• Announcements

    • Zapata

      Abbreviated rules   07/28/2017

      Underdawg did an excellent job of explaining the rules.  Here's the simplified version: Don't insinuate Pedo.  Warning and or timeout for a first offense.  PermaFlick for any subsequent offenses Don't out members.  See above for penalties.  Caveat:  if you have ever used your own real name or personal information here on the forums since, like, ever - it doesn't count and you are fair game. If you see spam posts, report it to the mods.  We do not hang out in every thread 24/7 If you see any of the above, report it to the mods by hitting the Report button in the offending post.   We do not take action for foul language, off-subject content, or abusive behavior unless it escalates to persistent stalking.  There may be times that we might warn someone or flick someone for something particularly egregious.  There is no standard, we will know it when we see it.  If you continually report things that do not fall into rules #1 or 2 above, you may very well get a timeout yourself for annoying the Mods with repeated whining.  Use your best judgement. Warnings, timeouts, suspensions and flicks are arbitrary and capricious.  Deal with it.  Welcome to anarchy.   If you are a newbie, there are unwritten rules to adhere to.  They will be explained to you soon enough.  
alpinist

Chasing the dream.

Recommended Posts

Just moved to Miami from Reno Nevada to chase my cruising dream. Have almost no sailing experience so I clearly have a lot to learn before I buy my boat in the next 9 to 15 months. Current thinking is to purchase something in the 27 to 35 foot range that would be classified as a cruiser/racer. I do need something solid for blue water but reading around has led me to believe that full keel is not always desirable. Apparently something lighter can be sturdy and have many benefits for cruising, (light air, nimbleness and handeling among others). One thing seems clear there are many ways to skin the sailing cat and each seems to have it plusses and minuses. Open mind here. 

I am hoping to meet up with folks in the south Florida area who perhaps need an extra set of hands for a day of sailing or for repairs they are doing. I want to absorb knowledge and gain experience. I have a beer fund!

Flame away if you feel like it

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Every boat is a compromise and it all boils down to personal preference.  The problem is developing that preference.  That requires a lot of experience sailing on a lot of different boats, and making a few mistakes along the way.

Few experienced sailors would be happy with the first boats they drooled over as beginners.  So take your time to figure it out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
26 minutes ago, alpinist said:

Just moved to Miami from Reno Nevada to chase my cruising dream. Have almost no sailing experience so I clearly have a lot to learn before I buy my boat in the next 9 to 15 months. Current thinking is to purchase something in the 27 to 35 foot range that would be classified as a cruiser/racer. I do need something solid for blue water but reading around has led me to believe that full keel is not always desirable. Apparently something lighter can be sturdy and have many benefits for cruising, (light air, nimbleness and handeling among others). One thing seems clear there are many ways to skin the sailing cat and each seems to have it plusses and minuses. Open mind here. 

I am hoping to meet up with folks in the south Florida area who perhaps need an extra set of hands for a day of sailing or for repairs they are doing. I want to absorb knowledge and gain experience. I have a beer fund!

Flame away if you feel like it

Holy crap, a sensible newbie/dreamer! Welcome to SA.

I'm, not in FL, but I've been cruising full time for a while. I'm not an expert, but I haven't sunk the boat yet, either.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
26 minutes ago, Whisper said:

Few experienced sailors would be happy with the first boats they drooled over as beginners. 

You mean I wouldn't be happy with that 65' ferro Brigantine anymore?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My advice (worth twice what you paid for it):  

1) Join a local sailing club, and sail with as many different people on as many different boats as possible. If the club has a racing program, volunteer as crew. Even if you don't particularly like racing, try it for a series or two.  Three months of racing will teach you more about making a sailboat "go" than three years of day sailing on your own.  

2) Over here on the west coast of Florida, we have a popular sailing school that can provide you with concentrated coursework and boat handling practice that - again - will bring you up to speed quicker.  You will start with a Colgate 26, and upgrade to a large Hunter cruising boat if you desire - you'll gain valuable hands on experience docking, navigating, sailing, planning, adapting,and developing judgement.  (...I do not work for them nor do I have any relationship with them, but I know many people who have used them and benefited.)

https://www.offshoresailing.com/our-locations/

3) While you are sailing along on everybody else's big boat - go out and get yourself a small boat to learn on now. Not sure of your age or physical condition. but if you are young and flexible enough, think about something like a Sunfish, Laser, small dinghy, or other small boat locally available for cheap. A small boat will teach you "cause and effect" quicker than years on a big boat - so even if you only sail it for a year or two, the dividends will be large.  Big boats experience the same responses as small boats - it just takes different conditions to develop them. Small boat experience will help you learn to anticipate what may be happening next on your bigger boat someday.

That's enough from me for now. Just sail other people's boats as much as you can before you buy your own boat, and try and learn the fundamentals as efficiently (and soon) as possible. Good luck!

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
32 minutes ago, Tom Scott said:

My advice (worth twice what you paid for it):  

1) Join a local sailing club, and sail with as many different people on as many different boats as possible. If the club has a racing program, volunteer as crew. Even if you don't particularly like racing, try it for a series or two.  Three months of racing will teach you more about making a sailboat "go" than three years of day sailing on your own.  

2) Over here on the west coast of Florida, we have a popular sailing school that can provide you with concentrated coursework and boat handling practice that - again - will bring you up to speed quicker.  You will start with a Colgate 26, and upgrade to a large Hunter cruising boat if you desire - you'll gain valuable hands on experience docking, navigating, sailing, planning, adapting,and developing judgement.  (...I do not work for them nor do I have any relationship with them, but I know many people who have used them and benefited.)

https://www.offshoresailing.com/our-locations/

3) While you are sailing along on everybody else's big boat - go out and get yourself a small boat to learn on now. Not sure of your age or physical condition. but if you are young and flexible enough, think about something like a Sunfish, Laser, small dinghy, or other small boat locally available for cheap. A small boat will teach you "cause and effect" quicker than years on a big boat - so even if you only sail it for a year or two, the dividends will be large.  Big boats experience the same responses as small boats - it just takes different conditions to develop them. Small boat experience will help you learn to anticipate what may be happening next on your bigger boat someday.

That's enough from me for now. Just sail other people's boats as much as you can before you buy your own boat, and try and learn the fundamentals as efficiently (and soon) as possible. Good luck!

 

^^^+1000

Every word is true.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jesus, this place is getting soft.

Fuck off, Noob. And post a picture of your girlfriend's tits.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What Tom said. I never met a great driver that didn't learn in small boats - won't be accidentally jibing or locked in irons for starters.  Just getting the feel of how sails and rudder work. Learning how to maneuver a bigger boat is a different set of skills, docking and undocking for sure.  Lots to learn and it is so much easier on other peoples boats.  I have been sailing for multiple decades and I still try to learn something every time I go out. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
37 minutes ago, IStream said:

Jesus, this place is getting soft.

Fuck off, Noob. And post a picture of your girlfriend's tits.

By all means!  Forgive me for overlooking the protocol before responding.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Get your boat. Get a buddy who you trust who knows how to sail. Go about stocking the boat with smoking hot chicks who have no clue how to sail nor a desire to touch a single line.  Somewhere along the way, the motivation should kick in that you've gotta figure this shit out in a hurry so that you can solo with whatever  honey your left with when the dust settles. Fastest way to get from A to B without having to bother with C.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Also, maybe take some lessons. You're only as good as your worst wipeout. Wipeouts on any size sailboat can hurt or worse.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The bigger question to all this... Seriously why Florida dude

You came from Reno but did not see you had the whole state of California so close to start a sailing life, make better money in a shorter period of time as well as get your badges and bitches together.  Contrary to what you may want to believe but boats are less expensive in San Francisco and getting a great cruiser/racer is far more doable for most folks who seek to take in the sailing/racing/cruising life in the nearer future. Then again if you are seeking a shoal draft boat and want to island hop, drink beer, smoke up and get an early start to skin cancer, you picked the right spot. Now that you are there - be careful about your circles, be the guy who is open, the one can be counted on and ready to learn earnestly.  Keep your eye on your prize and don't let them discount you for a moment.

Knowing what i know now, i still would pick a full keel boat if you are looking to push off Florida to destinations unknown.  I would go with a reasonable loved old boat with a good yanmar with a purchase price equal to 1/3 your earning potential for the year. Plan on spending 1/3 of that potential on repairs and modernization.  I would plan on doing the Atlantic circuit once you found your groove. This is a wonderful world and south Florida and the islands to the south are just a small part of this. But for hanging around Florida for the long spell waiting for the perfect moment - that might not be so wise on one's psyche and angels of one higher nature.  Life has a way of closing out and entrapment caused by extenuating circumstances which kills inspiration, desire and clouds the reason you set course.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Tom Scott said:

My advice (worth twice what you paid for it):  

1) Join a local sailing club, and sail with as many different people on as many different boats as possible. If the club has a racing program, volunteer as crew. Even if you don't particularly like racing, try it for a series or two.  Three months of racing will teach you more about making a sailboat "go" than three years of day sailing on your own.  

2) Over here on the west coast of Florida, we have a popular sailing school that can provide you with concentrated coursework and boat handling practice that - again - will bring you up to speed quicker.  You will start with a Colgate 26, and upgrade to a large Hunter cruising boat if you desire - you'll gain valuable hands on experience docking, navigating, sailing, planning, adapting,and developing judgement.  (...I do not work for them nor do I have any relationship with them, but I know many people who have used them and benefited.)

https://www.offshoresailing.com/our-locations/

3) While you are sailing along on everybody else's big boat - go out and get yourself a small boat to learn on now. Not sure of your age or physical condition. but if you are young and flexible enough, think about something like a Sunfish, Laser, small dinghy, or other small boat locally available for cheap. A small boat will teach you "cause and effect" quicker than years on a big boat - so even if you only sail it for a year or two, the dividends will be large.  Big boats experience the same responses as small boats - it just takes different conditions to develop them. Small boat experience will help you learn to anticipate what may be happening next on your bigger boat someday.

That's enough from me for now. Just sail other people's boats as much as you can before you buy your own boat, and try and learn the fundamentals as efficiently (and soon) as possible. Good luck!

 

Yup, my kid is currently doing what's called (I.e., called by the national sail training/education body) here in Canada "CanSail 3"  --it's intermediate/advanced Laser sailing-- is way more knowledgeable --or will be shortly-- about sailing techniques/theory than I was when starting out lazily daysailing on my dad's boat as a 16 year old.  So, yeah, start on small boats - nothing better for teaching and hammering home the basics.  And also sailing on other's boats.

Now, "seamanship" and all the stuff around fixing/maintaining/upgrading...that comes with blood, sweat and tears and boat ownership --preferably something not too big, so you're not crushed by the burden. (If you're actually an "alpinist" as your posting handle suggests, you're a quick learner, used to handling ropes in challenging high-angle, high-risk environments outdoors in a variety of weather conditions and thus you might actually get bored with local sailing unless it's challenging.

So, finally, at some point, you might find a week doing a Coastal Nav course helpful and interesting.  I did one with Bluewater Sailing School (Ft Lauderdale) years ago - lucked out with a good instructor.  Then, if you've got the money and inclination, they also do an offshore course from FL to Bermuda  --that'll give you an idea if you want to continue to venture offshore, which is a diffferent beast altogether (especially if you learn celestial navigation).  (Offshore race boat crew deliveries are also a low-commitment way to get such offshore experience.)

Also read a lot.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, Whisper said:

^^^+1000

Every word is true.

That's good advice.

I think there are three things that need to be balanced to have a happy experience with your boat.

  1. Where are you using it, what are you using it for? You mention a "blue water cruiser" but honestly is this what you are going to do with this boat? I've seen so many people search for a blue water cruiser who mostly weekend/daysail. And even if your ultimate dream is that round the world cruise, are you going to do it on THIS boat or will you work up to it?
  2. What are you willing to do? Most of the issues on a boat are things you can figure out. Youtube is your friend for this. But it's a lot of work. I know personally, if I won the lottery the big beneficiary would be a local yard. But I haven't so I do my own work, learning along the way. You can too. 
  3. Go sailing. Other already covered this. Go, sail, learn.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

A little about me..I'm not happy if I dont have a serious adventure i'm involved in ..outdoors in someplace spectacular and awe inspiring. I've spent months in arctic conditions living out of a sled dragged behind me. That happened to be some of the happiest times of my life. I like going light and efficiently..I like challenges that have elements of risk that is manageable with good judgement and solid execution of those proper decisions.

It's time for a new adventure. Past time

Why Florida? Well I need experience and there are lots of boats here. Florida is also the obvious jumping off point for a guy who loves Caribbean. Other options were Puerto Rico or USVI. I have spent a lot of time in Puerto Rico but work options are not particularly good there. Work options here in Florida are well..hmm we shall see.

The goal is simply stated finish putting away finances to buy a boat and spend up to two years cruising without any additional income.  Buy a good boat.  Bluewater worthy is critical. The reason for this is I suspect I am going to want to head into the pacific if I manage to get enough of the Caribbean. I want that option in any case. 

I am well aware that I need more knowledge and hands on experience to pick the right boat the first time (at least right enough..beware the grass is greener syndrome). Measure 10 times if you must but always.. cut once. 

An interesting thing I have noticed is that shoal draft and bluewater capability can come in a small package. Also my reading has suggested that real safety from broadsides in heavy seas doesn't seem to come into play unless you are looking at 60ft plus monohulls..even then it seems like a bad idea to be sideways. In other words avoidance of bad conditions, handeling and water sense? or watever you call experience with rough seas seems to be the keys to safety. That and a boat that is seriously reliable and has the power/nimbleness to maneuver as needed. Oh yeah and did I mention avoidance of bad conditions ...I'm a big fan of waiting for the right time when momma nature is involved.

Maybe I'm talking out my ass here..Thats the thing..I need experience at this point..all the reading and video watching is about as done as I can be without some hands on to really get going.

I still need to know how I like to set thing up..lines sails....the head..galley..stowage ..endless ..on and on..

So..who needs a hand out there..I'm a good mechanic..I have a massive roll of fiberglass matting in storage,...Have balls will travel...

sorry no tits

BTW is there a guy named Guido around here..has or had a boat called Shanachie..I know him from a different area of adventure..hope he is around.

BoatLogo-pic.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Depends how much money she plunks down up front. Recently escaped.. I'm going..have cash she can come along..she better have  enough for her airfare when she gets tired of it/me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, Brent Swain said:

This usually results in getting steered away from boats, and into real estate debt, for decades,by the 'Hot chick " who claimed to be interested in cruising ,but much later , will eventually  admit  she had no intention of ever going cruising. I have seen it happen time and time again.Exceptions happen, but rarely.  

The wise newbie and wannabe adventure would be smart to put this idiot ^^ on ignore now. Or at least don't believe anything he says, but pay some attention to those that call out his lies and bullshit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yo

2 hours ago, alpinist said:

 

A little about me..I'm not happy if I dont have a serious adventure i'm involved in ..outdoors in someplace spectacular and awe inspiring. I've spent months in arctic conditions living out of a sled dragged behind me. That happened to be some of the happiest times of my life. I like going light and efficiently..I like challenges that have elements of risk that is manageable with good judgement and solid execution of those proper decisions.

It's time for a new adventure. Past time

Why Florida? Well I need experience and there are lots of boats here. Florida is also the obvious jumping off point for a guy who loves Caribbean. Other options were Puerto Rico or USVI. I have spent a lot of time in Puerto Rico but work options are not particularly good there. Work options here in Florida are well..hmm we shall see.

The goal is simply stated finish putting away finances to buy a boat and spend up to two years cruising without any additional income.  Buy a good boat.  Bluewater worthy is critical. The reason for this is I suspect I am going to want to head into the pacific if I manage to get enough of the Caribbean. I want that option in any case. 

I am well aware that I need more knowledge and hands on experience to pick the right boat the first time (at least right enough..beware the grass is greener syndrome). Measure 10 times if you must but always.. cut once. 

An interesting thing I have noticed is that shoal draft and bluewater capability can come in a small package. Also my reading has suggested that real safety from broadsides in heavy seas doesn't seem to come into play unless you are looking at 60ft plus monohulls..even then it seems like a bad idea to be sideways. In other words avoidance of bad conditions, handeling and water sense? or watever you call experience with rough seas seems to be the keys to safety. That and a boat that is seriously reliable and has the power/nimbleness to maneuver as needed. Oh yeah and did I mention avoidance of bad conditions ...I'm a big fan of waiting for the right time when momma nature is involved.

Maybe I'm talking out my ass here..Thats the thing..I need experience at this point..all the reading and video watching is about as done as I can be without some hands on to really get going.

I still need to know how I like to set thing up..lines sails....the head..galley..stowage ..endless ..on and on..

So..who needs a hand out there..I'm a good mechanic..I have a massive roll of fiberglass matting in storage,...Have balls will travel...

sorry no tits

BTW is there a guy named Guido around here..has or had a boat called Shanachie..I know him from a different area of adventure..hope he is around.

BoatLogo-pic.jpg

There are plenty of options of reasonably safe sailboats that you can take offshore in the 25-35 ft range with also a reasonable shoal draft. Other than sailing skills and boat handling which is not rocket science, consider getting some experience in boat works, maybe in a local boatyard or with people who are refitting an old boat and need help. Mechanicals skills are also  important if you intend to rely on Internal Combustion Engine. It's not just about being self reliant but also getting to know how a boat works.

There is also knowledge you will have to acquire studiyng books or attending classes: navigation, weather, collision avoidance, lights and day shape.

It's a  slow process but it's not difficult and it seems that you are already on the right path.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am well aware that I need more knowledge and hands on experience to pick the right boat the first time (at least right enough..beware the grass is greener syndrome). Measure 10 times if you must but always.. cut once. 

An interesting thing I have noticed is that shoal draft and bluewater capability can come in a small package.

Unless you have all the money in this world you would most likely have  make compromise. Boats are often a matter of desire vs. opportunity. You look for certain features but if you are too picky then you only have few available to chose from at the  budget you have. Or none. A good boat in good shape will take you far. Don't measure too much, use common sense instead, you can do a lot even on a not ideal boat

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

First: You're going to fucking DIE !

Now that we have THAT out of the way;

You want to buy a blue-water capable cruising boat and you don't know how to sail ?

Would you buy a full-size touring motorcycle as your first bike ?   How old are you ?   How smart are you ?  ( honestly - how good at mechanical systems,  simple physics and organization )  What is your budget range ?  What is your budget for sustaining this adventure ?

I say this because the MINUTE you take ownership of a vessel it becomes a liability.  Nobody smart ever said "I need to save money,  I'll buy a sailboat." unless they lived on an island.  Florida is not an island.  I looked that up.

Your 'Dream' is a good one,  and nobody here would want to dissuade a potential inmate of the asylum that is yachting,  but you really owe it to yourself to do this in a reasonable fashion,  and learn from the experience of others rather than at the expense of the United States Coast Guard.  They don't deserve that shit.

If you want to "Learn the Ropes" and haven't already read every back-copy of Good Old Boat,  then Stop (Hammertime) and do so.  This will provide insight into the used boat market of modest, fiberglass auxiliary boats ( do you even know what that means ? ).

If you learn how to sail,  buy a 30-footer and get it and yourself competent enough for coastal cruising and get to the Carib you will be way ahead of the odds and with sufficient funding at THAT point ( 2 years from now ) you will be able to fairly asses and acquire your Blue Water boat.  What is much more likely is that you buy a Great Deal on Way Too Much Boat for you,  and you sink all your kitty into fixing the Everything and 2 years from now you are sick of living in a marina on the Redneck Riviera and come here to rant about how sailing sucks.

For the Love of God,  go do some Sailing First - you wouldn't be the first guy to get 5 miles out and decide this shit is for the goddamn birds and wouldn't it just be cheaper to fly there ( yes,  yes it is )  or travel by RV,  at least those don't sink.   

The sea won't kill you quite as fast as the sky will, but it's seriously persistent.       I know - you just want to go have a bit of fun and how hard can it be ?   Well, truth is,  it's not that hard - you just have to want to DO it,  and not just the magazine version of it,  but the head-unclogging, sail-humping, rig-climbing, bottom-painting, part too.     Our concern here,  aplinist,  is that you don't know what you don't know.

You remind me of the guy that is learning to ride motorcycles and instead of getting a starter bike to drop a couple times wants to 'save money' by just getting his forever bike right up front.  This almost never goes the way they think it will.  You want to save money ?   Get yourself aboard a group charter and go out there and do it for a week and see if you like having salty eyelids.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  1)  Every 'smart' n00b these days finds a girl with an impressive, camera friendly, rack.  Then starts a Patreon account after establishing a good social media following.  The actual boat is secondary to the drama of how many times you can get that impressive rack in a bikini in the water.

  2)   If Rule #1 doesn't apply, bus tables or roof houses, or start doing something flexible, and beg/borrow/barge your way onto delivery trips up or down the coast.  You'll learn more in one delivery trip with a good captain than a decade of courses.

 

Quote

sorry no tits

Oh then bugger off!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Great Red Shark said:

First: You're going to fucking DIE !

Now that we have THAT out of the way;

You want to buy a blue-water capable cruising boat and you don't know how to sail ?

Would you buy a full-size touring motorcycle as your first bike ?   How old are you ?   How smart are you ?  ( honestly - how good at mechanical systems,  simple physics and organization )  What is your budget range ?  What is your budget for sustaining this adventure ?

I say this because the MINUTE you take ownership of a vessel it becomes a liability.  Nobody smart ever said "I need to save money,  I'll buy a sailboat." unless they lived on an island.  Florida is not an island.  I looked that up.

Your 'Dream' is a good one,  and nobody here would want to dissuade a potential inmate of the asylum that is yachting,  but you really owe it to yourself to do this in a reasonable fashion,  and learn from the experience of others rather than at the expense of the United States Coast Guard.  They don't deserve that shit.

If you want to "Learn the Ropes" and haven't already read every back-copy of Good Old Boat,  then Stop (Hammertime) and do so.  This will provide insight into the used boat market of modest, fiberglass auxiliary boats ( do you even know what that means ? ).

If you learn how to sail,  buy a 30-footer and get it and yourself competent enough for coastal cruising and get to the Carib you will be way ahead of the odds and with sufficient funding at THAT point ( 2 years from now ) you will be able to fairly asses and acquire your Blue Water boat.  What is much more likely is that you buy a Great Deal on Way Too Much Boat for you,  and you sink all your kitty into fixing the Everything and 2 years from now you are sick of living in a marina on the Redneck Riviera and come here to rant about how sailing sucks.

For the Love of God,  go do some Sailing First - you wouldn't be the first guy to get 5 miles out and decide this shit is for the goddamn birds and wouldn't it just be cheaper to fly there ( yes,  yes it is )  or travel by RV,  at least those don't sink.   

The sea won't kill you quite as fast as the sky will, but it's seriously persistent.       I know - you just want to go have a bit of fun and how hard can it be ?   Well, truth is,  it's not that hard - you just have to want to DO it,  and not just the magazine version of it,  but the head-unclogging, sail-humping, rig-climbing, bottom-painting, part too.     Our concern here,  aplinist,  is that you don't know what you don't know.

You remind me of the guy that is learning to ride motorcycles and instead of getting a starter bike to drop a couple times wants to 'save money' by just getting his forever bike right up front.  This almost never goes the way they think it will.  You want to save money ?   Get yourself aboard a group charter and go out there and do it for a week and see if you like having salty eyelids.

 

 

2 hours ago, Great Red Shark said:

There should be a law against buying a keel boat before you've sailed 100 miles. 

^^^ What HE said!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Great Red Shark said:

There should be a law against buying a keel boat before you've sailed 100 miles. 

Agreed. That is why I moved early before I am ready to buy. Lets go! Anyone need a hand in the south Florida area? If not, any recommendations on a good sailing club in the Miami area?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Great Red Shark said:

There should be a law against buying a keel boat before you've sailed 100 miles. 

Why? What do  you know after 100miles?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Blitz said:

Rimas has sailed or drifted over 100 mi. he still shouldnt have a boat.

He's also never made it into port without a rescue tow....and usually requires a tow out. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Cuntyhunk said:

Why? What do  you know after 100miles?

If you really like this whole Sailing thing,  or not. 

I used to crew for a couple who would get sick the first day out on any long offshore trip.  They would be miserable at first and later would rally and be a stoked on the trip as any salty dog ever was - me personally,  if I regularly got that sick I'd find another goddamn hobby.

Come sail the Kauai Channel race (about 80 miles each way, open seas, reinforced summer trades)   - in 3 weeks and find out if you like being wet and scared and living on pop-tarts and Coors light.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
25 minutes ago, Great Red Shark said:

If you really like this whole Sailing thing,  or not. 

I used to crew for a couple who would get sick the first day out on any long offshore trip.  They would be miserable at first and later would rally and be a stoked on the trip as any salty dog ever was - me personally,  if I regularly got that sick I'd find another goddamn hobby.

Come sail the Kauai Channel race (about 80 miles each way, open seas, reinforced summer trades)   - in 3 weeks and find out if you like being wet and scared and living on pop-tarts and Coors light.

Pop-tarts and Coors Light gets me ralphing on dry land.  Only IPA's are allowed on my boat!  And rum.

Wish I could do the Kauai race, but I'll be in LA that week.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's the point...

As for alpinist,  well,  as he couldn't be arsed to answer a single of my questions,  I have limited insight into how to help,  aside from don't be in a hurry to buy something you don't understand. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Everything that's been said here trying to help this guy out has been gospel. But you left out the fun part. All the stuff about paying his dues is fine but, the truth is, if he doesn't put some kind of stupid deadline on himself like crossing the Atlantic twelve months from now and instead focuses on just enjoying the acquisition of new skills and experiences as they come, he'll find the learning curve is mostly self reinforcing. It's supposed to be fun-and it usually is!

Now about those tits.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fair enough,  I just see the "Fool and his money are soon parted" scenario far too often.  Marina where I keep one boat has a classic example - young kid,  had a little bit of inheritance, just got sold 2-3x the boat he needs (the broker really ought be ashamed of himself)  and now is not only well over his head,  but can't afford a pot to piss in to boot.   Don't be that guy.

Gee, mister, that sure is a neat sailboat,  how much is it ?
"How much you got,  kid ?"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry Red. BTW thanks for the yer gunna die..damned if I don't feel at home unless someone is telling me that. 

I'm an excellent mechanic..I will need to be. Need more experience with fiberglass but I'll get there. 

I'm smarter than the average bear.. I am also aware that I am woefully ignorant. I NEED experience..thus I moved to Florida..Learning to sail in the desert of Nevada is akin to learning to mountaineer in Florida. (doable but not ideal) When I wanted to become a good climber I moved to Yosemite.

I don't really have a ton of questions at this point. I know about as much as I can know without some experience to start sorting out what is important and the details that simply cannot be comprehended without getting salty. Once that begins I suspect I will start having some good questions.

So I keep asking ..what are some good local sailing clubs or groups  I can get involved with. Does anyone need a hand with some boat maintenance..or dare I hope some day sailing?

Here is a track of my one day of sailing experience off my Inreach..friends 37' Beneteau. More boat than I need I think but seemed easy enough to handle ..in the good conditions we had. I have spent a lot of time Kayaking and camping off the east side of Puerto Rico

499882_8388_L.jpg

Fun times

499884_29871_L.jpg

499880_6337_L.jpg

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah,  about Florida in the summertime... it's hot as blazes and everybody that CAN leave,  does.   I don't have much experience there,  but from what I'm told by buddies cruising through,  it's a power-boater mecca,  and while they DO still have some world-class regattas there (in the early spring)  those are specific racing-centered events.  Don't know any cruising centers there,  though one would think there really SHOULD be something,  but...the sailing "scene" is certainly not what it once was.   Have you been to the larger marinas, recreational harbors, & boatyards ?   Checked out a charter base or two ?    I can't help you from here,  other than to say that you will be well-served to KEEP YOUR OPTIONS OPEN by NOT purchasing the first boat that strikes your fancy - all it will be is another expense while you pile up some sea-miles working deliveries and such. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tom Scott - an inmate here is in Punta Gorda ( left coast of FL ) and could probably be talked into going for a sail.  You should read his stuff and get in touch.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Why not look into the Everglades Challenge and hit the ground running? If your willing to work at it, you might find an experienced sailor that you can assist with training and or testing out their craft, and eventually, you might be able to crew. Your camping and survival skills will be an asset, and you can start learning on a much smaller boat that you might not have to pay for. Sure this would be a steep learning curve but sounds like some of your back up skills could be a could trade off for your lack of sailing experience to the right competetor.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Screw all this negativity. Buy a boat with half your budget and go sailing. Avoid hurricanes if you can, bring a good attitude and you'll be fine and have an adventure*. Many a clueless idiot (which you may or may not be) have circumnavigated while the armchair experts sit around working on their qualifications. If you can fix a Yanmar you'll probably come home with more money than you started with. After a while you'll have a much better idea of the boat you should have bought so maybe you upgrade. There's only one place to get the education you need and that's behind the wheel of your own boat. 

 

* Adventures usually involve a healthy dose of suffering

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Alpinist, you have had a bunch of ideas thrown at you in this thread, BUT you need to read the thread that I have linked to, get in touch with them, go use your mechanical skills and help them put a new motor in, and learn heaps, and enjoy yourself!!

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Cuntyhunk said:

Buy a boat with 25%of  budget. You will need the rest in repairs and  go places

That is very close to what I have figured. $40k to $50k is the budget. 1 to 2 years cruising.

HILLY that thread says they are in Brazil?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

You  have  good budget:

5k -10k boat around 30ft

10K-20k equipment, repairs, yard bills etc.

25k 2 years cruising 

+/-10k depending on luck

You may also find employment along the way.

46 minutes ago, alpinist said:

That is very close to what I have figured. $40k to $50k is the budget. 1 to 2 years cruising.

HILLY that thread says they are in Brazil?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Cuntyhunk said:

 

You  have  good budget:

5k -10k boat around 30ft

10K-20k equipment, repairs, yard bills etc.

25k 2 years cruising 

+/-10k depending on luck

You may also find employment along the way.

 

Also, cruising only happens once you fixed the boat,and made it decent to live aboard. Consider 1 year where you are  grounded and actively preparing for cruising. That year also will cost you money.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
41 minutes ago, Brent Swain said:

Great Post! Right on!

You should also avoid advice form armchair experts who have never done any cruising, boat building, long term boat maintenance or living aboard , like the one on this site, who charges $175 an hour for such advice, without having done any of the above. Such fakes are common in this business, and overpaid out of  many people's  freedom chips, costing them years of cruising freedom.

Take no advice from this delusional liar.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, alpinist said:

That is very close to what I have figured. $40k to $50k is the budget. 1 to 2 years cruising.

HILLY that thread says they are in Brazil?

Yeah, probably in Brazil, but I thought you wanted adventure, they have an Atlantic crossing "planned", but whatever happens, this is a way to find out if you can handle this boating life, the work involved, the sweat equity/ enjoyment ratio, without having to buy a boat first.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well one nice thing about all this.. If I'm wrong I can always sell the boat for a loss.. or mebbe scuttle it to make a future dive site.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, alpinist said:

Well one nice thing about all this.. If I'm wrong I can always sell the boat for a loss.. or mebbe scuttle it to make a future dive site.

That was one point to my wife we we talked about boats. Buying a boat is NOT flushing the purchase price of the boat down the toilet. While it won't appreciate, it WILL maintain some non-zero value.

So at the end of the day...yeah, you might spend more maintaining it and owning it than you paid for it, but when you sell it you will have some cash back.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

À propos of nothing, but how did they fly in this formation from the strike force carrier deck?

Apropos of nothing, but how did they fly in this formation from the strike force carrier deck?.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Captain Gigi said:

À propos of nothing, but how did they fly in this formation from the strike force carrier deck?

Apropos of nothing, but how did they fly in this formation from the strike force carrier deck?.jpg

uuummmmm... they take off one by one, fly in a circle, get in formation and fly over the carrier?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/7/2017 at 1:48 AM, Tom Scott said:

My advice (worth twice what you paid for it):  

1) Join a local sailing club, and sail with as many different people on as many different boats as possible. [snipped]

2) https://www.offshoresailing.com/our-locations/

3) While you are sailing along on everybody else's big boat - go out and get yourself a small boat to learn on now. [snipped]

Just another voice in favour of Tom Scott's excellent advice.

If you buy a big boat now, you'll be paying insurance + maintenance + marina fees, and that's going to be at least $300 per month, every month, before you fix or break a single thig on the boat.

The same budget will buy you a lot of sailing lessons, a cheap fast dinghy to learn on, and plenty of good quality bottles to make you an even more welcome crew member on the boats of other people.  You'll learn far more that way, both about sailing and about what you do or don't like in bigger boats

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2017-07-07 at 0:45 PM, Great Red Shark said:

If you really like this whole Sailing thing,  or not. 

...if you like living on pop-tarts and Coors light.

Coors Lite is just fine if it's blazing hot out and the beer is absolutely ice cold, and in an emergency breakfast situation pop tarts approximate a fine French croissant, as long as they're toasted perfectly golden brown.

You don't do this in the Kauai Race? :-) 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎7‎/‎8‎/‎2017 at 10:50 AM, Brent Swain said:

Great Post! Right on!

You should also avoid advice form armchair experts who have never done any cruising, boat building, long term boat maintenance or living aboard , like the one on this site, who charges $175 an hour for such advice, without having done any of the above. Such fakes are common in this business, and overpaid out of  many people's  freedom chips, costing them years of cruising freedom.

Hey Asshole,  go shit on your own fucked up threads.   To clue you in, alpinist - this jerk ( B.S.) is sniping at one of the most prolific yacht designers in American today,  who has the good humor to post here on Sailing Anarchy regularly.  His success in the design of dozens of well-regarded is something that offends the hermit from Comox who takes every opportunity to share his unhinged take on things.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, Great Red Shark said:

Hey Asshole,  go shit on your own fucked up threads.   To clue you in, alpinist - this jerk ( B.S.) is sniping at one of the most prolific yacht designers in American today,  who has the good humor to post here on Sailing Anarchy regularly.  His success in the design of dozens of well-regarded is something that offends the hermit from Comox who takes every opportunity to share his unhinged take on things.

Well thIs is Anarchy...the OP didn't go looking for advice on Sailnet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Independent of all the above, consider what this guy did with 10k and an unseen boat.  Think he may be still at it.

 

Www.sailgeja.com

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Learned about blanking plugs for the through hulls today. Happy! So now I need to know how to stop a cutlass bearing/driveshaft leak.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A cutlass bearing should not pass through the hull.   Are you refering to the stuffing box?  Have extra stuffing and wrenches that fit.  Test them. Also, wax toilet rings if it turns to shit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, alpinist said:

Ok ..looking at some diagrams and yeah stuffing box. Found a good explanation here. http://www.boatus.com/boattech/casey/stuffing-box.asp

Thanks for the correction that put me in the right direction and the heads up on wrenches.

stuffing-box.jpg

I highly highly highly recommend Nigel Calder's mechanical/electrical/diesel books.

Read, study thoroughly, repeat.  :-)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm probably the only person who finds Calder almost incomprehensible in many areas, and badly organised. The index is so bad it's nearly useless. 

Nevertheless I do have a copy on the boat   and I have learned much from it  

I'd better duck and hide now. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, A horse, of course said:

I'm probably the only person who finds Calder almost incomprehensible in many areas, and badly organised. The index is so bad it's nearly useless. 

Nevertheless I do have a copy on the boat   and I have learned much from it  

I'd better duck and hide now. 

Yeah, not feeling your plight.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, A horse, of course said:

I'm probably the only person who finds Calder almost incomprehensible in many areas, and badly organised. The index is so bad it's nearly useless. 

Nevertheless I do have a copy on the boat   and I have learned much from it  

I'd better duck and hide now. 

I just basically meant learn as much as you (OP) can about mechanical, electrical and diesel stuff (whether through Calder or whatever).

(Or, really, far more challenging/interesting, go full-on Lin/Larry Pardey:  engineless and (nearly?) electricity-less.  You'll become a way better sailor that way, no doubt, and also have great sailing stories to tell in a bar.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Welcome to Florida,

    ...now please leave!

;)

 

 

 

http://www.bbyra.net/   the so fla 5 club circuit.  

coconut grove sailing club would be my choice if I were going to spend some money to join a club.   half decent club with shuttle to moorings,  But none of the so fla clubs are very cheap.  a little further up north club memberships are around 100/yr

join the crew pool, look for NOR and  skipper meetings and go...  ask who needs crew.     

 

in hollywood there is gulfstream sailing club, sunfish races every 4 weeks, on north lake.  also some big boat racing.  

http://www.gulfstreamsailingclub.org/sailorspoint/

Hillsboro inlet sailing club has beer can races in summer.  again go to the meeting, and skipper meetings.  someone will pick you up.  

https://www.hisc.org/

get good shoes and gloves.

also look at arc in miami for cheaper rentals.

http://www.arcmiami.com/index.htm

 

by october racing starts again.  til then its hot and little wind unless its raining...  

oh, yeah, volunteer at shake a leg.... they have sonars   IIRC.  http://www.shakealegmiami.org/

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Awesome! Thanks for the info! I'm leaving Florida as fast as I can possibly get my boat. And get it and me close enough to ready and GO!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Came to the conclusion I really do not like Miami. Not really surprising..so while debating whether to stick it out or go back to Nevada ..I came up with an executed a third crazier option. I bought a boat to escape from Miami on.

I got a bit lucky. Purchased S/V Attitude a 1978 Morgan Out Island 33. Hope to have her in Culebra Puerto Rico by new years.

 

 

svattitude1.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice...and congrats! The OI33 is a very roomy boat and perfect for escaping Miami across the Gulf Stream. That's what Charlie Morgan intended. A friend has one, so I know a bit about the OI33. Not a stellar under sail, but adequate...more than adequate as a motor-sailor if the diesel is in good nick. Turns a fair size 3 blade wheel, as I recall. Attend to the important details like rig, sails, thru-hulls and motor, and she will take care of you. Keep us updated.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks!

She will be home for the next couple years at least assuming things go as planned.

Yeah she has a different mast than original ..Taller with roller furling and apparently this greatly improved windward performance without adding significant weather helm. Does have an oversize blade and hits hull speed at about 1800rpm in mild conditions (very lightly loaded would expect a bit more under cruising trim) . Saw no tendency to overheat on the perkins 4108 which did surprise me a bit.. happy surprise. Still as one might expect.. So much to do.. interior is rough ..running rigging is marginal.. sails ok standing rigging good with a couple swage issues. I got a pretty special deal I think. One marginal through hull but it will seal fine if I must. Want to get it to Fajardo Puerto Rico before I pull her out. but will see.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Brent Swain just posted:

" When a father sees the death  of his son as a business opportunity, to cash in on sympathy donations ,and pockets  such donations ,he becomes a vulture,  feeding off the carcass of his offspring."

Think about that. Maybe a note to Scott, the editor is appropriate.

spike close up

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Bob Perry said:

Brent Swain just posted:

" When a father sees the death  of his son as a business opportunity, to cash in on sympathy donations ,and pockets  such donations ,he becomes a vulture,  feeding off the carcass of his offspring."

Think about that. Maybe a note to Scott, the editor is appropriate.

spike close up

 

Bob , got tears in my eyes looking at your fine looking son and as a father that has too lost a child I can only say that the pain is endless.

BS has no human respect or understanding and the comments you have posted are without question both foul and disrespectful.

Scott time to man up and permanently erase this fucker.

 

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Priscilla said:

Scott time to man up and permanently erase this fucker.

Time to stop spreading this personal shitfight across every fucking thread in CA! Leave the shitfighting where it belongs: in the Origami Madness thread. I mean , I don't like these personal attacks either, but from what I see in the 'rules', this is part of Anarchy. Anyway, back to the regularly scheduled program...jeeze...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I must have missed an epic shitfest....Bob. if you lost that fine looking young man you have my utmost and sincerest condolences.

I am spending my first night aboard a boat. My boat! Looking at the stars listening to the fish. Happy. Must begin eating the elephant tomorrow.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Took her out for the first time. Had the previous owner along to give me tips getting out of the Marina. Really good guy. So my first unexpected experience is is an idiot lobster hunting in the channel along the houses on the way out.. I'm putting along as slow as i can wondering if he is ever going to notice me. Guy has his diving float/flag too.. I'm thinking to myself.. how the fuck do I maintain 300 foot distance in a maybe 50 foot wide channel. cant reverse prop walk is f-ing nutz.. Does a diving flag really legally shut down a marina? Wishing I had bought that airhorn this morning when i replaced my out of date flares. ..so whistled as hard as could dude noticed and ducked under some boat. ..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The only thing a dive flag means is the divers need to keep their heads down so they don't get hit. Meaningless, no more than advice, to a boat. The moronic dive boats here fly thier flag 24/7 ... in the marina ... everywhere.

Reserves no water. Dive gear will scratch the bottom paint though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/13/2017 at 8:13 PM, Bob Perry said:

Brent Swain just posted:

" When a father sees the death  of his son as a business opportunity, to cash in on sympathy donations ,and pockets  such donations ,he becomes a vulture,  feeding off the carcass of his offspring."

Think about that. Maybe a note to Scott, the editor is appropriate.

spike close up

 

Bs is a dick. He needs a boot up the ass.  Time for the flick. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Um, bad news. I think you forgot to close your companionway hatch...

Seriously, good luck to you and all the SA'ers in harm's way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Attitude made it through as if nothing even happened! Very Happy.  Did not even lose my jury rigged mast light. May have recieved winds approx 50knots for about 4hrs. 

I am singlehanding back to Miami from my Hurrican hole in Port St. Lucie. Thus I need to use the ICW. I do not need to be in a rush but I do not prefer to dawdle either.

Word from Coast guard sector Miami is that Boca Inlet and Southern Blvd Bridges are Non-Op at this time. They suspect there may be others drawbridge issues but it has been a busy 48hrs since Irma and they simply do not have all information. Anyone else aware of major issues to navigation? New wrecks in channel etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes! I have so Much Time on My Hands to clean up postsand make them perfect right now. I very much appreciate your highly useful and timely information thank you

 

Some of that was original and all was my writing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
28 minutes ago, alpinist said:

Yes! I have so Much Time on My Hands to clean up postsand make them perfect right now. I very much appreciate your highly useful and timely information thank you

 

Some of that was original and all was my writing.

It shows. :P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now