• Announcements

    • Zapata

      Abbreviated rules   07/28/2017

      Underdawg did an excellent job of explaining the rules.  Here's the simplified version: Don't insinuate Pedo.  Warning and or timeout for a first offense.  PermaFlick for any subsequent offenses Don't out members.  See above for penalties.  Caveat:  if you have ever used your own real name or personal information here on the forums since, like, ever - it doesn't count and you are fair game. If you see spam posts, report it to the mods.  We do not hang out in every thread 24/7 If you see any of the above, report it to the mods by hitting the Report button in the offending post.   We do not take action for foul language, off-subject content, or abusive behavior unless it escalates to persistent stalking.  There may be times that we might warn someone or flick someone for something particularly egregious.  There is no standard, we will know it when we see it.  If you continually report things that do not fall into rules #1 or 2 above, you may very well get a timeout yourself for annoying the Mods with repeated whining.  Use your best judgement. Warnings, timeouts, suspensions and flicks are arbitrary and capricious.  Deal with it.  Welcome to anarchy.   If you are a newbie, there are unwritten rules to adhere to.  They will be explained to you soon enough.  
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
plenamar

Clear rust protection

12 posts in this topic

A friend asks me if transparent rust protection coating exists.

For example, can I paint an iron surface with clear epoxy as a rust protection system?

My friend likes the look of bare iron.

 

Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Iron that has a clear coat over it doesn't look like bare iron. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fur trappers boil and dye their traps to get the black oxide layer that add some level of protection.   Not sure what the stuff is but looks similar to gun blueing or using Ospho on rusty metal.  Isn't the new architectural trend to just let it rust?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Clear matt acrylic auto enamel.  You can get it in rattle cans at any auto parts store.  Do 5 coats.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is a clear version of POR15.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rat Rods often spray over the old finish to preserve their "rusty wreck" patina. Believe as Guerdon suggested they use clear coat. 

Clear POR15 as PeterSailor suggests might be more durable, that stuff is pretty tough.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/4/2017 at 1:32 AM, sailak said:

Fur trappers boil and dye their traps to get the black oxide layer that add some level of protection.   Not sure what the stuff is but looks similar to gun blueing or using Ospho on rusty metal.  Isn't the new architectural trend to just let it rust?

 

Corten steel used in architecture and public art.  Good stuff used well.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Weathering_steel 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/4/2017 at 5:17 AM, Scratchanot said:

Clear powder coat. You can google it.

I've got some brushed stainless parts on a product I'm developing that need some fingerprint protection. I've tried a few different flavors of "clear" satin powder coat but they all have a yellowish tinge. Anyone aware of a truly clear satin product?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

IStream: outdoor or indoor use (it doesn't sound like this is for a sailboat).  What about a thin coat of epoxy?

I used to build bike frames as a hobby, and one of my friends would clear coat his frames with System 3 furniture epoxy.  In Seattle-level sunshine the bikes could get daily use outside for years before the epoxy started to break down, for inside use it would last forever.

It still might be too yellow, but it is worth trying.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, Alex  these instruments are indoor only, so no UV but incidental exposure to both acids and bases plus various nonpolar solvents. I hadn't thought of epoxy because we're trying to stick with a powder coat but it could work. I'll start looking into it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0