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Point Break

Reading Mockingbird Again

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So........I read Harper Lee's "To Kill a Mockingbird" for a lit class many, many....no many, many, many years ago. Crowded in with "Lord of the Flies" and "Fahrenheit 451" along with multiple others I don't remember being especially affected either way. It was interesting but thats it. So "Go Set a Watchman" worked its way up on my personal reading list and I decided to give it a whirl but wanted to reread or at least scan Mockingbird again first. Since I'm driving to LA a couple times a week right now, sometimes more, I have been enjoying the audible books for the 1hr+ sometimes 2 hr drive so I grabbed the audible version which is read by Sissy Spacek. Unbelievable. A couple observations:

  1. I don't know if its because I'm older and have more life experience or....what....but its an amazing experience now. I do not remember the fantastic imagery in her writing. What beautifully descriptive writing. The story itself is far more moving than I remember as well. I'm sure the quality of the writing has a lot to do with that. I've actually found myself tearing up at several points through the book.
  2. Sissy Spacek's narration adds more than I ever thought possible to the story. I'm sure some of my reaction to the book is due to the impact of her excellent reading in her beautiful southern drawl.
  3. How the hell is it that Harper Lee produced a work of such quality and depth and then never wrote another piece? The quality is not accidental....her abilities as a writer are clear in this book. How could she never have written more? I get that this single story came from experiences and she fully told that story...but the quality of her writing could be brought to so many other stories/subjects if she was inclined. Why not? Amazing............

Anyway..........I loved it, beyond words and am so glad I decided to utilize the audible version to review the book. If anyone is inclined, I cannot recommend this version highly enough. Unf^&ing believable.

Now on the Watchman.

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 There are a lot of folks who say the reason Harper never wrote another is because her best-est buddy Truman was either the real author or was "very" involved in writing Mockingbird 

 

i don't care either way. I'm a big fan of the Mockingbird and Truman Capote 

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Just now, pbd said:

 There are a lot of folks who say the reason Harper never wrote another is because her best-est buddy Truman was either the real author or was "very" involved in writing Mockingbird 

Interesting......I've not read anything by Capote but it would be interesting to compare. I mean Mockingbird is a remarkable work. Hmmmmmmmmmmm

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I think In Cold Blood is a great read. You know who done it but you're still riveted 

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29 minutes ago, pbd said:

 There are a lot of folks who say the reason Harper never wrote another is because her best-est buddy Truman was either the real author or was "very" involved in writing Mockingbird 

 

i don't care either way. I'm a big fan of the Mockingbird and Truman Capote 

Maybe Lee didn't have time to write more books because she was too busy ghostwriting books for Capote?

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4 minutes ago, B.J. Porter said:

Way too short to be stuck an island with.

But you can read it twice :D

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4 minutes ago, Shortforbob said:

But you can read it twice :D

Yeah, and you can read the Wheel of Time twice too, but you'll have forgotten half of it before you get back to the restart.

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3 hours ago, B.J. Porter said:

Yeah, and you can read the Wheel of Time twice too, but you'll have forgotten half of it before you get back to the restart.

I am on 3X for the Wheel of Time, following along with my son this time. A good editor could easily cut that series in half.

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14 hours ago, Point Break said:

So........I read Harper Lee's "To Kill a Mockingbird" for a lit class many, many....no many, many, many years ago. Crowded in with "Lord of the Flies" and "Fahrenheit 451" along with multiple others I don't remember being especially affected either way. It was interesting but thats it. So "Go Set a Watchman" worked its way up on my personal reading list and I decided to give it a whirl but wanted to reread or at least scan Mockingbird again first. Since I'm driving to LA a couple times a week right now, sometimes more, I have been enjoying the audible books for the 1hr+ sometimes 2 hr drive so I grabbed the audible version which is read by Sissy Spacek. Unbelievable. A couple observations:

  1. I don't know if its because I'm older and have more life experience or....what....but its an amazing experience now. I do not remember the fantastic imagery in her writing. What beautifully descriptive writing. The story itself is far more moving than I remember as well. I'm sure the quality of the writing has a lot to do with that. I've actually found myself tearing up at several points through the book.
  2. Sissy Spacek's narration adds more than I ever thought possible to the story. I'm sure some of my reaction to the book is due to the impact of her excellent reading in her beautiful southern drawl.
  3. How the hell is it that Harper Lee produced a work of such quality and depth and then never wrote another piece? The quality is not accidental....her abilities as a writer are clear in this book. How could she never have written more? I get that this single story came from experiences and she fully told that story...but the quality of her writing could be brought to so many other stories/subjects if she was inclined. Why not? Amazing............

Anyway..........I loved it, beyond words and am so glad I decided to utilize the audible version to review the book. If anyone is inclined, I cannot recommend this version highly enough. Unf^&ing believable.

Now on the Watchman.

Yep. It's a classic and I hope that people will still read it and pass it around 100 years from now. Through some bizarre coincidence of timing, I re-read Mockingbird about a year before the re-release & Watchman. Which I did not like as much.

Speaking of which, I think Go Set A Watchman is also a great book, or perhaps has a great book buried in it. But the story line is more convoluted and has less human imperative. Lots of beautiful writing but some tedious spots and things that I coulnd't figure out why or in some cases what was happening. With painting beauty is enough but "beautiful writing" is not why people read books IMHO.

Why did Harper Lee not write more? I dunno, maybe she felt the pressure to produce another great work and didn't want to risk failing. Maybe she was having too much fun with the money and fame and didn't have time. Maybe she figured she'd already said what she had to say. Maybe something entirely different, maybe some combination. It's a shame though.

-DSK

 

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Be thankful for what is, not what could have been. If I produced only one thing as great as TKAM, I'd be satisfied with my contribution to society.

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25 minutes ago, kent_island_sailor said:

I am on 3X for the Wheel of Time, following along with my son this time. A good editor could easily cut that series in half.

Certainly we could spend less time on Nynaeve and Egwine's dresses, yes. But once you get to a certain critical mass as a writer...they print what you write.

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14 minutes ago, IStream said:

Be thankful for what is, not what could have been. If I produced only one thing as great as TKAM, I'd be satisfied with my contribution to society.

+1     :D

Good point!

-DSK

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10 hours ago, pbd said:

 There are a lot of folks who say the reason Harper never wrote another is because her best-est buddy Truman was either the real author or was "very" involved in writing Mockingbird 

 

i don't care either way. I'm a big fan of the Mockingbird and Truman Capote 

Why didn't Capote have another big book after In Cold Blood? It is well known that Harper Lee was very involved in writing that book. Maybe he couldn't do it again without her. 

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I have never gotten through the whole book. I have to pick it back up. For some reason it was never assigned in school. Yet they made us slog through Great Expectations, I tried reading it a couple of years ago and never finished. 

I don't know why, I  guess it just took so long developing the story it didn't get to the actual story by the time I returned it to the library.

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35 minutes ago, chinabald said:

I have never gotten through the whole book. I have to pick it back up. For some reason it was never assigned in school. Yet they made us slog through Great Expectations, I tried reading it a couple of years ago and never finished. 

I don't know why, I  guess it just took so long developing the story it didn't get to the actual story by the time I returned it to the library.

Great Expectations......that was a slog. If you're interested, the narrated version was really good. 

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5 hours ago, B.J. Porter said:

Yeah, and you can read the Wheel of Time twice too, but you'll have forgotten half of it before you get back to the restart.

I'm trying that one again......it is good enough but it goes on and on. I gave up once about 1/2 way. I'm three books back in and I already keep saying "Jesus H. Christ Rand......you're the f^*#ing Dragon Reborn. Stop whining about it already"......sheesh.

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I went to school and lived in Ann Arbor from '75-'89.  In the fall of '80, after a football game we're driving and an old short geezer struts out in front of us.  The driver dynamites the brakes and rather than cringe, the old guy grabs the door handle and jumps in and says, you're giving me a ride. We start giving him shit as he had the effeminate voice that we associated with being gay.  Yes, young and stupid we were.  We started giving this guy shit and he kept saying that we should pull over and he would slit our tires.  We tooled around town for a few minutes and we were at a stop sign within sight of "The Flame" and I made the comment that it was the only gay bar in town. Our visitor demanded to get out and we watched as he entered the flame.  

I read two days later that Truman Capote had been in town as part of a lecture series.  

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Truman Capote was a repellent asshole who wrote two good books.

End of.

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It was sometime in the 90s when I heard that Robert Duval  played Boo in the movie. So I had to watch it again. 

Sure enough, there he was.

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16 minutes ago, Dorado said:

It was sometime in the 90s when I heard that Robert Duval  played Boo in the movie. So I had to watch it again. 

Sure enough, there he was.

When I finish the book again, I'll grab the movie one evening. I had no idea Duval was in it. Perfectly typecast as Boo though..........I can't wait to see it again. I was so locked up on Peck as Atticus that I didn't pay much attention to the others.

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On 2017-6-29 at 1:22 PM, pbd said:

I think In Cold Blood is a great read. You know who done it but you're still riveted 

+1

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17 hours ago, kent_island_sailor said:

I am on 3X for the Wheel of Time, following along with my son this time. A good editor could easily cut that series in half.

Yeah, I'm on my 4th read through in 20 years and up to Crossroads of Twilight. Holy shit, but nothing happens in that damn book!

I remember waiting for it to be released, and thinking "I guess this isn't going to be a 10 book series after all. Fuck, I hope Jordan doesn't die before he wraps this thing up...."

FML

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45 minutes ago, Timmy Time said:

Yeah, I'm on my 4th read through in 20 years and up to Crossroads of Twilight. Holy shit, but nothing happens in that damn book!

I remember waiting for it to be released, and thinking "I guess this isn't going to be a 10 book series after all. Fuck, I hope Jordan doesn't die before he wraps this thing up...."

FML

Just make sure you keep George R.R. Martin in your daily prayers...

Though I read recently that Martin 1) is a two finger typist and 2) still uses Wordstar, on an ancient PC, because he hates all the features of modern word processors like spell checking and autocorrect. Could explain why many of us might drop dead before the next book comes out.

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5 hours ago, B.J. Porter said:

Just make sure you keep George R.R. Martin in your daily prayers...

Though I read recently that Martin 1) is a two finger typist and 2) still uses Wordstar, on an ancient PC, because he hates all the features of modern word processors like spell checking and autocorrect. Could explain why many of us might drop dead before the next book comes out.

 

image.jpeg

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BJ, I was about to say get on with your blog but you have !!!

Always good to have others do the research on batteries.

Glad you enjoyed our NYE fireworks.

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7 hours ago, B.J. Porter said:

Just make sure you keep George R.R. Martin in your daily prayers...

Though I read recently that Martin 1) is a two finger typist and 2) still uses Wordstar, on an ancient PC, because he hates all the features of modern word processors like spell checking and autocorrect. Could explain why many of us might drop dead before the next book comes out.

My dad long held the view the most efficient word processing program was on his apple IIe.   Every upgrade after that used more memory but failed to increase his typing speed.  

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On 6/28/2017 at 5:51 PM, Point Break said:

So........I read Harper Lee's "To Kill a Mockingbird" for a lit class many, many....no many, many, many years ago. Crowded in with "Lord of the Flies" and "Fahrenheit 451" along with multiple others I don't remember being especially affected either way. It was interesting but thats it. So "Go Set a Watchman" worked its way up on my personal reading list and I decided to give it a whirl but wanted to reread or at least scan Mockingbird again first. Since I'm driving to LA a couple times a week right now, sometimes more, I have been enjoying the audible books for the 1hr+ sometimes 2 hr drive so I grabbed the audible version which is read by Sissy Spacek. Unbelievable. A couple observations:

  1. I don't know if its because I'm older and have more life experience or....what....but its an amazing experience now. I do not remember the fantastic imagery in her writing. What beautifully descriptive writing. The story itself is far more moving than I remember as well. I'm sure the quality of the writing has a lot to do with that. I've actually found myself tearing up at several points through the book.
  2. Sissy Spacek's narration adds more than I ever thought possible to the story. I'm sure some of my reaction to the book is due to the impact of her excellent reading in her beautiful southern drawl.
  3. How the hell is it that Harper Lee produced a work of such quality and depth and then never wrote another piece? The quality is not accidental....her abilities as a writer are clear in this book. How could she never have written more? I get that this single story came from experiences and she fully told that story...but the quality of her writing could be brought to so many other stories/subjects if she was inclined. Why not? Amazing............

Anyway..........I loved it, beyond words and am so glad I decided to utilize the audible version to review the book. If anyone is inclined, I cannot recommend this version highly enough. Unf^&ing believable.

Now on the Watchman.

Plusse oune, didde thiss samthing laste yeare on drive southe.

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I have heard it said, that if you've never read TKAMB, you'll enjoy Set a Watchman more.

I have resisted reading Watchman, but perhaps I should.

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4 minutes ago, Mrleft8 said:

I have heard it said, that if you've never read TKAMB, you'll enjoy Set a Watchman more.

I have resisted reading Watchman, but perhaps I should.

Most reviews of Watchman have been pretty bleak. That's why it's been kinda low on my read list. I'm just really curious. 

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6 hours ago, Lark said:

My dad long held the view the most efficient word processing program was on his apple IIe.   Every upgrade after that used more memory but failed to increase his typing speed.  

Leading Edge Model D, with LEWP word processor.  Nowadays I mostly use LaTeX.

 

Back to books -- this summer seems ripe for the fourth reading of Catch 22. . .

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18 hours ago, Point Break said:
18 hours ago, Mrleft8 said:

I have heard it said, that if you've never read TKAMB, you'll enjoy Set a Watchman more.

I have resisted reading Watchman, but perhaps I should.

Most reviews of Watchman have been pretty bleak. That's why it's been kinda low on my read list. I'm just really curious. 

Kind of my take on it too. The general sense is you'll never think on Atticus Finch in the same way again, which I'm not so enthused to do.

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16 hours ago, bplipschitz said:
23 hours ago, Lark said:

My dad long held the view the most efficient word processing program was on his apple IIe.   Every upgrade after that used more memory but failed to increase his typing speed.  

Leading Edge Model D, with LEWP word processor.  Nowadays I mostly use LaTeX.

 

Back to books -- this summer seems ripe for the fourth reading of Catch 22. . .

If you're serious about writing something more complex, Word gets kind of clumsy over 10,000-15,000 words I've found. A tool like Scrivener doesn't have all the massive bells and whistles of Word, but it lets you set up a much larger and complex work and still keep it organized and coherent. You don't NEED all the crap that Word can do 99% of the time, though Scrivener lacks Word's most useful feature IMHO - redlining on edits.

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I am on a the quest to reread or actually read a bunch of classics, and if you think Great Expectations is a slog, finished A Tale of Two Cities last night. Let me tell you, there were no best of times. sheesh.  TKAM is coming up soon, trying to alternate the easy with the difficult.  The movie is still in my top 10 as well.  Never read ICB, interesting as it was discussed recently by some of my smart friends.

Perhaps there could be a thread for most difficult to get through, glad I did it and would never do it again?

 

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28 minutes ago, d'ranger said:

I am on a the quest to reread or actually read a bunch of classics, and if you think Great Expectations is a slog, finished A Tale of Two Cities last night. Let me tell you, there were no best of times. sheesh.  TKAM is coming up soon, trying to alternate the easy with the difficult.  The movie is still in my top 10 as well.  Never read ICB, interesting as it was discussed recently by some of my smart friends.

Perhaps there could be a thread for most difficult to get through, glad I did it and would never do it again?

 

Which classics have you re read that you enjoyed? I'm trying to class up my reading choices.

Some of the old authors needed to describe everything. A guy enters a room takes 5 pages because the furniture, rugs and art on the walls need to be described in detail whether or not it matters in the story. 

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If anyone is interested in revisiting "Stranger In A Strange Land" or perhaps reading it for the first time, try to find the short version. As published the the first time around, that is. The "original unedited" version is about 3X longer and buries the story under a lot of extraneous detail. Heinlein was a great writer IMHO but editing is good.

My reading tends to be about half fiction and half nonfiction, and about a third is re-reading favorites and classics. Last year I re-read "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn" for what must be about the eighth or ninth time; highly recommended. DIckens, not so much. And the Russians, gawd I tried to wade thru "War & Peace" again a couple years ago. Give me 'The Journals Of Capt. James Cook' any day!

-DSK

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58 minutes ago, d'ranger said:

I am on a the quest to reread or actually read a bunch of classics, and if you think Great Expectations is a slog, finished A Tale of Two Cities last night. Let me tell you, there were no best of times. sheesh.  TKAM is coming up soon, trying to alternate the easy with the difficult.  The movie is still in my top 10 as well.  Never read ICB, interesting as it was discussed recently by some of my smart friends.

Perhaps there could be a thread for most difficult to get through, glad I did it and would never do it again?

 

I've tried to get through Moby Dick on three separate occasions. Unsuccessful so far.

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1 hour ago, d'ranger said:

IPerhaps there could be a thread for most difficult to get through, glad I did it and would never do it again?

I thick Trintey by LU sucked.  I hade juste finiste Catch-22 when I picte up Tritey, coudente waite to bedone with it.  Immediatley reread C-22.

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My quest is still in the early stages - Moby Dick = not on the list, Catch 22 is. I love dark humor, thus Carl Hiassen is one of my favs. If I could only read one author it would have to be Steinbeck and Cannery Row's dark humor makes me lol.  I went through a long phase of reading every sci fi I could get my hands on and from memory Dune and the Foundation trilogy were at the top. Will report back later to see if they still hold up. 

For video - GoT is almost here, the books were impressive, not sure about the conclusions since the videos have deviated so far.  So many great books, so little time.  I may have to revisit Great Expectations - read in school and I just remember how intense the imagery was.  Now I must go do a rum race.  Which brings up something strange is there are no sailing books on my favorites.....   hmmmmm.  Open to suggestions there.  And no Moby f'ning Dick, thanks.  

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1 hour ago, d'ranger said:

I am on a the quest to reread or actually read a bunch of classics, and if you think Great Expectations is a slog, finished A Tale of Two Cities last night. Let me tell you, there were no best of times. sheesh.  TKAM is coming up soon, trying to alternate the easy with the difficult.  The movie is still in my top 10 as well.  Never read ICB, interesting as it was discussed recently by some of my smart friends.

Perhaps there could be a thread for most difficult to get through, glad I did it and would never do it again?

 

Not a bad thread suggestion.....I also enjoy interspersing the "classics" with more contemporary novels. Just a bit ago, I finished up a rerun of most of Steinbeck.....very easy and enjoyable again. I grab a Burroughs book now and then as a guilty pleasure nod to my childhood when I devoured everything he wrote. Funny thing, a bit ago I reread Jack London's White Fang, another childhood favorite.......meh. AC Doyle's stuff is a mood thing. They are not easy reads but in the right mood I've been hitting one every once in a while.

Can't get through it.....and done trying......Pillars of the Earth.......not sure why, maybe because it's so damn consistently depressing but I've started it and abandoned it a couple times now. I'm over it.

In another category I put Shelby Foote's trilogy The Civil War. I enjoy it but there is simply no way you can read it straight through. At least not for me.

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19 minutes ago, d'ranger said:

My quest is still in the early stages - Moby Dick = not on the list, Catch 22 is. I love dark humor, thus Carl Hiassen is one of my favs. If I could only read one author it would have to be Steinbeck and Cannery Row's dark humor makes me lol.  I went through a long phase of reading every sci fi I could get my hands on and from memory Dune and the Foundation trilogy were at the top. Will report back later to see if they still hold up. 

For video - GoT is almost here, the books were impressive, not sure about the conclusions since the videos have deviated so far.  So many great books, so little time.  I may have to revisit Great Expectations - read in school and I just remember how intense the imagery was.  Now I must go do a rum race.  Which brings up something strange is there are no sailing books on my favorites.....   hmmmmm.  Open to suggestions there.  And no Moby f'ning Dick, thanks.  

Sailing......Riddle of the Sands....Childers. 

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Steinbeck: "The Short Reign of Pippin IV" (the Fourth, Roman numerals, not intravenous)

For those who enjoy making fun of the French. In a classy way, of course.

220px-ShortReignOfPippinIV.JPG

I inherited a copy of this and it sat on my shelf untouched for about 25 years. Dunno what made me pick it up, but it's one of the few books I sat up all night reading. I need to pick up a copy of Travels With Charley

+1 on Riddle Of The Sands, too.

-DSK

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On 6/28/2017 at 2:51 PM, Point Break said:

So........I read Harper Lee's "To Kill a Mockingbird" for a lit class many, many....no many, many, many years ago. Crowded in with "Lord of the Flies" and "Fahrenheit 451" along with multiple others I don't remember being especially affected either way. It was interesting but thats it. So "Go Set a Watchman" worked its way up on my personal reading list and I decided to give it a whirl but wanted to reread or at least scan Mockingbird again first. Since I'm driving to LA a couple times a week right now, sometimes more, I have been enjoying the audible books for the 1hr+ sometimes 2 hr drive so I grabbed the audible version which is read by Sissy Spacek. Unbelievable. A couple observations:

  1. I don't know if its because I'm older and have more life experience or....what....but its an amazing experience now. I do not remember the fantastic imagery in her writing. What beautifully descriptive writing. The story itself is far more moving than I remember as well. I'm sure the quality of the writing has a lot to do with that. I've actually found myself tearing up at several points through the book.
  2. Sissy Spacek's narration adds more than I ever thought possible to the story. I'm sure some of my reaction to the book is due to the impact of her excellent reading in her beautiful southern drawl.
  3. How the hell is it that Harper Lee produced a work of such quality and depth and then never wrote another piece? The quality is not accidental....her abilities as a writer are clear in this book. How could she never have written more? I get that this single story came from experiences and she fully told that story...but the quality of her writing could be brought to so many other stories/subjects if she was inclined. Why not? Amazing............

Anyway..........I loved it, beyond words and am so glad I decided to utilize the audible version to review the book. If anyone is inclined, I cannot recommend this version highly enough. Unf^&ing believable.

Now on the Watchman.

I hear that. Many of those forced-to-read books I read as a kid look entirely different to me now. Re-reading them when my kids were also forced was an eye-opener, big time. Watership Down is fun to read..now. 

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56 minutes ago, Mark K said:

I hear that. Many of those forced-to-read books I read as a kid look entirely different to me now. Re-reading them when my kids were also forced was an eye-opener, big time. Watership Down is fun to read..now. 

I always loved to read, but some books wre certainly more enjoyable than others.

BTW I loved Watership Down, still re-read it from time to time.

What about SHOGUN

-DSK

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1 hour ago, Mark K said:

I hear that. Many of those forced-to-read books I read as a kid look entirely different to me now. Re-reading them when my kids were also forced was an eye-opener, big time. Watership Down is fun to read..now. 

I have never read Watership Down.........so I'm missing something.....I mean a bunch of anthropomorphized rabbits?

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50 minutes ago, Point Break said:

I have never read Watership Down.........so I'm missing something.....I mean a bunch of anthropomorphized rabbits?

Pretty much. Be a mistake to hold that against it though. What was the Lord of the Rings about? Hobbits. 

 JRR Tolkein is on a video somewhere describing how it all came about. He said he was just doodling around and decided to hammer out some prose. He typed "Upon a hill lived a hobbit". That will do, he thought, it "sings" and has a nice bounce. He leaned back to congratulate himself. But there was one little problem...What's a hobbit??

 :lol: 

 

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1 hour ago, Point Break said:

I have never read Watership Down.........so I'm missing something.....I mean a bunch of anthropomorphized rabbits?

Well if you do, just remember one thing.

Stoat = Weasel 

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24 minutes ago, Mark K said:

Pretty much. Be a mistake to hold that against it though. What was the Lord of the Rings about? Hobbits. 

 JRR Tolkein is on a video somewhere describing how it all came about. He said he was just doodling around and decided to hammer out some prose. He typed "Upon a hill lived a hobbit". That will do, he thought, it "sings" and has a nice bounce. He leaned back to congratulate himself. But there was one little problem...What's a hobbit??

 :lol: 

 

Oh, I don't disagree with those observations at all. After all, I thought Orwell's Animal Farm was pure genius. I guess I just thought Watership Down was kinda a kids "bunny" story. Duh......I guess.......never heard a word about it in any of my Lit classes........I'll add it to the list. God its getting to be a long list. Thank God I'm retired!!! :lol:

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32 minutes ago, Dorado said:

Well if you do, just remember one thing.

Stoat = Weasel 

I actually knew that......and I have no idea why........

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5 hours ago, Point Break said:

Oh, I don't disagree with those observations at all. After all, I thought Orwell's Animal Farm was pure genius. I guess I just thought Watership Down was kinda a kids "bunny" story. Duh......I guess.......never heard a word about it in any of my Lit classes........I'll add it to the list. God its getting to be a long list. Thank God I'm retired!!! :lol:

It's way less lecturey than AF but shares some things. More humor though. 

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Maybe she only had the one good novel in her.

Just been reading 5 of her essays.

Not exactly inspiring.

http://www.vulture.com/2015/02/read-harper-lees-5-great-nonfiction-pieces.html

Doesn't mean she didn't write TKAMB though.

There's a writer by the name of Mary Stewart. Been writing short romantic fluffy adventure mysteries since 1954..good writer if this genre BUT...then wrote her "merlin trilogy" you wouldn't guess it was the same writer. Really great books if you like that sort of thing. Then went back to short romantic fluffy.

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5 hours ago, Dorado said:

Well, I guess you see a lot of them on the freeways down there.

 

Oh.....well played sir. Very well played! :lol:

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I'm reading Moby Dick for the first time. It is not going very fast. The only book I have never finished in 4 or 5 attempts was Umberto Eco's The Name Of The Rose.  It made a wonderful film, but it is an unreadable book. 

Next on the list is My Family and Other Animals by Gerald Durrell. I studied it for O Level back when the world was young and want to retread it now.

Most read is The Lord of the Rings, I'm not sure but I expect I've read them all 7 times!!

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On 7/1/2017 at 8:32 AM, IStream said:

I've tried to get through Moby Dick on three separate occasions. Unsuccessful so far.

You and me both brother

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