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mad

Darwin strikes again

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1 minute ago, SloopJonB said:

The “patient did not had enough brain function to sustain life,” 

:lol: Ya think?

I really hope he didn’t swim in the gene pool before his demise. 

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Probably smoking while he was siphoning - "hold my cigarette for a sec."

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50 minutes ago, Marcjsmith said:

So close...

oregon man sets himself onfire while siphoning gas.   Police still searching for man.

https://abc7chicago.com/man-trying-to-steal-gas-from-u-haul-sets-his-pants-on-fire/4733237/

 

That's the sort of accident that can delete you from the gene pool without actually killing you.

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5 minutes ago, Ishmael said:

That's the sort of accident that can delete you from the gene pool without actually killing you.

Butte stille qualtifies victime forra DA.                                               :)

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Roasted, dude.

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10 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

Probably smoking while he was siphoning - "hold my cigarette for a sec."

I was thinking that maybe since the cans were inside the van, build up fumes, and maybe static electricity.  Or if it was an old van. Maybe faulty interior light.   Open door light comes on. Boom....

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3 hours ago, Marcjsmith said:

I was thinking that maybe since the cans were inside the van, build up fumes, and maybe static electricity.  Or if it was an old van. Maybe faulty interior light.   Open door light comes on. Boom....

Could this be why it is a no no to fill a container anywhere but on the ground?

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31 minutes ago, Windward said:

Could this be why it is a no no to fill a container anywhere but on the ground?

It’s Also why the tell you not to get in and out of your car while filling.  Sliding on thhe seats can build up a static charge and when you grab the nozzle.  Sparky...

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The technique has become less popular over the years and people have been figuring out (the hard way) how to do it safely, so I'd say odds are low. Then again, I keep underestimating the number/percentage of morons out there so I should probably keep my money in my pocket.

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1 hour ago, bmiller said:

What's the over under on deep fried turkey incidents this year?     

Guaranteed several in my old outfit. As you know, unless someone gets hurt it’s pretty funny with the guy all sheepish and wife glaring a whithering “god you’re a dumbass” look. I did have one where the guy did it on a sheet of plywood in the middle of his kitchen.......that one was truly a Darwin winner. On the up side they got a kitchen remodel......and dining room.....and living room.........:lol:

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Considering all the carnage is it that good to justify the risk??? Or are we talking real dumbass here.

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21 minutes ago, HuronBouy said:

Considering all the carnage is it that good to justify the risk??? Or are we talking real dumbass here.

It is different but it is pretty good. One year we did one of each at the firehouse and I still like the oven method, but the deep fryer with the Cajun seasoning was pretty good.......

The deep fry disasters are always people who didn’t pay attention to the instructions regarding temperature, how much oil to use, and speed of the dunk......often all three........it’s the same “here hold my beer” percentage of folks. 

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2 hours ago, The Main Man said:

Sorry your application has been rejected.  The applicants failed to remove themselves from the gene pool,  thereby invalidating their nomination for the Darwin Award.   From you link, “The 17-year-old driver, her 16-year-old passenger and the occupants of the other car all escaped serious injury.”

Although they do qualify as dumbasses

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1 hour ago, Snore said:

Sorry your application has been rejected.  The applicants failed to remove themselves from the gene pool,  thereby invalidating their nomination for the Darwin Award.   From you link, “The 17-year-old driver, her 16-year-old passenger and the occupants of the other car all escaped serious injury.”

Although they do qualify as dumbasses

It’s why I said it was a near miss.

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On 1/13/2019 at 6:52 AM, mad said:

There is a new level of stupidity arriving every week it seems

 

the question is who was on the higher level,  the driver or the passenger...   despite what some people think, jesus will not take the wheel, as a passenger sometimes you just have to take control of the wheel... btdt..

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Quote

An Indonesian woman has been mauled to death by a pet crocodile in Sulawesi after she fell into its enclosure.

Deasy Tuwo, 44, had reportedly been feeding the crocodile at the pearl farm where she worked, and where the animal was being kept illegally.

The 700kg crocodile, named Merry, is thought to have bitten off her arm and most of her abdomen.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-46901245

 

Chalk that one up as a win.

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3 hours ago, QBF said:

This wasn't recent, but still...

A woman in Thailand has killed herself by jumping into a pit full of crocodiles in front of scores of horrified tourists.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/2186323.stm/

if you got to go..  go with style..  being drowned and ripped apart..

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8 minutes ago, mad said:

I got no idea where this belongs but here’s a start. 

Quote

Man repeatedly injects himself with semen in attempt to cure chronic back pain

Mite disserve its owen threade, as I suspectte manney hearer our continueng the studey.                     :)                         

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7 minutes ago, Snaggletooth said:

Mite disserve its owen threade, as I suspectte manney hearer our continueng the studey.                     :)                         

All yours Snags, I’m sticking with tramadol and Valium for mine. 

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On ‎1‎/‎17‎/‎2019 at 7:32 AM, QBF said:

A woman in Thailand has killed herself by jumping into a pit full of crocodiles in front of scores of horrified tourists.

Thick she wase tryning be licke Danielle in liones den?  Ore bing morre licke John Allen Chowe gonig in to converte them?

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A sollide effortte;

juste coudentte close the dealle.  NOI Darwin Awade forre you!                                         :)

 

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In case any of you aren't understanding.... If the water is 212f at sea level (or near it) it is boiling..... Bubbling..... At 2,000' altitude water at 212f may not be bubbling (boiling) but it is still 212f.

 

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On 1/14/2019 at 12:25 PM, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

 

the question is who was on the higher level,  the driver or the passenger...   despite what some people think, jesus will not take the wheel, as a passenger sometimes you just have to take control of the wheel... btdt..

I’ve been the passenger in cars driven by teens. The blindfold might be handy. 

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1 hour ago, Mrleft8 said:

In case any of you aren't understanding.... If the water is 212f at sea level (or near it) it is boiling..... Bubbling..... At 2,000' altitude water at 212f may not be bubbling (boiling) but it is still 212f.

 

You got that backwards. Boiling water at sea level is 212. As the altitude increases, the boiling point of water goes down, so you can boil water at much lower temperatures at higher altitude and still have it lukewarm.

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2 minutes ago, Ishmael said:

You got that backwards. Boiling water at sea level is 212. As the altitude increases, the boiling point of water goes down, so you can boil water at much lower temperatures at higher altitude and still have it lukewarm.

Adgreede!

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That's why ultra high altitude pilots wear pressure suits - their blood would boil in their veins otherwise.

Well, that's one of the reasons anyway.

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3 hours ago, chinabald said:

I’ve been the passenger in cars driven by teens. The blindfold might be handy. 

My sister, as a teen, went around a corner, kept turning and hit a tree.  She said she didn't know that you had to "turn back". 

In some ways, she's pretty smart.  However, I wouldn't have her drive a nail.

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11 hours ago, Mrleft8 said:

In case any of you aren't understanding.... If the water is 212f at sea level (or near it) it is boiling..... Bubbling..... At 2,000' altitude water at 212f may not be bubbling (boiling) but it is still 212f.

 

It's the other way around. As altitude increases boiling temp decreases. 

For example I put a thermometer in boiling water at 8,000 feet and it reads 189. 

That's why it takes so much longer to cook pasta up here.

 

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1 hour ago, bmiller said:

It's the other way around. As altitude increases boiling temp decreases. 

For example I put a thermometer in boiling water at 8,000 feet and it reads 189. 

That's why it takes so much longer to cook pasta up here.

 

I apologize. I see that indeed I had it backwards. This is why cooking spaghetti at 3,000' is such a pain in the ass....

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21 minutes ago, dolphinmaster said:

At 2000 ft elevation and 212 degrees fareheit,  it stopped being water a bit ago

208-9f? Most of the western USA is at or above 2,000'

I've made spaghetti in Boulder, Co..... It just took a little longer.

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1 hour ago, Mrleft8 said:

208-9f? Most of the western USA is at or above 2,000'

I've made spaghetti in Boulder, Co..... It just took a little longer.

Correct, it would be steam. Water in it's liquid state can only get so hot, depending on atmospheric pressure. As you gain elevation you lose atmospheric pressure. So the temp at which water turns from a liquid to a vapor decreases. That's why it takes so much longer to cook pasts, it's cooking at a reduced temperature.

Maybe some engineer can correct me or explain it better.

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1 hour ago, Mrleft8 said:

208-9f? Most of the western USA is at or above 2,000'

I've made spaghetti in Boulder, Co..... It just took a little longer.

Maybe geologically but not from a population density standpoint. It takes a person to make spaghetti.

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Just now, bmiller said:

Correct, it would be steam. Water in it's liquid state can only get so hot, depending on atmospheric pressure. As you gain elevation you lose atmospheric pressure. So the temp at which water turns from a liquid to a vapor decreases. That's why it takes so much longer to cook pasts, it's cooking at a reduced temperature.

Maybe some engineer can correct me or explain it better.

I'm an engineer and I'd say you nailed it.

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14 minutes ago, bmiller said:

Correct, it would be steam. Water in it's liquid state can only get so hot, depending on atmospheric pressure.

The radiator cap principle.

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17 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

That's why ultra high altitude pilots wear pressure suits - their blood would boil in their veins otherwise.

Well, that's one of the reasons anyway.

The other one is past someplace around 40,000 feet or so, even breathing pure O2 isn't enough oxygen for you. The blood boiling thing is sort-of correct, you would get the bends badly well before the water in your blood turned to steam and be long since dead before the steam problem.

Fun trivia fact - at cruising altitude, do NOT open the window on a Concorde. The oxygen mask won't do you any good at 60,000 feet :o

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4 minutes ago, kent_island_sailor said:

The other one is past someplace around 40,000 feet or so, even breathing pure O2 isn't enough oxygen for you. The blood boiling thing is sort-of correct, you would get the bends badly well before the water in your blood turned to steam and be long since dead before the steam problem.

Fun trivia fact - at cruising altitude, do NOT open the window on a Concorde. The oxygen mask won't do you any good at 60,000 feet :o

Extra trivia fact - the engineers never wanted to put windows in Concorde in the first place, it was forced on them for commercial reasons. 

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4 hours ago, IStream said:
4 hours ago, bmiller said:

Correct, it would be steam. Water in it's liquid state can only get so hot, depending on atmospheric pressure. As you gain elevation you lose atmospheric pressure. So the temp at which water turns from a liquid to a vapor decreases. That's why it takes so much longer to cook pasts, it's cooking at a reduced temperature.

Maybe some engineer can correct me or explain it better.

I'm an engineer and I'd say you nailed it.

And the opposite end of the equation is why pressure cookers work.

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And this is also why boilers can be so dangerous. A railroad near me was somewhat clueless as to keeping their site gauge in good condition and let the water get too low in the boiler. It exposed a part of the boiler to the coal fire underneath with no water above it and cracked the metal there. The water in the boiler was well over 212 degrees but not turned to steam yet because of the pressure in the boiler. When that pressure was lost it ALL flashed to steam at once and launched parts of the locomotive all over the place :o:o

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14 minutes ago, kent_island_sailor said:

And this is also why boilers can be so dangerous. A railroad near me was somewhat clueless as to keeping their site gauge in good condition and let the water get too low in the boiler. It exposed a part of the boiler to the coal fire underneath with no water above it and cracked the metal there. The water in the boiler was well over 212 degrees but not turned to steam yet because of the pressure in the boiler. When that pressure was lost it ALL flashed to steam at once and launched parts of the locomotive all over the place :o:o

High pressure steam can be fucking scary stuff at times. 

steam-train-boiler-explosion-2.jpg.60770bcbdfb5d58948389c7c7275db6c.jpg

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26 minutes ago, kent_island_sailor said:

The other one is past someplace around 40,000 feet or so, even breathing pure O2 isn't enough oxygen for you. The blood boiling thing is sort-of correct, you would get the bends badly well before the water in your blood turned to steam and be long since dead before the steam problem.

Fun trivia fact - at cruising altitude, do NOT open the window on a Concorde. The oxygen mask won't do you any good at 60,000 feet :o

Yep.  At lower pressures (about 60,000'), the air is so thin that it's almost impossible to get sufficient oxygen molecules into your lungs with normal breathing so you get hypoxia even on 100% oxygen.  Solution between around 60K and "pressure suit" region" around 80,000' is pressure breathing where the mask provides some significant positive pressure so you relax and it forces O2 into you lungs and you have to forcefully exhale. That "feature" has now been added to include "G" sensitivity to increase O2 flow under high "G" conditions to improve G tolerance.  First couple of times that you experience it is not terribly fun. Military jets are pressurized differently than civil ones so you are a lot more exposed to the lower pressures.   

OBTW, at 65,000' you can start to make out the curvature of the earth.  

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5 hours ago, bmiller said:

Correct, it would be steam. Water in it's liquid state can only get so hot, depending on atmospheric pressure. As you gain elevation you lose atmospheric pressure. So the temp at which water turns from a liquid to a vapor decreases. That's why it takes so much longer to cook pasts, it's cooking at a reduced temperature.

Maybe some engineer can correct me or explain it better.

Oh GOD...  Now  u have done it.  Woofsie will soon appear...  Almost as bad as saying his name 3 times while looking in a mirror...  

 

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33 minutes ago, mad said:

High pressure steam can be fucking scary stuff at times. 

steam-train-boiler-explosion-2.jpg.60770bcbdfb5d58948389c7c7275db6c.jpg

The exploding engine guys let scale build up in the site glass and could no longer see the water level.

This had to hurt :o

About 7:20 p.m. on June 16, 1995, the firebox crownsheet of Gettysburg Passenger Services, Inc., steam locomotive 1278 failed

while the locomotive was pulling a six-carvexcursion train about 15 mph near Gardners, Pennsylvania. The failure resulted in an

instantaneous release (explosion) of steam through the firebox door and into the locomotive cab, seriously burning the

engineer and the two firemen. The firemen were taken by ambulance to area hospitals.The engineer, who had

third-degree burns over 65 percent of his body, was airlifted to a burn center near Philadelphia. None of the

310 passengers or other crewmembers were injured. Locomotive damage was limited tothe firebox grates

and crownsheet, with some ancillary smoke and debris damage tothe locomotive cab.

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16 minutes ago, Innocent Bystander said:

Yep.  At lower pressures (about 60,000'), the air is so thin that it's almost impossible to get sufficient oxygen molecules into your lungs with normal breathing so you get hypoxia even on 100% oxygen.  Solution between around 60K and "pressure suit" region" around 80,000' is pressure breathing where the mask provides some significant positive pressure so you relax and it forces O2 into you lungs and you have to forcefully exhale. That "feature" has now been added to include "G" sensitivity to increase O2 flow under high "G" conditions to improve G tolerance.  First couple of times that you experience it is not terribly fun. Military jets are pressurized differently than civil ones so you are a lot more exposed to the lower pressures.   

OBTW, at 65,000' you can start to make out the curvature of the earth.  

I have a feeling the O2 masks on the Concorde did not do this.

Thread creep - My copilot is going "I can't see I can't see" and I was like "Man up that didn't break 6 G" and he said "Not THAT, my contacts got pulled off center" :o

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10 hours ago, bmiller said:

It's the other way around. As altitude increases boiling temp decreases. 

For example I put a thermometer in boiling water at 8,000 feet and it reads 189. 

That's why it takes so much longer to cook pasta up here.

 

A pressure cooker helps....

 

Oh...

Never mind

Ishmeister beat me to it.

 

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1 hour ago, mad said:

High pressure steam can be fucking scary stuff at times. 

steam-train-boiler-explosion-2.jpg.60770bcbdfb5d58948389c7c7275db6c.jpg

It could and did blow stern wheelers to matchsticks at times.

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44 minutes ago, kent_island_sailor said:

I have a feeling the O2 masks on the Concorde did not do this.

Thread creep - My copilot is going "I can't see I can't see" and I was like "Man up that didn't break 6 G" and he said "Not THAT, my contacts got pulled off center" :o

Probably a good reason that Concord was limited to 60,000’ operating altitude.  Interestingly, cabin altitude was maintained at 6,000’, even at operating ceiling. 

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How could that even happen? An open vat of acid?

The worst I ever heard of was a guy doing an old style mopped tar & gravel roof. He took a header off the roof and landed head first in the tar kettle.

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Ouch. The article says the concentration was only @10%. I guess that's still enough. I wonder if the 165 degrees was way more damaging than the acid.....

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1 hour ago, SloopJonB said:

How could that even happen? An open vat of acid?

The worst I ever heard of was a guy doing an old style mopped tar & gravel roof. He took a header off the roof and landed head first in the tar kettle.

Try a Galvanising tank!. It’s grim!! 

 

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36 minutes ago, mad said:

Try a Galvanising tank!. It’s grim!! 

 

I had a new mast compression post for my boat galvanised a couple of years back.  I was astonished to see NO protective barriers around the tank!  And the heavy metal and acid fumes had destroyed most of the brain cells of the workers at the plant - they were like automatons.  Fucking scary!

Bloke in Queensland last year "fell" into a woodchipper.  Police later charged his two "workmates".  The only way that could have come about is that one of them boasted about it.  THAT would have been a fun night at the pub!  "Haha - you should have seen it ...."

I think it's been discussed here before, but there's a particularly nasty plant in tropical Aus that has a leaf you don't want to brush against.  It's been described as like being electrocuted while in a tub of boiling acid!  Documented cases include a horse leaping over a cliff to escape the agony, and an army officer shooting himself with his service revolver after using the leaf for "toilet purposes". 

Maybe this should be in the WTF Australia thread ...

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2 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

How could that even happen? An open vat of acid?

The worst I ever heard of was a guy doing an old style mopped tar & gravel roof. He took a header off the roof and landed head first in the tar kettle.

450 degrees

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1 hour ago, Point Break said:

Ouch. The article says the concentration was only @10%. I guess that's still enough. I wonder if the 165 degrees was way more damaging than the acid.....

150 degree water can cause third degree burns in seconds

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I recall a case in Maine I think it was,  a few years ago where a Doc offed his wife stuck her in the deep freeze, then hired a woodchipper and feed her through it while parked on a bridge in a snowstorm, in the middle of the night, a snowplow driver  reported it after happening upon the scene, forensics didn't find much except for some small amounts of dental work done to teeth that were found downstream that could be linked to now absent wife.

Its always the little things that get the Darwin candidates and murderers.

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2 minutes ago, Navig8tor said:

I recall a case in Maine I think it was,  a few years ago where a Doc offed his wife stuck her in the deep freeze, then hired a woodchipper and feed her through it while parked on a bridge in a snowstorm, a snowplow driver  reported it after happening upon the scene, forensics didn't find much except for some small amounts of dental work done to teeth that were found downstream that could be linked to now absent wife.

Its always the little things that get the Darwin candidates and murderers.

Note to oneself, 

Aim wood chipper over the dock edge at the start of the outgoing tide. Thanks  

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39 minutes ago, burndoc said:
1 hour ago, Point Break said:

Ouch. The article says the concentration was only @10%. I guess that's still enough. I wonder if the 165 degrees was way more damaging than the acid.....

150 degree water can cause third degree burns in seconds

One of the saddest weeks of my life was in 1980 when one of my sailors woke up to the smell of gas, got out of the house but went back inside to wake up and help his roommates escape the now rapidly expanding fire. He received 2nd and 3rd degree burns ove 70 or 80% of his body. We medicated him from Beeville, TX up to the burn center at Ft Sam Houston in San Antonio. The daily reports of “condition Satisfactory, not expected to survive” was pretty tough his friends and family. He lasted about 10 days. Report was this guy was extracted, had an emergency shower and was walking and talking before transport. Had to be hard. 

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2 minutes ago, Innocent Bystander said:

One of the saddest weeks of my life was in 1980 when one of my sailors woke up to the smell of gas, got out of the house but went back inside to wake up and help his roommates escape the now rapidly expanding fire. He received 2nd and 3rd degree burns ove 70 or 80% of his body. We medicated him from Beeville, TX up to the burn center at Ft Sam Houston in San Antonio. The daily reports of “condition Satisfactory, not expected to survive” was pretty tough his friends and family. He lasted about 10 days. Report was this guy was extracted, had an emergency shower and was walking and talking before transport. Had to be hard. 

Many of our big burns come in talking. Get the breathing tube in before airway is lost. Great unit. Col. Pruitt was the doc there for many years. Great surgeon

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25 minutes ago, bmiller said:

Hey doc, have you heard the D Rep story? Toughest human being I've ever known.

https://denver.cbslocal.com/2018/02/26/dave-repsher-frisco-helicopter-crash/

Yes. Every now and then you get someone who breaks the odds. They did a great job on him

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32 minutes ago, Navig8tor said:

I recall a case in Maine I think it was,  a few years ago where a Doc offed his wife stuck her in the deep freeze, then hired a woodchipper and feed her through it while parked on a bridge in a snowstorm, in the middle of the night, a snowplow driver  reported it after happening upon the scene, forensics didn't find much except for some small amounts of dental work done to teeth that were found downstream that could be linked to now absent wife.

Its always the little things that get the Darwin candidates and murderers.

That was covered on one of those forensics shows - I remember it because the guy was such a dummy - spraying from right beside the road bridge and well clear of the water so there was lots of "remains" for them to work with.

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36 minutes ago, Navig8tor said:

I recall a case in Maine I think it was,  a few years ago where a Doc offed his wife stuck her in the deep freeze, then hired a woodchipper and feed her through it while parked on a bridge in a snowstorm, in the middle of the night, a snowplow driver  reported it after happening upon the scene, forensics didn't find much except for some small amounts of dental work done to teeth that were found downstream that could be linked to now absent wife.

Its always the little things that get the Darwin candidates and murderers.

 

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An Arizona man was fatally shot Monday after he donned a bulletproof vest and asked a friend to shoot him, authorities said.

Parker Ray Lynch and two friends were firing rounds from a .223 single-shot rifle at a ballistic vest in a tree-lined area in the town of Central, about 160 miles east of Phoenix, the Graham County Sheriff’s Office said. At one point, Lynch, 25, put on the vest and asked his friend Steven Watson to shoot at him, authorities said.

 

Watson fired one round at Lynch’s abdomen. It was unclear if the bullet pierced the vest or missed it. Lynch was taken to a hospital and died during surgery.

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Not a good place to work, as they had a death there a few years prior.  MIOSHA will be busy on this for a while.

 

Sovik said he was not aware of any previous chemical vat accidents at the business, but said several years ago, a machine accident there resulted in the death of an employee.

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I could have sworn that this was a mythbusters episode once.... no proof that Darwin was involved yet.  But...I can’t really see how he couldn’t be.   That or Taco Bell

https://www.baltimoresun.com/news/maryland/crime/bs-md-ci-burned-body-found-20190217-story.html

man died after being engulfed in flames and running from a portable toilet that was also on fire in the parking lot of M&T Bank Stadium in Baltimore Sunday afternoon.

The man was seen, running and on fire, by a security guard for M&T Bank Stadium around 3 p.m. It wasn’t clear how long he had been in the toilet or what had caused the fire. 

 

 

 

 

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Methane explosion?

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11 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

Methane explosion?

Light a man a fire and he'll be warm for a day.  Light a man on fire and he'll be warm for the rest of his life.

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