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      Abbreviated rules   07/28/2017

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Olson_30_Guy

FE28R Tuning Guide anyone?

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Just took delivery of USA-293 and will be racing mainly in Baltimore and Annapolis. Trying to scratch up at least a starting point tuning guide. I have been playing in the J/70 fleet these last 4 seasons and I have to say having abundant information out there is very helpful and improves the racing. Has anyone over in Sweden put together anything you are willing to share? How about the Aussies?

 

Thanks in advance!

 

-Jon

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I have been asking behind the scene about just this. The Fareast Australia guys are super helpful. The Swedes and great. Now that Fareast USA has some more racing experience input from them would be great. Below is from some emails I have:

 

- Forestay max length to minimize the lee-helm. I would like to (and
probably will) go further adding a toggle or a longer stud to get weather
helm.
- We have quite flat sails as the boat is fully powered up in 8-10kn of
breeze. Whom have you got sails from?
- Mast pre-bent: has to be adjusted to the luff curve of your main, it's
good to re-adjust for different winds, more pre-bent in the higher winds to
flatten the main. Spend some time on tuning this, measure and write down rig
tension, unfortunately you have to go up to do the D2's.
- In the lights, traveller all the way up and some twist in the main,
halyard tensions off, some outhaul off, no cunningham (basic stuff you
probably already do)
- Backstay: once you can reach target upwind speed you start bringing it on,
in probably 8-10 kn of breeze when you easily can sail target speed the
backstay will be full on to get max forestay tension so you can point high.
Work the traveller to dump power if needed. Steer quite aggressive to keep
the balance / pressure and therefore the speed constant.
- Tacking: especially in winds up to 12kn TWS keep the jib rounded till you
almost reach your target speed before trimming it off. Always first speed
then height. Open the leach of the main by easing the fine tune when
accelerating (3 inches)
- The guy steering should only be doing that, info he needs is wind gusts,
waves when to tack and gibe and other boats that are coming in.
- Mainsail trimmer is steering the boat for 50% when going upwind and is
responsible for the heel / pressure on the boat, swap in a training session
to get the feel of each others job.

Hope this adds something to you knowledge or helps you to faster and higher.
Please let me know if you have questions or where it's not clear.

and these answers to my questions:

 

able to maintain close hauled speed at 6.5 to 6.8 kts. I can do the 6.5 but find it hard to do 6.8's myself, the guy steering my boat is bringing some experience in! Very important first speed than height. Ease the main 4 inches on the fine tune in the tack, accelerate after a tack by letting the backstay off (you have to anyway to get the flicker over the top of the main) the leach of the main has to open up to be able to accelerate. Don't trim the jib off before you almost reached target speed. (in light and medium air the trimmer comes up and goes down again to trim the jib off) Once nearly on speed trim the jib off and pull the backstay on, this will bring you a few degrees up. We sail pure on the jib and its tell tales, further it's the leach of the main that will give you height and the backstay full on to get forestay tension (if you can comfortably reach target speeds so from 8-10kn wind) If you often fall of the speed due to waves or if you can't keep her in the groove ease the jib 15mm on the sheet to get more power but it will cost a little bit of height. Work the traveller to keep the boat balanced / powered. The fine tune is your throttle, ease it 2-3 inches to speed up if necessary. we don't use the vang at all only downwind. I assume your driver is sailing to the tell-tails and looking to keep the leeward ones flowing straight back and the weather ones oscillating up part of the time. I also assume you are putting on halyard tension to give the luff some roundness More tension makes the jib flatter, less fuller. In light to medium I like to just start to see very small wrinkles to make sure there isn't too much tension on the jib halyard and keep the draft about at 40% of chord. If you use a windex are you staying even with or inside the 45 deg marks? Not sure, either on the tab or a tiny bit inside in higher winds. Main thing is to sail on pressure /jib tell tales with a little bit of heel My experience is that the boat is fastest with the windex arrow about half a width outside the 45 degree marks. Also how does the crew on traveler maintain constant speed- the mainsail trimmer is responsible for the heel of the boat (=pressure) if the boat starts to heel to much you will lose speed so traveller down before that happens, if the boat comes up the traveller goes up to for more pressure / steer down a degree or two if needed do you vang sheet with the vang on and ease in the puffs and do you shoot for constant heel ? One last thing with respect to downwind- do you try to sail deep , hot or in between? you always try to sail as deep as possible but you have to heat it up to get speed, once the speed increases the apparent wind angle goes forward and you can come down, if you sail to deep you will lose pressure, try to sail on the point where the pressure kicks in, you'll feel it. It's hard in the lights and tempting to heat it up but it's all about VMG, if you can read out VMG it becomes easier to find the right angles.

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Basic rig tune for a multiple spreader rig is described nicely by Ivar Dedekam in his book Illustrated Sail and Rig Tuning by Wiley Nautical. Center the mast - I use a metal tape measure from the mast top to the shroud bottoms with the shrouds hand tight only. Then set the rake using the forestay turnbuckle and upper shrouds so you have about 2 degrees rake. Then start tensioning the uppers to about 20 to 25 on Loos Pro guage . The exact amount depends on wind range of course but this is a good mid range. The lowers get about 70% of the uppers but that may be more if needed to make sure mast stays straight under load. Check the forestay sag with backstay on/off. Should be able to distort about 6 to 8 inches when off and be hard to move with backstay full on. Then the tedious task of fine adjustment of lowers and diagonals. Basically you want to try and bend the mast by pulling in on the uppers and checking that the mast is staying in column and not falling off or making "S" turns at the shrouds. This whole process takes 2 to 3 hours. Then go sailing in 10 to 12 kt winds and see if the mast stays straight when loaded. In higher winds the mast may fall off to lee a little but make sure it is not making an "S" anywhere. I didn't mention pre-bend- that has to be done to match your sail's cut so varies.

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Follow the directions in the Selden book. Most important is to measure each shroud before installing as recommended by Selden. My upper cap was 3/4" longer on starboard versus port. Made that adjustment before raising mast and it made the whole process easier. I too will be adding a short toggle as recommended by Matt Wake. He just finished Charleston and came up with a whole new set of rig tune settings which he has agreed to share as I understand. Feel free to PM me so we can have additional discussions. 

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I now have my new set of One Sails 4T Forte sails for my FE28R dialed in. As part of the One Sails Sweden team I will write a tuning guide for them.

Gjbike get many things right above. For me the boat, with only one Jib will be sailed very much like a big Melges 24. Doing a lot of turns on the V1 turnbuckles in the transition from light to powered up. Balance between jib and main is paramount for vmg. We have a target at 6.3-6.5 upwind in 12-16kn, trying to sail high instead. 

The boat need inhaulers and the class is working to get the class rule updated with a smart and simple system. 

Crew weight placement is very dynamic and far forward in the light and coming back in a breeze. Keep the same optimum heel angle very constant upwind using weight movement and trimming! 

I will be back with more and contact Filip@onesails.com if you need a really fast set of sails

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Jon, is this you guys?  Kite says #356.  At any rate, boat looks very cool and if there is now another one in the area, 293, so much the better!  Fun racing against you guys, looks like you already have the boat dialed in nicely.  

FE28R356.jpg

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On 7/24/2017 at 7:31 AM, TimFordi550#87 said:

Jon, is this you guys?  Kite says #356.  At any rate, boat looks very cool and if there is now another one in the area, 293, so much the better!  Fun racing against you guys, looks like you already have the boat dialed in nicely.  

FE28R356.jpg

Yep, that's us.  Getting it dialed in, still learning for sure.  It's a fun boat.

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The boat works great with inhaulers. You should mount the fairleads quite close together in order to not loose power and enable more dynamic adjustments under sail. 

Important to design jib for close angles incl a high clew cut away

our boat took silver in the worlds and we were super fast and pointing high and running low down wind. This boat is really coming alive on all points of sail and wind speeds. We are at max rake, trimming the main hard, max inboard in most conditions. 

I have more data now from SWE-117 

Please look at great pix at www.fareast28r.com or on FB Fareast28R

IMG_3275.JPG

IMG_3290.JPG

IMG_3306.JPG

IMG_3338.JPG

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It seem to me that it would be better if you cross sheeted the inhaulers.  Seems silly to have to come off the rail if you need to ease them off in waves.

MS

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just a few observations on the inhauler arrangement and a shout out to the older and wiser to weigh in with their obesrvations

(1) the rule permits 4:1 purchase but no one seems to be using it

(2) as MS mentioned it makes sense to cross sheet the inhaulers so the active one can be trimmed from windward

(3) with no blocks at all in the entire arrangement it looks rather high friction

in comparison on the Platu (cross sheeted inhaul) we had a turning block at the base of the mast for the windward inhaul control line and a block with a simple SS ring on it - the latter may be redundant with the low friction Antal fitting but the remainder of the arrangement it seems to me is very high friction

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On 2017-11-06 at 7:18 AM, Seaferns said:

just a few observations on the inhauler arrangement and a shout out to the older and wiser to weigh in with their obesrvations

(1) the rule permits 4:1 purchase but no one seems to be using it

(2) as MS mentioned it makes sense to cross sheet the inhaulers so the active one can be trimmed from windward

(3) with no blocks at all in the entire arrangement it looks rather high friction

in comparison on the Platu (cross sheeted inhaul) we had a turning block at the base of the mast for the windward inhaul control line and a block with a simple SS ring on it - the latter may be redundant with the low friction Antal fitting but the remainder of the arrangement it seems to me is very high friction

I agree with your points. See inhauler thread for my descriptions 

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On 2017-08-20 at 6:33 AM, gjbike said:

How close together measured from front of bulkhead? Any pics?

I have the rear fair lead taking two loops and most of the load just aft of the high clew on a properly trimmed jib.  Just use a marker pen to find your position for your jib  

The forward fairlead is just 8cm forward. We use a 4:1 purchase and can trim while sheeted.

 

Trimming from windward is right for the boat. 

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