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      Abbreviated rules   07/28/2017

      Underdawg did an excellent job of explaining the rules.  Here's the simplified version: Don't insinuate Pedo.  Warning and or timeout for a first offense.  PermaFlick for any subsequent offenses Don't out members.  See above for penalties.  Caveat:  if you have ever used your own real name or personal information here on the forums since, like, ever - it doesn't count and you are fair game. If you see spam posts, report it to the mods.  We do not hang out in every thread 24/7 If you see any of the above, report it to the mods by hitting the Report button in the offending post.   We do not take action for foul language, off-subject content, or abusive behavior unless it escalates to persistent stalking.  There may be times that we might warn someone or flick someone for something particularly egregious.  There is no standard, we will know it when we see it.  If you continually report things that do not fall into rules #1 or 2 above, you may very well get a timeout yourself for annoying the Mods with repeated whining.  Use your best judgement. Warnings, timeouts, suspensions and flicks are arbitrary and capricious.  Deal with it.  Welcome to anarchy.   If you are a newbie, there are unwritten rules to adhere to.  They will be explained to you soon enough.  
Simon Collyer

General Thoughts

81 posts in this topic

 

I represented the Nautical Channel in the UK and went to the Americas Cup launch at the Renaissance Hotel, UK.  The sailors are an impressive bunch, but the AC is Lala Land compared, to the real world, and I am not losing any sleep worrying about any of it!   

Sir Ben Ainslie is a brilliant sailor and an all-round British sporting hero of course.

Ainslie was brilliant in the Finn and Laser but he is a ‘gym boy’ and in classes with a team dynamic, he has not always shone quite as brightly (not quite). He certainly has not out classed those around him. Both Percy and Ainslie are from pointing up boats. It seemed a better idea to bring in helms from multihulls or footing off boats! The Synergy syndicate certainly grasped that.

When the chips are down, Ainslie 'ups' the aggression, but the AC is a game of strategy (ask Dennis Conner) who brought in the business experience that Ben Ainslie simply does not have. You need to follow the wisdom of Tokugawa Ieyasu, the Daimyo and War Lord who united medieval Japan at the Battle of Sekigahara, and who was known for his patience.  He would wait patiently for the right moment - years if necessary. Ainslie had a nice points lead, he did not have to go in to the competition fists swinging. He could have done better to ‘conserve his powder’ and use the first few races to observe the competition and their strengths and weaknesses.  Instead the teams energy has been spent on patching up the boat. He starting to look like a future ambassador for Plastic Padding…!!

Sir Ainslie I guess, would have felt under a lot of personal pressure. That is understandable. Going into an event like this feeling slow must be 'gut-churning' however...if you name a business after yourself, and you are the CEO and the Chief Producer - when things do not work out it can be a huge strain. Ainslie is used to winning, he would also do better to show a bit of humility if he does not want to alienate his fan base. Especially to Dean Barkers team - where are those beers!. Ben is not arrogant but, in the UK media you have to be humble if you stuff up.  I remember Colin Chapman (Lotus) who died young and who was under huge pressure at the time. Ian Percy’s route is better, distributing the responsibility and not being the ultimate chief. He has good people around him like business manager David Tyler and of course the main Syndicate financier. His syndicate wants results, but at least you are not trying to hold full responsibility for everything simultaneously.

I have never been convinced by motor racing people who come into sailing. The best people to design boats are boat designers. I saw one very successful cruising catamaran manufacture sunk by an expert manager from the car industry. He just did not talk the same language. I am sure the F1 guys have made a great contribution, but they have not outshone the so called ‘cottage industry’ boat builders from places like Australia and New Zealand.

On the danger from boats rounding up on the start-line, you have the same problem in WW1 aircraft. If the engine stalled and you attempted to turn back to the airfield, the inside wing lost lift and dropped and the outer wing sped up and gained more lift. The plane would roll into the ground, especially if it had a rotary engine like the Sopwith Camel. The only solution might be to have separate vertical dagger boats in future like the ones on the IMOCA boats. Dean Barker did not luff excessively, Ainslie in a split second was caught out. He corrected more and more but it was too late. He was in a 'skid'. Even WW1 aces were killed by the manner described.  

Lastly, could we have less swearing on these bulletin boards. Children read them and in the UK if you must swear to make a point it makes you look uneducated? Try using ‘Oh Gosh’ or ‘Cripes’:-) Sailings become a sport of the upper classes, once more. I am not particular thrilled about being reduced to a flag waving fan. Brilliant event however.  There is one winner this time for a change, the Americas Cup itself.

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I'm really tempted to write something totally inappropriate in reply to the last paragraph. But I will lean back and wait until someone else will give you the right welcome, noob (hopefully they haven't all been banned...).

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Race 13: LRB vs France   Winner ? 
Race 14:  NZ  vs   Sweden     Winner ?
Race 15: France vs Japan       Winner ? 

Predictions ?

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Better not listen to the on-board audio then

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When I came to SA there was a brillant WELLCOME to every newcommer. It Read: FUCK OFF NEWBIE.

Well, after about 1o Years I`m still here.

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9 minutes ago, ET1 said:

When I came to SA there was a brillant WELLCOME to every newcommer. It Read: FUCK OFF NEWBIE.

Well, after about 1o Years I`m still here.

+1 & Simon, suggest a bit of research into "Anarchy"?

 

 

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In response to Simon's rather misjudged opening first, and final four sentences: buy an ad, and fuck off. And provide offerings. The offerings rhyme with noobs! If you know this forum, you should know the rules.

1 hour ago, Simon Collyer said:

 

...

Lastly, could we have less swearing on these bulletin boards. Children read them and in the UK if you must swear to make a point it makes you look uneducated? Try using ‘Oh Gosh’ or ‘Cripes’:-) Sailings become a sport of the upper classes, once more. I am not particular thrilled about being reduced to a flag waving fan. Brilliant event however.  There is one winner this time for a change, the Americas Cup itself.

And as per your concern for the children, how about the demonstration your precious ainslie gives them: punch the press, get special treatment to join Olympics, make a team all about yourself, sail in an unseamanlike manner, swear on live TV to your ginger helm...

 

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1 hour ago, Simon Collyer said:

On the danger from boats rounding up on the start-line, you have the same problem in WW1 aircraft. If the engine stalled and you attempted to turn back to the airfield, the inside wing lost lift and dropped and the outer wing sped up and gained more lift. The plane would roll into the ground, especially if it had a rotary engine like the Sopwith Camel.

Some rubbish there. One wonders how a stopped rotary engine can produce the necessary torque.

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1 hour ago, Rennmaus said:

I'm really tempted to write something totally inappropriate in reply to the last paragraph. But I will lean back and wait until someone else will give you the right welcome, noob (hopefully they haven't all been banned...).

 

CiC, Bermuda, Play-offs/Finals, OD, a CoR committee, Defender organizing the CSS, Defender sailing in the CSS, London Agreement...
-
Where has the AC gone?

No telling where, it is just gone....

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25 minutes ago, Happie Jack said:

Lolz exactly the same way your expertise interprets foils and wing sails. Re read again = a stopped motor produces zero anything.

Aero and momentum however...

Haven't a clue what you're trying to say.

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2 hours ago, Simon Collyer said:

 

I represented the Nautical Channel in the UK and went to the Americas Cup launch at the Renaissance Hotel, UK.  The sailors are an impressive bunch, but the AC is Lala Land compared, to the real world, and I am not losing any sleep worrying about any of it!   

Sir Ben Ainslie is a brilliant sailor and an all-round British sporting hero of course.

Ainslie was brilliant in the Finn and Laser but he is a ‘gym boy’ and in classes with a team dynamic, he has not always shone quite as brightly (not quite). He certainly has not out classed those around him. Both Percy and Ainslie are from pointing up boats. It seemed a better idea to bring in helms from multihulls or footing off boats! The Synergy syndicate certainly grasped that.

When the chips are down, Ainslie 'ups' the aggression, but the AC is a game of strategy (ask Dennis Conner) who brought in the business experience that Ben Ainslie simply does not have. You need to follow the wisdom of Tokugawa Ieyasu, the Daimyo and War Lord who united medieval Japan at the Battle of Sekigahara, and who was known for his patience.  He would wait patiently for the right moment - years if necessary. Ainslie had a nice points lead, he did not have to go in to the competition fists swinging. He could have done better to ‘conserve his powder’ and use the first few races to observe the competition and their strengths and weaknesses.  Instead the teams energy has been spent on patching up the boat. He starting to look like a future ambassador for Plastic Padding…!!

Sir Ainslie I guess, would have felt under a lot of personal pressure. That is understandable. Going into an event like this feeling slow must be 'gut-churning' however...if you name a business after yourself, and you are the CEO and the Chief Producer - when things do not work out it can be a huge strain. Ainslie is used to winning, he would also do better to show a bit of humility if he does not want to alienate his fan base. Especially to Dean Barkers team - where are those beers!. Ben is not arrogant but, in the UK media you have to be humble if you stuff up.  I remember Colin Chapman (Lotus) who died young and who was under huge pressure at the time. Ian Percy’s route is better, distributing the responsibility and not being the ultimate chief. He has good people around him like business manager David Tyler and of course the main Syndicate financier. His syndicate wants results, but at least you are not trying to hold full responsibility for everything simultaneously.

I have never been convinced by motor racing people who come into sailing. The best people to design boats are boat designers. I saw one very successful cruising catamaran manufacture sunk by an expert manager from the car industry. He just did not talk the same language. I am sure the F1 guys have made a great contribution, but they have not outshone the so called ‘cottage industry’ boat builders from places like Australia and New Zealand.

On the danger from boats rounding up on the start-line, you have the same problem in WW1 aircraft. If the engine stalled and you attempted to turn back to the airfield, the inside wing lost lift and dropped and the outer wing sped up and gained more lift. The plane would roll into the ground, especially if it had a rotary engine like the Sopwith Camel. The only solution might be to have separate vertical dagger boats in future like the ones on the IMOCA boats. Dean Barker did not luff excessively, Ainslie in a split second was caught out. He corrected more and more but it was too late. He was in a 'skid'. Even WW1 aces were killed by the manner described.  

Lastly, could we have less swearing on these bulletin boards. Children read them and in the UK if you must swear to make a point it makes you look uneducated? Try using ‘Oh Gosh’ or ‘Cripes’:-) Sailings become a sport of the upper classes, once more. I am not particular thrilled about being reduced to a flag waving fan. Brilliant event however.  There is one winner this time for a change, the Americas Cup itself.

Thoughtful writing, spot on comments concerning Ben

don't be a ben.JPG

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3 hours ago, Simon Collyer said:

Some other guff

Lastly, could we have less swearing on these bulletin boards. Children read them and in the UK if you must swear to make a point it makes you look uneducated? Try using ‘Oh Gosh’ or ‘Cripes’:-) Sailings become a sport of the upper classes, once more. I am not particular thrilled about being reduced to a flag waving fan. Brilliant event however.  There is one winner this time for a change, the Americas Cup itself.

Unfortunately, in the UK we do tend to suffer from tall poppy syndrome where we attack anyone successful in their field, whereas other countries support them. Much of your comment seems to be along those lines. Possibly you won't have come across too many people at the top of sailing at Brightlinsea sailing club, but I can assure you that Ben is very much seen as a team player and respected by those that have.

I appreciate that I only have a degree in maths (including fluid dynamics), not  a city and guilds in concrete technology, but I can assure that there is no similarity between the Sopwith Camel case and what happened to Ben in the incident with SBTJ. Nor for that matter does it have anything much in common with the comings and goings at Brightlingsea Sailing Club.

May I also add, that if you are concerned about standards of English: it should be "Sailing's become..." (or better still "Sailing has become..."); and Bachelor is spelled without a "T" (even in "Bachelor of Sailing" which is a new one on me). Also no-one in the UK says "Cripes" any more.

But thank you for confirming that I should not subscribe to "The Nautical Channel", and do, by all means cripes off.

 

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14 hours ago, ET1 said:

When I came to SA there was a brillant WELLCOME to every newcommer. It Read: FUCK OFF NEWBIE.

Well, after about 1o Years I`m still here.

Yup, I would suggest he take a hot cup of concrete and harden the fuck up.

I dont swear in front of my children and rarely at all.

But here it is anarchy and if you let children read these forums then you are not only a dumb arse  but a fairly irresponsible parent imo. But hey, im only an uneducated bum with an honours degree in engineering and a masters in info tech.

Shit! Talk about pretentious!

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Good manners are about consideration for others. Being able to express yourself well and to present a counter argument without lots of swearing or being abusive has more impact than a stream of profanity in my world view. I don't expect all to agree. People can say what they like, but the Manchester bombing is an example of people who are fundamentally selfish and feel that only their view matters. Good manners starts with the idea of respect for other people and for learning tolerance. In the US lots of young people do not know how to behave and that came out after Trump won the election. You saw young people with a complete lack of respect for authority committing vandalism, crying uncontrollably, or needing safe spaces. In the UK we have elements of this but you look at some of the young people who commit murder in court the US. They have no respect for authority whatsoever, NONE. It comes from poor parenting, or lack of parents altogether. To me these things are all connected.  I entered into sailing as a cadet to be socialised well as much as anything else. i see the power of sport and the power of sailing as a force for good in society. For the Nautical Channel, I helped set up the Bart's Bash coverage.I hope to work again with the Andrew Simpson Foundation with a not-for-profit I founded. Today many young people have all the material goods (in the developed world) but in some ways society and its values have not made the same progress.   

I have been a Sailing Anarchy fan from the early days, but have only felt motivated to post anything due to the current interest in the AC. I dabbled in selling AC hospitality and that included a breakfast opportunity with Team Dennis Conner in San Diego. There was very little interest in sporting hospitality in those days. I set up an opportunity with the largest hospitality company in the UK. At the Dennis Conner comeback Western Australia event they had sold 25 packages!!. 

Brightlingsea Sailing Club has a host of sailing champions. The late Reg White MBE and John Osborne MBE won the first Tornado Olympic Gold Medal in Canada 1976. Reg's firm Sailcraft grew from a small start. The joke was Reg could not even spell his own name. A local myth, but Reg was a shrewd businessman although Robert (his eldest son) once told me they had spent over £100K on sails during their Olympic campaign and that was back in the early 70s!!  I was friends with Reg, Robert was twice Tornado World Champion and winner of much more. Dave White his next son is prominent in sailboarding. David is also an accomplished photographer. I have attached a shot David took at the weekend of Brightlingsea. Reg and Bob Fisher were very involved in the C Class catamarans and the Little Americas Cup. Also the Hornet Class which had a wild social scene which makes things seem very tame today. Very tame indeed...!! 

I have sailed around the world from a regatta in Enoshima in Japan as a guest (Ben Ainslie was taking part in an Optimist World Championships nor far away - each boat had its own garage) to a pre-Olympics in the 470 Class in Los Angeles. I have lived in Australia, covering the Skiffs and the Sydney Hobart for an Australian magazine and Fast Boat, a publication that failed in its attempt to replace Yachts and Yachting. Y&Y came out bi-weekly (unusual) and had all the dinghy racing results. I worked in the marine industry for a top notch Company, one of the directors James Flynn founded Navico (Simrad Navico) and was awarded an OBE and my with parents ran a well known chandlers. The previous company to Navico (Channel Marine) developed and supplied a lot of RORC safety kit especially after the 1979 Fastnet. We also sold the Aqua Signal navigation lights when IMCO regulations required every pleasure vessel to upgrade from fairy lights, and my first trip on a plane was to go to the factory in Bremen, Germany. We had a really hairy landing in high winds. I loved it and thought that was the norm but I then saw my director Richard Webb's face looking distinctly white!

I took part in 12 London Boat Shows. Going to bed at 5 am getting up at 8am and doing from 10am to 8:30pm after a night 'on the lash' with the water ski demonstration team (Mike Hazelwood and Luck Lou who had his shirt ripped off every night it seemed) and the promo girls. I would last about two days (not ten) now! 

So many stories from a Boat Show where an IRA bomb in a toilet blew the deck off a boat, but left the toilet intact(!)  to organising and setting up a stand on Waterloo Station to help Time and Tide, the first Disabled crew in the Chay Blyth BT Global Challenge. I visited the Robin Knox Johnson Clipper organisation a couple of years ago for the Nautical Channel. It was a very blustery day and by mistake I was directed to a room with a crew in it getting dressed to go afloat. I had come to sell them some advertising! That caused a laugh in the office! Luckily the error was spotted or i would have been doing a pitch mid-Solent! 

I started as a kid in a sport that people did in old clothing and perhaps a divers wetsuit and with a sailing club that was a Nissen Hut, to the sport at it is today. I was running my own sailing school (age 14 ish), selling boats for a local chandlers and then the sailing lessons. You used to win money in those days and my Mirror Dinghy was quite a profit centre looking back. I was very determined. After staying out to 7pm to round a buoy, called Mersea Wreck in flat calm against a foul tide, the sailing club introduced a time limit after I finished with only the OOD still present. The sailing club locked up and everybody had gone home. Sailing in the 470 Class I encountered may famous sailors, like Lawrie Smith, Chris Law and Eddie Warden Owen plus the international crowd. The competition was incredible. One race at the Spring Cup, South of France, Steve Benjamin and crew finished last in one race from memory. They were struggling with a Pajot boat compared to their Vanguard, but you had to be 'on your game' just to survive. Today top sailors are  good, but the middle of the fleet is missing compared to the old days. Young people do not have the income to do week after week of open meetings and Olympic indicators to get that good. In the UK we had one 470 Olympic indicator with 43 entries but 16 of those teams had won significant dinghy championships i.e: 70 boats upwards. Only two boats went to the 470 Worlds. You could count AC (future participants) down in 70th odd place surrounded by other top sailors. 

The Fireball Nationals would have 180 boats, the Enterprise could top 200 boats for a big event. Everyone had jobs in those days. the average wage in the late 70's for example in the UK was worth about £800 per week today. If you were a sales rep living at home, you could compete in Olympic sailing. To do a 470 Olympic campaign today you would now need £100K+!!!  

I met others involved in the AC like Derek Clark and Andy Clayton on the design side. John Oakley offered to lend me his Soling but it was out of date in an a poor state, but it was a nice gesture. I met Hans Fogh at a bus stop in Amsterdam by pure chance in the last few years and we talked about Elvestrom on a tram (magical). Rodney Patterson and Ian MacDonald Smith both attended the absolutely brilliant Yachting Journalists Association dinner in the Sir Max Aiken museum in Cowes . I went to that after the Abu Dhabi Volvo launch and being photographed with hunting Falcon that looked stuffed!  

Sailing has taken me round the world but in the end you gravitate back to 'home' and for me that is Brightlingsea, well nearby Colchester in fact... I hope you don't mind me sharing a few experiences. Being trained in concrete technology was great to fall back on. If ever the Mafia need a specialist, I might have something to offer! 

Brightlingsea from the Air.jpg

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Posted (edited)

Original post deleted once I put my drink down.

thank you for sharing Simon

Edited by Rangi
Sobriety

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jesus, what a novel. About as interesting as the fucken bible/koran or any other religious dribble

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2 minutes ago, raging rash said:

jesus, what a novel. About as interesting as the fucken bible/koran or any other religious dribble

You read THAT? My eyes glazed over after about the first two sentences but then being uneducated will do that to you.

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25 minutes ago, Simon Collyer said:

Good manners are about consideration for others. Being able to express yourself well and to present a counter argument without lots of swearing or being abusive has more impact than a stream of profanity in my world view. I don't expect all to agree. People can say what they like, but the Manchester bombing is an example of people who are fundamentally selfish and feel that only their view matters. Good manners starts with the idea of respect for other people and for learning tolerance. In the US lots of young people do not know how to behave and that came out after Trump won the election. You saw young people with a complete lack of respect for authority committing vandalism, crying uncontrollably, or needing safe spaces. In the UK we have elements of this but you look at some of the young people who commit murder in court the US. They have no respect for authority whatsoever, NONE. It comes from poor parenting, or lack of parents altogether. To me these things are all connected.  I entered into sailing as a cadet to be socialised well as much as anything else. i see the power of sport and the power of sailing as a force for good in society. For the Nautical Channel, I helped set up the Bart's Bash coverage.I hope to work again with the Andrew Simpson Foundation with a not-for-profit I founded. Today many young people have all the material goods (in the developed world) but in some ways society and its values have not made the same progress.   

I have been a Sailing Anarchy fan from the early days, but have only felt motivated to post anything due to the current interest in the AC. I dabbled in selling AC hospitality and that included a breakfast opportunity with Team Dennis Conner in San Diego. There was very little interest in sporting hospitality in those days. I set up an opportunity with the largest hospitality company in the UK. At the Dennis Conner comeback Western Australia event they had sold 25 packages!!. 

Brightlingsea Sailing Club has a host of sailing champions. The late Reg White MBE and John Osborne MBE won the first Tornado Olympic Gold Medal in Canada 1976. Reg's firm Sailcraft grew from a small start. The joke was Reg could not even spell his own name. A local myth, but Reg was a shrewd businessman although Robert (his eldest son) once told me they had spent over £100K on sails during their Olympic campaign and that was back in the early 70s!!  I was friends with Reg, Robert was twice Tornado World Champion and winner of much more. Dave White his next son is prominent in sailboarding. David is also an accomplished photographer. I have attached a shot David took at the weekend of Brightlingsea. Reg and Bob Fisher were very involved in the C Class catamarans and the Little Americas Cup. Also the Hornet Class which had a wild social scene which makes things seem very tame today. Very tame indeed...!! 

I have sailed around the world from a regatta in Enoshima in Japan as a guest (Ben Ainslie was taking part in an Optimist World Championships nor far away - each boat had its own garage) to a pre-Olympics in the 470 Class in Los Angeles. I have lived in Australia, covering the Skiffs and the Sydney Hobart for an Australian magazine and Fast Boat, a publication that failed in its attempt to replace Yachts and Yachting. Y&Y came out bi-weekly (unusual) and had all the dinghy racing results. I worked in the marine industry for a top notch Company, one of the directors James Flynn founded Navico (Simrad Navico) and was awarded an OBE and my with parents ran a well known chandlers. The previous company to Navico (Channel Marine) developed and supplied a lot of RORC safety kit especially after the 1979 Fastnet. We also sold the Aqua Signal navigation lights when IMCO regulations required every pleasure vessel to upgrade from fairy lights, and my first trip on a plane was to go to the factory in Bremen, Germany. We had a really hairy landing in high winds. I loved it and thought that was the norm but I then saw my director Richard Webb's face looking distinctly white!

I took part in 12 London Boat Shows. Going to bed at 5 am getting up at 8am and doing from 10am to 8:30pm after a night 'on the lash' with the water ski demonstration team (Mike Hazelwood and Luck Lou who had his shirt ripped off every night it seemed) and the promo girls. I would last about two days (not ten) now! 

So many stories from a Boat Show where an IRA bomb in a toilet blew the deck off a boat, but left the toilet intact(!)  to organising and setting up a stand on Waterloo Station to help Time and Tide, the first Disabled crew in the Chay Blyth BT Global Challenge. I visited the Robin Knox Johnson Clipper organisation a couple of years ago for the Nautical Channel. It was a very blustery day and by mistake I was directed to a room with a crew in it getting dressed to go afloat. I had come to sell them some advertising! That caused a laugh in the office! Luckily the error was spotted or i would have been doing a pitch mid-Solent! 

I started as a kid in a sport that people did in old clothing and perhaps a divers wetsuit and with a sailing club that was a Nissen Hut, to the sport at it is today. I was running my own sailing school (age 14 ish), selling boats for a local chandlers and then the sailing lessons. You used to win money in those days and my Mirror Dinghy was quite a profit centre looking back. I was very determined. After staying out to 7pm to round a buoy, called Mersea Wreck in flat calm against a foul tide, the sailing club introduced a time limit after I finished with only the OOD still present. The sailing club locked up and everybody had gone home. Sailing in the 470 Class I encountered may famous sailors, like Lawrie Smith, Chris Law and Eddie Warden Owen plus the international crowd. The competition was incredible. One race at the Spring Cup, South of France, Steve Benjamin and crew finished last in one race from memory. They were struggling with a Pajot boat compared to their Vanguard, but you had to be 'on your game' just to survive. Today top sailors are  good, but the middle of the fleet is missing compared to the old days. Young people do not have the income to do week after week of open meetings and Olympic indicators to get that good. In the UK we had one 470 Olympic indicator with 43 entries but 16 of those teams had won significant dinghy championships i.e: 70 boats upwards. Only two boats went to the 470 Worlds. You could count AC (future participants) down in 70th odd place surrounded by other top sailors. 

The Fireball Nationals would have 180 boats, the Enterprise could top 200 boats for a big event. Everyone had jobs in those days. the average wage in the late 70's for example in the UK was worth about £800 per week today. If you were a sales rep living at home, you could compete in Olympic sailing. To do a 470 Olympic campaign today you would now need £100K+!!!  

I met others involved in the AC like Derek Clark and Andy Clayton on the design side. John Oakley offered to lend me his Soling but it was out of date in an a poor state, but it was a nice gesture. I met Hans Fogh at a bus stop in Amsterdam by pure chance in the last few years and we talked about Elvestrom on a tram (magical). Rodney Patterson and Ian MacDonald Smith both attended the absolutely brilliant Yachting Journalists Association dinner in the Sir Max Aiken museum in Cowes . I went to that after the Abu Dhabi Volvo launch and being photographed with hunting Falcon that looked stuffed!  

Sailing has taken me round the world but in the end you gravitate back to 'home' and for me that is Brightlingsea, well nearby Colchester in fact... I hope you don't mind me sharing a few experiences. Being trained in concrete technology was great to fall back on. If ever the Mafia need a specialist, I might have something to offer! 

Brightlingsea from the Air.jpg

Oh for fuck sake Simon, take a hike and write your novel somewhere else, next you'll be telling us all not to masturbate while watching porn...why would you let your children visit a site that quite plainly is lightly moderated anyway? Oh and yes I'm uneducated, on a benefit and homeless, stole a phone and just sit on SA all day...Fuck You....ah that's better, back to begging I go!!

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2 minutes ago, jaysper said:

You read THAT? My eyes glazed over after about the first two sentences but then being uneducated will do that to you.

no it's called boredome. Summary for you is.......look what I have done, I'm fantastic and I thought you all needed to know

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29 minutes ago, Simon Collyer said:

Good manners are about consideration for others. Being able to express yourself well and to present a counter argument without lots of swearing or being abusive has more impact than a stream of profanity in my world view. I don't expect all to agree.

The problem, friend, is that this sandbox we're all playing in here at SA has a big fuck-off sign that says "shit and piss here" and every damn kid playing in it has read that sign, understood that sign and jumped right the fuck in.

Except you.

Fuck off.

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9 minutes ago, raging rash said:

no it's called boredome. Summary for you is.......look what I have done, I'm fantastic and I thought you all needed to know

I think you missed the part where he is actually better than the rest of us, but to be fair Im only assuming that is in there after reading his first diatribe.

I have to say that the poster is so genuinely obnoxiously pretentious that I am left wondering if this is TRG trolling us.

Certainly TRG is clever enough to pull off such a troll and its more believable than the prospect of such a stuck up prick actually coming on these boards and posting this shit.

Your thoughts?

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no I'm affraid i googled him and he is real

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1 minute ago, raging rash said:

no I'm affraid i googled him and he is real

But TRG could have just googled "worlds most pretentious yachting cunt" and found this dudes name to use.

Surely more believable (and a lot more preferable) than this dickwit actually being serious?

Perhaps Ive lead a sheltered life but Ive only met a handful of people like this in real life and I used to beat fuck out of them at school.

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18 hours ago, Simon Collyer said:

 

Lastly, could we have less swearing on these bulletin boards. Children read them 

I want to stop swearing but I cunt.

 

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1 hour ago, Simon Collyer said:

 

Thank you for the enjoyable read Simon. Keep it coming...:)

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1 hour ago, Simon Collyer said:

 

MAN-NODDING-OFF.jpg

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Gosh off you crickey faced piece of pretentious cripes. And while you are gosling off you can gee willikers a bag of darn it. 

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19 hours ago, ET1 said:

When I came to SA there was a brillant WELLCOME to every newcommer. It Read: FUCK OFF NEWBIE.

Well, after about 1o Years I`m still here.

When I joined it was FUCK OFF NEWBIE AND SHOW US YOUR TITS, and I'm still here as well.

Simon read http://forums.sailinganarchy.com/index.php?/announcement/17-a-few-simple-rules/ and then stay and accept us, or ..... leave.

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simon, there is also the delicate matter of your wifes tits to be shown for admission, you may well have a girlfriend / mistress as well so those will do instead......

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4 minutes ago, Happie Jack said:

i guess as no Kiwi specific adventures has resulted in much of the above rant hate?

at least 167149 has posted the traditional SA welcome.

politely too, and how is it you know so much about the emmies at akarana ?

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Well that was fun!  I stand by all the points I made, including those on aerodynamics. Forget the engine part, just think of the point I made. My grandfather actually worked for Fairey Marine that built the Supermarine Spitfire and after the war boats like the Firefly: http://www.britishpathe.com/video/firefly-racing-dinghy

Nobel (of dynamite fame) invented Plywood and that construction was a lot cheaper and that and the Marshall Plan economic boom 'exploded' sailing for the masses.  The Mirror, GP14, Enterprise and others backed by National Newspapers!!      

A little of respect on this one. This is Reg's memorial and an image from the day thousands turned out to celebrate the Gold medal victory, with Reg and John standing shown here on the trampoline of a Gold Tornado (1976). Robert (White) is on Reg's left and I think that is Derek Clark (470 crew with Phil Crebbin) half shown.  Clark brought a strange new craft back with him called a Windsurfer!! Few people (even sailing Gold Medallists today) attract the sort of crowds Reg and John did on that day. It was more like an FA Cup victory.

At least you know a bit about Brightlingsea from my efforts...!! 

I think Big Ben is really up against it this time. He did phenomenally well to put together a UK challenge. Time to move on and hope our man can find his mojo!

Thanks folks.   

Tendring-20140421-00480.jpg

osborn_white.jpg

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26 minutes ago, Simon Collyer said:

Well that was fun!  I stand by all the points I made, including those on aerodynamics.

That a stopped engine will increase the rate of roll on a Sopwith Camel in a turn? That's a good trick.

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Don't get me wrong, Reg White was a hero of mine as a kid. I mean no disrespect to him.

Its you I think is a prat

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3 minutes ago, enigmatically said:

Don't get me wrong, Reg White was a hero of mine as a kid. I mean no disrespect to him.

Its you I think is a prat

Yup.

"My grandfather actually worked for Fairey Marine that built the Supermarine Spitfire " #FuckImAwesome.

Well, I can beat that. My grandmother worked as a $1.50 hooker on the docks during the war and $1.50 back then was a VERY high class hooker.

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oh this just gives and gives. For anyone interested 

 

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Gold! But I think this turd is too good to know what a dust man is. #ShitDontStink

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9 hours ago, Simon Collyer said:

Well that was fun!  I stand by all the points I made, including those on aerodynamics. Forget the engine part, just think of the point I made. My grandfather actually worked for Fairey Marine that built the Supermarine Spitfire and after the war boats like the Firefly: http://www.britishpathe.com/video/firefly-racing-dinghy

 

Never mind the bollocks, time to get down to business. Pics of your wife's Great Tits are in order. Here's mine:

 

Great%20Tits.jpg

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8 hours ago, jaysper said:

Yup.

"My grandfather actually worked for Fairey Marine that built the Supermarine Spitfire " #FuckImAwesome.

Well, I can beat that. My grandmother worked as a $1.50 hooker on the docks during the war and $1.50 back then was a VERY high class hooker.

You guys sound awfully similar, your grandmother didn't work as a $1.50 hooker outside the Fairey Marine factory by any chance did she?

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Just now, Boybland said:

You guys sound awfully similar, your grandmother didn't work as a $1.50 hooker outside the Fairey Marine factory by any chance did she?

Could have. All I know is my father had a LOT of uncles growing up. Very generous too.

Is that you Great Uncle Irving?

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On 5/29/2017 at 4:40 PM, DayTripper said:

Haven't a clue what you're trying to say.

 

 

A planes outer wing must travel further in a 180-degree turn, and in turning the airflow over the outer wing speeds up. This in turn creates more lift on the outer wing so the wing rises. The inner wing being already close to stalling speed, stalls and drops. WW1 planes has very low powered engines. Just 80hp early on in WW! from memory The French Gnome engine) but they were light. So you could not power your way out of trouble.

In such circumstances, the plane spins into the ground. You were told to land 'forward' but of course people naturally tried to turn back. A (sputtering) rotary engine would have a significant effect due to torque. The Sopwith Camel was very difficult to fly, as the centre of gravity was tightly centred with all the weight in a few feet (6 feet)  and the Rotary engine made it easy to roll. Good fighter planes are unstable. Tom Blackaller tried a canard on his 12 meter and he could spin the boat on a dime. Sailing in a straight line in waves was trickier. He had to get two rudders and keel working together.  It he had more time he could been a strong AC contender.

The Eurofighter has a canard... its angle of attack has to be controlled by a computer because the pilot cannot maintain stability. It reminds you of a flapping flag where the high and low-pressure sides swap at an incredible rate.  That is not the issue regarding the AC.  

Going back to BAR tight turning: to avoid the Kiwis the inner foil stalled or lost significant lift, and this caused the windward hull to drop, yet the leeward hull accelerated due to more lift and as a result the leeward hull popped up. Lateral resistance disappeared as the leeward hull rose and Ben Ainslee was left 'over steering' to use a motor racing term.

Drag a butter knife through water and you get a feel for how little resistance these boats must have foiling. 

The Rotary engine has a high power to weight ration. The problem is as you increase the engine power this creates a larger frontal area and more drag. The answer is the in-line engine. The Spitfire Rolls Royce Merlin engine had a gravity fed carburettor and that could cut-out in a roll or dive. BMW developed the V Cylinder engine. They had to decide to buy Rolls Royce. They had overcome a problem called 'Harmonics' with their engines. Was a Rolls Royce really a Rolls Royce if it had a BMW engine in it? Eventually they did buy Rolls Royce.  A friend of mine (a sailor) was on the committee. 

Aero-Hydrodynamics of Sailing was written by Czesaw A. Marchaj , Charles Curry (International 14s) and Frank Bethwaite DFC, OAM were also major figures in the more theoretical side of aerodynamics in sailing. I grew up learning about Reynolds numbers and gybing centreboards and cavitation.

I have been to three Extreme Sailing Series events. Ainslee was consistent but not exciting and you have to remember that Jimmy Spithall won his ESS season.  

I hope that helps.

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22 minutes ago, Simon Collyer said:

I hope that helps.

No, in no way did it explain your contention that a stopped engine increased the rate of roll in a Sopwith Camel. Care to have another go?

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So the case you are talking about is that any aircraft in a turn tends to lose some lift on the inner wing (the tighter the turn the more it loses) 

So nothing specific to the rotary engine, or the sopwith camel - although that did have specific issues relating to torque from the engine which when it failed caused a sudden change which could be dangerous.

So remind me of the relevance of your father's job?

Or pretty much everything else you wrote really

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24 minutes ago, enigmatically said:

So nothing specific to the rotary engine, or the sopwith camel - although that did have specific issues relating to torque from the engine which when it failed caused a sudden change which could be dangerous.

I thought the issue was that it rolled one way much faster than the other because of engine torque and that at low airspeed that could be fatal.

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5 minutes ago, enigmatically said:

Yes, but that isn't relevant to the AC boats

neither is fish and chips or soap dodging however the end result is discombobulated

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2 hours ago, enigmatically said:

So the case you are talking about is that any aircraft in a turn tends to lose some lift on the inner wing (the tighter the turn the more it loses) 

So nothing specific to the rotary engine, or the sopwith camel - although that did have specific issues relating to torque from the engine which when it failed caused a sudden change which could be dangerous.

So remind me of the relevance of your father's job?

Or pretty much everything else you wrote really

I am trying to help people understand the points I am making. I have written for yachting magazines and worked in the industry. I have won races in the Olympic 470 Class at national level Ii narrowly missed winning the Spring Cup one year) and represented the UK in many major regattas and sailed very successfully in other classes. Without me going into detail and sounding like I am a big 'I am'. I am just trying say  know what I am talking about and just trying to  give a bit of background information. 

1) I don't think that that one line entry's with a slew of four letter words add anything interesting. If people can only express themselves that way they are uneducated. Its not about exam passes, it is whether you can express yourself. 

2) I am glad we have Ken Read doing commentary. I think there are people like me who would like a bit of detail. At the last AC the Americas Cup organizing committee actually paid the networks to air the event. There is more interest this time. We are stack with terminology like 'The Play-offs' and terminology like that for a non-sailing audience and I accept that, but I find the questions posed at some of the press conferences, pretty bland and the answers just the same.  I think that is one area that could be made a lot more interesting.  

3) So I have tried to juxtaposition myself and give a bit of detail of why i hold my views. I hope that helps. 

 

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Go away you massive egotist...

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2 hours ago, enigmatically said:

Yes, but that isn't relevant to the AC boats

The lift and drag part is. The Rotary engine part is not...but I am just explaining the whole issue.  I travelled along the lines of WW1 in 1916 from Switzerland to the Belgium Coast with Sir Anthony Seldon last year. The Via Sacra Walk. I am interested in flying also in Radio Model plane flying. Look at rudders - continuous leading edge, such as on the Albatross wing. Wire and bottlenecks were even used to keep the fuselage straight. The term aircraft rigger comes from this. Tommy Sopwith raced in the J Class. The Hurricane was mainly wood and so was the Mosquito. The Hurricane could take more battle damage than a Spitfire. There is a huge cross-over.     

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1 minute ago, nav said:

Go away you massive egotist...

That's rubbish! 

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3 hours ago, enigmatically said:

So the case you are talking about is that any aircraft in a turn tends to lose some lift on the inner wing (the tighter the turn the more it loses) 

So nothing specific to the rotary engine, or the sopwith camel - although that did have specific issues relating to torque from the engine which when it failed caused a sudden change which could be dangerous.

So remind me of the relevance of your father's job?

Or pretty much everything else you wrote really

There you have it. My grandfather worked for Fairey Marine after the war they moved into boat building. Firefly, Swordfish. However Nobel (inventor of Dynamite) invented plywood and that was cheaper and lent itself to kit boats. My father was a navigator in Lancaster Bombers and would have gone to Cambridge University as a Mathematician but after the war he worked for a traditional chandlers. On his death my mother took over his job and the chandler became more of a yacht chandlers. My mother married a boat builder. He raced Flying Dutchmen and later went into cruising. In fact they recently bought a Westerly Griffin. In fact I am taking a bunch of students on a sailing adventure up the River Colne to the Anchor Pub, Rowhedge and back. June 12th.   

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I winder if Simon Collyer is related to Brent Swain?

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4 minutes ago, Sailbydate said:

I winder if Simon Collyer is related to Brent Swain?

I think it could be TRG trolling us. I'm hoping so, because the actual existence of a total douche like this is a little disconcerting!

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I think if we stick with this format then this will be the last Cup as helmsman for Sir Ben, ,Dean, and Frank. That is if they don't let their egos get in the way of progression which is hard for a lot of top sports people.

It feels like they are almost too old for it now.

The next cup will probably be 2 sailors and 4 cyclors per boat anyway.

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36 minutes ago, Happie Jack said:

Simon, grab Once Were Warriors, watch a season or 2 of Go Girls, maybe Step Dave and note the group postings, Vis-à-vis The National Working Sheep Dog Trials and you may understand what you are posting with/to/at.

Funny I thought Simon could be a Jake the Muss sock puppet, who happens across Roget's Thesaurus and takes a course in extreme verbosity.. 

"What Becomes of the Narcissistic"? 

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31 minutes ago, Simon Collyer said:

There you have it. My grandfather worked for Fairey Marine after the war they moved into boat building. Firefly, Swordfish. However Nobel (inventor of Dynamite) invented plywood and that was cheaper and lent itself to kit boats. My father was a navigator in Lancaster Bombers and would have gone to Cambridge University as a Mathematician but after the war he worked for a traditional chandlers. On his death my mother took over his job and the chandler became more of a yacht chandlers. My mother married a boat builder. He raced Flying Dutchmen and later went into cruising. In fact they recently bought a Westerly Griffin. In fact I am taking a bunch of students on a sailing adventure up the River Colne to the Anchor Pub, Rowhedge and back. June 12th.   

perhaps you'd like to pop ya yeller welly's on and show us how it's done in these...NZ mullet boats ....hull length 22' O/A length 35' internal ballast 1 imperial ton, spinnaker 800sq' and yes they do sink

mulleties.jpg

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14 minutes ago, sosoomii said:

Is this thread for real??

That depends on who you talk to.

I am thinking it could be TRG trolling us. Very clever troll if he is. Otherwise, total stuck up dickhead if this dude is on the level.

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Sadly, I think it is real.  Still, makes for entertainment on a day of no racing. 

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44 minutes ago, sosoomii said:

Is this thread for real??

Lmao, it's funny as hell!!

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News flash, Simon waff waff was actually TRG. 

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3 hours ago, jaysper said:

That depends on who you talk to.

I am thinking it could be TRG trolling us. Very clever troll if he is. Otherwise, total stuck up dickhead if this dude is on the level.

Those two things are not necessarily mutually exclusive...just sayin.' Or_wink.gif

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2 hours ago, raging rash said:

News flash, Simon waff waff was actually TRG. 

Simon N?

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Just now, FinnFish said:

Simon N?

simon collyer

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2 hours ago, raging rash said:

News flash, Simon waff waff was actually TRG. 

Ok, so whilst I suspect this to be true (I was the first one to raise the prospect AFAIK), you know this for sure and how?

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3 hours ago, ~Stingray~ said:

Lmao, it's funny as hell!!

I never post, but as Stingray said....

Three-quarter through I started laughing and each new Simon-post laughed louder.

Thanks.

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6 hours ago, Happie Jack said:

They inherit the golf course?

Hey I resent that comment :angry::D

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On ‎30‎/‎05‎/‎2017 at 0:47 AM, enigmatically said:

Unfortunately, in the UK we do tend to suffer from tall poppy syndrome where we attack anyone successful in their field, whereas other countries support them. Much of your comment seems to be along those lines. Possibly you won't have come across too many people at the top of sailing at Brightlinsea sailing club, but I can assure you that Ben is very much seen as a team player and respected by those that have.

I appreciate that I only have a degree in maths (including fluid dynamics), not  a city and guilds in concrete technology, but I can assure that there is no similarity between the Sopwith Camel case and what happened to Ben in the incident with SBTJ. Nor for that matter does it have anything much in common with the comings and goings at Brightlingsea Sailing Club.

May I also add, that if you are concerned about standards of English: it should be "Sailing's become..." (or better still "Sailing has become..."); and Bachelor is spelled without a "T" (even in "Bachelor of Sailing" which is a new one on me). Also no-one in the UK says "Cripes" any more.

But thank you for confirming that I should not subscribe to "The Nautical Channel", and do, by all means cripes off.

Oops - chose the wrong sailing club there. Brightlingsea is where Reg White built his Tornados and he represented GBR at the Olympics.

During the Olympic trials for selection of the catamaran class Reg was crewed by none other than Bob "The Fish" Fisher, 2 times world champion and author of "An Absorbing Interest" the definitive history of the America's Cup class.

His interest in The Cup started when he listened to tales of the J Class from fishermen wearing pullovers with the very faded word "Endeavour" across their chest sitting at the top of the hard in Brightlingsea. He also has competed in the Little America's Cup (sod off Russell - nothing wrong with calling it that and the C Class were wing sailing way before AC were). He probably knows more about the AC than all of us put together on this thread and I guarantee that despite being 80+ ( I wont give his real age away but he isn't shy about it) he will doubtlessly be in Bermuda. BTW he still actively races too and in the past has won the RORC Yacht of the Year.

And to cap it all he is a really nice guy.

No top sailors from Brightlingsea Sailing Club? Give me a break!

Other than that ;-) I agree that Ben is very much a team player, just ask Jimmy Spithill about their relationship in San Francisco where Ben is credited with being one of the prime reasons that Oracle turned 1-8 into 9-8.

Add to that his on camera comments at this AC, he has taken virtually none of the glory himself, praising his crew, the shore team repairs and the whole 100+ man squad

Anyway - back to work.

SS

 

 

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I didn't say there had not been any top sailors at that club, merely that he might not have come across them. 

 

And if it was TRG, I was right!

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1 hour ago, enigmatically said:

I didn't say there had not been any top sailors at that club, merely that he might not have come across them. 

 

And if it was TRG, I was right!

I wasn't having a pop enigmatically, I was just amused by the club you chose having such illustrious alumni, especially related to cats and the AC - stay safe, sail fast

SS

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On 5/30/2017 at 5:43 PM, Rangi said:

Original post deleted once I put my drink down.

thank you for sharing Simon

+ 1 Really not sure how to reply to Simon because there are so many frustrations in his tone but they lack a real focus so I am putting my drink down too.! Thanks Simon

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1 hour ago, ET1 said:

who the fuck is TRG?

Just a shiftless no account troll with numerous sock puppet manifestations. Nothing to see here, move along.

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Simon: Out of curiosity, what exactly did you take away from Blur's Charmless Man

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For the record, TRG's post re naming his movements after Oracle sailors is the funniest thing I've read on here. The attention to detail was that of a craftsman delivering a masterpiece.

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20 hours ago, Chris UK said:

For the record, TRG's post re naming his movements after Oracle sailors is the funniest thing I've read on here. The attention to detail was that of a craftsman delivering a masterpiece.

And some people find Keystone Cops funny. Just sayin.

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Goodbye Ben Ainslee. BAR needed more time to work the boat up, but the New Zealanders are a pretty hot bunch, let us be fair. Been doing it a long time. Looked at as a first effort there was no disgrace in the way BAR sailed. Just getting a well funded team together in the UK is a remarkable effort. We will be back....!!   

My thoughts are with Dave 'Whitey' White who had a stroke in Mauritius. Dave is Reg Whites second son and a board sailing ace and excellent 'sailboarding/Kite surfing/paddle boarding photographer. Dave is in hospital and recovering, though it may take some time before he is back on the water. Do visit his Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/search/top/?q=dave white k63  

I don't have a tankard in the 'Cherry Tree' pub at Brightlingsea, I have never seen the blue films shot in the beer cellar either...!!! That's what you call a 'lock-in'...! . 

Election night here...Zzzzzzzz... Actually quite exciting. 

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1 hour ago, Simon Collyer said:

Goodbye Ben Ainslee. BAR needed more time to work the boat up, but the New Zealanders are a pretty hot bunch, let us be fair. Been doing it a long time. Looked at as a first effort there was no disgrace in the way BAR sailed. Just getting a well funded team together in the UK is a remarkable effort. We will be back....!!   

My thoughts are with Dave 'Whitey' White who had a stroke in Mauritius. Dave is Reg Whites second son and a board sailing ace and excellent 'sailboarding/Kite surfing/paddle boarding photographer. Dave is in hospital and recovering, though it may take some time before he is back on the water. Do visit his Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/search/top/?q=dave white k63  

I don't have a tankard in the 'Cherry Tree' pub at Brightlingsea, I have never seen the blue films shot in the beer cellar either...!!! That's what you call a 'lock-in'...! . 

Election night here...Zzzzzzzz... Actually quite exciting. 

she doesn't look impressed

ena.png

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On 2017-5-29 at 11:29 PM, Simon Collyer said:

 

I represented the Nautical Channel in the UK and went to the Americas Cup launch at the Renaissance Hotel, UK.  The sailors are an impressive bunch, but the AC is Lala Land compared, to the real world, and I am not losing any sleep worrying about any of it!   

Sir Ben Ainslie is a brilliant sailor and an all-round British sporting hero of course.

Ainslie was brilliant in the Finn and Laser but he is a ‘gym boy’ and in classes with a team dynamic, he has not always shone quite as brightly (not quite). He certainly has not out classed those around him. Both Percy and Ainslie are from pointing up boats. It seemed a better idea to bring in helms from multihulls or footing off boats! The Synergy syndicate certainly grasped that.

When the chips are down, Ainslie 'ups' the aggression, but the AC is a game of strategy (ask Dennis Conner) who brought in the business experience that Ben Ainslie simply does not have. You need to follow the wisdom of Tokugawa Ieyasu, the Daimyo and War Lord who united medieval Japan at the Battle of Sekigahara, and who was known for his patience.  He would wait patiently for the right moment - years if necessary. Ainslie had a nice points lead, he did not have to go in to the competition fists swinging. He could have done better to ‘conserve his powder’ and use the first few races to observe the competition and their strengths and weaknesses.  Instead the teams energy has been spent on patching up the boat. He starting to look like a future ambassador for Plastic Padding…!!

Sir Ainslie I guess, would have felt under a lot of personal pressure. That is understandable. Going into an event like this feeling slow must be 'gut-churning' however...if you name a business after yourself, and you are the CEO and the Chief Producer - when things do not work out it can be a huge strain. Ainslie is used to winning, he would also do better to show a bit of humility if he does not want to alienate his fan base. Especially to Dean Barkers team - where are those beers!. Ben is not arrogant but, in the UK media you have to be humble if you stuff up.  I remember Colin Chapman (Lotus) who died young and who was under huge pressure at the time. Ian Percy’s route is better, distributing the responsibility and not being the ultimate chief. He has good people around him like business manager David Tyler and of course the main Syndicate financier. His syndicate wants results, but at least you are not trying to hold full responsibility for everything simultaneously.

I have never been convinced by motor racing people who come into sailing. The best people to design boats are boat designers. I saw one very successful cruising catamaran manufacture sunk by an expert manager from the car industry. He just did not talk the same language. I am sure the F1 guys have made a great contribution, but they have not outshone the so called ‘cottage industry’ boat builders from places like Australia and New Zealand.

On the danger from boats rounding up on the start-line, you have the same problem in WW1 aircraft. If the engine stalled and you attempted to turn back to the airfield, the inside wing lost lift and dropped and the outer wing sped up and gained more lift. The plane would roll into the ground, especially if it had a rotary engine like the Sopwith Camel. The only solution might be to have separate vertical dagger boats in future like the ones on the IMOCA boats. Dean Barker did not luff excessively, Ainslie in a split second was caught out. He corrected more and more but it was too late. He was in a 'skid'. Even WW1 aces were killed by the manner described.  

Lastly, could we have less swearing on these bulletin boards. Children read them and in the UK if you must swear to make a point it makes you look uneducated? Try using ‘Oh Gosh’ or ‘Cripes’:-) Sailings become a sport of the upper classes, once more. I am not particular thrilled about being reduced to a flag waving fan. Brilliant event however.  There is one winner this time for a change, the Americas Cup itself.

You make a lot of sense Simon and make lots of good points. In anyone's make up that wants to challenge in the Americas Cup if you don't get the enormity of the challenge you are destined to fail. This puts the Aussie's win in 1983 into perspective. The Australian's couldn't back it up though and then came the Kiwis. Their design prowess and ingenuity was unique for such a small country. Ben's claim to fame was his sailing talent in his class earning him a "SIR" but does he have the make up to put together a team with the capabilities of winning the cup? If you look at the Oracle team Larry simply went out and hired the winners, the people who had won the cup before. Personally I would like to see the Nationality clause come into play so that the cup becomes a country against country competition instead of money vs country? That said this cup has been exciting to watch and fascinating for so many reasons because we have more teams competing. Finishing up Ainslie did well when it's all said and done. 

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10 hours ago, Simon Collyer said:

 

I don't have a tankard in the 'Cherry Tree' pub at Brightlingsea, I have never seen the blue films shot in the beer cellar either...!!! That's what you call a 'lock-in'...! . 

 

I had the misfortune of going in that pub a few weeks ago. It is worse than dire. I am retiring to Mersea Island in a few years time anyway but hope I dont go near that pub..

Your post(s) has some fair points, if a little too articulate and lengthy for here. I wouldnt go on about language on here. This site is a very rough playground and you post at your peril.

Ben did a great job. The boat had some speed issues which needs some post-mortem on for the next campaign - hopefully in the same boats so that they all get time to learn how to master these beasts better.

I would bail out of this thread Simon if I was you ;-)

 

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