marina, hotel, food and transportation choices all made it the logical place to base this particular effort out of and it all worked out perfectly.  Well, other than accidently taking my car keys with me when we shoved off the dock for Marblehead.

After that bit of drama, we banged out the 2 hour motor sail up to Marblehead and got there with plenty of time to reconnoiter the starting legs.  The RC sets up a line well outside of the Harbor and sends the boats down a 1.5 mile leg to the shore, then turns 90 degrees to port for another 1.5 mile leg along the shore to give the spectators a good show, then turns another 90 degrees at a second inflatable mark to send the boats directly to the southeast corner of Nova Scotia, 126 miles down the track.  Imagine three sides of a box.

By the time we got there, the wind was doing some funky stuff.  Clouds over the shore marked an early start to the sea breeze on what was turning into a hot day, and the sea breeze was fighting gradient for dominance.  In the hour leading up to the start, we were seeing shifts of 70 degrees, and wind that ranged from 4 knots to 13 knots.  Sail selection for the first two short legs could have ranged from the A2 kite to the Code 5 to a Solent.  By the time we left the line, we were seeing some unexpected NNW breeze in the 10 knot range with the Sea breeze dominate in that particular location

We had a good start, first or near first over the line after luffing up to hold a position at the eastern boat end.  We carried it out to be the western boat, then banged a tack back towards the shore and carried that over to the layline, crossing our class.  A final tack took us to the first mark comfortably ahead of the two Farr 40s from Oakcliff that were in 2nd and 3rd.  The short second leg was a shy reach parade  under the same solent, and we rounded the mark in to a kite set, with some deep VMG running. 

Initially as we started down the long leg, sea breeze meant no one could hold the distant mark, and we were all cheating off to the west.  But over the next hour as we cleared the short, the gradient reassumed dominance and the breeze pulled a bit forward which meant a vigilant helm could keep the boat pointed at Brazil Rock.  Or the point on the horizon where we knew Brazil Rock to be.  Complicating the effort was a crap load of shear, a story that was to turn out to be a constant across the race course.  Breeze at the top of the rig was a deep, deep run, practically by-the-lee.  And down on the deck, we were seeing breeze that was forward of the beam.  Trimming the sails was an active exercise, inducing plenty of twist into the main and some odd use of the articulating sprit and twing for the kite

Towards the latter part of Sunday as we fought our way through the boats from the 5 classes that started before us, the breeze did pull further forward to the SW and was a 115 to 120 TWA.  It also picked up to high teens, and caused us to think for a bit about putting up the Code 5.  Instead, we loaded some ballast and pressed on, and as night fell the breeze pulled back to the west and softened (with the shear returning) making the kite the continued choice.  In fact, we were to stick with the kite for the entire trip, hoisting it off the beach in Marblehead and dropping it in the harbor in Halifax.

A great run under a full moon on Sunday night and Monday morning, plus a bit of good fortune in timing put us off the south coast of Nova Scotia around lunch time on Monday.  We had tide running with us as we rounded within a half mile of Brazil Rock, and I saw the Brazil bouy for what was the first and likely last time of my life.  I have been around that corner a half dozen time at this point, but never on a clear day with unlimited viz.

Turning the corner we were back to VMG running and starboard board favored.  At this point, we were leading our class (PHRF class 1) and had pulled through all of the rest of the fleet except the boats in IRC 1 and ORR 1.  While we were actually within 9 miles of the ORR 1 boats and had made some decent progress of clawing back a couple of miles on them here and there, we knew that was an unlikely outcome and our goal was to consolidate and hold our lead on our class.  Toothface was the closest boat, and occasionally visible on AIS.  We put a good cover on them as we gybed down the coast over Monday night, each maneuver lit up by the same full moon shining across the clear, fog free sky.

Every inch counted, and after a hearty debate about the differences between VMG and VMC, we rotated helms every 60 minutes to keep things fresh and focused.  Our nipper, 18 year old Evan Langford, turned out to be a keen hand on the tiller and more than held up his end.

The wind had softened after turning the corner and the last 100 miles were rolling along with about 9 knots of breeze until 4 Am on Tuesday when it went sub 5 knots.  At this point, the ORR boats had managed to get into the outer harbor of Halifax and we lost touch with them, but we held our lead on Toothface.  Boats further back in the fleet held the breeze and started pulling up into us, losing us any chance for the overall PHRF prize, but we still had a good shot for Class 1.  Dragon likes the light stuff as well as any Class 40, and we used that to our advantage to squeeze a few more miles lead out to Toothface as we ooched our way to what we thought was the final gybe off enjoyed the harbor mouth and 10 miles out from the finish line.

The harbor turned out to be more tricky than expected, if for no other reason than the 2 or 3 mile band of fog we ran into.  The only fog of the race, I think it turned up to remind us of what a Halfax race usually is like.  As we worked our way through the harbor, shear continued to be a factor and we also started seeing 30+ degree shifts and wind that ranged from 4 knots to 14 knots.  It forced us out to the west side of the harbor and necessitated one final gybe a mile below the finish line.

We crossed on Tuesday morning and started counting down the 28 minutes we needed to beat Toothface by as we sorted the boat and motored for the Squadron.  We tied up as that milestone passed, and enjoyed a cold beer courtesy of Nautigirl when we got to the dock.  A quick and efficient trip to customs, 20 minutes of work and the boat was sorted as Toothface rafted up to us.

At dinner on Saturday before the race with the lads from Toothface, we had talked about how in college rowing the losing boat pulls up to the winning boat and gives up their shirts.  In what I hope becomes a new tradition in the Class 40, Toothface surrendered her shirts to Dragon when they got to the dock.  After a through trip to the laundry, I am going to sport mine with pride.

Racing with Evan Langford, Kyle Hubley and Mark Washeim was a blast, in what has to be one of the finest sets of conditions that a Halifax race has seen in quite some time. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Any reason why they start the fast boats first? More fun the other way around.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Probably so the slow boats don't impact any records. I was pretty happy to not have to fight through slowboat windshadow in a dying Marblehead breeze to get offshore!

Better questions is, why isn't this race started on Friday?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Rail Meat said:

Shear Beauty

In the category of better late than never, I finally found some time to cobble together a recap.

Sunday the 9th dawned as forecast, sunny and warm and with a 10 knot westerly blowing down in Boston harbor where we had docked Dragon for a few days prior to the race.  The proximity to marina, hotel, food and transportation choices all made it the logical place to base this particular effort out of and it all worked out perfectly.  Well, other than accidently taking my car keys with me when we shoved off the dock for Marblehead.

After that bit of drama, we banged out the 2 hour motor sail up to Marblehead and got there with plenty of time to reconnoiter the starting legs.  The RC sets up a line well outside of the Harbor and sends the boats down a 1.5 mile leg to the shore, then turns 90 degrees to port for another 1.5 mile leg along the shore to give the spectators a good show, then turns another 90 degrees at a second inflatable mark to send the boats directly to the southeast corner of Nova Scotia, 126 miles down the track.  Imagine three sides of a box.

By the time we got there, the wind was doing some funky stuff.  Clouds over the shore marked an early start to the sea breeze on what was turning into a hot day, and the sea breeze was fighting gradient for dominance.  In the hour leading up to the start, we were seeing shifts of 70 degrees, and wind that ranged from 4 knots to 13 knots.  Sail selection for the first two short legs could have ranged from the A2 kite to the Code 5 to a Solent.  By the time we left the line, we were seeing some unexpected NNW breeze in the 10 knot range with the Sea breeze dominate in that particular location

We had a good start, first or near first over the line after luffing up to hold a position at the eastern boat end.  We carried it out to be the western boat, then banged a tack back towards the shore and carried that over to the layline, crossing our class.  A final tack took us to the first mark comfortably ahead of the two Farr 40s from Oakcliff that were in 2nd and 3rd.  The short second leg was a shy reach parade  under the same solent, and we rounded the mark in to a kite set, with some deep VMG running. 

Initially as we started down the long leg, sea breeze meant no one could hold the distant mark, and we were all cheating off to the west.  But over the next hour as we cleared the short, the gradient reassumed dominance and the breeze pulled a bit forward which meant a vigilant helm could keep the boat pointed at Brazil Rock.  Or the point on the horizon where we knew Brazil Rock to be.  Complicating the effort was a crap load of shear, a story that was to turn out to be a constant across the race course.  Breeze at the top of the rig was a deep, deep run, practically by-the-lee.  And down on the deck, we were seeing breeze that was forward of the beam.  Trimming the sails was an active exercise, inducing plenty of twist into the main and some odd use of the articulating sprit and twing for the kite

Towards the latter part of Sunday as we fought our way through the boats from the 5 classes that started before us, the breeze did pull further forward to the SW and was a 115 to 120 TWA.  It also picked up to high teens, and caused us to think for a bit about putting up the Code 5.  Instead, we loaded some ballast and pressed on, and as night fell the breeze pulled back to the west and softened (with the shear returning) making the kite the continued choice.  In fact, we were to stick with the kite for the entire trip, hoisting it off the beach in Marblehead and dropping it in the harbor in Halifax.

A great run under a full moon on Sunday night and Monday morning, plus a bit of good fortune in timing put us off the south coast of Nova Scotia around lunch time on Monday.  We had tide running with us as we rounded within a half mile of Brazil Rock, and I saw the Brazil bouy for what was the first and likely last time of my life.  I have been around that corner a half dozen time at this point, but never on a clear day with unlimited viz.

Turning the corner we were back to VMG running and starboard board favored.  At this point, we were leading our class (PHRF class 1) and had pulled through all of the rest of the fleet except the boats in IRC 1 and ORR 1.  While we were actually within 9 miles of the ORR 1 boats and had made some decent progress of clawing back a couple of miles on them here and there, we knew that was an unlikely outcome and our goal was to consolidate and hold our lead on our class.  Toothface was the closest boat, and occasionally visible on AIS.  We put a good cover on them as we gybed down the coast over Monday night, each maneuver lit up by the same full moon shining across the clear, fog free sky.

Every inch counted, and after a hearty debate about the differences between VMG and VMC, we rotated helms every 60 minutes to keep things fresh and focused.  Our nipper, 18 year old Evan Langford, turned out to be a keen hand on the tiller and more than held up his end.

The wind had softened after turning the corner and the last 100 miles were rolling along with about 9 knots of breeze until 4 Am on Tuesday when it went sub 5 knots.  At this point, the ORR boats had managed to get into the outer harbor of Halifax and we lost touch with them, but we held our lead on Toothface.  Boats further back in the fleet held the breeze and started pulling up into us, losing us any chance for the overall PHRF prize, but we still had a good shot for Class 1.  Dragon likes the light stuff as well as any Class 40, and we used that to our advantage to squeeze a few more miles lead out to Toothface as we ooched our way to what we thought was the final gybe off enjoyed the harbor mouth and 10 miles out from the finish line.

The harbor turned out to be more tricky than expected, if for no other reason than the 2 or 3 mile band of fog we ran into.  The only fog of the race, I think it turned up to remind us of what a Halfax race usually is like.  As we worked our way through the harbor, shear continued to be a factor and we also started seeing 30+ degree shifts and wind that ranged from 4 knots to 14 knots.  It forced us out to the west side of the harbor and necessitated one final gybe a mile below the finish line.

We crossed on Tuesday morning and started counting down the 28 minutes we needed to beat Toothface by as we sorted the boat and motored for the Squadron.  We tied up as that milestone passed, and enjoyed a cold beer courtesy of Nautigirl when we got to the dock.  A quick and efficient trip to customs, 20 minutes of work and the boat was sorted as Toothface rafted up to us.

At dinner on Saturday before the race with the lads from Toothface, we had talked about how in college rowing the losing boat pulls up to the winning boat and gives up their shirts.  In what I hope becomes a new tradition in the Class 40, Toothface surrendered her shirts to Dragon when they got to the dock.  After a through trip to the laundry, I am going to sport mine with pride.

Racing with Evan Langford, Kyle Hubley and Mark Washeim was a blast, in what has to be one of the finest sets of conditions that a Halifax race has seen in quite some time. 

Great write-up and mostly true except for the part that the Mids on Apollo actually took your strategy after the start a little further right and crossed you and the rest of the fleet ;) (our moment of glory!)  I have a pic somewhere on my phone of you, taken thru our stern pulpit, turning around the 2nd mark :) will post it up if I can find it

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Bump-n-Grind said:

Great write-up and mostly true except for the part that the Mids on Apollo actually took your strategy after the start a little further right and crossed you and the rest of the fleet ;) (our moment of glory!)  I have a pic somewhere on my phone of you, taken thru our stern pulpit, turning around the 2nd mark :) will post it up if I can find it

 

Damn. I was so busy looking behind us that I missed you in front of is ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, Rail Meat said:

Damn. I was so busy looking behind us that I missed you in front of is ;)

it didn't last long LOL the kids got so busy lookin at Ti you and Toothie got around us and stayed there...

we thought we might save our time on y'all if the wind held up.. but such was not the luck... those last 12-15 hours were painful for the big swan LOL

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, Slim said:

Any reason why they start the fast boats first? More fun the other way around.

not really much point in bunching every one up for the hour or so it would take for the fleet to assume it's natural order. it is an offshore distance race.. not like an inshore where you could create a nice visual for spectators.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now