Savage2288

Brand new and totally ignorant

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4 hours ago, Savage2288 said:

attempted to step the mast today. got it part way up and realised that I neglected to move my Camaro and promptly started to have a panic attack =/ we got it back down without dropping it and we are gonna try again in a few minutes. it's scarier than I thought it would be because the front of the trailer is so wiggly.

You are one dedicated poster to check in between stepping attempts... maintaining the narrative tension.

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34 minutes ago, groundhog said:

You are one dedicated poster to check in between stepping attempts... maintaining the narrative tension.

lol I'm sorry. posting on here has been helping relieve some of my frustration about everything taking so long. I want to get it in the water and get on with it. We weren't able to try again =/ it suddenly came a thunderstorm . Its so irritating that the weather is being so uncooperative.

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Its been really nice getting all of the information yall have provided me over the past several days. Plus all of the encouragement has been super helpful! everyone has been so nice and i really appreciate it so much!

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Pffft... you let me stay and I'm an asshole.

That gator patch is very interesting!  They might be a bit on the thin side for sailboat repair. I wonder if you can stack a few of them up for an emergency repair?

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it says you can layer up to 5 of them.

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I am sorely tempted to try them on my little bow repairs.....I'm a sucker for quick and easy but I also love my little sailboat and I don't want to get sucked into something that's too good to be true and end up with a mess on my hands...

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4 minutes ago, Savage2288 said:

it says you can layer up to 5 of them.

It may be hard to feather and sand for a cosmetic patch if you planned on repainting. but would likely be a relatively easy to apply. From what I saw, masking the area and coating the scarred up bow with pure epoxy to seal it will be the least ugly quick repair,   You may cause similar damage docking or trailering yourself, so I wouldn't worry about perfection.    Taping off the bottom of the chain plate slots, stuffing with some matting and squirting some epoxy by syringe would be a 'close' patch with minimal visible ugliness on the outside allowing you to caulk the remaining gap.   It would be good to unbolt them, smear some epoxy on the holes with a q tip,to seal them, and rebolt them first, so you could double check for hidden cracks.    From what I saw, you don't need the gator patch.   

This is your goal.   Except I need to get a vertical batten.   Ignore the open Valcro.   Coming in last evening, a sailing fix after a boatless roadtrip (but I did look at other people's boats at Grand River Ohio as a side trip.   Too bad there were no open boat shops that evening for the batten).

IMG_0159.JPG

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I talked to the previous owner yesterday about the chainplate damage and he says he has already taken the chainplates out and re-fiberglassed the area several times. I told him I was going to fill the gaps with something flexible and he said he hadn't tried that yet. Apparently, this is an ongoing problem with this particular boat that I'm sure has everything to do with the pilot house being added =/ the only permanent fix would seem to be going back to the plan of external chainplates and bending them around the rubrail.

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I know I wont be repainting anytime soon. Not sure yet about this winter. I mainly just want to get on the water quickly nd protect the area from further damage.

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I would think that any competent machine shop could put the necessary bend into the plates to get them around the rub rail.

Another thought- Why not just cut out the section of rubber where the chainplates would reside? This would mean less bend is required.

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Or remove the rubrail section, replace with external plates, and add a shiny new rubrail as a 2019 goal.   Alternately just do your flexible gasket for now and do the whole thing in a couple years.  Of course that project may drift further back depending how much rain gets in.  I'm not sure it's the pilot house, the boat was built in 1972? with a projected lifespan somewhat less then half a century.  We keep fixing and sailing long after the builder fails due to lack of repeat sales.    Meanwhile the AC guy wants to replace a 24 year old machine with a new one that may last 11 years.   

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look! what about one of these to prevent the trailer from damaging the bow again? I think it would look pretty nice. Might even cover both damaged spots to "pretty-fy" things again. https://www.gator-guards.com/bowshield-bow-guard/ 

Probably I will just use a composite shim and some Lifecaulk (cant find 4200....have been told 5200 is not the thing) to fix the chainplate damage for now and revisit the project later on once I know a little more about all of this stuff.

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To fix little dings get some MarineTex epoxy,mix use celoophane over the patch to fair it smooth, let harden, remove celophane and you have a smooth patch.  I have never seen stays bent around a rubrail, it would cause point loading.  If you remember that stress flows like water it will help you in your boatbuilding/fixes .

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26 minutes ago, Lark said:

Or remove the rubrail, section, replace with external plates, and add a shiny new rubrail as a 2019 goal.   Alternately just do your flexible gasket for now and do the whole thing in a couple years.  Of course that project may drift further back depending how much rain gets in.  I'm not sure it's the pilot house, the boat was built in 1972? with a projected lifespan somewhat less then half a century.  We keep fixing and sailing long after the builder fails due to lack of repeat sales.    Meanwhile the AC guy wants to replace a 24 year old machine with a new one that may last 11 years.   

I want a rubrail like THIS! http://floatechmarine.com/products.html

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15 minutes ago, Savage2288 said:

what is point loading?

 

Point loading is putting pressure or pulling force on a small, concentrated area.

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1 hour ago, Savage2288 said:

I talked to the previous owner yesterday about the chainplate damage and he says he has already taken the chainplates out and re-fiberglassed the area several times. I told him I was going to fill the gaps with something flexible and he said he hadn't tried that yet. Apparently, this is an ongoing problem with this particular boat that I'm sure has everything to do with the pilot house being added =/ the only permanent fix would seem to be going back to the plan of external chainplates and bending them around the rubrail.

No you needn't do the external. Once rug is up we can talk u thru it 

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1 hour ago, guerdon said:

To fix little dings get some MarineTex epoxy,mix use celoophane over the patch to fair it smooth, let harden, remove celophane and you have a smooth patch.  I have never seen stays bent around a rubrail, it would cause point loading.  If you remember that stress flows like water it will help you in your boatbuilding/fixes .

I'm a big believer in using polyester wherever you can, on a polyester boat. But marine-tex is useful too.

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well. I reckon I'm off to the store to get some of them there patches. My husband doesn't think it will hurt anything and I am super curious to try them. I'm not terribly concerned about them being obvious (it was going to look patched anyway) and they claim to be paint able so I guess we shall see.

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also getting my paperwork notarized (finally) so I'll be one step closer to getting on the water!

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1 minute ago, fastyacht said:

Real fiberglass repairs are really not difficult. Just itchy. Haha.

yes. My husband is a contractor and when I used to help him put insulation up he always laughed at me because I have such an aversion to fiberglass that he claims its a phobia =/ he would make fun of how distraught I would get when it would start to get itchy lol the jerk.

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The first boat I bought (loooong story...never made it in the water)  was aluminum because I have always been so anti fiberglass lol.

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5 minutes ago, Savage2288 said:

 I have such an aversion to fiberglass that he claims its a phobia =/ he would make fun of how distraught I would get when it would start to get itchy...

Haha I know that experience.
My wife refused to drive in my car back in the day.
Fiberglass insulation is worse in my experience.
I once re-insulated the fiberglass shop during a slow period, My god, that was hell. Freaking hell. And I was already acclimatized to the itchy powder from everyday flange grinding!

 

edit

> The first boat I bought (loooong story...never made it in the water)  was aluminum because I have always been so anti fiberglass lol.

 

Hahaha, HAHAHAHAAAA!!!! :-P

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Simple polyester fiberglass repairs. It would have been difficult to do with the cool patch stuff you found. And once these are gelcoated or even just painted, they disappear. Ypou can see the end result--rattlecan painted-- in the second photo. I was lazy and didn't do a resin fill before painting so you see the mat texture too much. But it is my boat, I've been converted to a swamp yankee, and I wanted to go rowing dammit.
34647018391_e0c90b8118_o.jpg
35054054872_a2563e9065_o.jpg

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my first boat was going to be named "wishful thinkin" ( my husband's idea .....he lacked faith. he was right) and I'm tempted to name this one "wishful thinkin II"

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but I kinda feel like that would be throwing good luck after bad =/

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21 minutes ago, fastyacht said:

Simple polyester fiberglass repairs. It would have been difficult to do with the cool patch stuff you found. And once these are gelcoated or even just painted, they disappear. Ypou can see the end result--rattlecan painted-- in the second photo. I was lazy and didn't do a resin fill before painting so you see the mat texture too much. But it is my boat, I've been converted to a swamp yankee, and I wanted to go rowing dammit.
34647018391_e0c90b8118_o.jpg
35054054872_a2563e9065_o.jpg

I think it looks great! what is a swamp Yankee??? that sounds like a MUCH more tolerable sort of Yankee than just a regular Yankee ! ;)

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On 6/8/2017 at 11:15 PM, Savage2288 said:

when I first got a motorcycle I quickly realized that if it fell over I couldn't lift it back up....so I spent several days laying it down and struggling it back upright to make sure I would never be stranded....this seems like the same thing. I just have to figure out what works for me.

Like this?

 

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HA! no....she's way smarter than me. I just man handled it until I built my muscles up.

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2 hours ago, Savage2288 said:

I think it looks great! what is a swamp Yankee??? that sounds like a MUCH more tolerable sort of Yankee than just a regular Yankee ! ;)

A swamp yankee is kinda sorta like the New England homegrown version of a redneck.

Some days, I think I'm becoming a bit of a swamp yankee. Fastyacht talks a good game but he's definitely not too much of a swamp yankee, these repair photos notwithstanding. No worthwhile swamp yankee would have wasted time or money with paint of any sort.

 

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lol! that's hilarious! I didn't know y'all called yourselves Yankees. folks get mad when I refer to them as Yankees =/ I never understood that... I call myself a redneck rebel all the time. I like "swamp Yankee". although I don't believe y'all really have swamps in yankee-ville.

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UPDATE!!! mostly because I'm excited that I actually got some things done today....I got my paperwork notarized, managed to get ahold of a map of the area I'll be sailing in (important because it's a bit treacherous and I need to scout out the dangerous bits so I can mark them ) , bought the patch to fix the hull damage with, finally found some life caulk to fix the chain plate damage with , and found this snazzy sponge to get my boat clean with! But it was storming again today so I still couldn't do anything but dream =[
 on a side note....I'm starting to feel like a commercial with all these nifty boat things I keep finding. anybody seen/used these?

http://m.basspro.com/Boat-Bully-Great-White-Boat-Cleaning-Sponge/product/2247739/

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and my sweet husband just surprised me with a 48 hour emergency food supply for if I ever get swept down river!!! XD

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I'm actually laffing. The sponge thing is great!

I use these:
http://www.starbrite.com/item/cellulose-big-boat-bail-sponge-7-34-x-4-14-x-2-34

these:

http://www.scotch-brite.com/3M/en_US/scotch-brite/

blue for scratch free, green for when something gets serious.
And of course:
https://www.softscrub.com/

cleans without scratching.
But when it is really dirty after the winter, I use:

https://www.jamestowndistributors.com/userportal/show_product.do?pid=64346&familyName=TotalBoat+Marine+Soap

or a few others.

And for stains, this stuff is the bee's knees:
https://www.jamestowndistributors.com/userportal/show_product.do?pid=2486&familyName=Y-10+Fiberglass+Stain+Remover
 

As for swamps, yankees and swamps, HAHA!  Yes, we have swamps. We just don't call them that. We upscale Connecticut Yankees prefer the upscale "marsh" or "wetland." :-P Especially the realtors. "Marsh View" is actually a "thing." Just bring your DEET and your citronella.

But as I have a real honest to god swamp in my backyard, I actually qualify for a waiver from upscale. My wife *hates* it when I say we have a swamp! You can almost see it in that photo. Well almost.

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BWAHAHAHAHAHA "Marsh View" is AMAZING

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I also found a great home for my poor old aluminum boat today so that's one more accomplishment. now it will get the attention it deserves!

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ooooh! I like that Y10 stuff and that boat soap! what witchery is this?!

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but I still call bs on swamps up there! I have a gator that lives in my yard and I feed him pork chops....that's swamp.

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3 minutes ago, fastyacht said:

Good!

Oh my God! Even in Sea Pines!

Boyohboy they're getting deparate down in Hilton Head!
http://www.thepattisallgroup.com/sea-pines/marsh-view/

all that Spanish moss and palm trees is CONNECTICUT??????

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I overtopped my hip boots in quick mud a week ago, hunting trout. That was pretty swampy. But you're right, no gators. Only otters, beavers, black bear, bobcats, mink, snapping turtles and upland we have the fisher cats and coyotes. Actually the coyotes are everwhere. Even in my backyard. But all that definitely pales to the gator. One trip to sea pines as a teen, we were doing what teenagers do---wandering in a pack, looking for whip-poor-wills during the day, and we came across some gators sunning up the bank from a pond. Kinda like Beavis and Butthead we all said, "woah, cool...hhhhuhuhuhu" and then that gator when ZOOM! into the water. Freaking FAST!  We realized at that momen, "thank God we didn'te get 'tween the gator and the water!!"

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We have lichen up here, not spanish moss. You have to go to the Maritimes (Nova Scotia) to get the Old Man's Beard, northern variety. But we do have palm trees. In pots. Also live oak---dead live oak that is.

 

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I didnt know any variety of spanish moss would grow that far north.... where is Sea Pines? gators dont get any farther north than virginia

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There are patches of cypress in a couple Indiana and Ohio swamps, stands that survived the last ice age.  And of course our polite little massasagua swamp rattler.   We are rather civilized up here, though parks like to put out warning signs to keep mushroom and ginseng hunters on the trails.   Fens (alkaline seeps feed them) and marshes along rivers and Lake Erie contrast with our wooded swamps for the complete alligator free soggy experience.   

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here is our little gator that just moved in about a week ago. it's only about 4 feet.

 

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I'm getting you off track.
Sea Pines is in Hilton Head, South Carolina. I just thought it was hilarious that even *there* they're doing the marsh thing!
We don't have spanish moss but our lichen stands in for it and in Nova Scotia, the lichen actually looks almost like spanish moss.

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OH! lol my bad. I thought you had seen gators in yankee-ville and was about to tell my husband to let the Master Naturalist Association know!

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5 minutes ago, Lark said:

There are patches of cypress in a couple Indiana and Ohio swamps, stands that survived the last ice age.  And of course our polite little massasagua swamp rattler.   We are rather civilized up here, though parks like to put out warning signs to keep mushroom and ginseng hunters on the trails.   

I always thought it was so cool that yall have ginseng. I didnt know cypress grew that far north either! those rattlers look kinda like fat corn snakes! I had never seen one till i looked them up just now, theyre cute!

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2 minutes ago, fastyacht said:

Well they do get gators in Manhattan but that's well, NY and anything goes there.

there arent gators in manhattan! youre pullin my leg!

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Isn't your little friend cute. I once went canoeing in Okefenokee.    I think we saw 128 gators.   Plus those crazy spiders that look like they belong in a Tolkien story, a giant web straight across the canal.   

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was it lost? were they able to rescue it and get it back down south? (the manatee)

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OMG those spiders are the devil. we have tarantulas here and theyre awful. My husband has one as a pet that he caught in nachitochez.

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Im honestly not sure what kind of bird that is. we are reptile folks and havent done much bird research.....my sister will know though hang on.

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4 minutes ago, Savage2288 said:

that's too bad. I do remember when that one was sighted before that. Same sort of problem happens with porpoises occasoinally. There's a river in New Jersey that flows northerly and a few died there because they swam upriver trying to go south.

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thats crazy...i didnt know they swam that far north

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I have kind of a random question.....when I first started posting someone posted a picture of a sock puppet and said "smells like a dirty sock puppet" what was that all about?

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49 minutes ago, Savage2288 said:

but I still call bs on swamps up there! I have a gator that lives in my yard and I feed him pork chops....that's swamp.

fattening him up for the BBQ ?

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5 minutes ago, 167149 said:

fattening him up for the BBQ ?

lol nope. im a vegetarian. hes safe here.

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Just now, Savage2288 said:

thats crazy...i didnt know they swam that far north

An Indianapolis city park had three flamingo as temporary residents a couple years ago, to the delight of the naturalists,   I forget the details, but think they followed a gulf storm.    They stuck around a few weeks and wandered back south.    

 

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did you know flamingos live in highly toxic volcanic environments and their pink color comes from drinking toxic water and absorbing the toxins into their feathers?!?! theyre so bad ass...

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lol when i search "flamingos in indianapolis" it keeps pulling up some night club/strip club

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4 minutes ago, Savage2288 said:

lol nope. im a vegetarian. hes safe here.

spent a bit of time as a kid in Lae New Guinea and have seen them all sizes up to 18' on the Markham, locals think the wee ones are a delicacy........big ones just to be avoided......crocs though not gators

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1 minute ago, 167149 said:

spent a bit of time as a kid in Lae New Guinea and have seen them all sizes up to 18' on the Markham, locals think the wee ones are a delicacy........big ones just to be avoided......crocs though not gators

folks eat gator around here. usually fried with hot sauce. its one of our seasons. king cake season, crawfish season, gator season, football season.

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Bored Anarchists are known to create alternate personalities (sock puppets) and lead the helpful and gullible on with fanciful stories and incredible claims.  If you had followed up with plans to sail to Alaska via the Southern Hemisphere, learning as you go and hunting whales for food even I would have eventually gotten suspicious,    The result is newbies are suspect, just in case we are being practiced on.   Unfortunate, as we want to encourage sailing.

The flamingoes in Indy were white.   Nobody could see a leg band to suggest escapees, so it was assumed a prior storm had blown them.  The bird watchers were understandably fascinated.  It was winter with broken ice as I recall.   They stayed in the open water for a couple weeks then one day all three were gone.

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2 minutes ago, Lark said:

Bored Anarchists are known to create alternate personalities (sock puppets) and lead the helpful and gullible on with fanciful stories and incredible claims.  If you had followed up with plans to sail to Alaska via the Southern Hemisphere, learning as you go and hunting whales for food even I would have eventually gotten suspicious,    The result is newbies are suspect, just in case we are being practiced on.   Unfortunate, as we want to encourage sailing.

The flamingoes in Indy were white.   Nobody could see a leg band to suggest escapees, so it was assumed a prior storm had blown them.  The bird watchers were understandably fascinated.  It was winter with broken ice as I recall.   They stayed in the open water for a couple weeks then one day all three were gone.

oh lord.....I mean....I have some fanciful stories and I frequently come up with wild schemes that usually dont work out but I dont lie about them....im just crazy.

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for instance: It is one of my goals to eventually take my little sailboat down to New Orleans via the red river and mississippi....but I dont know enough to attempt something like that yet and I know its not impossible because I have found 2 different online sailing logs of people who have done it but said it was a bitch and a half.

plus im in the shreveport area so thats only about 430 miles

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23 minutes ago, 167149 said:

spent a bit of time as a kid in Lae New Guinea and have seen them all sizes up to 18' on the Markham, locals think the wee ones are a delicacy........big ones just to be avoided......crocs though not gators

thats so cool that you lived in New Guinea! (i was focused on crocs/gators and not on where you said you lived) what was it like there???

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