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austin1972

Good Cheap Wine

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So, I picked up a bottle of this stuff called Dark Horse Big Red 33-1 to saute some mushrooms for a steak and decided to try a glass. For $8 wine, it's pretty damn good IMO.

Are there other inexpensive wines out there worth trying? I'm more of a red guy but have an open mind. I was just shocked that 8 buck chuck could be good.

And I'm sick of beer and only do scotch on Christmas Eve in the hard liquor dept.

edit: not quite true. I have a martini on the 4th and a Bloody on the 1st brisk day of college football. Usually October.

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You don't say where you live but I have had good luck with the Costco, Kirkland brands of wine.  They have their own versions of a French Bordeaux red, a Cab, Chardonnay and other types.  The price is usually better than the branded wines they sell.

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Gnarly Head "Black" Old Vine Zinfandel  $8:00 @ most supper markets..  Keep your eyes open for Bianchi Cabernet or Zinfandel...  Once in  while they go on sale and you can't go wrong.

Here is a good place to get some additional info on cheapo but good wine..  have hit a few home runs here..   And, Trader Joe's is overpriced!

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Decent Malbecs can often be had inexpensively, as can some blends which really aren't too bad.  Syrah/grenache comes to mind. . .

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1 hour ago, bplipschitz said:

Decent Malbecs can often be had inexpensively

Disagree. I think the decent cheap (<=$10) Malbec in the US ship sailed 10 years ago. Argentine inflation coupled with wine industry trends killed that off.

I know you are out in the country Austin (and I have no clue about Illinois liquor laws), but the best way to find reliable decent wine was to find a decent independent wine shop. They'd have stuff at $10-25/bottle from places that weren't yet names but looking to make it, and the shop would chose what would sell. This was the kind of place http://www.vintageberkeley.com/ small production, under $25 bottle. The only bottle I remember not being enjoyable they warned about, because it was a strange Italian sparkling dry red wine. I'd think there might be that kind of place in Chicago?

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As a former vintner... Good is a relative term, as tastes vary so much. 

many bulk process (think > 100k liter tanks) can be acceptable to the mass taste, much as Budweiser is aimed at the big part of the market, think pre-sized sails that are off the rack.

If you want a wine from well known varietals (Pinot, Cabernet, Chardonnay) from a well known location (Napa, Sonoma, Bordeaux....) it will cost, just as buying a name brand sail. 

The handmade wines from smaller wineries can be great, and can be very stylized, sort of like going to your local loft and hoping that their knowledge, skill and passion is a good bet. 

 

 

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1 hour ago, LionessRacing said:

As a former vintner... Good is a relative term, as tastes vary so much. 

many bulk process (think > 100k liter tanks) can be acceptable to the mass taste, much as Budweiser is aimed at the big part of the market, think pre-sized sails that are off the rack.

If you want a wine from well known varietals (Pinot, Cabernet, Chardonnay) from a well known location (Napa, Sonoma, Bordeaux....) it will cost, just as buying a name brand sail. 

The handmade wines from smaller wineries can be great, and can be very stylized, sort of like going to your local loft and hoping that their knowledge, skill and passion is a good bet. 

 

 

Sure, but a well made sail can last a very long time. A well made wine, just like the cheap stuff, will turn to piss in a few hours.

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Try the Bogle brand.  Usually a decent bit of juice for cheep. 

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Wife went to Aldis and brought home a $2.89 bottle of Winking Owl Merlot. Used half of it to braise some short ribs. I drank the rest. I was pleasantly surprised. It tastes like a $6 bottle. 

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11 hours ago, chinabald said:

Wife went to Aldis and brought home a $2.89 bottle of Winking Owl Merlot. Used half of it to braise some short ribs. I drank the rest. I was pleasantly surprised. It tastes like a $6 bottle. 

Especially if you run it through an aerator.  Then it's like a $6.50 or so.

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parents used to be the gallon jug gallo sippers... when I came over for dinner i'd bring a bottle of wine,  they'd complain that I was snooty with my $10 bottle of wine..    years later after upgrading their palate to something better, I brought over a nice aussie syrah, when a lot of the aussie wineriers started moving to screw caps...   my parents were like,  we don't drink wine from screw top bottles..   fine , I'll drink it myself..

 

also, find a decent bottle shop , make friends with the people in the wine dept and tell them your preferences, they'll help you out and even give you a call when something nice is available..

 

 

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14 hours ago, pbd said:

Try the Bogle brand.  Usually a decent bit of juice for cheep. 

I picked up a bottle of their Petit Syrah that was awful. We had part of one glass each and the rest went into a pot of bolognese sauce. 

We've got a Total Wine store nearby. The best cheap reds I've found lately are Brisa, a Chilean Carmenere $8, and Third Wheel, a $9 California table wine,

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10 minutes ago, dreaded said:

parents used to be the gallon jug gallo sippers... when I came over for dinner i'd bring a bottle of wine,  they'd complain that I was snooty with my $10 bottle of wine..    years later after upgrading their palate to something better, I brought over a nice aussie syrah, when a lot of the aussie wineriers started moving to screw caps...   my parents were like,  we don't drink wine from screw top bottles..   fine , I'll drink it myself..

 

also, find a decent bottle shop , make friends with the people in the wine dept and tell them your preferences, they'll help you out and even give you a call when something nice is available..

 

 

Good advice here. Most shops have an interest in repeat business so they want to match you with wines you'll enjoy in your price range. Downside is as your palate develops it will lure you to the wine rathole and soon you'll find yourself with more wine than you need.......you can tell you're approaching the abyss when you hear yourself say "how much is a case of that". One thing to be aware of is the remarkable difference in people's preferences that have little to do with the quality of any specific wine. It's what tastes good to you.

The screw top is interesting, some very good wines have toyed with screw tops. It's actuallly a superior closure to cork. But it hasn't caught on and I completely understand why. Some amount of the enjoyment is the process. I prefer cork because I like the whole schtick that goes with opening, decantanting, and pouring. It's an illness......and not a cheap one........

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17 hours ago, Mismoyled Jiblet. said:

Disagree. I think the decent cheap (<=$10) Malbec in the US ship sailed 10 years ago. Argentine inflation coupled with ywine industry trends killed that off.

I know you are out in the country Austin (and I have no clue about Illinois liquor laws), but the best way to find reliable decent wine was to find a decent independent wine shop. They'd have stuff at $10-25/bottle from places that weren't yet names but looking to make it, and the shop would chose what would sell. This was the kind of place http://www.vintageberkeley.com/ small production, under $25 bottle. The only bottle I remember not being enjoyable they warned about, because it was a strange Italian sparkling dry red wine. I'd think there might be that kind of place in Chicago?

I had to go into Chicago last week. I'm sure there are great wine shops but I couldn't get out of the city fast enough. Yes, it's beautiful but as I get older, the crowds, noise and traffic drive me batshit crazy. Weird since I'd hop the train all the time as a kid and go wander around the city.

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Where I live 8 bucks or  100 rands will buy you excellent wine, probably as good or better than some 30 dollar wine in your part if the world. 

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1 hour ago, Point Break said:

Good advice here. Most shops have an interest in repeat business so they want to match you with wines you'll enjoy in your price range. Downside is as your palate develops it will lure you to the wine rathole and soon you'll find yourself with more wine than you need.......you can tell you're approaching the abyss when you hear yourself say "how much is a case of that". One thing to be aware of is the remarkable difference in people's preferences that have little to do with the quality of any specific wine. It's what tastes good to you.

The screw top is interesting, some very good wines have toyed with screw tops. It's actuallly a superior closure to cork. But it hasn't caught on and I completely understand why. Some amount of the enjoyment is the process. I prefer cork because I like the whole schtick that goes with opening, decantanting, and pouring. It's an illness......and not a cheap one........

had a roommate who was a beer and highball drinker.. I had gotten back into drinking wine, one night he was ,"watcha drinking there?"   gave him a taste and he was hooked.. a couple of years later after he got married he had a 300 bottle breezer in the living room and cases around the house that his kids would use to build forts..  he had about 4 -5 different wine guys on speed dieal when something good came in..  those 4 - 5 guys were rarely wrong..

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29 minutes ago, dreaded said:

had a roommate who was a beer and highball drinker.. I had gotten back into drinking wine, one night he was ,"watcha drinking there?"   gave him a taste and he was hooked.. a couple of years later after he got married he had a 300 bottle breezer in the living room and cases around the house that his kids would use to build forts..  he had about 4 -5 different wine guys on speed dieal when something good came in..  those 4 - 5 guys were rarely wrong..

:lol:

After a wine tasting trip with some friends to Napa that I thought would be boring, in 10 years I went from........wine? No, I don't drink much wine..............to this..........

 

IMG_0165_zpsivarr3rd.jpg

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The chilean La Moneda Reserva’s Malbec costs about $7 a bottle and was considered by the Decanter magazine one of the best wines in the world.

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7 hours ago, Point Break said:

Good advice here. Most shops have an interest in repeat business so they want to match you with wines you'll enjoy in your price range. Downside is as your palate develops it will lure you to the wine rathole and soon you'll find yourself with more wine than you need.......you can tell you're approaching the abyss when you hear yourself say "how much is a case of that". One thing to be aware of is the remarkable difference in people's preferences that have little to do with the quality of any specific wine. It's what tastes good to you.

The screw top is interesting, some very good wines have toyed with screw tops. It's actuallly a superior closure to cork. But it hasn't caught on and I completely understand why. Some amount of the enjoyment is the process. I prefer cork because I like the whole schtick that goes with opening, decantanting, and pouring. It's an illness......and not a cheap one........

The screwtop hasn't caught on as much in the US, and France. The US I think has a bias against "screw tops being cheap" or something - I think it's the same mentality that let upstate NY's crappy weak "Chablis" destroy the rep in the U.S. of an actual proper Chablis from France (more for the rest of us, I'd say...back when I could drink that regularly). The French...are French. They probably have a law against screwtops and very strict rules regarding the specific nature of the corks you can use if you want certain quality marks on your label.

You can't hardly buy a bottle of wine in Australia (or NZ) with a cork in it. We drove out to wine country, bought and tasted some very nice wines that ranged into the fairly pricey. All of them were screw tops, every last one. We came back with a couple of hundred bucks worth of delightful wines in screw top bottles.

Sadly, I went down the wine rathole years ago. Even been wine tasting in Burgundy and the Loire valley a couple of times; great fun. Then, when we decided to go cruising, it occurred to us that routinely cracking open $15-$20 bottles of wine was a patently stupid way to be saving money. So we implemented the "$10 Rule" (at the time) and started the hunt for good drinkable wine under $10/bottle. Now, since actively cruising that's more like the "$5 Rule" (or 5 Euro, $8 NZD, 600 XPF, etc. depending on locale). We only buy the really good stuff now when we visit wineries.

So I've had to de-tune the palate quite a bit...though we did find a surprisingly drinkable box wine (recommended by a French/Polish couple we met) here in Oz for $15 AUD for a 5L box. For the slow at math, at today's exchange rate  that works out to ~$1.68/bottle...

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This is building out to be a nice list! I will try each recommendation that I can find. I have some built-ins that will work well as a display/storage spot (it's a craftsman style house form the 1920s). Think something like the below. My phone won't talk to my computer so I can't post actual photos.

f0142d1bc5e88b9a85cfa6c2c663945b--crafts

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39 minutes ago, austin1972 said:

This is building out to be a nice list! I will try each recommendation that I can find. I have some built-ins that will work well as a display/storage spot (it's a craftsman style house form the 1920s). Think something like the below. My phone won't talk to my computer so I can't post actual photos.

f0142d1bc5e88b9a85cfa6c2c663945b--crafts

Nice! I'm guessing you don't have space in there for a box of my $12 Aussie rotgut...

If you have an Android, there are many easy apps to allow a direct connection from phone to PC via WiFi to move files. Basically they set the phone up as a mini FTP/Web server and let you browse and download across your local net.

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If I'm not mistaken, even Penfolds has largely gone over to screw tops, including for Grange. As related by a collector friend in Aus, they split one year's vintage between corks and crew tops and found that the acre too was better at excluding oxygen (duh) and that had some effect on how the wine aged but generally.any Aussies able to say if current release Grange (2012 vintage) is cork or screw top?  Just finished 7 years of paying college bills so haven't had a nice Grange in the house for far too long  

like you, BJ, we have had to recalibrate the "screw top means cheap and nasty" bias and now buy what's good to drink 

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Italy is the last bastion of really drinkable, really cheap, wine available in North America.

If you like full bodied reds, try any Nero d'Avola.  I don't think I've ever seen a bottle for sale higher than $10, the problem is what's available near you.

 

Ugh, try to find a decent cheap wine in Milaukee that doesn't have Door County cherries in it.......Think I ended up in Madison trying to satiate my wine fix one afternoon.

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11 minutes ago, Dilligaf0220 said:

Italy is the last bastion of really drinkable, really cheap, wine available in North America.

If you like full bodied reds, try any Nero d'Avola.  I don't think I've ever seen a bottle for sale higher than $10, the problem is what's available near you.

 

Ugh, try to find a decent cheap wine in Milaukee that doesn't have Door County cherries in it.......Think I ended up in Madison trying to satiate my wine fix one afternoon.

Not wine. But spent the weekend in your neck of the woods and was introduced to spotted cow beer. That wasn't bad. 

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12 minutes ago, chinabald said:

Not wine. But spent the weekend in your neck of the woods and was introduced to spotted cow beer. That wasn't bad. 

I don't live there, just spent time there working last summer.

Best part about Wisconsin...Spotted Cow is thier Budweiser, it's only uphill from there (my personal fav is the bourbon barrel aged Scotch Ale's...and the microbrews in pretty much every hamlet.  Seriously, try anything from Central Waters Brewery.)

Worst part about Wisconsin...trying to find a decent wine under $10 when you are on beer overload, lol.  Finally found a wine shop that had a booth in the Milwaukee farmers market.  Ended up buying a case of Montelpulciano...and a case of Grigio.

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47 minutes ago, B.J. Porter said:

Nice! I'm guessing you don't have space in there for a box of my $12 Aussie rotgut...

If you have an Android, there are many easy apps to allow a direct connection from phone to PC via WiFi to move files. Basically they set the phone up as a mini FTP/Web server and let you browse and download across your local net.

Sure I do. If there's one thing I am definitely not hurting for it's storage. I have 6 built-ins and 4 walk in closets. One closet even turns a corner. I have no idea what they were thinking but based on the history I know, real estate taxes used to be based on the number of rooms and closets counted as a room. So, old houses had wardrobes instead of closets. I think that changed at the turn of the century and maybe it was a big selling point.

I don't let my Droid talk to my 'puter because Win10/Cortana always wants to put it on it's cloud. I don't trust MSFT because their apps are so forceful about the whole thing.

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9 minutes ago, Dilligaf0220 said:

I don't live there, just spent time there working last summer.

Best part about Wisconsin...Spotted Cow is thier Budweiser, it's only uphill from there (my personal fav is the bourbon barrel aged Scotch Ale's...and the microbrews in pretty much every hamlet.  Seriously, try anything from Central Waters Brewery.)

Worst part about Wisconsin...trying to find a decent wine under $10 when you are on beer overload, lol.  Finally found a wine shop that had a booth in the Milwaukee farmers market.  Ended up buying a case of Montelpulciano...and a case of Grigio.

Spotted Cow is very good. Bells Two Hearted and Oberon are great beers (Michigan though). At least you can get Bells in IL. New Glarus only provides the Sconnies in Cheeseland.

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6 minutes ago, austin1972 said:

Spotted Cow is very good. Bells Two Hearted and Oberon are great beers (Michigan though).

Oh hell you can't swing a dead cat in Wisconsin without finding a very good beer.  Spotted Cow is...fine...but New Glarus puts out A LOT better beers.  Their limited edition stuff is top level stuff, lol even in Wisconsin.  If you like Spotted Cow, try to find some Spotted Cow Grand Cru.  Crazy good.

 

582e31893f17e.image.jpg?resize=1200,1181

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59 minutes ago, austin1972 said:

Sure I do. If there's one thing I am definitely not hurting for it's storage. I have 6 built-ins and 4 walk in closets. One closet even turns a corner. I have no idea what they were thinking but based on the history I know, real estate taxes used to be based on the number of rooms and closets counted as a room. So, old houses had wardrobes instead of closets. I think that changed at the turn of the century and maybe it was a big selling point.

I don't let my Droid talk to my 'puter because Win10/Cortana always wants to put it on it's cloud. I don't trust MSFT because their apps are so forceful about the whole thing.

That's the beauty of the Wifi transfer Apps - your computer will never know it's there. Just connect both to your home Wifi, and your phone looks like another web site with files on it.

I don't have that problem with Win 10 on mine, but I lobotomized Cortana straight off.

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2 minutes ago, B.J. Porter said:

That's the beauty of the Wifi transfer Apps - your computer will never know it's there. Just connect both to your home Wifi, and your phone looks like another web site with files on it.

I don't have that problem with Win 10 on mine, but I lobotomized Cortana straight off.

 

Nice. I guess I'm gonna do the Googles tomorrow.

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53 minutes ago, Dilligaf0220 said:

Oh hell you can't swing a dead cat in Wisconsin without finding a very good beer.  Spotted Cow is...fine...but New Glarus puts out A LOT better beers.  Their limited edition stuff is top level stuff, lol even in Wisconsin.  If you like Spotted Cow, try to find some Spotted Cow Grand Cru.  Crazy good.

 

582e31893f17e.image.jpg?resize=1200,1181

I really enjoy a Summer Shandy after mowing the lawn on a hot day.

In college, I pretty much drank Rhinelander. It was $4 a case for returnable bottles. Man that stuff sucked.

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37 minutes ago, austin1972 said:

I really enjoy a Summer Shandy after mowing the lawn on a hot day.

In college, I pretty much drank Rhinelander. It was $4 a case for returnable bottles. Man that stuff sucked.

Lol Rhinelander was bought out by an East Indian family from Toronto, they have the big brewery in Monroe.  No the beer hasn't gotten any better, but it still ain't PBR.

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Wine is like boats.

There's good and there's cheap. Pick one.

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Well there's always the REALLY cheap option...make your own from juice.

Or fruit.

 

I have 5 gallons of lemon wine fermenting in the basement, should be ready for the weekend.  Don't think I'll submit it to the Wine Spectator, but I won't have to worry about any left over either.

 

Skeeter Pee

 

100_0501.jpg

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11 hours ago, Dilligaf0220 said:

Lol Rhinelander was bought out by an East Indian family from Toronto, they have the big brewery in Monroe.  No the beer hasn't gotten any better, but it still ain't PBR.

I assume you are referring to brother and sister Ravinder and Manjit Minhas.

Manjit is one good looking woman: https://www.google.ca/search?q=pictures+manjit+minhas&safe=active&tbm=isch&imgil=7hZCIK-DN041-M%3A%3BJNLHflu5MgGLFM%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.vancitybuzz.com%252F2015%252F10%252Fdragons-den-manjit-minhas-interview%252F&source=iu&pf=m&fir=7hZCIK-DN041-M%3A%2CJNLHflu5MgGLFM%2C_&usg=__16ch11m8l4IscwEq1vxjyoFPut4%3D&biw=1034&bih=847&ved=0ahUKEwjntIXAp-PUAhUM0mMKHR0jCzwQyjcIPg&ei=fxRVWaf5CYykjwOdxqzgAw#imgrc=7hZCIK-DN041-M:

 

east indian?  what is this 1975? ^_^

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so what's that special bottle y'all are hanging on to?   I have '85 Mondavi Cab special reserve... , it's probably going down hill by now.. I'm just needing a good excuse to drink it..   maybe watch sideways again..

wine tours:  did one in nappa with a small tour company while my wife was in meetings..    me, the guide, and this gay couple from kansas city..  guide took us to some great small wineries..   so if you've never been on a tour , places usually start you off with a white wine sample and work their way up to their best red..   couple were into white wines only.. so by the last red , they were tossing most of the sample into the bucket..  by the end of the tour I was ready  to kill them..  dammit, that was a $80 bottle  red you just tossed you hosers..    had a lot of fun..  if you ever tour, find a small tour company instead of those buses, you'll visit better wineries and have a better time, btw  cops in wine country just love looking for dwi's

 

 

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23 hours ago, nimroods said:

Cheap wine, take your pick.  And don't forget the brown bag to bring out the true character of the lot # vintage.

tl-horizontal_main.jpg

No Ripple?

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15 hours ago, chinabald said:

Not wine. But spent the weekend in your neck of the woods and was introduced to spotted cow beer. That wasn't bad. 

New Glarus makes some great beers.  Got a mixed 12-pack in the fridge right now.

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1 hour ago, dreaded said:

 

so what's that special bottle y'all are hanging on to?   I have '85 Mondavi Cab special reserve... , it's probably going down hill by now.. I'm just needing a good excuse to drink it..   maybe watch sideways again..

wine tours:  did one in nappa with a small tour company while my wife was in meetings..    me, the guide, and this gay couple from kansas city..  guide took us to some great small wineries..   so if you've never been on a tour , places usually start you off with a white wine sample and work their way up to their best red..   couple were into white wines only.. so by the last red , they were tossing most of the sample into the bucket..  by the end of the tour I was ready  to kill them..  dammit, that was a $80 bottle  red you just tossed you hosers..    had a lot of fun..  if you ever tour, find a small tour company instead of those buses, you'll visit better wineries and have a better time, btw  cops in wine country just love looking for dwi's

 

 

I probably would have said, "If you're not gonna drink that I'll take it. I'm not proud!"

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So nobody mentions the Bota Box Malbec?  It's a couple bucks cheaper and just as good or better as the Black Box Malbec, under $20 and it's got a spigot and good for a month, since I am really into craft beers (just finished a trip with a visit to Empire in Cazenovia NY - awesome brews) it allows me to have a decent red with dinner whenever I want. 

Screw wine tours, the craft brewers are doing some awesome stuff and they are everywhere.  I have become a beer snob but could never tell the difference between a decent red and a pricey one, lots of crappy wines though.  Don't fear the box.

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2 hours ago, bplipschitz said:

No Ripple?

Nahh. Even since the Grateful Dead gave it notoriety it has crept up a few rungs on the ladder. But I do suggest one still searches out the low Lot # for the best vintage. That is it hasn't turned to paint thinner by then.

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4 hours ago, dreaded said:

 

so what's that special bottle y'all are hanging on to?   I have '85 Mondavi Cab special reserve... , it's probably going down hill by now.. I'm just needing a good excuse to drink it..   maybe watch sideways again..

wine tours:  did one in nappa with a small tour company while my wife was in meetings..    me, the guide, and this gay couple from kansas city..  guide took us to some great small wineries..   so if you've never been on a tour , places usually start you off with a white wine sample and work their way up to their best red..   couple were into white wines only.. so by the last red , they were tossing most of the sample into the bucket..  by the end of the tour I was ready  to kill them..  dammit, that was a $80 bottle  red you just tossed you hosers..    had a lot of fun..  if you ever tour, find a small tour company instead of those buses, you'll visit better wineries and have a better time, btw  cops in wine country just love looking for dwi's

 

 

85? If its a regular format (750) toss it............too late now. Even if its not vinegar by now it won't be....good.

 

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1 hour ago, d'ranger said:

So nobody mentions the Bota Box Malbec?  It's a couple bucks cheaper and just as good or better as the Black Box Malbec, under $20 and it's got a spigot and good for a month, since I am really into craft beers (just finished a trip with a visit to Empire in Cazenovia NY - awesome brews) it allows me to have a decent red with dinner whenever I want. 

Screw wine tours, the craft brewers are doing some awesome stuff and they are everywhere.  I have become a beer snob but could never tell the difference between a decent red and a pricey one, lots of crappy wines though.  Don't fear the box.

One of my sons-in-law is a brewer doing a new Belgian sour beer program for a pretty successful craft brewery here locally. He is about 2 years into the production and just getting the first of the beer out of the barrels. I'm not much of a beer guy anymore (I drink a couple beers a week at most, almost always with a meal that just screams BEER! I drink much more wine.) but I do like his sours a bit. Pretty interesting stuff. His wife (our daughter) is way into it as well and is working as the front person for the local guild of craft brewery's.......wish I drank more beer but............

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1 hour ago, d'ranger said:

Screw wine tours, the craft brewers are doing some awesome stuff and they are everywhere.  I have become a beer snob but could never tell the difference between a decent red and a pricey one, lots of crappy wines though.  Don't fear the box.

Yeah, I've been doing craft beers for awhile. I used to drink some wine but kinda fell out of it until I needed to saute some mushrooms for a rare+ steak and decided to have a glass. I forgot how much I like red wine but I have no idea what I'm doing and don't want to spend heavy drug user money on an assumption that if it's expensive then it must be good.

I'd like to keep the prices in the same range as a decent 6 pack of beer like 3 Floyds Gumballhead, Lagunitas 'Lil Sumpin', Bells Two Hearted, Founders Breakfast Stout etc. Just kind of sick of beer but I don't think anyone wants me completely sober. I'd be a pretentious dick.

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1 hour ago, d'ranger said:

Screw wine tours, the craft brewers are doing some awesome stuff and they are everywhere.  I have become a beer snob but could never tell the difference between a decent red and a pricey one, lots of crappy wines though.  Don't fear the box.

Find something cool like these guys passport days http://scmwa.com/ On them a ton of winerys open up that are rarely open to the public, some of them run out of their garage, making good enjoyable wine with pretty unpretentious people. It's not the mega-tasting room where the staff grimaces as yet another bus of drunks in manblouses and miniblouses disgorges. In some ways wine is less pretentious than some of the douchefests that are great craft beer releases ("oooohhh I can wait in line for an hour to wait in line for another 15 minutes to get a glass of Pliny the Younger")

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5 hours ago, Mismoyled Jiblet. said:

Find something cool like these guys passport days http://scmwa.com/ On them a ton of winerys open up that are rarely open to the public, some of them run out of their garage, making good enjoyable wine with pretty unpretentious people. It's not the mega-tasting room where the staff grimaces as yet another bus of drunks in manblouses and miniblouses disgorges. In some ways wine is less pretentious than some of the douchefests that are great craft beer releases ("oooohhh I can wait in line for an hour to wait in line for another 15 minutes to get a glass of Pliny the Younger")

More like Pliny the Dickhead.  The beer geeks are just too over the top for me, and I've been a homebrewer for > 30 years.  As far as MI beer goes, Shorts Lager is ass-kickingly good.

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On 6/29/2017 at 8:55 AM, B.J. Porter said:

The screwtop hasn't caught on as much in the US, and France. The US I think has a bias against "screw tops being cheap" or something - I think it's the same mentality that let upstate NY's crappy weak "Chablis" destroy the rep in the U.S. of an actual proper Chablis from France (more for the rest of us, I'd say...back when I could drink that regularly). The French...are French. They probably have a law against screwtops and very strict rules regarding the specific nature of the corks you can use if you want certain quality marks on your label.

You can't hardly buy a bottle of wine in Australia (or NZ) with a cork in it. We drove out to wine country, bought and tasted some very nice wines that ranged into the fairly pricey. All of them were screw tops, every last one. We came back with a couple of hundred bucks worth of delightful wines in screw top bottles.

Sadly, I went down the wine rathole years ago. Even been wine tasting in Burgundy and the Loire valley a couple of times; great fun. Then, when we decided to go cruising, it occurred to us that routinely cracking open $15-$20 bottles of wine was a patently stupid way to be saving money. So we implemented the "$10 Rule" (at the time) and started the hunt for good drinkable wine under $10/bottle. Now, since actively cruising that's more like the "$5 Rule" (or 5 Euro, $8 NZD, 600 XPF, etc. depending on locale). We only buy the really good stuff now when we visit wineries.

So I've had to de-tune the palate quite a bit...though we did find a surprisingly drinkable box wine (recommended by a French/Polish couple we met) here in Oz for $15 AUD for a 5L box. For the slow at math, at today's exchange rate  that works out to ~$1.68/bottle...

Well... don't leave us hanging like that.  

 

What's the Chateau Cardboard for $15 that's OK?

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36 minutes ago, scratchanut said:

Well... don't leave us hanging like that.  

 

What's the Chateau Cardboard for $15 that's OK?

These are...drinkable...for the money. When it got cold and damp down in NSW we mulled our fair share of the red stuff before we left.

If you're looking to find something for less that a few bucks a bottle that won't make you go blind, spoil the taste of what you are eating, or turn your tongue purple - these two meet that fairly humble set of criteria for an every day wine.

We kept a bottle from some nice wine and refill it from the white, since we don't have room for a big box in the boat fridge.

 

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14 hours ago, Point Break said:

85? If its a regular format (750) toss it............too late now. Even if its not vinegar by now it won't be....good.

 

I wouldn't be so hasty.  Mondavi produced some wonderful wines.  If it is a 'special reserve' it is probably one of their better wines.  Back in the '80s California wineries were still making classic, Old World style reds that were made to age, and not the fruit forward, made to drink now style that is so prevalent in California.   A well made wine from great grapes from a good vintage, if stored properly, should have no problem lasting 30 years.

I have drank plenty of 30-50 year old wine from no-name chateaus in Bordeaux and Burgundy that were very nice.  Maybe about 1 in 10 or so were dead and not drinkable, but the rest ranged from drinkable to outstanding.  The really, really good wines from Bordeaux aren't even drinkable until they are 25-30 years old.  One of the best wines I have ever drank was a 70 year old Burgundy, from the 1920s, it was incredible.

In my experience most very old wines don''t usually turn to vinegar, they just either fade away to nothing, get extremely oxidized or acquire other unpleasant flavors.  

I would open the old Mondavi soon and it might be a wonderful experience.  Just be aware that old wines develop unique 'aged' flavors that aren't like a younger wine.

 

When it comes to inexpensive reds, I don't think you can beat a Rioja.  I have had many Riojas priced from 5-10$ a bottle that drank far better than their price and the $30-$40 ones are outstanding.  I have rarely had a Rioja that wasn't at least good.

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Principe de Butera from Italy.  Nero d'Avola grape.  Just picked up a case for $155usd.

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1 hour ago, soak_ed said:

I wouldn't be so hasty.  Mondavi produced some wonderful wines.  If it is a 'special reserve' it is probably one of their better wines.  Back in the '80s California wineries were still making classic, Old World style reds that were made to age, and not the fruit forward, made to drink now style that is so prevalent in California.   A well made wine from great grapes from a good vintage, if stored properly, should have no problem lasting 30 years.

I have drank plenty of 30-50 year old wine from no-name chateaus in Bordeaux and Burgundy that were very nice.  Maybe about 1 in 10 or so were dead and not drinkable, but the rest ranged from drinkable to outstanding.  The really, really good wines from Bordeaux aren't even drinkable until they are 25-30 years old.  One of the best wines I have ever drank was a 70 year old Burgundy, from the 1920s, it was incredible.

In my experience most very old wines don''t usually turn to vinegar, they just either fade away to nothing, get extremely oxidized or acquire other unpleasant flavors.  

I would open the old Mondavi soon and it might be a wonderful experience.  Just be aware that old wines develop unique 'aged' flavors that aren't like a younger wine.

 

When it comes to inexpensive reds, I don't think you can beat a Rioja.  I have had many Riojas priced from 5-10$ a bottle that drank far better than their price and the $30-$40 ones are outstanding.  I have rarely had a Rioja that wasn't at least good.

Help me understand this - I've made a few barrels of wine, but, have only been at it about 10 years or so.  Mine are all really raw until they've been sitting about a year, and at that point, they've been passably OK.  I let a bottle sit for 5 years, and it tasted bland in comparison to the "last year's batch".   I have to admit that I've only ever once paid more than $60 for a bottle of wine (I bought one in Belluno, Italy at a little restaurant, that was supposed to be the "Pinnacle of Friuli reds") and it was OK, but, nothing noticeably wonderful.   SO - what makes a wine that old so much better?  what makes some OK, and others seem to fade in taste and intensity? 

 

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1 hour ago, A guy in the Chesapeake said:

Help me understand this - I've made a few barrels of wine, but, have only been at it about 10 years or so.  Mine are all really raw until they've been sitting about a year, and at that point, they've been passably OK.  I let a bottle sit for 5 years, and it tasted bland in comparison to the "last year's batch".   I have to admit that I've only ever once paid more than $60 for a bottle of wine (I bought one in Belluno, Italy at a little restaurant, that was supposed to be the "Pinnacle of Friuli reds") and it was OK, but, nothing noticeably wonderful.   SO - what makes a wine that old so much better?  what makes some OK, and others seem to fade in taste and intensity? 

 

It's not a simple explanation but it is a combination of factors in the vineyard and wine making. The type of grape, when it's picked in its maturation cycle which controls the ratios of sugars, acids and other compounds to the water in the fruit, the skin contact time which increases tannins that impact aging.......when they say the "wine was built to age" it's all those factors. Usually buying the ability to control/measure by the home wine maker. "Aging" for homemade wines usually means getting it past the overwhelming "fruity" stage which takes 6 months to a year in most cases (or so I've read). I've not made wine at home but have really enjoyed chatting with winemakers during extended tastings about their craft and have asked that very question of many of them.

By the way......the vast majority of wine is made to be consumed soon after bottling and does not benefit from aging.

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3 hours ago, Point Break said:

 

By the way......the vast majority of wine is made to be consumed soon after bottling and does not benefit from aging.

That's good to know. I can see myself going through 2 bottles/week based on how fast that red went. What is a bottle, like 4 glasses?

So a glass with dinner and using a little in cooking would pin me at 2/week. More if I'm cooking for friends who like wine.

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28 minutes ago, austin1972 said:

That's good to know. I can see myself going through 2 bottles/week based on how fast that red went. What is a bottle, like 4 glasses?

So a glass with dinner and using a little in cooking would pin me at 2/week. More if I'm cooking for friends who like wine.

A 750 ml bottle (standard size) will generally produce 4 nice glasses. 

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5 hours ago, A guy in the Chesapeake said:

Help me understand this - I've made a few barrels of wine, but, have only been at it about 10 years or so.  Mine are all really raw until they've been sitting about a year, and at that point, they've been passably OK.  I let a bottle sit for 5 years, and it tasted bland in comparison to the "last year's batch".   I have to admit that I've only ever once paid more than $60 for a bottle of wine (I bought one in Belluno, Italy at a little restaurant, that was supposed to be the "Pinnacle of Friuli reds") and it was OK, but, nothing noticeably wonderful.   SO - what makes a wine that old so much better?  what makes some OK, and others seem to fade in taste and intensity? 

 

PB is right.  First thing to know is you will never make good wine from bad grapes.  White wines to me are rarely interesting so I will focus on red wines. The best wines have been grown in the types of soils that will help the grapes achieve their potential.  The best soils are rather dry, with good drainage and some of the best vineyards in Bordeaux have very rocky soil, mostly limestone.  It is said that if the vines struggle they tend to produce better grapes although the yields are low.  Sun is important, not enough and the grapes don't produce enough sugar, too much and the sugar level is high, creating high alcohol wines.  Grapes can also get burned in strong sunlight.  Too much rain and the grapes will have too much water, diluting the sugar and other compounds in the grape.  The best wine growing region in California is Napa Valley which has the cooling effect from the cold Pacific and frequent fog and clouds which helps to keep some of the sun away.  Also much of the soil there is rocky.  Many Cali wines from the southern parts of the state are high in alcohol because of the long, sunny days there.  The next thing is the components of the grape.  There are many compounds and flavors but the 2 most important things are the tannin levels and the acid levels.  Tannin occurs in the grape, the seeds and the stems.  Tannin produces an astringency which creates that drying sensation in the mouth, acid helps to cut through the fruitiness and gives the wine some 'zing'. Too much of either of these things can be unpleasant.   

Once a wine has been fermented dry, that is to say all of the sugar has been turned into alcohol, it is left to age in the barrel for varying lengths of time.  Barrels can be new or used and barrels from different parts of the world have different characteristics.  Oak barrels also have tannin in them.  New barrels can impart an oak flavor but not always.  After about 3 uses, the barrel is considered neutral, that is, it won't impart any flavor to the wine.  Due to the nature of the barrel, air reacts with the wine causing different chemical reactions to occur. The barrel  has a bit of an effect on softening the rough edges on the wine, usually barrels are charred inside anywhere from very lightly to heavily and this acts as a kind of filter.  After the wine is bottled, the aging process continues, cork allows a small amount of air into the bottle and this allows the chemical reactions to continue.  Modern screw caps, such as a 'Stelvin Closure' are often engineered to also allow a small amount of air in the bottle although they might look just like the cap on a bottle of Ripple, they aren't the same.

The bottom line is wine is a living thing.  It will continue to develop and change as time goes on. The best reds at the time of bottling are very tannic and very acidic.  With time, the tannins mellow and the acidity calms down, and while both are still noticeable, they are at a level that is perceived as pleasant.  Other things also happen and with some time, usually about 6-10 years, secondary flavors and aromas develop.  Sometimes there is often an unpleasant, frequently sulfurous smell immediately noticeable when opening an old wine.  Don't despair, this often goes away after a few minutes.  Some of the smells associated with old wines are cedar, tobacco and leather.  Like a good single malt, if people are used to drinking fruity, fresh tasting wines, it might take a little time to get used to the flavors of an older wine.

Because wine is always evolving and is a natural product, things can happen.  Although the best wines are made to age for 40-50 years or more, bad things can happen to any wine.  The bottling process should be as clean as possible to keep bacteria that can ruin a wine on the bottle, away. Sulfite is added to wine as a preservative, there are sulfite free wines but most wines have it, a small amount of sulfite is naturally present in all grapes.   A common flaw in wines is called 'corked'.  There is a chemical compound in some corks called TCA which gets into the wine and produces a distinct smell, often described as wet cardboard or a band aid.  It isn't pleasant and once you smell it, you will never forget it.  Some people are very sensitive to the smell, others won't notice it as much.  Another bad thing that can happen is 'Brett' which is the Brettanomyces fungus which produces a 'barnyard' smell.  Some people like a touch of Brett in their wine, a lot will render the wine undrinkable.  Prolonged exposure to heat is another bottle killer, the higher the heat, the greater the damage.  There is no real offensive flavor associated with a 'cooked' wine, it is just usually flat and unremarkable tasting.  If a wine cooler or a cool cellar isn't possible to store wine, then a place in the home away from heat and sunlight is the best.  The biggest key is to try to keep the wine at a steady, cool temperature with little fluctuation.  

In my opinion, a well made red wine is a thing of beauty, to be sipped slowly and appreciated.  Wines high in acid tend to be good with food, especially meat as the acid helps to cut through the fat in the meat.  My preference for really good wine is to drink it alone without any other flavors to interfere.  Although price is a good indicator when buying wine, the best wine is one you enjoy drinking. Remember wines in restaurants are marked up 2-3 times the retail price!  Many restaurants will allow you to bring your own wine for a 'corkage' fee, usually $10-$15, which covers their trouble for providing glasses and opening the wine for you.  If you bring a good wine and share a little with the staff, sometimes they will waive the fee.

The best way to learn to appreciate wine is to try a lot of different wins and remember which grapes taste like what, look for variations in the same grape from different areas, etc.  It is fun and interesting to get the same wine from different years from the same winery to get an idea of how age affects the taste.  Every vintage is different but it is a good way to see how the wine develops.  Or you can buy several bottles of a wine you like and open one each year to see the difference.  

I mentioned earlier that price is a good way to identify a god wine however, there are inexpensive wines that can be very good and more expensive wines that are not always worth the price.   I have drank wine from the best Chateaux in Bordeaux, bottles that sell for $300-$400 and way higher, and they are generally very nice but honestly, to the average wine drinker it is pretty difficult to tell much difference in a bottle that costs over $100.00 a bottle.  Having said that, I do believe there is usually a big difference between a $10.00 bottle and a $50.00 bottle.

As one wine friend of mine says, the best way to learn about wine is to "Pull lots of corks and remember what you taste."   

Last but not least, when making your own wine it is best to stick to white wine. Red wines need to be barrel aged and due to the physics of surface area, it is really difficult to age red wines in a barrel smaller than about 50 gallons.  There are products available to add oak to a glass carboy, but there is no substitute for a real barrel.  Just about all white wines do very well in a glass carboy and the bottle.

 

 

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24 minutes ago, soak_ed said:

  As one wine friend of mine says, the best way to learn about wine is to "Pull lots of corks and remember what you taste."   

This will crack you up.......I took that so seriously, that when I put together my excel spreadsheet to track the wine in my cellar, I included a sheet where I keep a running list of every wine we have opened, and our impressions. It's interesting to watch our palate change over the years. Right now I have close to 900 bottles on that list. :lol:

People have accused me of being a bit OCD............

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8 minutes ago, Point Break said:

This will crack you up.......I took that so seriously, that when I put together my excel spreadsheet to track the wine in my cellar, I included a sheet where I keep a running list of every wine we have opened, and our impressions. It's interesting to watch our palate change over the years. Right now I have close to 900 bottles on that list. :lol:

People have accused me of being a bit OCD............

Sure that's a bit OCD :D.  But on the other hand, that's a good way to keep track of what you are drinking and what you like.  I am a little more easy going, the only time I ever took notes of what I drank was the night we opened the 3 bottles below, the cost of which at todays prices would buy a decent nice car.  I think I still have the notes somewhere, the one thing I remember was describing the '47 Cheval Blanc as "The perfect wine."Memorable.thumb.jpg.c8d80b2894014011a5f44f20a56d3b68.jpg

 

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24 minutes ago, Point Break said:

This will crack you up.......I took that so seriously, that when I put together my excel spreadsheet to track the wine in my cellar, I included a sheet where I keep a running list of every wine we have opened, and our impressions. It's interesting to watch our palate change over the years. Right now I have close to 900 bottles on that list. :lol:

People have accused me of being a bit OCD............

Not so odd -- we used to get together with (for the purpose of drinking reds), and kept a log book of what we thought.  It's fun to go through it, as each couple had control of the book for awhile.  It's a good way to remember which ones you liked, as you get into your third bottle of the night. . .

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On 06/29/2017 at 10:59 AM, chester said:

I assume you are referring to brother and sister Ravinder and Manjit Minhas.

east indian?  what is this 1975? ^_^

In Canada and Wisconsin, there's enough "indians" you need to be more specific, dot or feather.

The Minhas brewery in Monroe has tailored their market niche to the Rhinelander crowd, but nothing is really BAD.  I ended up buying two bottles of their $10 apple pie moonshine, which was surprisingly not horrible.  They do have a VERY limited selection of actually really quality beers only available at their store, but it's VERY limited.

 

I'm not sure why, but Hungarian Eger Bullsblood has been impossible to find.  I have the last bottle from a case of '91 that has just been giving me the evil eye lately.  I would've named that as my fav cheap wine, but Eger Bikaver I just can't find in two countries, two provinces and half a dozen states.  It's drinkable young, but ages VERY well.  10yrs is probably the peak.

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6 hours ago, bplipschitz said:

Not so odd -- we used to get together with (for the purpose of drinking reds), and kept a log book of what we thought.  It's fun to go through it, as each couple had control of the book for awhile.  It's a good way to remember which ones you liked, as you get into your third bottle of the night. . .

One thing that has been interesting is to track how our tastes really did change over the last 10 years or so.really the challenge is to find really good wine at moderate pricing. I've always said anybody can find great wine at huge prices, just as anybody can find passable wine that is inexpensive. Now finding a remarkable wine at reasonable cost.....that takes some effort. In order to be successful at that you really need to understand what characteristics you really like in wine.

its been fun.....and tasty......and expensive......

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17 hours ago, soak_ed said:

PB is right.  First thing to know is you will never make good wine from bad grapes.  White wines to me are rarely interesting so I will focus on red wines. The best wines have been grown in the types of soils that will help the grapes achieve their potential.  The best soils are rather dry, with good drainage and some of the best vineyards in Bordeaux have very rocky soil, mostly limestone.  It is said that if the vines struggle they tend to produce better grapes although the yields are low.  Sun is important, not enough and the grapes don't produce enough sugar, too much and the sugar level is high, creating high alcohol wines.  Grapes can also get burned in strong sunlight.  Too much rain and the grapes will have too much water, diluting the sugar and other compounds in the grape.  The best wine growing region in California is Napa Valley which has the cooling effect from the cold Pacific and frequent fog and clouds which helps to keep some of the sun away.  Also much of the soil there is rocky.  Many Cali wines from the southern parts of the state are high in alcohol because of the long, sunny days there.  The next thing is the components of the grape.  There are many compounds and flavors but the 2 most important things are the tannin levels and the acid levels.  Tannin occurs in the grape, the seeds and the stems.  Tannin produces an astringency which creates that drying sensation in the mouth, acid helps to cut through the fruitiness and gives the wine some 'zing'. Too much of either of these things can be unpleasant.   

Once a wine has been fermented dry, that is to say all of the sugar has been turned into alcohol, it is left to age in the barrel for varying lengths of time.  Barrels can be new or used and barrels from different parts of the world have different characteristics.  Oak barrels also have tannin in them.  New barrels can impart an oak flavor but not always.  After about 3 uses, the barrel is considered neutral, that is, it won't impart any flavor to the wine.  Due to the nature of the barrel, air reacts with the wine causing different chemical reactions to occur. The barrel  has a bit of an effect on softening the rough edges on the wine, usually barrels are charred inside anywhere from very lightly to heavily and this acts as a kind of filter.  After the wine is bottled, the aging process continues, cork allows a small amount of air into the bottle and this allows the chemical reactions to continue.  Modern screw caps, such as a 'Stelvin Closure' are often engineered to also allow a small amount of air in the bottle although they might look just like the cap on a bottle of Ripple, they aren't the same.

The bottom line is wine is a living thing.  It will continue to develop and change as time goes on. The best reds at the time of bottling are very tannic and very acidic.  With time, the tannins mellow and the acidity calms down, and while both are still noticeable, they are at a level that is perceived as pleasant.  Other things also happen and with some time, usually about 6-10 years, secondary flavors and aromas develop.  Sometimes there is often an unpleasant, frequently sulfurous smell immediately noticeable when opening an old wine.  Don't despair, this often goes away after a few minutes.  Some of the smells associated with old wines are cedar, tobacco and leather.  Like a good single malt, if people are used to drinking fruity, fresh tasting wines, it might take a little time to get used to the flavors of an older wine.

Because wine is always evolving and is a natural product, things can happen.  Although the best wines are made to age for 40-50 years or more, bad things can happen to any wine.  The bottling process should be as clean as possible to keep bacteria that can ruin a wine on the bottle, away. Sulfite is added to wine as a preservative, there are sulfite free wines but most wines have it, a small amount of sulfite is naturally present in all grapes.   A common flaw in wines is called 'corked'.  There is a chemical compound in some corks called TCA which gets into the wine and produces a distinct smell, often described as wet cardboard or a band aid.  It isn't pleasant and once you smell it, you will never forget it.  Some people are very sensitive to the smell, others won't notice it as much.  Another bad thing that can happen is 'Brett' which is the Brettanomyces fungus which produces a 'barnyard' smell.  Some people like a touch of Brett in their wine, a lot will render the wine undrinkable.  Prolonged exposure to heat is another bottle killer, the higher the heat, the greater the damage.  There is no real offensive flavor associated with a 'cooked' wine, it is just usually flat and unremarkable tasting.  If a wine cooler or a cool cellar isn't possible to store wine, then a place in the home away from heat and sunlight is the best.  The biggest key is to try to keep the wine at a steady, cool temperature with little fluctuation.  

In my opinion, a well made red wine is a thing of beauty, to be sipped slowly and appreciated.  Wines high in acid tend to be good with food, especially meat as the acid helps to cut through the fat in the meat.  My preference for really good wine is to drink it alone without any other flavors to interfere.  Although price is a good indicator when buying wine, the best wine is one you enjoy drinking. Remember wines in restaurants are marked up 2-3 times the retail price!  Many restaurants will allow you to bring your own wine for a 'corkage' fee, usually $10-$15, which covers their trouble for providing glasses and opening the wine for you.  If you bring a good wine and share a little with the staff, sometimes they will waive the fee.

The best way to learn to appreciate wine is to try a lot of different wins and remember which grapes taste like what, look for variations in the same grape from different areas, etc.  It is fun and interesting to get the same wine from different years from the same winery to get an idea of how age affects the taste.  Every vintage is different but it is a good way to see how the wine develops.  Or you can buy several bottles of a wine you like and open one each year to see the difference.  

I mentioned earlier that price is a good way to identify a god wine however, there are inexpensive wines that can be very good and more expensive wines that are not always worth the price.   I have drank wine from the best Chateaux in Bordeaux, bottles that sell for $300-$400 and way higher, and they are generally very nice but honestly, to the average wine drinker it is pretty difficult to tell much difference in a bottle that costs over $100.00 a bottle.  Having said that, I do believe there is usually a big difference between a $10.00 bottle and a $50.00 bottle.

As one wine friend of mine says, the best way to learn about wine is to "Pull lots of corks and remember what you taste."   

Last but not least, when making your own wine it is best to stick to white wine. Red wines need to be barrel aged and due to the physics of surface area, it is really difficult to age red wines in a barrel smaller than about 50 gallons.  There are products available to add oak to a glass carboy, but there is no substitute for a real barrel.  Just about all white wines do very well in a glass carboy and the bottle.

 

 

First Growthrs_zpsoqsx4xha.jpg

Haven't tried the middle one in that picture, though I don't recall the vintages I tried of the other two.

Haven't been to Bordeaux yet, a lot of my tasting in France was in Burgundy so I have a very big soft spot for the Côte d'Or wines.  I'm not as familiar with the Bordeaux wines.

But I like both whites and reds, and found some of my favorite whites that I can't afford to drink any more around there.

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This has been a great thread, thanks. We drink a fair amount of grocery store box wine. It's usually pretty good but nothing to brag about. I have liked most of the Bogle and Toasted Head that we've tried.

I try to find wine with a picture of a sailboat on the label. And I'm still looking for a good beer that comes in screw-off tops.

-DSK

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I have a friend who has always had horses, she and her mother have 9, all pets, none get ridden. When she comes over for dinner she always brings a red with a horse on the label , not a bad one yet so I don't say neigh to them. 

edit: last night at grocery they are blowing out the 1.5l Botas for 5 bucks, picked up a couple of the Cabs, seems a bit sweet for a Cab but certainly drinkable. Not the best nor the worst but I do love a bargain. 

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9 minutes ago, d'ranger said:

I have a friend who has always had horses, she and her mother have 9, all pets, none get ridden. When she comes over for dinner she always brings a red with a horse on the label , not a bad one yet so I don't say neigh to them. 

edit: last night at grocery they are blowing out the 1.5l Botas for 5 bucks, picked up a couple of the Cabs, seems a bit sweet for a Cab but certainly drinkable. Not the best nor the worst but I do love a bargain. 

This wine was horrible, about $4.00 a bottle, but I love the label.

Penguins 1.jpg

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1 hour ago, soak_ed said:

This wine was horrible, about $4.00 a bottle, but I love the label.

Penguins 1.jpg

Obviously horse piss trumps penguin piss at any price.

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On 6/28/2017 at 1:03 AM, dreaded said:

always liked the spanish rioja's ,  they're always decent price..

I would agree. Spanish rioja's is a good entry level for its decent price.

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6 hours ago, cardinals69 said:

OT soak_ed,  I like the sailboat model you have there.

Thanks, I quite like it.  My friend that shares his magnificent wine cellar with me, brought that to me as a gift from his holiday in Menorca last year.

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17 hours ago, soak_ed said:

Thanks, I quite like it.  My friend that shares his magnificent wine cellar with me, brought that to me as a gift from his holiday in Menorca last year.

Thumbs up to you!

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On 01/07/2017 at 11:33 PM, B.J. Porter said:

Modern screw caps, such as a 'Stelvin Closure' 

Went to get a bottle of wine one night in Paris, we were eating in with local ingredients. I did not have a corkscrew and looked for a Stelvin lid,  two to choose from and didn't like either of them.  The proprietor of course thought I was just a crazy Anglais.  Bought a cork bottle and then a remover. 

It is the reverse her in AUS, most good wines have a screw lid now and those that do not are doing so for the tradition, not the quality.

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On 28/06/2017 at 8:42 AM, LionessRacing said:

As a former vintner... Good is a relative term, as tastes vary so much. 

Anchored up one night and the owner of the boat we were shifting brought out the red (all beered-out).  We took a few sips saying nothing, watching the landscape rotate past us as the boat swung.  Content, words not required, we had heard all of each others stories multiple times, we were making a new one.

Owner: "How's the wine?"

Me: "It's ok, thanks." (we both knew it came from a weight saving cardboard box and he recognised my WTF look)

Owner: "You told me once that you messed about making wine."

Me: "Yep, years ago, just after school."

Owner: "So tell me, if this wine was one that you had made ... what would you think of it then?"

Me: "I would consider it an unreserved fucking masterpiece!"

I meant that too.  It's all relative.

 

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Concha y toro, 5-8/bottle

Aussie and ZA wines

Malbecs

i can generally find cheap. 

 

i can sometimes find Montepulciano d'Abruzzo cheap

 

ive never cared for US wines but I've had one called Liberty Creek that was ok, or maybe just the one bottle

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3 hours ago, Max Rockatansky said:

Concha y toro, 5-8/bottle

Aussie and ZA wines

Malbecs

i can generally find cheap. 

 

i can sometimes find Montepulciano d'Abruzzo cheap

 

ive never cared for US wines but I've had one called Liberty Creek that was ok, or maybe just the one bottle

You can find cheap bottles of almost any grape varietal wine.  it is a matter of if; a.) If it even tastes remotely like the grape it is allegedly made from, and b.)  If, even in the unlikely event that condition 'a' is met, does it taste like something you would really want to drink?  With a few exceptions, most of the cheap wines I have drank are memorably unremarkable, varietally indistinguishable, and sometimes utterly undrinkable.  The photo of the "Penguin" wine I posted earlier fell into that category, it was about $4.00.  But the label is so damn cute.  By cheap I mean under $10.00 a bottle.

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19 minutes ago, soak_ed said:

You can find cheap bottles of almost any grape varietal wine.  it is a matter of if; a.) If it even tastes remotely like the grape it is allegedly made from, and b.)  If, even in the unlikely event that condition 'a' is met, does it taste like something you would really want to drink?  With a few exceptions, most of the cheap wines I have drank are memorably unremarkable, varietally indistinguishable, and sometimes utterly undrinkable.  The photo of the "Penguin" wine I posted earlier fell into that category, it was about $4.00.  But the label is so damn cute.  By cheap I mean under $10.00 a bottle.

And it was merlot as well............that's what happens if you drink blending varietals..........:lol:

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i've been able to find decent chilean cabernet sauvignons here in brazil for about 8 to 10 US$ a bottle. concha y toro, casa silva, etc.

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