Savage2288

Brand new and totally ignorant

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Dow Corning Silicon Building Sealant.. 

https://www.korellis.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/Dow-Corning-790-Silicone-sealant.pdf

When i was at one of the charter companies in the PNW the Catalina and C&C windows had a habit of pooping out.. this stuff was incredible. 

I have used it everywhere now.. Its very sticky and stays malleable. 

 

This can be used instead of 4200. 

 

Oceaner

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1 hour ago, oceaneer said:

Dow Corning Silicon Building Sealant.. 

https://www.korellis.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/Dow-Corning-790-Silicone-sealant.pdf

When i was at one of the charter companies in the PNW the Catalina and C&C windows had a habit of pooping out.. this stuff was incredible. 

I have used it everywhere now.. Its very sticky and stays malleable. 

 

This can be used instead of 4200. 

 

Oceaner

I think I accidentally flagged this post =/ I didn't mean to

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4200 is actually stronger than 5200 but has a bond you can open if you need to.

Only buy it from a fresh batch. Common to find it hardened in the tube.

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yes, I just watched a YouTube video that went in depth about the differences between types of sealants and I think I need to get some 4200. I am pretty sure the sikaflex I bought is the wrong kind anyway =/

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4200 is actually stronger than 5200 but has a bond you can open if you need to.

Only buy it from a fresh batch. Common to find it hardened in the tube.

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I havnt read evry post. 

The gap die to a misalignment at some point.

I would suggest first stepping the masrlt rigg8ng up and carefully comparing the angle of the shroud to that of the chplt.

Fiberglass is not rigid. It also hates holes slots and point loads. The load path, if different from the chainplt will open a gap as you have.

Best solution will come with assessing.

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My guess is it got pulled out/bent because it was used to tie the boat up..... not the best idea.  The structural attachment to the hull should be fine- much of this stuff is over built anyway.  Just clean out what comes easy and fill the gap with 3M 5200.  It will not only seal the area against leaks but also glue/bind the surrounding bits of deck together.  Then go learn to sail.  It's not worth worrying about beyond that.  In a year your level of understanding will have expanded so much you'll probably want another boat anyway.  ;-)

 

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I don't know sailboats but I have done years of construction including this 8000 sq foot shop. This is one of those things that looks bad but is likely of no consequence. Three holding bolts, and a large strap, is almost certainly more than enough.  I might caulk it this year and think about a more permanent fix during the winter. The right permanent fix would likely involve grinding or sanding off the rogue material. Then fiberglass the area.

Congrats on keeping a sense of humor.

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Congratulations and commiserations on your new to you boat...

I have two thoughts about boat ownership to share with you.

1) A boat is a hole in the water that you throw money into..

2) BOAT is an acronym- Break Out Another Thousand.

This from a guy who has built boats, owned boats, broke boats and repaired boats......and now is a ride mooch on OPB's(mostly racing, but still breaking and repairing them..)

Oh yeah, use the 4200 on the chainplate gap and go sailing.......have fun and stay safe!

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People love to say those cute acronyms quoted by madohe. A number of people go out and get drunk. That explains a large number of sad boating incidents.

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thanks! yes, I have referred to boats as "a hole in the water" for years....but I wanted one anyway lol

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Good comment from fastyacht about 4200. I have 5200 holding the centerboard gasket on my Buccaneer. It's horrendous stuff. I like 4200. For the first time this year, I tried Sikaflex 291 when installing a new thru-hull on my C&C, and really like that stuff. Probably similar adhesion to the 3M products, but easier to cleanup, and not requiring a chainsaw for removal. I'm now a Sikaflex fan.

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I googled Clipper Marine 21 because I wanted to see what they looked like prior to the pilothouse mod and came across a blog by a woman doing a restoration of one (https://christinedalton.wordpress.com).  It looks like the chainplates originally followed the contours of the hull then bent inward to get up through the deck :

07-13-2012-cm-at-the-shop1.jpg

There's another picture somewhere there of the chainplates from the inside and you can see the bend.  Yours appear to have become straightened out, causing the edge of the deck to push out and crack, and making the hole much bigger than it should be.  I think I'd pull the chainplates and get them into the correct shape, or make new ones, prior to repairing the deck.

 

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I couldn't find 4200 anywhere locally. I let the guy at the local shop talk me in to 5200 =/

 

ACK: that's a great resource! thanks for showing me her blog!

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47 minutes ago, Savage2288 said:

I couldn't find 4200 anywhere locally. I let the guy at the local shop talk me in to 5200 =/

 

ACK: that's a great resource! thanks for showing me her blog!

be liberal with the tape, put it on, walk away. Wear clothes you won't mind throwing out as 5200 WILL get on all your clothes and in your hair. I don't know how. It just does.

Don't touch it for a couple days after you put the goo on.... or it will get on NEW clothes....

 

then go sailing and don't worry about it...

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5200 does have a well-earned reputation for being virtually permanent, but there are tricks for getting it to break its hold later, if you need to.  

You may have noticed that the advice to you here comes from two camps:

1 - The "do it right" sort, since you will eventually get there anyway, so why do it twice?

2 - Just fix it enough to be safe and go sailing, since that's a good way to figure out everything else you want to fix or change.  And get sailing.

I suggest #2, but either way is perfectly appropriate.  

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16 hours ago, Ishmael said:

Would be close to my last choice, unless your boat is ferrocement.

3M 5200, 3M 4200, Sikaflex 291, in that order.

Gotta disagree with you Ish.. some silicone building products are really amazing. It depends on for what and why.. 

For your C&C if you use those on your windows.. it wont last forever. Some of the other sealants are better. 

And From your list I would have it go the other way.. 5200 is really an adhesive, that is also a sealant. 

I cannot find anyplace on my boat where it should be used. 

291 is great stuff. 

oceaneer

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yes, I bought this boat because it was being used almost daily just a few months ago by the older couple that owned it when they were in alaska so I figured it wouldnt take much to get it on the water and then figure out what i want to do with it moving forward. I have been reading a blog that someone suggested to me earlier about a lady in florida who has been restoring one of these and I'm starting to feel inadequate lol.

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2 minutes ago, oceaneer said:

Gotta disagree with you Ish.. some silicone building products are really amazing. It depends on for what and why.. 

For your C&C if you use those on your windows.. it wont last forever. Some of the other sealants are better. 

And From your list I would have it go the other way.. 5200 is really an adhesive, that is also a sealant. 

I cannot find anyplace on my boat where it should be used. 

291 is great stuff. 

oceaneer

I would never use a solvent-based polyurethane on acrylic. I'm hedging there because System Three makes a two-part water-based polyurethane that works incredibly well as long as you give it a month to cure before using it. My windows are currently held in with LifeSeal, which (as you probably know) is a silicone-buffered polyurethane.

Next go round will be 3M VHB tape with a couple of beads of either Sikaflex 295 UV on a properly primed surface or Dow 795 silicone.

The ONLY place on a boat I would use 5200 would be on chainplate gaskets because it sticks to stainless better than anything else does and gives enough movement to allow for the boat working. Luckily, my C&C has different design chainplates that don't need that kind of adhesion.

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someone earlier suggested that i go back to the external cplate idea for a permanent solution and I told them that we had decided that the rubrail would be in the way so they told me to just bend the c plate around it and I didnt think much of it at the time until today when I noticed that the  c plate on the back by the motor is external and bends around the rubrail. That really seems like the best plan to me..... for in the future anyway

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unless I'm not taking something important into account.

 

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3 minutes ago, Ishmael said:

I would never use a solvent-based polyurethane on acrylic. I'm hedging there because System Three makes a two-part water-based polyurethane that works incredibly well as long as you give it a month to cure before using it. My windows are currently held in with LifeSeal, which (as you probably know) is a silicone-buffered polyurethane.

Next go round will be 3M VHB tape with a couple of beads of either Sikaflex 295 UV on a properly primed surface or Dow 795 silicone.

The ONLY place on a boat I would use 5200 would be on chainplate gaskets because it sticks to stainless better than anything else does and gives enough movement to allow for the boat working. Luckily, my C&C has different design chainplates that don't need that kind of adhesion.

795 rocks on windows.. We were using a shop vac to pull vacuum all around the window. A light scuff of both sides and no worries. 

We are in agreement on 5200 vs stainless steel. Its just such a bugger to get off. 

Thanks

oceaneer

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4 minutes ago, Savage2288 said:

unless I'm not taking something important into account.

I'm in the inspect them, caulk them and go sailing now camp.  As long as the chainplates aren't cracked or corroded you should be good to go for now.  You need to get on the water to start learning.  Who knows, you may find that you don't even like sailing!  Or you might get so into it you want a different boat.  If you really like sailing and this boat turns out to be a keeper you can do a more involved repair later on, with no harm done in the meantime. 

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33 minutes ago, CruiserJim said:

I'm in the inspect them, caulk them and go sailing now camp.  As long as the chainplates aren't cracked or corroded you should be good to go for now.  You need to get on the water to start learning.  Who knows, you may find that you don't even like sailing!  Or you might get so into it you want a different boat.  If you really like sailing and this boat turns out to be a keeper you can do a more involved repair later on, with no harm done in the meantime. 

+1

Go sailing!

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2 hours ago, Savage2288 said:

I couldn't find 4200 anywhere locally. I let the guy at the local shop talk me in to 5200 =/

 

ACK: that's a great resource! thanks for showing me her blog!

http://www.defender.com

Your best friend web site as a boater in the U.S.

It still makes me maudlin to think I only lived an hour from that place and visited several times a year.

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21 minutes ago, B.J. Porter said:

http://www.defender.com

Your best friend web site as a boater in the U.S.

It still makes me maudlin to think I only lived an hour from that place and visited several times a year.

Or often better, meet someone with a Worstmarine Pro Platinum account and use their number.

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Just now, Whisper said:
23 minutes ago, B.J. Porter said:

http://www.defender.com

Your best friend web site as a boater in the U.S.

It still makes me maudlin to think I only lived an hour from that place and visited several times a year.

Or often better, meet someone with a Worstmarine Pro Platinum account and use their number.

West Marine is for when you can't wait until tomorrow for it, and they don't stock it at the local riggers...

At least when I lived in the states. Where I lived, UPS Ground from Defender was the same as next day shipping.

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10 minutes ago, B.J. Porter said:

West Marine is for when you can't wait until tomorrow for it, and they don't stock it at the local riggers...

At least when I lived in the states. Where I lived, UPS Ground from Defender was the same as next day shipping.

Yeah, but I can usually get better prices than Defender--except for electronics and other low margin stuff.  Seattle Marine can sometimes blow them both away.

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1 hour ago, Savage2288 said:

someone earlier suggested that i go back to the external cplate idea for a permanent solution and I told them that we had decided that the rubrail would be in the way so they told me to just bend the c plate around it and I didnt think much of it at the time until today when I noticed that the  c plate on the back by the motor is external and bends around the rubrail. That really seems like the best plan to me..... for in the future anyway

The fitting on the back, I think it is called a tang, sees much lower force and stress than the chainplates on the sides. The chainplates are thicker (stronger) metal and less easily formed than the tang, which is much thinner. Probably why the builder made them internal and through the deck where a single minor bend was the only forming needed. 

Don't over think it or worry too much, just seal the current gap and get some sailing time in. You'll have a slew of questions and issues before the cplates need to be addressed again.

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11 minutes ago, Whisper said:
22 minutes ago, B.J. Porter said:

West Marine is for when you can't wait until tomorrow for it, and they don't stock it at the local riggers...

At least when I lived in the states. Where I lived, UPS Ground from Defender was the same as next day shipping.

Yeah, but I can usually get better prices than Defender--except for electronics and other low margin stuff.  Seattle Marine can sometimes blow them both away.

Well yeah, if you have Port Supply pricing or the like, it's cheaper.

But you can't get that walking in off the street.

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Rig the boat on the trailer. Look at the angles of everything.
If it all looks straight with the rig rigged up correctly, then seal the hole and go sailing.
Don't try to seal the hole with a big goob of 5200. That's nasty. Make a little piece of filler and fill the hole with that--sika it in and fillet over it. Filler you can make out of a chunk of wood that you shape and then paint or varnish to seal it.

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1 hour ago, TwoLegged said:

+1

Go sailing!

+2  Despite all the talk and adhesive debate, it looks like the chainplate is *not* likely to fail. (good, because a failure would be unpleasant).  

It appears to me the only issue is that a little water can get in the gap; rain, splashing, or if you really bury the rail (heel excessively).   But it's not a big leak, and if you've got a bilge pump, it's nothing more than a nuisance.  In other words 'check bilge pump' has higher priority.

Go Sailing!  Find someone knowledgeable to go with you and give you pointers. 

Have fun and stay safe.

 

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1 hour ago, fastyacht said:

Rig the boat on the trailer. Look at the angles of everything.
If it all looks straight with the rig rigged up correctly, then seal the hole and go sailing.
Don't try to seal the hole with a big goob of 5200. That's nasty. Make a little piece of filler and fill the hole with that--sika it in and fillet over it. Filler you can make out of a chunk of wood that you shape and then paint or varnish to seal it.

The sika I bought isn't marine sika it's for concrete because I'm a dummy =/

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So um.....my tiny best friend (5'1" 90lbs) came over to help me try to step the mast and after LOTS of curse words and exertion we managed to get it untied and down......and laid across my porch lol. We were going to try to step it but there are lots of cars parked around and my husband parkednthe boat right against our house and well.....she and I are both super clumsy so we got intimidated. I will try again tomorrow.

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24 minutes ago, Savage2288 said:

The sika I bought isn't marine sika it's for concrete because I'm a dummy =/

Perhaps you have a deck or some concrete steps you can repair...

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Be careful with the mast.  Normally boats this size have a hinged mast step, the base of the mast has a hole for the mast step bolt, the base is pinned with the mast projecting aft then it is pivoted up with shrouds and back stay attached. I don't thing this will work on your boat due to the pilot house. Did the prior owner give you any info about how to do it?

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Yes, he gave me a rundown while we were walking around/climbing on the boat but everything was lashed down for transport so he couldn't actually show me. I understand in theory but thus far I can't even pick the mast up by myself ......it's not too heavy it's too unwieldy

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I am beginning to think I was wrong to take it all the way down, I should have slid it backwards and then leveraged it up and slid the base into the mast step....but the previous owner said he always started from the ground.

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I will figure it out somehow.

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Two people: one at the mast butt, the other "walks it up" same as with a long ladder.
Then, one keeps mast vertical, right next to the edge of the boat. Other person climbs on deck. Once up there you grab mast to steady it. Then you lift mast vertically passing it from the ground person to the deck person. Now ground person gets up on deck too and you move hast to final position, while keeping it vertical.
That's how we step a Star class mast, except only the one person on deck in the end.
On Etchells with two people we use a crane...

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Two things;

I'm wondering if the guy who built the house atop the deck remembered to reverse the hinging mast base.

and...

Do these boats have a bit of a sweep to the spreaders? 

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Yeah, I will probably have to make my poor husband help me. The guy who owned it before said he used to do it by himself so I was hoping I could but I feel like I'll tear something up.

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2 minutes ago, hobot said:

Two things;

I'm wondering if the guy who built the house atop the deck remembered to reverse the hinging mast base.

and...

Do these boats have a bit of a sweep to the spreaders? 

Um......maybe I'll post pictures tomorrow....or make a YouTube video tour.

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Somethings bugging me about this picture of the interior starboard chainplate. 

It's the starboard side right? then why is the load path awkward? 

Was the pic of the boat on the trailer reversed?

tmp_11096-18879910_1460845017292564_3209

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8 minutes ago, hobot said:

Somethings bugging me about this picture of the interior starboard chainplate. 

It's the starboard side right? then why is the load path awkward? 

Was the pic of the boat on the trailer reversed?

tmp_11096-18879910_1460845017292564_3209

Good eye, looks portside to me.

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Port side (hahaha "starboard, right?" I know it wasn't meant to be punny but still)

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Nah, I looked again and I was suffering from a stupid attack.

And as Emily Litella used to say, "never mind".

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1 hour ago, Savage2288 said:

I am beginning to think I was wrong to take it all the way down

Yeah, that's what prompted my message.  Yes make your "poor husband" help.  I don't think he will get much sympathy here, he has a wife who bought a boat, and she also wants to sail it and fix things!  Poor guy!

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Well, he does deserve SOME sympathy. He takes really good care of me and runs a business and runs an animal rescue out of pocket.....he is just really busy and I hate bothering him with my projects  when he works so hard to afford me the ability to have projects. But I made him come get a spider off my boat earlier so Im sure he will be happy to help lol

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15 hours ago, B.J. Porter said:

http://www.defender.com

Your best friend web site as a boater in the U.S.

It still makes me maudlin to think I only lived an hour from that place and visited several times a year.

I mirror that statement 100%, but right now it's ..."several times a month."

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12 hours ago, Savage2288 said:

Yeah, I will probably have to make my poor husband help me. The guy who owned it before said he used to do it by himself so I was hoping I could but I feel like I'll tear something up.

I had years of single handing rigging an 18 foot dinghy when I got the 22.  The first time I lowered the mast (the delivery guy helped me raise it) I  recruited a couple able bodied friends but still came close to dropping it.  I released a turnbuckle I wasn't supposed to.   I caught my mistake immediately, but needed the extra hands to hold things while I put it back.   Now that I understand the directions (many simple steps in a critical sequence) I can do it solo without (much) difficulty and strength is optional.   Recruit everybody, Move the truck out of the way for your first time, unless its insured.  DOUBLE CHECK FOR OVERHEAD LINES!  

Make sure the tongue weight is sufficient the trailer can't teeter totter while you balance the mast.  If it was towed down From Alaska its probably fine, but that's another important discussion for safe towing, just like loading cargo on any trailer.   Its easy to load the boat too far back in shallow water, screwing yourself up.    At least I make it look easy.   :unsure:

Have one person film the ordeal for our appraisal.  :lol:   Perhaps a forward hinge like Hobot suggested would help dodge the pilot house.    I have no idea what your prior owner did, but I've never personally started with the mast on the ground.   Generally it is slid back (or forward) until the foot can be bolted or pinned to the step, then it is raised either by hand or a winch system.   My rig is heavy (jib roller furler and main furls inside the mast) so I have to use a winch.  The advantage is I can pause at any point and move whatever stay is snagged, then climb back to the foredeck and start cranking again.   Something will snag.   

Most important.  Make sure you post the video.   We'll provide the popcorn.   Have fun.  Repetition will make it easy.  If not, this lot will give you advice.  

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6 hours ago, RedRyder said:
22 hours ago, B.J. Porter said:

http://www.defender.com

Your best friend web site as a boater in the U.S.

It still makes me maudlin to think I only lived an hour from that place and visited several times a year.

I mirror that statement 100%, but right now it's ..."several times a month."

I was driving down from Warwick, so I had to ration my trips since it was about an hour each way.

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5 hours ago, Lark said:

Most important.  Make sure you post the video and loop in the Benny Hill theme song also. We'll provide the popcorn.   Have fun.  Repetition will make it easy.  If not, this lot will give you advice.  

Fixed.

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Well, I wanted to try and rig the boat today but I ended up with a migraine so instead I filmed a video tour of my funky little boat and I'm putting it on YouTube. I'll post the link here when it is finished...I don't know how interesting it will be but I like looking at different boats so I figured y'all might too.

 

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41 minutes ago, Savage2288 said:

 

Don't run your boat down, it has potential...and it's yours!

I'd fix the VHF up. Cell phones...are handy, but not the best when trying to reach everyone around you, boats you don't know, the US Coast Guard.

If your husband is going to do the wiring, have him look into boat wiring. There's some ways to do it that are different than what you can tolerate in a house.

And those wasps. Be careful, don't let them get settled in the boat! Before you know it, they'll be making martinis, wearing ugly pants, and thinking you're the help.

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yeah I've been fighting the wasps for all I'm worth.

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You didn't do bad.   

The hull looks fine.    Minor wear and battle scars to prove the boat got use.    I'd just put a little epoxy on the bow where the gel coat outer layer has worn into the matting,

The pilot house is interesting.   The prior owner had good joinery skills, it looks solid.   I don't know what he used for wood (cedar?) and fasteners, you may battle rot in your tropical climate.    But maybe you can winter sail.

The radio is good for any coastal use where you find yourself out of cell signal or the phone gets wet.   Plus i think it's still easier for rescue to get a fix off radio than get your cell gps in an emergency,

if you figure out his wheel steering invention (and it works) please add another video.   I'm curious. 

Let your husband rewire it (use marine wire, not the car stuff the bassboat guys use), so he can share your pride.

and sail.  That's what it's all about.  

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yeah I'm really interested to get the wheel thing figured out too. I'm trying to talk him into coming to visit the boat and give me some more info about the wheel idea. I thought he did a great job of making the cabin blend in but I wasn't sure if I was just being optimistic or not lol

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Nice detailed videos!

And you do great for having a migraine.
The mast step is indeed set up to step the mast from the bow, and you would crank it up to vertical from the stern.
The shrouds would be attached to the chainplates prior to pulling the mast vertical, and you'd have the forestay set up too.

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14 minutes ago, fastyacht said:

Nice detailed videos!

And you do great for having a migraine.
The mast step is indeed set up to step the mast from the bow, and you would crank it up to vertical from the stern.
The shrouds would be attached to the chainplates prior to pulling the mast vertical, and you'd have the forestay set up too.

thank you so much! I almost didn't post them because I figured I was mostly just rambling nonsense! yeah, when the previous owner gave me the rundown of how to step it that's pretty much what he told me. my main problem isn't that the mast is too heavy it's that when I have one end off the ground the other end hits the ground. it's like my arms won't spread wide enough to keep both ends up to maneuver it where I need it to get started. I'll figure it out though.

 

when I first got a motorcycle I quickly realized that if it fell over I couldn't lift it back up....so I spent several days laying it down and struggling it back upright to make sure I would never be stranded....this seems like the same thing. I just have to figure out what works for me.

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2 hours ago, Lark said:

You didn't do bad.   

The hull looks fine.    Minor wear and battle scars to prove the boat got use.    I'd just put a little epoxy on the bow where the gel coat outer layer has worn into the matting,

The pilot house is interesting.   The prior owner had good joinery skills, it looks solid.   I don't know what he used for wood (cedar?) and fasteners, you may battle rot in your tropical climate.    But maybe you can winter sail.

The radio is good for any coastal use where you find yourself out of cell signal or the phone gets wet.   Plus i think it's still easier for rescue to get a fix off radio than get your cell gps in an emergency,

if you figure out his wheel steering invention (and it works) please add another video.   I'm curious. 

Let your husband rewire it (use marine wire, not the car stuff the bassboat guys use), so he can share your pride.

and sail.  That's what it's all about.  

look! I think this may be what he had intended to rig up!

tmp_12832-wl26-fig32090209009.jpg

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Marine wire is tinned. That is the #1 thing about it, for your purposes. Plain copper just corrodes in no time.
Also, if you want to make lasting connections, use the tyco crimp solder seal type--not the simple crimp and shrink tube. Yo udon't need the crimpable type but it is sometimes easier. The real key is to have the adhesive and the solder ring inside the butt tube.
Here is an example of the non crimp type:
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Tyco-Solder-and-seal-Adhesive-Lined-Heatshrink-Butt-Connectors-No-Crimping-/171406887294

That cable steering sketch---it doesn't get big but the lettering looks really familiar.

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7 minutes ago, Savage2288 said:

look! I think this may be what he had intended to rig up!

tmp_12832-wl26-fig32090209009.jpg

Ok.   I've seen this set up on an old (1966?) Volvo,penta 4 banger inboard / outdrive with no hydraulics. 

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5 minutes ago, fastyacht said:

Marine wire is tinned. That is the #1 thing about it, for your purposes. Plain copper just corrodes in no time.
Also, if you want to make lasting connections, use the tyco crimp solder seal type--not the simple crimp and shrink tube. Yo udon't need the crimpable type but it is sometimes easier. The real key is to have the adhesive and the solder ring inside the butt tube.
Here is an example of the non crimp type:
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Tyco-Solder-and-seal-Adhesive-Lined-Heatshrink-Butt-Connectors-No-Crimping-/171406887294

That cable steering sketch---it doesn't get big but the lettering looks really familiar.

see if this link works better for you wl26-fig3.jpg

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I don't actually think the wiring is wrong or non functional I think it just needs a battery. I just don't understand electrical stuff at all. as far as I'm concerned it's all magic and witchery

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Once you maneuver the mast into the step, it will be difficult to lift it standing on the bow as most of the mast will be hanging off the bow. It could be easier with the boat in the water at a dock where someone could stand ahead of the boat to hold and lift the mast part way up.   

Another option would be to use the boom as a gin pole, the main halyard fastened to the end of the boom and use the main sheet tackle for some lifting purchase. Would have to rig a way to hold the boom up vertically during the lifting process. 

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42 minutes ago, Savage2288 said:

I don't actually think the wiring is wrong or non functional I think it just needs a battery. I just don't understand electrical stuff at all. as far as I'm concerned it's all magic and witchery

The issue with marine wiring isn't if it works NOW.  That's easy.

The issue is will it work next week, and the week after, and the week after.

A boat is a very hostile environment to things on it. You've got constant vibration, moisture, corrosion, etc. All of these are continuously trying to trash your electrical and mechanical installations.

As a result, there are certain ways of invoking that magic and witchery which increase the odds that it will all work nicely again the next time you flip the switch.

There are some excellent books on the topic out there which you may want to add to your Flag Day gift list for your husband...

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14 minutes ago, B.J. Porter said:

The issue with marine wiring isn't if it works NOW.  That's easy.

The issue is will it work next week, and the week after, and the week after.

A boat is a very hostile environment to things on it. You've got constant vibration, moisture, corrosion, etc. All of these are continuously trying to trash your electrical and mechanical installations.

As a result, there are certain ways of invoking that magic and witchery which increase the odds that it will all work nicely again the next time you flip the switch.

There are some excellent books on the topic out there which you may want to add to your Flag Day gift list for your husband...

51TGeUy52VL._SX258_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

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As long as there isn't a fire, electrical failure isn't a big deal.   She won't be somewhere between Oz and Ragnarok without refrigeration or navigation.    But if Mr. Savage is enticed to rewire, use the right stuff the first time.   

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19 minutes ago, Ishmael said:

51TGeUy52VL._SX258_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

Yeah, that one. But I was too lazy to go get the picture.

Charlie Wing's book is first rate too, but it is ONLY electrical. I suspect our neophyte owner may appreciate the non electrical bits in Calder's book more than the extreme detail in Wing's tome.

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3 minutes ago, Lark said:

As long as there isn't a fire, electrical failure isn't a big deal.   She won't be somewhere between Oz and Ragnarok without refrigeration or navigation.    But if Mr. Savage is enticed to rewire, use the right stuff the first time.   

Biggest risks are probably losing her running lights at night, or the radio in an emergency where she'll be sailing. That engine looks like a pull starter, and the sailing is all muscles.

But you are right, there is no sense making re-wiring the boat an annual project by doing it in a suboptimal fashion the first time.

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7 hours ago, Savage2288 said:

I don't actually think the wiring is wrong or non functional I think it just needs a battery. I just don't understand electrical stuff at all. as far as I'm concerned it's all magic and witchery

Most boat owners don't understand electrickery.  Most of us at one time or another, have bought a boat stuffed with multi-colored spaghetti and intermittent functionality.

I'm blessed with a solid grasp of Ohm's Law. I do struggle to stuff myself into all the nooks and crannies to run the wiring so my runs as tidy as I'd like them, but usually better than what I find.

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6 hours ago, B.J. Porter said:

Biggest risks are probably losing her running lights at night, or the radio in an emergency where she'll be sailing. That engine looks like a pull starter, and the sailing is all muscles.

But you are right, there is no sense making re-wiring the boat an annual project by doing it in a suboptimal fashion the first time.

She said she's in bassboat territory.   A flashlight will give her a second chance.    Once she gets the bug and starts planning her vacations and holidays and begins jumping along the coast, yea, make sure every bit of the boat is reliable.    For now, make sure the pointy bit goes up and stays up.   When I was at her point, I would have just looked for time on protected water in 5-10 in nice weather, knowing that will expand to 5-25 in any weather wihout ice or lightning.   Then a weekend to more water.    But as she starts and the weather window is small, there will be plenty of days she will be happier tinkering then fighting gibes in white caps.

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9 hours ago, Savage2288 said:

thank you so much! I almost didn't post them because I figured I was mostly just rambling nonsense! yeah, when the previous owner gave me the rundown of how to step it that's pretty much what he told me. my main problem isn't that the mast is too heavy it's that when I have one end off the ground the other end hits the ground. it's like my arms won't spread wide enough to keep both ends up to maneuver it where I need it to get started. I'll figure it out though.

 

when I first got a motorcycle I quickly realized that if it fell over I couldn't lift it back up....so I spent several days laying it down and struggling it back upright to make sure I would never be stranded....this seems like the same thing. I just have to figure out what works for me.

Slight hijack - has anyone ever shown you how to lift your motorcycle by backing up to it, squatting down, putting your butt against the seat, grabbing the handlebars w/one hand, the back of the seat w/the other, and then pushing backwards to get it back on it's wheels? 

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2 hours ago, A guy in the Chesapeake said:

Slight hijack - has anyone ever shown you how to lift your motorcycle by backing up to it, squatting down, putting your butt against the seat, grabbing the handlebars w/one hand, the back of the seat w/the other, and then pushing backwards to get it back on it's wheels? 

nope. no one showed me anything. I just toughened the hell up and man handled it back on its wheels. but it's not an issue anymore because now I have a service dog who refuses to ride in anything open air (like a side car) so now I have a Camaro with a sunroof and air conditioning instead of a ratty ass bike with a slight death wish. truth be told I was never much of a true biker. I wore Hawaiian shirts and Bermuda shorts and waved madly like a lunatic when I saw other bikers and had a big white egg head helmet that made me look JUST like that little flying saucer guy from the Jetsons. I still have a little red scooter and it's much more my thing than the motorcycle ever was. BUT NOW I HAVE A BOAT AND ITS THE BEST!!!!!! XD

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6 hours ago, hobot said:

Uh oh, the disease, it's taken hold....

Firmly. Wait 'til she gets it in the water...

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I'm tellin yall, I've been wanting a sailboat since I was in highschool. Thats a LONG time.

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