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    • UnderDawg

      A Few Simple Rules   05/22/2017

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carcrash

Olson 40 Euphoria - Total Refit at Finco

37 posts in this topic

My wife bought me this boat for my 60th birthday. My friend Steve Brown and his excellent crew at Finco Fabrication, in Santa Ana CA, has done all the work. Here is a video from Wednesday, July 12 2017. I had been gone on a road trip for almost 4 weeks, and I was and continue to be very, very happy with the work done.

https://www.dropbox.com/s/343igr7tpc7cyth/IMG_2887.MOV?dl=0

All the workers are very proud of what they are doing, they were very excited to show it off.

On deck, what looks to be inconsistent color of the deck is just because most of the boat is covered by a sun shade which is netting. The color is perfect. All the paint and varnish is amazingly well done. Even things like the inside of the lazarette, underneath the bunks, and inside the man overboard tubes in the transom have been sanded smooth, painted, and, wherever its gloss, has been wet sanded to a mirror finish.

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Here are some photos, for those who are annoyed by the video production quality.

These three exterior shots show that the damage from the fatal accident a few years ago is perfectly repaired. Nobody can see where the V shaped hole was: most of the boat between the aft port stanchion and pushpit. Even using the reflections in the topside paint, its not at all detectable. Nobody has been able to identify where the damage happened, even if I show them exactly where it was.

Also, note how shiny the Olson 30 is next door. Mine is as shiny, but its dirty right now.

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The shaft, log, strut, and prop are all new. The strut is much stronger than original.

We have filled in several through hulls: that is where the bottom paint is much darker.

There was a bit of rot in the balsa near the strut, so that was fixed and strengthened inside and out. Also, there was about a half inch of rotten core around the hole cut for the depth sounder transducer. This transducer hole was just cut into the glass, leaving the core exposed, and then the thru-hull wrenched tight. When I removed the transducer, I was dismayed that the exposed core was complete mush, about the same consistency as mashed potatoes. Yet when we dug into it, the water had migrated only a half inch into the balsa! Perfectly dry and stiff core beyond that half inch. Cleaned out the rot, and laid fresh glass to make a proper, strong repair.

Soon, will install all the new Forespar Marelon through hulls, and a single tri-ducer (speed, depth, temp).

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Here are some deck pictures.

We removed everything off the deck, and almost nothing is going back on. The deck layout will be much closer to a 1D35 or Farr 40 than to an IOR boat from 1983. There were very many holes: instruments, the Navtec 4-way hydraulic panel, speakers, track, traveller, pad eyes, winches, turning blocks, running backstay blocks, antennae, anchor windlass, and so on.

Then the entire deck was sanded, all the holes ground, glassed, and sanded again, all the big holes (instrument, windlass, hydraulic panel, speakers) filled with foam core and covered with glass.

Then the entire deck has been painted with awl grip with the special grit additive so it could all be sprayed. All the white has been wet sanded and polished. Note the reflections in the white paint. Note those crisp paint lines, every single one perfect.

Again, the sun shade over the boat, so necessary in this hot summer, causes the weird shadows on deck. The color is perfectly consistent grey and white.

This looks so much better than Kiwi Grip its just not funny.

Also, all the windows and hatches have brand new plastic. The hatches aft of the cockpit have not been re-installed yet, to avoid damage as we climb over them every time we get on or off the boat via the ladder at the transom.

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The interior is really amazing. I was overcome when I saw it. Beautiful!

There are just a few little things left on this phase: paint the icebox lid, a bit of between coat sanding and a couple more coats on the new storage unit that replaces the chart table, and a couple of new pieces of wood that still need varnish, and the door and step to the chain locker just need to be installed -- they are done and look great.

Everything has been sanded, ground smooth, repainted with a very light grey gel coat, and the bits that should be shiny were then wet sanded and polished.

All the wood was sanded and varnished.

Note the paint lines.

Under the port settee where a water tank and 2 of the T105 batteries will live; the port upper pilot berth, looking aft, and then looking forward at the port side galley

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We took out the useless chart table. Who uses paper charts anymore? It was a really, really good chart table back in the day. But I prefer to navigate using my iPad etc. The table was also great back in the day because it was a tight fit, which was useful when plotting. But it was such a tight fit that it was very difficult to use that space in any other way: almost impossible to get a cooler under the table for example.

So we removed the chart table and built storage, following the design ethos of Santa Cruz. Lots of storage right over the keel.

 

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That's really awesome. Great work, and you have wife of the year.

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The head is ready for the Raritan Elegance fresh water flush electric head.

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We stripped out the bow, and added a chain locker aft of the foredeck hatch, just forward of the head, to starboard. That will move the weight aft, put the windlass in a position where a winch handle can really be used if needed, and it ensures all that nasty gunk on the chain stays separate from the bilge. A little bilge pump goes in the bottom of the chain locker.

The door and a step, to make it easier to get out the foredeck hatch, are beautifully finished and about to be installed.

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Even the lazarette, and under the aft berths aft of the engine, are beautifully done.

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Good question, By the Lee.

Where, and in what conditions, have you experienced oil canning on an Olson 40?

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Never been on an Olson 40. Never been on any Olson.

Someone once told me all those Olson's were super lightly built, and, having to wear beams and jock-straps and all, I just assumed that oil canning would be an issue.            

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Nicely done- clean, simple.... and light weight!  Did they have to replace much of the wood or did it just clean up?  Veneer?

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Beautiful job Crash, great boats and your's will be much improved over an already wonderful sailing machine.

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Beautiful job Steve's shop is doing, you and your family are gonna have a blast!

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15 hours ago, By the lee said:

Never been on an Olson 40. Never been on any Olson.

Someone once told me all those Olson's were super lightly built, and, having to wear beams and jock-straps and all, I just assumed that oil canning would be an issue.            

The 30s certainly seem to gain from the beams and straps. The 40 is pretty light too, but here is how the chainplates tie into the boat. At the deck there is a big burly block of SS. Three U bolts go through the deck for the shrouds. A tie rod comes down to a big burley SS plate that is through bolted to a big, thick, stiff longitudinal vertical stringer that is glassed to athwartship keel floors and to three different brunzeel plywood bulkheads. So the load is spread out along multiple structural features.

I already mentioned above that the increased load from the bulb keel did cause problems with the keel floors, which have been greatly strengthened (and proven by some local SoCal sailing prior to the refit.). There was no sign of any structural issues with any other structural components in the boat anywhere: no cracks in any tabbing, in any plywood, in any stringer or frame, and very limited areas of any balsa core rot. So structurally, it seems solid.

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15 hours ago, boatcat65 said:

Nicely done- clean, simple.... and light weight!  Did they have to replace much of the wood or did it just clean up?  Veneer?

The boat will be much lighter than it was! We have removed hundreds of pounds of stuff, and the changes added about 40 lbs. The deck equipment and systems are much lighter than what we took out.

The wood looked pretty beat up -- this was a well used 34 year old race boat!

We did add some non-structural wood to cover the forward ends of both quarter berths, as those panels were perforated by rough cut holes.

The floor boards were trashed. The old floorboards are still in the boat and therefore in all these pictures. The new floorboards are about 150% as thick, so stiffer to walk on, and will also be covered by Lonseal vinyl that looks like teak and holly. That stuff holds up well, cleans up well, and provides good non-skid, better than varnished floors.

Otherwise, sanding and varnishing has worked to bring it all back.

We've also already varnished the wood bits related to the headliner, and the extension settee berth bottoms, and the new floorboards. Those things won't go back aboard until we are pretty close to being finished.

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22 hours ago, carcrash said:

Good question, By the Lee.

Where, and in what conditions, have you experienced oil canning on an Olson 40?

I've never seen an O40 oil can, but that one did bend fore and aft a bit. 

The work looks great, but I miss the big nav station! The boat always had plenty of storage.

When do we get to see the massive bowsprit - are you cutting through the hull or is it a deck mount?

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Could you post photos of the bilge area/floors ?

 

Congrats for a fine project !

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Ah..... a vote for Lonseal vinyl.  Looking at replacing the flooring in a boat we've got.  Although I have some reservations with the esthetic of the stuff in the end I think it wins when all is considered.  85% of the way to yes.  How are you finishing the edges of your floorboards?

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The Awlgrip/Awltek decks look great.  If you are going to spend the time and grind the old non-skid off, that is a great way to go.  Love the clean paint lines, too.

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Thanks for starting this thread.  Nice boat.

Not the original keel?  Was the keel structure beefed up at some point?

Oh, and what yard is it at?

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Fantastic looking boat! Wish the images were higher resolution but such is life sometimes.

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Thanks for sharing the project & all of the many stages.   That's a great base to start from - the boat coming out this way,  or staying-put ?

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Hey Carcrash, PM me i'm the owner of Live Wire, another heavily modified O40 in SoCal, Love to see your and show you mine. 

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It looks like a Transpac 2019 Olson 40 run is in order.  

Buena Vista (Ventura) might go. 

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2 minutes ago, dkrowe said:

It looks like a Transpac 2019 Olson 40 run is in order.  

Buena Vista (Ventura) might go. 

Yes sir, that's the plan.

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2 hours ago, O40_77885 said:

Yes sir, that's the plan.

My daughter, who has been asking to do Transpac, said, "Absolutely!"

Let's do this!

 

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On 7/15/2017 at 6:43 PM, sunseeker said:

That's really awesome. Great work, and you have wife of the year.

Lisa is the best! I am still amazed after 30 years!!

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Ah,  so we will be seeing your boat here afterall.  I'll look forward to shopping for the arrival party Mai Tais..

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On 7/16/2017 at 5:53 PM, plenamar said:

Could you post photos of the bilge area/floors ?

 

Congrats for a fine project !

I should have swept the bilge before taking these pictures. Each of the floors have been built up, the keel stub is gone, big fat keel bolts as widely spaced as possible, through beefy washers or backing plates. The mast step is currently out of the boat. Its a simple, thick piece of wood with an aluminum shoe that matches the (original) Ballenger spar, and will be fastened down to these floors. The aluminum pole in the picture goes up through the hole in the deck for the mast to be one of the many supports for the sun shade. The floorboards in the picture are the old boards.

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On 7/16/2017 at 5:28 PM, _DB said:

I've never seen an O40 oil can, but that one did bend fore and aft a bit. 

The work looks great, but I miss the big nav station! The boat always had plenty of storage.

When do we get to see the massive bowsprit - are you cutting through the hull or is it a deck mount?

Did you sail on this boat?

As a chart table, I also really liked that big old nav station! It was a REALLY good one.

But now, I and very many others never ever use paper charts. I use Navionics and iNavX on my laptop and iPad. For me, I find this approach results in much better, newer charts, much easier to find the proper chart, much easier to switch between charts (zoom!) to see different stuff in the immediate area, or in the larger scheme of things. Ability to look at the charts while negotiating a channel, harbor, lagoon, etc. AIS overlay. Weather overlay. And so on, etc etc etc. So the table was obsolete.

The amount of storage required for voyaging is much more than needed for local offshore racing. Lots of moderate sized compartments that are close to the CoG and easy to access is useful. We were originally going to expand the galley to both sides, and the storage is convenient to the galley so will probably be used as a pantry. The top shelf is specifically intended for cocktail related items.

A few more coats of varnish!

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1 hour ago, carcrash said:

Did you sail on this boat?

As a chart table, I also really liked that big old nav station! It was a REALLY good one.

But now, I and very many others never ever use paper charts. I use Navionics and iNavX on my laptop and iPad. For me, I find this approach results in much better, newer charts, much easier to find the proper chart, much easier to switch between charts (zoom!) to see different stuff in the immediate area, or in the larger scheme of things. Ability to look at the charts while negotiating a channel, harbor, lagoon, etc. AIS overlay. Weather overlay. And so on, etc etc etc. So the table was obsolete.

The amount of storage required for voyaging is much more than needed for local offshore racing. Lots of moderate sized compartments that are close to the CoG and easy to access is useful. We were originally going to expand the galley to both sides, and the storage is convenient to the galley so will probably be used as a pantry. The top shelf is specifically intended for cocktail related items.

A few more coats of varnish!

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Yes - I raced on that boat a bunch (and a few other Olsons). 

It'll be really interesting to see her with a sprit!

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1 minute ago, _DB said:

Yes - I raced on that boat a bunch (and a few other Olsons). 

It'll be really interesting to see her with a sprit!

We are just about to do everything related to the sprit, so will have photos soon.

For the sprit we will take the spinnaker pole and its car, mount the car on the deck just forward of the forestay fitting, and provide sufficient dyneema stays to hold it up (from bow pulpit down to the pole), hold it down against code zero headstay tension (from pole down to a hole in the bow), and keep it centerline (from pole to sides of boat at toerail).

The loads are the same as when the pole is on the mast: the whiskers to the side have the same load as after guys. Using various scantling and yacht rule codes and other rules, its about 1500 lbs of pull in the direction of the sail, or about double that if trying to go to windward (headstay tension added to tension due to the tack). The loads are a function of righting moment, not location of the tack or sail area.

The angle from end of pole to where the whiskers are on the gunwale, just forward of the mast, is 9 degrees, which is a good angle, same as shroud angles. The other angles are 12 degrees or better.

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5 hours ago, Great Red Shark said:

Ah,  so we will be seeing your boat here afterall.  I'll look forward to shopping for the arrival party Mai Tais..

Looking forward to doing the proper blessing of the boat once we get her home to WYC.

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