Vaeredil

An Idiot, a cat, and a sailboat

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So, some of you may remember my post over on SA looking for a "dirt cheap boat" I bought a Pearson 28, but it ended up having more serious rigging problems than I thought, and I sold it to some enthusiastic and apparently rich Vancouverites for a grand total of 650... $50 profit!

Spent most of my money buying a Pearson 26 for $1200 that is in much better condition, by the name of Amrak. 

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She doesn't have even an outboard, but has solid rigging and a half- decent set of sails. The interior is much better too, and this one has a heater (although it is kerosene :/) 

 

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Oh, and I also now have a little cat.... she's a spiteful little shit, but I still love her. She was going my the nickname "Crack Kitty" in reference to her past life as a crack house rescue.... but I've renamed her "Mistral". She's been adapting well to the boat life, and loves to hiss at the local swan and prowl around the foredeck in the evenings. 

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I'm thinking since I'm within a few hundred of being bankrupt, and don't have anything better to do, I'll head north.... to Haida Gwaii, maybe? I was gifted a survival suit that actually fits me, and nabbed a set of charts (albeit 1975 charts) from the Pearson 28 before I sold it; they cover all the way up the inside of Vancouver Island and almost to Haida. Just installed a battery today (another friendly gift from someone who was replacing theirs), and hopefully I can get the old depth sounder and VHF working at some point. I guess I need a solar panel or something to keep that charged :P

I'd love to have a small outboard (Even, I guess, a 3 horse would push this along into a harbour or in a dead calm), but no such luck so far. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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5 minutes ago, Bob Perry said:

Good luck. I like the cat.

Thanks, Mr. Perry. She's a great companion

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Good evening,

Congrats with the new boat.

Before you set off, beef up that sagging beam supporting the mast step. Many moons ago I did my first paid for delivery job taking a Pearson 26 on a 450 mile off shore passage delivery. That same sagging beam nearly cost us the rig. It was impossible to get any tension on the shrouds, the mast just pushed further down and the rig flexed like spaghetti. A quick fix is to just prop it up from below with a piece of hard timber.

Have fun.

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Amrak was in a marina near me for a long time - it was a well kept boat but it looks like it's suffered some neglect since, judging by the bottom.

$1200 is a steal.

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Congrats, Vaeredil.  Got to love the cushion fabric on boats from that era!  When I finally looked under the covers on mine I found similar colours, and in great shape too.

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That force 10 kero heater is workable but read up on how to start and use it before lighting it the first time. Do it wrong and you will need to shop for your third cheep boat as you watch your Pearson become a smoldering wreck. I converted mine to propane using a kit they sold at the time which made it better safer and less smelly but that is probably over your budget. Keep in mind it uses the same air you breath for combustion so ventilation is important .

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Vaerd:

Look into the Origo heater. It cost about $100 and on a boat your size it will serve you well. It's alcohol powered. Simple and very effective.

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17 minutes ago, Bob Perry said:

Vaerd:

Look into the Origo heater. It cost about $100 and on a boat your size it will serve you well. It's alcohol powered. Simple and very effective.

I'm sometimes alcohol powered and when I am I'm fucking useless.

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Thanks be to the sea and weather gods that Amrak didn't end up on the rocks in the bay there (lots have; I recognized the place from your pic, and know of the boat) - that's my backyard.  Good luck.

Don't be an "idiot" (the term you used) on a mooring in fall/winter/spring there:  it's not a forgiving place at all in a SE'ly...

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I was trying to figure where it was - it seems familiar but I just can't place it.

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17 hours ago, trisail said:

Good evening,

Congrats with the new boat.

Before you set off, beef up that sagging beam supporting the mast step. Many moons ago I did my first paid for delivery job taking a Pearson 26 on a 450 mile off shore passage delivery. That same sagging beam nearly cost us the rig. It was impossible to get any tension on the shrouds, the mast just pushed further down and the rig flexed like spaghetti. A quick fix is to just prop it up from below with a piece of hard timber.

Have fun.

Now that sounds like an Albin Vega!  And lots others too of course. Easy fix though :-)

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On 2017-07-22 at 10:33 PM, steele said:

That force 10 kero heater is workable but read up on how to start and use it before lighting it the first time. Do it wrong and you will need to shop for your third cheep boat as you watch your Pearson become a smoldering wreck. I converted mine to propane using a kit they sold at the time which made it better safer and less smelly but that is probably over your budget. Keep in mind it uses the same air you breath for combustion so ventilation is important .

"Get thee behind me, demon propane!" Apparently I am one of the few remaining fans of kerosene or paraffin for as a cooking and heating fuel. The biggest problem with these units is that its bloody hard to find parts now. But, as steele says, read up on them before lighting! The most common mistake is to open the fuel valve before the burner is fully preheated. Fill the spirit cup at the base of the burner with methyl hydrate, or 99% isopropyl alcohol, or fondue fuel. Let this preheat fuel burn off completely   before attempting to light the burner. Clean the kerosene tank and purge the fuel line before you try firing the heater the first time - I'll bet there is old, contaminated fuel in there. Refill with fresh K1 grade kerosene. I think you will find it will work very well in a cabin that size. If you are on the cheap, kero is a much safer fuel than propane.

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Good luck with your boat.

You can get a tool to clean the jet on that heater.

Plus one here for kerosene and the advice above. You can mix down diesel to burn better as well. Force 10 Cozy Cabin Heater Diesel/Kerosene Model Owners Manual

There are some easy harbours to sail into on your way north, like Hornby Island or Thormandy. Helmken Island near Kelsey Bay has a sail in cove on the eastern side. Nanaimo has a no anchoring policy now so rental mooring balls only. They suck, too close together. The tide gates will be very tough with no engine, you will need a big south wind for a couple days to make it. August is poor for wind. Red tide starts to appear. Fishing looked poor for salmon, better for ground fish. Just got back myself.

 

Cheers

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Don't you wish you would have tried to construct a plate-steel boat instead ?

No.   No,  I'm sure you don't !    Good on ya - get the bottom good and clean while the water is 'warm'.   Get and KEEP the boat in ship-shape.  Even if not in perfect repair,  keep it CLEAN - I know it sounds silly,  but it really is a big help and just like washing a car,  you WILL learn more about the boat when you've run your hands over every inch.

Gee, you folks really seen a bit fixated on this "heater" thing...hmmmm

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Dammit GRS, you're trying to invite the ectoplasm into this thread. We're gonna get slimed! ;-)

Stop it!

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9 hours ago, Great Red Shark said:

Don't you wish you would have tried to construct a plate-steel boat instead ?No.   No,  I'm sure you don't !    Good on ya - get the bottom good and clean while the water is 'warm'.  

Get and KEEP the boat in ship-shape.  Even if not in perfect repair,  keep it CLEAN - I know it sounds silly,  but it really is a big help and just like washing a car,  you WILL learn more about the boat when you've run your hands over every inch.

Gee, you folks really seen a bit fixated on this "heater" thing...hmmmm

This is absolutely NOT silly. It's called "pride of ownership" and "good seamanship."

My Pearson 30 was 40 years old when I lived aboard, but I kept the boat scrupulously clean. Except for the microfridge/microwave combo tucked into the quarterberth, you wouldn't know that I lived aboard.

Cleanliness of the boat does several things:

1. It contributes to a positive mindset to live in a clean, orderly environment instead of swimming in your own filth and "stuff". This is especially critical when living in small spaces.

2. It contributes to safety. This is a moving vessel, not a house sitting on a foundation. You need to be able to access tight areas in case of an emergency. Strongly resist the temptation to collect "stuff."

3. Frequent cleaning leads to frequent inspections. You'll find that dripping stuffing box or that weeping through-hull in plenty of time to fix it before it becomes an emergency.

4. It's respectful of your neighbors to keep a tidy boat instead of being a putrid eyesore that everyone around you has to tolerate.

5. Lastly, you will receive a warmer welcome from marinas and fellow sailors if you present the appearance of good seamanship instead of "Joe Shit, the Rag Man."  Marina staff are often conscious of the appearance of their guests, and whether a dirty guest will chase off other potential customers. Don't be that guy.

Don't be neglectful of your boat just because it's old. Fix it, love it, nurture it so that it will take care of you when the shit hits the fan.

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9 hours ago, Great Red Shark said:

Gee, you folks really seen a bit fixated on this "heater" thing...hmmmm

That would be the difference between sailing in Hawaii and cruising the coasts of "the Great White North"...

The first thing I did when my boat was trucked from Maryland to Nova Scotia was to replace the air conditioner with a heater.

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1 hour ago, Ajax said:

This is absolutely NOT silly. It's called "pride of ownership" and "good seamanship."

My Pearson 30 was 40 years old when I lived aboard, but I kept the boat scrupulously clean. Except for the microfridge/microwave combo tucked into the quarterberth, you wouldn't know that I lived aboard.

Cleanliness of the boat does several things:

1. It contributes to a positive mindset to live in a clean, orderly environment instead of swimming in your own filth and "stuff". This is especially critical when living in small spaces.

2. It contributes to safety. This is a moving vessel, not a house sitting on a foundation. You need to be able to access tight areas in case of an emergency. Strongly resist the temptation to collect "stuff."

3. Frequent cleaning leads to frequent inspections. You'll find that dripping stuffing box or that weeping through-hull in plenty of time to fix it before it becomes an emergency.

4. It's respectful of your neighbors to keep a tidy boat instead of being a putrid eyesore that everyone around you has to tolerate.

5. Lastly, you will receive a warmer welcome from marinas and fellow sailors if you present the appearance of good seamanship instead of "Joe Shit, the Rag Man."  Marina staff are often conscious of the appearance of their guests, and whether a dirty guest will chase off other potential customers. Don't be that guy.

Don't be neglectful of your boat just because it's old. Fix it, love it, nurture it so that it will take care of you when the shit hits the fan.

The messier it is, the less likely you will want to take it out sailing.  It's harder to get everything put away so it doesn't go flying.

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2 hours ago, Ajax said:

 ...instead of swimming in your own filth and "stuff".

4. It's respectful of your neighbors to keep a tidy boat instead of being a putrid eyesore that everyone around you has to tolerate.

5. Lastly, you will receive a warmer welcome from marinas and fellow sailors if you present the appearance of good seamanship instead of "Joe Shit, the Rag Man."  Marina staff are often conscious of the appearance of their guests, and whether a dirty guest will chase off other potential customers. Don't be that guy.

Don't be neglectful of your boat just because it's old. Fix it, love it, nurture it so that it will take care of you when the shit hits the fan.

Sadly, that particular bay (which I shall not name) --near a large city but removed from it because not accessible by road from it-- became, partially, a quasi-dumping ground for such boats and poorer folks --Joe Shit the Rag Man on a putrid eyesore of a boat, as you put it. I'm all for boating on the cheap, believe me, but what happened there is that people trying to find a place to live and with generally zero background or interest in basic etiquette/cleanliness/boating skills/seamanship anchored their floating largely derelict boats, becoming a problem in various ways (involving the local govt assuming tug/barge/salvage costs for peoples' derelict shit that washed up there.). We once came back from a few weeks away on our boat to find a disgusting wreck on our mooring literally filled with trash, cigarette butts, and beer cans.). There was a largely ignored, rotting 100' steel hulled vessel there that had been anchored for over 20 years, that would sweep the bay on its rusty chain swing radius radius, during storms, like the Grim Reaper swinging his sharpened scythe in a crowd of the unwary... :-)

Anyway, I've seen Amrak over the years and hope she's in good hands.

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Vaeredil,

Congrats on a nice little cruiser. Follow our advice and you'll never go wrong (especially Ajax and JonB)!

B.C.

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On 7/22/2017 at 3:59 PM, SloopJonB said:

Amrak was in a marina near me for a long time - it was a well kept boat but it looks like it's suffered some neglect since, judging by the bottom.

$1200 is a steal.

Yeah, from the general condition it seems like she was well kept for many years but then neglected for a few. There's been a few odd changes like a dorade box on top of the head's vent.... with no cowling on it. Shit like that, you know. I'm going to do my best to get it looking ship-shape again

On 7/22/2017 at 6:33 PM, steele said:

That force 10 kero heater is workable but read up on how to start and use it before lighting it the first time. Do it wrong and you will need to shop for your third cheep boat as you watch your Pearson become a smoldering wreck. I converted mine to propane using a kit they sold at the time which made it better safer and less smelly but that is probably over your budget. Keep in mind it uses the same air you breath for combustion so ventilation is important .

Absolutely. I've heard that lots of people use propane torches instead of the whole sketchy "fill the primer cup with alcohol" deal, and that makes it a lot safer. I cooked for a while on a kerosene pressure stove, so I'm somewhat familiar with how to start the design. 

 

 

On 7/22/2017 at 8:42 PM, Bob Perry said:

Vaerd:

Look into the Origo heater. It cost about $100 and on a boat your size it will serve you well. It's alcohol powered. Simple and very effective.

Looks interesting, but do you have any tips on sourcing fairly cheap fuel for it?

On 7/24/2017 at 8:43 AM, Norse Horse said:

Good luck with your boat.

You can get a tool to clean the jet on that heater.

Plus one here for kerosene and the advice above. You can mix down diesel to burn better as well. Force 10 Cozy Cabin Heater Diesel/Kerosene Model Owners Manual

There are some easy harbours to sail into on your way north, like Hornby Island or Thormandy. Helmken Island near Kelsey Bay has a sail in cove on the eastern side. Nanaimo has a no anchoring policy now so rental mooring balls only. They suck, too close together. The tide gates will be very tough with no engine, you will need a big south wind for a couple days to make it. August is poor for wind. Red tide starts to appear. Fishing looked poor for salmon, better for ground fish. Just got back myself.

 

Cheers

Thank you very much for the tips. Yeah, Nanaimo seems like a fairly unfriendly place these days. Even over by those crowded mooring balls, if you do get in, you're kinda stuck because I couldn't find a good spot to pull up the dinghy across the bay on the nanaimo side. 

It seems like maybe I'll just have to hang around somewhere up near cambell river/cortes/something like that and wait for good wind, perhaps find a bit more work?

 

On 7/25/2017 at 6:25 AM, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

Sadly, that particular bay (which I shall not name) --near a large city but removed from it because not accessible by road from it-- became, partially, a quasi-dumping ground for such boats and poorer folks --Joe Shit the Rag Man on a putrid eyesore of a boat, as you put it. I'm all for boating on the cheap, believe me, but what happened there is that people trying to find a place to live and with generally zero background or interest in basic etiquette/cleanliness/boating skills/seamanship anchored their floating largely derelict boats, becoming a problem in various ways (involving the local govt assuming tug/barge/salvage costs for peoples' derelict shit that washed up there.). We once came back from a few weeks away on our boat to find a disgusting wreck on our mooring literally filled with trash, cigarette butts, and beer cans.). There was a largely ignored, rotting 100' steel hulled vessel there that had been anchored for over 20 years, that would sweep the bay on its rusty chain swing radius radius, during storms, like the Grim Reaper swinging his sharpened scythe in a crowd of the unwary... :-)

Anyway, I've seen Amrak over the years and hope she's in good hands.

Yeah, this isn't exactly the nicest place, and like you say, has become a bit of a dumping ground. Just a few weeks ago we have a "new" boat from the large city, tossed here and not looked after. I don't think I've seen one person on it in that time. 

And I hope my hands will do well by her, she seems like she's a good boat. With any luck we'll go far together :)

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I've been power-less for the last several days but been working on getting her ready to go. The small rip in the genoa is patched up, and the tiller blank i was given has a new life, now installed. I'm not thrilled about how it looks, but it should *knock on wood* be strong enough until I can do a proper job. 

 

Got a battery and an "el cheapo" solar panel from can tire, so we're now bright as the sun at night. I've gotta make sure the nav lights work, and there's a truly ancient VHF aboard it would be great to install, but for now I'll be satisfied with what I have. 

 

Once I check the main, I think tomorrow will be time for a first test sail, wind permitting. With any luck, I'll be out and back and you won't have another "coast guard rescue" post :P

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The whole question for me around heat is how to source fuel up north, when you're often away from reasonably priced sources, especially for alchohol. I've been considering a wood stove just for the fact that everywhere on the BC coast, there's wood to burn, but does anyone have suggestions for a small cheap woodstove? Amrak's cabin is small enough that it won't take much at all to heat, but there's nothing worse than not being able to dry out when you get back to the boat on a wet cold night. And it's looking like a cold winter, if last year is anything to go off of at all. 

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I'd do diesel/kerosene. Wood is dirty. When I spent the summer at my cottage last year, I'd have to start a fire every morning because I never closed my windows from May - Sept. No matter what you do, dirt and other stuff tracks in. It forced me to buy a Roomba because I got sick of vacuuming every day.

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11 minutes ago, austin1972 said:

I'd do diesel/kerosene. Wood is dirty. When I spent the summer at my cottage last year, I'd have to start a fire every morning because I never closed my windows from May - Sept. No matter what you do, dirt and other stuff tracks in. It forced me to buy a Roomba because I got sick of vacuuming every day.

I mean I guess the plan is to stock up on as much kerosene as possible now, and hope I don't run out halfway up the coast :P

It's what I have, so I'll use it. Funds are down to $36 CAD and some loose change, but I have everything I need for supplies, I think, and then some. Made like $300 working last week clearing out this nice sailor's land-cabin of brush and old trees, but that went towards the solar panel and some sail tape and silicone to try and reseal the windows

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Just be sure you have some spares. In my experience, everything works until you desperately need it to. Then it breaks.

Shackles have been a major failing point for me. And a spare can opener is good.

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18 hours ago, Vaeredil said:

I mean I guess the plan is to stock up on as much kerosene as possible now, and hope I don't run out halfway up the coast :P

It's what I have, so I'll use it. Funds are down to $36 CAD and some loose change, but I have everything I need for supplies, I think, and then some. Made like $300 working last week clearing out this nice sailor's land-cabin of brush and old trees, but that went towards the solar panel and some sail tape and silicone to try and reseal the windows

Right - so you're saying that you're a just few dollars away from becoming a "strand-aboard" in that misbegotten bay where neither the waterfront property owners there or the local government tolerate such folks.  And you admit to being an idiot.  Sounds like a fabulous plan.  

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2 hours ago, p2x4x said:

Right - so you're saying that you're a just few dollars away from becoming a "strand-aboard" in that misbegotten bay where neither the waterfront property owners there or the local government tolerate such folks.  And you admit to being an idiot.  Sounds like a fabulous plan.  

Aren't you Mr. (or Ms.) Righteous! The guy owns the boat, he is putting his limited funds into making it better, he is asking politely for advice, he's not afraid to work, and you shit all over him because he isn't a 'yottie'? There has been lots neat sailing done on a shoestring budget. Let's wait and see what he accomplishes, rather than cutting him off at the knees before he even starts.

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^^This.

During my divorce, I was in this guy's shoes.  I was a clean, courteous liveaboard who sailed often, despite being tight on funds and living on a 40 year-old, 4ktsb. The other liveaboards said I made them look bad (in a good way.)

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As long as he has enough money to take care of the cat properly I'm fine with his plan.

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I live across from the bay he is moored in. There are a number of derelict boats swinging there 1/2 sunk and so forth. Periodically the real trash is towed to the mainland and cut up.

That said, those are only some of the boats there - the usual assholes that screw things up for everyone. There are a number of decent boats anchored there as well.

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3 hours ago, Minnesail said:

As long as he has enough money to take care of the cat properly I'm fine with his plan.

Mistral gets first dibs on food money. Only way she'll be in need is if I'm dead or sunk. 

 

6 hours ago, p2x4x said:

Right - so you're saying that you're a just few dollars away from becoming a "strand-aboard" in that misbegotten bay where neither the waterfront property owners there or the local government tolerate such folks.  And you admit to being an idiot.  Sounds like a fabulous plan.  

I've been known to do stupid things from time to time, yes, but do you have a better option for me and the cat? I mean, rentals are more expensive than anything has a right to be. the $1200 I spent on the boat would pay for about a month and a half's worth of apartment.....

and this way I'll hopefully get to sail as well. 

 

3 hours ago, Jim in Halifax said:

Aren't you Mr. (or Ms.) Righteous! The guy owns the boat, he is putting his limited funds into making it better, he is asking politely for advice, he's not afraid to work, and you shit all over him because he isn't a 'yottie'? There has been lots neat sailing done on a shoestring budget. Let's wait and see what he accomplishes, rather than cutting him off at the knees before he even starts.

Thanks for the support, friend

 

3 hours ago, Ajax said:

^^This.

During my divorce, I was in this guy's shoes.  I was a clean, courteous liveaboard who sailed often, despite being tight on funds and living on a 40 year-old, 4ktsb. The other liveaboards said I made them look bad (in a good way.)

I've gotta ask, what does a "4ktsb" mean?

 

 

 

 

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4 knot shitbox - the lovingly respectful term for the majority of our old boats - especially the ones under 30'

 

P.S. change your signature line (and attitude) about Rimas or this will end badly for you.

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4 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

4 knot shitbox - the lovingly respectful term for the majority of our old boats - especially the ones under 30'

 

P.S. change your signature line (and attitude) about Rimas or this will end badly for you.

Hahaha well yes, that sure does fit mine. Although I hit a little over 4 knots with the little bit of good wind I got yesterday. 

 

And hell you might be right, he's been a lot less inspiring lately. 

 

I must admit that the test sail was... interesting.... to say the least.  wind was supposed to be 10-20 until late evening, but died to about 3 knots about 45 minutes after I went out. I realized quite quickly I'm going to need to find a starboard winch (my current one is broken), and despite the "engineless sailors" of yore I do need an outboard. Got pushed around by current and managed to get a little too close for comfort to the ferry lanes. So, I now know that I can tow the boat with my tiny kayak...  Went about a mile at 1 knot, stayed clear of the langdale ferry. Then I see a boat coming up... annddd it's the RCM-SAR boat. Apparently they got a call from someone on shore who saw my headlamp, and thought I was in trouble. So, they offered a tow and in the interest of not wasting their trip out, I accepted. Of course, ten minutes after we hook up, I get the 15 knots of wind I was supposed to have all night. Oh well.  They were quite friendly and loved little Mistral, but i do feel a little like Rimas, and not in a good way. 

 

Gotta attempt to find another good bit of work on the island here, don't want that to happen again.  

 

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81Z7pRp.jpg

 

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Any boat-yards in the area you might be able to find work at ?   If so,  not only ight you learn some useful skills but you MIGHT (if you do good work) be able to bargain for a haul-out,  which you WILL need at some point.

Learning how to sail on a boat with a foul bottom is one more way to frustration with sailing and the life of a dock-barnacle.

You are about to come to appreciate that living aboard while being gainfully employed is a challenge and the same freedom from bills can be a barrier to earning the $ you will need to make your boat seaworthy and provisioned for travel.  Yet another of life's cruelties.  That's sailing for you.

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2 minutes ago, Great Red Shark said:

Any boat-yards in the area you might be able to find work at ?   If so,  not only ight you learn some useful skills but you MIGHT (if you do good work) be able to bargain for a haul-out,  which you WILL need at some point.

Learning how to sail on a boat with a foul bottom is one more way to frustration with sailing and the life of a dock-barnacle.

You are about to come to appreciate that living aboard while being gainfully employed is a challenge and the same freedom from bills can be a barrier to earning the $ you will need to make your boat seaworthy and provisioned for travel.  Yet another of life's cruelties.  That's sailing for you.

Yes, I've been struggling with that paradox for a while. I actually was considering careening it at a high tide and doing a few day's work on it. Scrape both sides of barnacles, paint, replace my head's through-hull fitting, etc.  Not sure if that's a good idea. I'd have to have a huge tarp to contain all the old paint, wouldn't want to get that all over the beach. Definitely would need a month or two of work first, to get an outboard, paint, through hulls, etc... and by then It'll be late august.... maybe still dry enough to try it. 

My rudder post suffers from the classic P26 problems with the bushings, and it's bad enough that I'm going to have to remove it and fix that before I go anywhere serious. Another useful lesson from the test sail last night. 

It looks like work for the winter and maybe next fall will be the big trips. Oh well, hopefully I can do right by this boat. 

 

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And no boatyards here on Bowen, I don't think. Perhaps something in Vancouver? That would be a hell of a commute though, every day. I could consider moving the boat down there..... once the tiller/rudder are fixed and I have an outboard. 

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I would definitely consider careening, if you can find somewhere suitable. You'll want a sandy-ish beach, not too steep, and well sheltered. Make sure to check the tides, and make sure you'll float off at the next high tide. Set a stern anchor as you come in. Swing the boom out and hang a bucket of water off the end to make sure you ground out on the side you want. 

The tarp would be a good idea if you're scraping off a lot of stuff and making a mess. You'll probably get a lot of flak on here for destroying the environment by scrubbing the bottom, but a) basically every race boat does this anyway, it's just less obvious and b] in real life, probably nobody will care. I used to keep a boat on a mooring in Victoria, just off the beach, in front of row after row of multi-million dollar homes. I did 3 bottom jobs on the beach and of the many people who wandered by, not one complained about what I was doing. 1 couple came down from their house to tell me that they saw me sailing all the time and how happy they were to see a boat actually get used. This was nearly 10 years ago, but I still see boats getting careened in the same spot, down in Cadboro Bay. 

As has been mentioned before, keeping the boat clean, showing a pride of ownership, and showing that you care, will do wonders for the reception you receive. 

 

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You can haul out at Fishermans Cove WVan. They pressure wash that shit off. The tide grids that are left won't let you do a scrape, even though there is not likely any antifoul left on your bottom.

Some tapered wood plugs for stuffing in your thruhull should it break are peace of mind.

Might be some shifts you could get at the marine gas bar at Horseshoe Bay, Subway or Bowen marina. A walk around Bowen will surely find a home under construction or guys working to ask regarding temp work. There is a large project right on the water in Horseshoe Bay starting.

Same for Comox, there are some mooring balls for rent, ask at the gas bar.

 

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3 hours ago, Vaeredil said:

I must admit that the test sail was... interesting.... to say the least.  wind was supposed to be 10-20 until late evening, but died to about 3 knots about 45 minutes after I went out. I realized quite quickly I'm going to need to find a starboard winch (my current one is broken), and despite the "engineless sailors" of yore I do need an outboard. Got pushed around by current and managed to get a little too close for comfort to the ferry lanes. So, I now know that I can tow the boat with my tiny kayak...  Went about a mile at 1 knot, stayed clear of the langdale ferry. Then I see a boat coming up... annddd it's the RCM-SAR boat. Apparently they got a call from someone on shore who saw my headlamp, and thought I was in trouble. So, they offered a tow and in the interest of not wasting their trip out, I accepted. Of course, ten minutes after we hook up, I get the 15 knots of wind I was supposed to have all night. Oh well.  They were quite friendly and loved little Mistral, but i do feel a little like Rimas, and not in a good way. 

 

Gotta attempt to find another good bit of work on the island here, don't want that to happen again.  

 

Ya gotta have motorvation around here - especially in the summer. Lots of fast currents, high tides and unreliable wind creates the situation you just experienced - all the time.

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2 hours ago, Vaeredil said:

And no boatyards here on Bowen, I don't think. Perhaps something in Vancouver? That would be a hell of a commute though, every day. I could consider moving the boat down there..... once the tiller/rudder are fixed and I have an outboard. 

Closest boatyard is Race Rock in the entrance to Fishermans Cove - just across the sound from you. Good DIY yard and reasonable for around here. Amrak knows the way. :D

Probably cost you most of a grand to haul, block & do the bottom. If you are going to careen around here, Spanish Bank is about your only option - pure sand. There's a tide grid in the fishboat harbour in False Creek. Or was anyway.

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55 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

Ya gotta have motorvation around here - especially in the summer. Lots of fast currents, high tides and unreliable wind creates the situation you just experienced - all the time.

Either that or a slick oar setup like the R2AK guys! No, I'm kidding, while the kayak tow did work when necessary I think the outboard is worth it. It would be great to find a nice 9.9 with a high thrust long leg and an alternator....

For now I work and make money hopefully.

48 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

Closest boatyard is Race Rock in the entrance to Fishermans Cove - just across the sound from you. Good DIY yard and reasonable for around here. Amrak knows the way. :D

Probably cost you most of a grand to haul, block & do the bottom. If you are going to careen around here, Spanish Bank is about your only option - pure sand. There's a tide grid in the fishboat harbour in False Creek. Or was anyway.

The tidal grid's still there but like the fellow above mentioned, they dot allow scraping. I wonder exactly what they think people will use it for, maybe inspection?

spanish banks is actually a decent thought. As long as the wind doesn't pick up before you get off you'd be ok. I had been considering the beach at the north end of Halkett bay because it's a bit more out of the way, any thoughts on that?

2 hours ago, Norse Horse said:

You can haul out at Fishermans Cove WVan. They pressure wash that shit off. The tide grids that are left won't let you do a scrape, even though there is not likely any antifoul left on your bottom.

Some tapered wood plugs for stuffing in your thruhull should it break are peace of mind.

Might be some shifts you could get at the marine gas bar at Horseshoe Bay, Subway or Bowen marina. A walk around Bowen will surely find a home under construction or guys working to ask regarding temp work. There is a large project right on the water in Horseshoe Bay starting.

Same for Comox, there are some mooring balls for rent, ask at the gas bar.

 

 I've heard the little pub here is hiring and I might check that out, I've done kitchen worn before and free food is usually part of the deal. I've done a few weeks of temp work here already, some brush clearing and other random stuff, but I do need something a bit more long term. (By which I mean like two months lmao)

Thank you for the tip on the comox mooring balls, I've been considering holing up there for the winter, they have more jobs than the small places like Bowen which dry up when there's no tourism 

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I don't know the Halkett beach you mentioned. As long as it's sand - so few around here are - there are usually some biggish rocks on every beach except the Bank.

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Halkett Bay is a marine park - please don't scrape your boat bottom there.  I mean, seriously...

I've used Burrard Civic Marina's tide grid.  That was 4-5 yrs ago - don't know if still there.  Call to check.  I did a small boat bottom...can't recall, but I probably did it on the sly... 

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Just pick the tide so low tide is 3 am. Clean the hull after everybody goes home :) 

As catamaran owners we used to regularly dry out for hull maintenance, once for painting. Key points:

- beach needs to be sheltered from waves/wind. Spanish banks is probably not a great idea because afternoon sea breeze kicks up most days.

- put out an anchor to seaward to ensure you can winch yourself off if an onshore breeze develops

- scout the beach the day before. Push a long stick into the sand where you plan to beach, ensuring it is free of rocks or other things that could hurt the hull

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Vaeredil-

What is the make and model of the winch that has failed?  Bacon Sails here in Annapolis has shitloads of used winches in a wide range of prices. They ship anywhere.  I am willing to browse their inventory for you, to see if I can locate a mate to your dead winch.  You simply cannot sail effectively without it.

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13 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

Ya gotta have motorvation around here - especially in the summer. Lots of fast currents, high tides and unreliable wind creates the situation you just experienced - all the time.

The classic book on coastal BC weather patterns, influenced as it is by mountains/fjords, etc.

https://www.amazon.ca/Wind-Came-All-Ways-Understand/dp/0660175177

 

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On 7/22/2017 at 1:00 PM, Vaeredil said:

 

She doesn't have even an outboard, but has solid rigging and a half- decent set of sails. The interior is much better too, and this one has a heater (although it is kerosene :/) 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

There should be no problem with the kerosene heater unless you're an idiot.

Oh, wait....

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Just kidding, Good luck with the boat and the cat.

 

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5 hours ago, Zonker said:

Spanish banks is probably not a great idea because afternoon sea breeze kicks up most days.

What is this "breeze" of which you speak? ;)

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Wreck Beach would be where I would do it. Good place to find crew.-_-

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8 hours ago, Ajax said:

 see if I can locate a mate to your dead winch.  You simply cannot sail effectively without it.

Eh,  you can always just run it across to the one good winch - THAT worked out so well for the Aussies...

 

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6 hours ago, Remodel said:

There should be no problem with the kerosene heater unless you're an idiot.

Oh, wait....

 

Just kidding, Good luck with the boat and the cat.

 

hahahaha

 

Well played, and thank you

6 hours ago, Norse Horse said:

Wreck Beach would be where I would do it. Good place to find crew.-_-

I concur :)

The woods just north of there and between the ocean and UBC is were I spent some time when I was hopeless formerly. Kinda was nice, being able to just bath every morning without worrying about people calling the police. 

17 hours ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

Halkett Bay is a marine park - please don't scrape your boat bottom there.  I mean, seriously...

I've used Burrard Civic Marina's tide grid.  That was 4-5 yrs ago - don't know if still there.  Call to check.  I did a small boat bottom...can't recall, but I probably did it on the sly... 

Hence the idea of a tarp and good cleanup :P 

I'll check it out, but yeah, I think any place I'll be doing it on the sly. Midnight grounding with a headlamp perhaps? Or should I break out my holocaust cloak (Please tell me some will get the reference) and go for the disguise in broad daylight? 

9 hours ago, Ajax said:

Vaeredil-

What is the make and model of the winch that has failed?  Bacon Sails here in Annapolis has shitloads of used winches in a wide range of prices. They ship anywhere.  I am willing to browse their inventory for you, to see if I can locate a mate to your dead winch.  You simply cannot sail effectively without it.

Ajax, it's a Lewmar 7, Single Speed. If you find one, that would be lovely, thank you! The Starboard one is the one that's broken, but I've also got to remove the port one and grease it. 

7 hours ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

The classic book on coastal BC weather patterns, influenced as it is by mountains/fjords, etc.

https://www.amazon.ca/Wind-Came-All-Ways-Understand/dp/0660175177

 

Yeah, "All Ways" just about describes it. 

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7 hours ago, Norse Horse said:

Wreck Beach would be where I would do it. Good place to find crew.-_-

I remember some years ago, while there, after remarking at how trimmed it was, having a casual conversation with a woman about how she got her pussy hair so well trimmed.  (I was thinking to myself, "Like, whoa, I'm having a conversation with this chick about...!!".)  

A fine beach.

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Hope you get your rudder bearing fixed soon.

You could make up some dirtbag oars with beach wood and 3/8 ply chunks, gets you anchored somewhere in no wind. Lash them to the winches to row. If your kayak pulls it, 12 ft oars will work.

Just now, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

I remember some years ago, while there, having a casual conversation with a woman about how she got her pussy hair so well trimmed.  (I was thinking to myself, Like, whoa, I'm having a conversation with this chick about...".)  

A fine beach.

Better than girl watching in Whistler Village on a hot day...

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17 minutes ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

I remember some years ago, while there, after remarking at how trimmed it was, having a casual conversation with a woman about how she got her pussy hair so well trimmed.  (I was thinking to myself, "Like, whoa, I'm having a conversation with this chick about...!!".)  

A fine beach.

I never even had that conversation in bed. :D

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5 hours ago, Vaeredil said:

I'll check it out, but yeah, I think any place I'll be doing it on the sly. Midnight grounding with a headlamp perhaps? Or should I break out my holocaust cloak (Please tell me some will get the reference) and go for the disguise in broad daylight? 

Inconceivable!

With regards the winch, have you taken it apart?  Dirt simple things, maybe it can be repaired?

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On 2017-07-25 at 10:11 AM, slap said:

The messier it is, the less likely you will want to take it out sailing.  It's harder to get everything put away so it doesn't go flying.

Amen.  I confess that with limited boat hours not enough of them go to clean-up.

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On 2017-07-27 at 9:54 PM, Vaeredil said:
On 2017-07-27 at 8:59 PM, SloopJonB said:

Ya gotta have motorvation around here - especially in the summer. Lots of fast currents, high tides and unreliable wind creates the situation you just experienced - all the time.

Either that or a slick oar setup like the R2AK guys! No, I'm kidding, while the kayak tow did work when necessary I think the outboard is worth it. It would be great to find a nice 9.9 with a high thrust long leg and an alternator....

For now I work and make money hopefully.

I knew a fellow who used a scull (single oar) off the transom of a 40' steel sailboat when the wind died.  He was happy with the speed he could make, about a knot, though he is rather a minimalist.  You've a smaller boat = potentially more speed, vs. more tidal current on the west coast than here, could still be worth looking at.

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7 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

I never even had that conversation in bed. :D

Really? I have had that conversation several times. With different ladies, even. I really appreciate a nicely cut lawn.

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On 2017-07-28 at 6:59 PM, sculpin said:

Inconceivable!

With regards the winch, have you taken it apart?  Dirt simple things, maybe it can be repaired?

The one that's still together I'm definitely going to try and take apart and clean. The broken one though, the interior drum that the metal bit revolves around is actually cracked a a piece is missing from it. Not gunna have much luck repairing it, I don't think :P

23 hours ago, groundhog said:

I knew a fellow who used a scull (single oar) off the transom of a 40' steel sailboat when the wind died.  He was happy with the speed he could make, about a knot, though he is rather a minimalist.  You've a smaller boat = potentially more speed, vs. more tidal current on the west coast than here, could still be worth looking at.

That's actually pretty encouraging. I was given a 4-stroke 4HP, but the rings appear to be blown on it, no compression at all. I think I'm going to take it back off the well and maybe try lashing an oar there and giving it a go. 

 

On 2017-07-28 at 2:38 PM, Norse Horse said:

Hope you get your rudder bearing fixed soon.

Me too, but I'm fairly sure it'll be two or four weeks at least.  Gotta find some steady work and money, order in the bearings from a US company I found that has them, and buy the epoxy and additive to repair the shaft. Going to end up being at least a $300 repair, but there's no way in hell I can do without fixing it. When the SAR guys were giving me a tow, you could feel the rudder going from side to side, with this loud and scary kerthunk.... kerthunk....

The whole money situation would be easier if I wasn't in credit card debt from my "misspent youth" three or so years ago. 

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Worked for a fellow sailor today, and made 30$, two paddles (looking at a cheap canoe for the getting to shore and back problem, my loaner kayak isn't mine for much longer), a Helly Hansen slicker for the cold winter, a liter of paint, and some supplies and help with tools for some new hatch boards. I've got a bit of acrylic I'm going to put in the top one for a window, and they're all ready to go after today. Just gotta paint them up and screw in and silicone the acrylic. It's not a huge repair but it's exciting in it's own way. 

 

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You might see fireworks tonight is the first night in Vancouver this year.

Feels good to get things done on the boat.

 

 

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Don't give up on the 4hp outboard as it may well only be a stuck open exhaust valve. The experience gained breathing life back into a free outboard is a skill well worth having. Anyway better to learn and make mistakes on a freebie than on something you have spent hard earned cash on.

Plenty of Utube vids on checking valve clearances and how to adjust them.

At worst you will fuck something in the process and still be better off than you are now, you'll have learn't how to not make the same mistake next time.

At best you will get it to run AND get some valuable experience.

win WIN situation!

If you have a go at it and are not sure how to begin ask here for advice. Plenty of knowledgeable types round here.

Good luck!

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11 hours ago, Vaeredil said:

The whole money situation would be easier if I wasn't in credit card debt from my "misspent youth" three or so years ago

Ha!  I think for a lot of posters here we would have to add a zero to that... you've got lots of time to make good.

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V,

Bacon Sails had two Lewmar 7's on the shelf yesterday.  One was $40. I suggest you call them on Monday. 

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1 hour ago, Ajax said:

V,

Bacon Sails had two Lewmar 7's on the shelf yesterday.  One was $40. I suggest you call them on Monday. 

I'm pretty sure I saw a couple of Lewmar 7's on the shelf at Spencer's Marine Supply in Sidney, and they were priced similarly. I'll check in the next couple of days and get back to you. 

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14 hours ago, Norse Horse said:

You might see fireworks tonight is the first night in Vancouver this year.

Feels good to get things done on the boat.

 

 

Definitely does feel good. Inching closer to "actual sailboat" as opposed to "sinking junk-heap"

 

I could hear the fireworks for sure but couldn't see them :/

6 hours ago, Ukuri said:

Don't give up on the 4hp outboard as it may well only be a stuck open exhaust valve. The experience gained breathing life back into a free outboard is a skill well worth having. Anyway better to learn and make mistakes on a freebie than on something you have spent hard earned cash on.

Plenty of Utube vids on checking valve clearances and how to adjust them.

At worst you will fuck something in the process and still be better off than you are now, you'll have learn't how to not make the same mistake next time.

At best you will get it to run AND get some valuable experience.

win WIN situation!

If you have a go at it and are not sure how to begin ask here for advice. Plenty of knowledgeable types round here.

Good luck!

Fair enough, and you're right. No point in giving up too soon on it. Worst comes to worse I'll fuck it up and have lost.... oh, no money at  all

3 hours ago, groundhog said:

Ha!  I think for a lot of posters here we would have to add a zero to that... you've got lots of time to make good.

Hoping to have it cleared away by next spring. The way things are going Haida might have to wait though, certainly not going anywhere without fixing this rudder shaft

 

3 hours ago, Ajax said:

V,

Bacon Sails had two Lewmar 7's on the shelf yesterday.  One was $40. I suggest you call them on Monday. 

I'll give them a shout. Thank you! I assume this is the store in Maryland? That's the one that comes up when I google it.

1 hour ago, Ishmael said:

I'm pretty sure I saw a couple of Lewmar 7's on the shelf at Spencer's Marine Supply in Sidney, and they were priced similarly. I'll check in the next couple of days and get back to you. 

Thanks, Ismael. Very much appreciated.

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Caution: Some of those old small cheap Lewmar winches are cheap because they require an obsolete winch handle that cannot be found nowadays at any cost.  (I think I lost the last one in the universe overboard by leaving it in the halyard winch while I reached for something else.)  The socket is only a couple mm smaller than normal ones, so you have to carry a handle with you to test.  Or calipers.  I've tried grinding down a regular handle , which is pretty hard to do with hand tools.  Easier to trade up to a newer winch that uses a normal handle.  Hence all the cheap used Lewmars in chandleries.  And Ebay.

Someone with the right tools could really clean up by making a small production run of those handles.  Heck, these days one probably only needs a 3D model and some internet magic...  

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I had some Knowsley winches that had that same problem. I ground down a cheap standard handles' stud to fit so I had a spare.

Also British - maybe their winch handle were BSW or something. :D

 

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I doubt I'll get any interest, honestly. Too late in the season and it's probably not worth $2000 right now. Jim's right, the money's super thin. Worked all week last week on a fellow's property digging trenches and cutting down trees, that kinda stuff. 6 hours a day ish and 15$ an hour. Get a paycheck and bam, credit card interest and almost a l that work gone. 

 

Maybe I should just stop paying off my credit card? 

I doubt I'll be too much better off with a car anyhow, and I couldn't keep the cat in a car in the summer anyhow. She was loving the local swan today, but he was having none of it. 

 

Maybe I just need to get that sculling oar and go across the straight to Comox/Campbell river/wherever, boat problems and lack of gear be damned. Had the VHF receiving weather forecasts  for about 3 hours last night, but couldn't transmit at all, and then blew the fuse when some bare wires got crossed accidentally. Fuck. So, after replacing the fuse, radio won't turn on. Gotta find a cheap old multimeter so I can figure this shit out. 

 

 

Anyhow, the ad's up but I'm still in the game, for now at least. 

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Perhaps you would benefit by reading some of the writings of (and about) Abraham Maslow? 

300px-MaslowsHierarchyOfNeeds.svg.png

Trying to cobble together a sailboat when you are already in debt up to your eyeballs and are so tenuously meeting your other basic needs is - as you are learning - difficult.  

Perhaps focusing on more "foundational" activities (...the lower portions of the pyramid) that are essential to meeting your basic needs will place you in a better position - over time - to have a sailboat (...fairly located somewhere toward the upper portions of the pyramid) ..and THEN you can enjoy cruising?  

There is generally an order in the steps taken to working your way up the pyramid.  Learn. Plan. Work. Save. Enjoy.  In reality, most people are doing bits of all four steps simultaneously, so, do not think of it as necessarily being a series of pre-requisites that must be accomplished before you move on.  Rather, think of the steps as "focus areas" that evolve over time. 

My point: Maybe you are "speeding" a bit in acquiring a large sailboat at this point in your life. I wanted my current boat when I was 8 years old.  I finally bought it when I was 45. There was a lot of learning, planning, working, and saving that came long before I could enjoy it. I enjoy it so much today because I appreciate everything that it took to place myself in the position to be able to acquire it, maintain it, and keep it in the manner I had always dreamed.  Dreams can come true!   But, there is usually a lot of learning, planning, working, and saving necessary to achieve them.  

Are there short cuts you can take to speed things up so you can "enjoy" sooner?  Perhaps.  But short of planning to inherit a few million dollars, nearly all of the short-cuts will result in a steep price to pay in your later years.  (..being old, unable to work, having nothing, and no means of support)  If you truly want to make it on your own, you need to focus on the goals that satisfy your needs, and move toward them deliberately ..over time.  For sure, buy a sailboat!  ..But maybe not right now.

I think you have a good heart, a great spirit, and are obviously willing to work - all to the good!  However, you may want to reshuffle your priorities. Good luck to you!  

 

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1 hour ago, Tom Scott said:

Perhaps you would benefit by reading some of the writings of (and about) Abraham Maslow? 

300px-MaslowsHierarchyOfNeeds.svg.png

Trying to cobble together a sailboat when you are already in debt up to your eyeballs and are so tenuously meeting your other basic needs is - as you are learning - difficult.  

Perhaps focusing on more "foundational" activities (...the lower portions of the pyramid) that are essential to meeting your basic needs will place you in a better position - over time - to have a sailboat (...fairly located somewhere toward the upper portions of the pyramid) ..and THEN you can enjoy cruising?  

There is generally an order in the steps taken to working your way up the pyramid.  Learn. Plan. Work. Save. Enjoy.  In reality, most people are doing bits of all four steps simultaneously, so, do not think of it as necessarily being a series of pre-requisites that must be accomplished before you move on.  Rather, think of the steps as "focus areas" that evolve over time. 

My point: Maybe you are "speeding" a bit in acquiring a large sailboat at this point in your life. I wanted my current boat when I was 8 years old.  I finally bought it when I was 45. There was a lot of learning, planning, working, and saving that came long before I could enjoy it. I enjoy it so much today because I appreciate everything that it took to place myself in the position to be able to acquire it, maintain it, and keep it in the manner I had always dreamed.  Dreams can come true!   But, there is usually a lot of learning, planning, working, and saving necessary to achieve them.  

Are there short cuts you can take to speed things up so you can "enjoy" sooner?  Perhaps.  But short of planning to inherit a few million dollars, nearly all of the short-cuts will result in a steep price to pay in your later years.  (..being old, unable to work, having nothing, and no means of support)  If you truly want to make it on your own, you need to focus on the goals that satisfy your needs, and move toward them deliberately ..over time.  For sure, buy a sailboat!  ..But maybe not right now.

I think you have a good heart, a great spirit, and are obviously willing to work - all to the good!  However, you may want to reshuffle your priorities. Good luck to you!  

 

I had a peek at a few pages about him and his theory, pretty interesting stuff.

 

I think the main problem I'm facing is that the boat, while it is turning out pretty difficult to fix up, is absolutely fulfilling some of my basic needs right now, shelter being the main one. There's also clothing and food to consider, too: it's much more difficult to keep clothes dry and food un-spoiled if I were to go back to living in the forest. (I've done it before. The squirrels get into EVERYTHING and banana slugs crawling on you clothing isn't fun).

 

There is Mistral, my cat, to consider too. She'd fit into the love/belonging bit of abraham's pyramid, I think. While I can still provide for her adequately I'm not going to send her to a shelter where she would either end up being put down or in limbo for a long time.

But you're quite right, honestly. If you have any ideas or other options that I could consider, please let me know. But as it is, unless I manage to sell the boat for (being honest here) far more than it's worth, it's my best shot at a living spot.

Rentals, even a single room here on Bowen needs $1600+ for the first month and $800 afterwards. There's work for now, the same kind of stuff that I've been doing, but come winter that drys up to nothing. 

 

Vancouver is close, and maybe if I can find a place to anchor near enough to take the bus in, I could make something work; but false creek is two weeks in two weeks out, and the city had been cracking down on dinghy and anchoring off the maritime museum. Theft is also a big problem. Not so bad when you're good on cash, but when my dinghy gets stolen and I can't get home or to shore for work, or the outboard gets cut off and I can't get into the creek in a winter gale.... it's not so good. I've been trying to find out if there's anywhere I can anchor up the Fraser, or a run-down dock to tie to. That's another option. 

Or there's parts unknown, comox or Campbell river? It's gotta be a larger place for winter work here on the coast, I think. 

 

I really don't know. Thought a lot about it, but if you (or anyone else) has some insight.... that would be wonderful. 

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Vaeredil,

Here are 25 steps that you may consider "food for thought" as you contemplate your future:

  1. Develop a goal - or a few goals.
  2. Consider ways that you might achieve those goals. List all of the possible ways. Write them down.
  3. Also, write down on a piece of paper those things that you can do well.
  4. Based on what you think you do well, consider what might be the best match (jobs) for achieving your goals?
  5. Learn what is necessary to become employed in an area that interests you and can help you achieve your goals.
  6. Do everything you are capable of doing to make yourself prepared and competitive for becoming employed in your chosen area of interest.
  7. Attempt to get employment doing what you like. You will likely fail multiple times. When you fail, ask the employer why. Listen to what they say.
  8. Be persistent. You may get a job close to what you want. Start wherever you can. 
  9. Develop a positive attitude. Attitude is often a more important factor than even talent. 
  10. Work hard. Do not be satisfied with "good enough". Work hard to be the best you can possibly be, no matter what your job. 
  11. Tell your boss that you want to learn everything and anything about your chosen field of work - and keep learning at every opportunity.
  12. Make yourself one of THE people that others turn to when something needs fixing or doing. Become the "go-to" guy.
  13. Become a problem solver. Don't bitch about it - fix it. Ask your boss "what keeps him or her awake at night" - and work to improve that situation.
  14. Become an expert at what you do. Take advantage of every learning opportunity that presents itself. Teach others, and share your expertise.
  15. Expect promotions or increased salary commensurate with your abilities. If you are not receiving them, talk with your boss and explain your goals and expectations.
  16. If you have been successful thus far, your boss will do everything possible to keep you on the team. 
  17. If they are unable to keep you, leave - but, try not to leave unless you already have a new place to go.
  18. As an expert in your field who trains others and solves problems, you will be in demand somewhere. 
  19. You may switch jobs many times in your working life, but always maintain your personal standards of excellence in all that you do.
  20. Avoid gossip. Do not bad mouth your boss, co-workers, company, or others.
  21. If things are truly bad, vote with your feet (leave), but if your field is small, you may cross paths with your old co-workers and managers again someday. (..hence item 20.)
  22. At some point, your observable attributes and great attitude may cause your to become a supervisor, manager, or boss. Accept that responsibility.
  23. When you become a supervisor, manager, or boss - treat others exactly the way you would want to be treated when you were in their shoes.
  24. Lead by example. Demand the best from your workers - the same as you demand from yourself - but do give them the tools, guidance, and support they need to succeed.
  25. Help others succeed. Share your successes; share your failures, and share lessons learned. 

As you are working through the outline above, here are some helpful hints that may assist you in dealing with life's speed bumps along the way:

  1. Always try to live below your means. Just because you can afford it does not mean you should buy it.
  2. Pay yourself first. Consider your savings account as a mandatory bill, and put something in there first - every time you get a paycheck.
  3. Always ask yourself where you would like to be when you are at age 60, 70, or 80. (...time is on your side when you are young - not so much when you're old.)
  4. Develop a plan.
  5. Do not be afraid to change the plan. (..the plan isn't nearly as important as the planning!).
  6. Look for ways to become a person who helps others. When you realize that life is bigger than your own needs and desires, everything changes.(..for the better!)
  7. Be patient. It takes time to succeed at anything.  Do not be afraid to fail - learn all you can from your failures, and never accept failure as an inevitable result. 
  8. Find a life partner you can love ..and who will love you back. Two people working toward a common goal is more fun, efficient, effective, rewarding, and satisfying.
  9. Develop your priorities, and focus on them. Time is always a challenge, so spend your time where the results are the most important for you.
  10. Have fun!  Find enjoyment in not spending all your money. Find enjoyment in working hard, Find enjoyment in helping others. Find enjoyment in fulfilling your dreams

Hope these help!  Life is tough, and seldom easy, but you are still young enough to make lots of changes and adjustments. (...For example, if welding interests you, begin planning now on how you might become the best welder. Don't become "a welder", become the "best welder".:) 

Stay flexible, but give some serious thought to where you are, and where you are going. Make sure that it is someplace of your own choosing.  If you have developed your own goals, you can at least use them as a basis for evaluating the many choices you have left to make as your life plays out.  Without them, you are just rolling the dice - and most dice games are seldom concluded in your favor.

Regards,

Tom Scott

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Vaeredil:

First, I'm sorry if I dragged you through painful shit by pointing out the boat was for sale.

Many of us have been where you are now, and you're getting some good advice. I'll add some that's specific to your location.

Whenever I was in your (figurative) boat, I'd go get a job washing dishes in a good restaurant. Show up on time and do a decent job, and you have a job for a long time. Plus, they feed you, which is why you pick a good restaurant. If you get on night shift, you can pick up odd day jobs, like you're doing, to add to the nest egg. (I like to think that I'll never be too proud to go back to washing dishes, if the need arises. I hope that theory is never put to the test, but...)

If your boat (and home) is in Mannion Bay then you should check out the restaurants in Snug Cove. https://www.tourismbowenisland.com/destination/eat/  Restaurant owners know that dishwashers are... uh... alternate. That could keep you going into the fall, and get you on a bit better foot, financially. You might get to know someone who has something that will get you through the rainy season. Or, see if there's anything in Horseshoe Bay for work, and commute. You can get a commuter rate on the ferry.

Vancouver is a non-starter. Way too expensive to do anything there. And, they'll be constantly harassing you to move your boat. Meanwhile, some of your neighbours in Mannion have been there since the last millennium.

You have a home. You have a cat. You have a chance to turn this around.

 

And, oh yeah, cut up your credit card. They are evil. (But keep making the minimum payments, if you can.)

 

Bonne chance.

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4 hours ago, Tom Scott said:

Vaeredil,

Here are 25 steps that you may consider "food for thought" as you contemplate your future:

  1. Develop a goal - or a few goals.
  2. Consider ways that you might achieve those goals. List all of the possible ways. Write them down.
  3. Also, write down on a piece of paper those things that you can do well.
  4. Based on what you think you do well, consider what might be the best match (jobs) for achieving your goals?
  5. Learn what is necessary to become employed in an area that interests you and can help you achieve your goals.
  6. Do everything you are capable of doing to make yourself prepared and competitive for becoming employed in your chosen area of interest.
  7. Attempt to get employment doing what you like. You will likely fail multiple times. When you fail, ask the employer why. Listen to what they say.
  8. Be persistent. You may get a job close to what you want. Start wherever you can. 
  9. Develop a positive attitude. Attitude is often a more important factor than even talent. 
  10. Work hard. Do not be satisfied with "good enough". Work hard to be the best you can possibly be, no matter what your job. 
  11. Tell your boss that you want to learn everything and anything about your chosen field of work - and keep learning at every opportunity.
  12. Make yourself one of THE people that others turn to when something needs fixing or doing. Become the "go-to" guy.
  13. Become a problem solver. Don't bitch about it - fix it. Ask your boss "what keeps him or her awake at night" - and work to improve that situation.
  14. Become an expert at what you do. Take advantage of every learning opportunity that presents itself. Teach others, and share your expertise.
  15. Expect promotions or increased salary commensurate with your abilities. If you are not receiving them, talk with your boss and explain your goals and expectations.
  16. If you have been successful thus far, your boss will do everything possible to keep you on the team. 
  17. If they are unable to keep you, leave - but, try not to leave unless you already have a new place to go.
  18. As an expert in your field who trains others and solves problems, you will be in demand somewhere. 
  19. You may switch jobs many times in your working life, but always maintain your personal standards of excellence in all that you do.
  20. Avoid gossip. Do not bad mouth your boss, co-workers, company, or others.
  21. If things are truly bad, vote with your feet (leave), but if your field is small, you may cross paths with your old co-workers and managers again someday. (..hence item 20.)
  22. At some point, your observable attributes and great attitude may cause your to become a supervisor, manager, or boss. Accept that responsibility.
  23. When you become a supervisor, manager, or boss - treat others exactly the way you would want to be treated when you were in their shoes.
  24. Lead by example. Demand the best from your workers - the same as you demand from yourself - but do give them the tools, guidance, and support they need to succeed.
  25. Help others succeed. Share your successes; share your failures, and share lessons learned. 

As you are working through the outline above, here are some helpful hints that may assist you in dealing with life's speed bumps along the way:

  1. Always try to live below your means. Just because you can afford it does not mean you should buy it.
  2. Pay yourself first. Consider your savings account as a mandatory bill, and put something in there first - every time you get a paycheck.
  3. Always ask yourself where you would like to be when you are at age 60, 70, or 80. (...time is on your side when you are young - not so much when you're old.)
  4. Develop a plan.
  5. Do not be afraid to change the plan. (..the plan isn't nearly as important as the planning!).
  6. Look for ways to become a person who helps others. When you realize that life is bigger than your own needs and desires, everything changes.(..for the better!)
  7. Be patient. It takes time to succeed at anything.  Do not be afraid to fail - learn all you can from your failures, and never accept failure as an inevitable result. 
  8. Find a life partner you can love ..and who will love you back. Two people working toward a common goal is more fun, efficient, effective, rewarding, and satisfying.
  9. Develop your priorities, and focus on them. Time is always a challenge, so spend your time where the results are the most important for you.
  10. Have fun!  Find enjoyment in not spending all your money. Find enjoyment in working hard, Find enjoyment in helping others. Find enjoyment in fulfilling your dreams

Hope these help!  Life is tough, and seldom easy, but you are still young enough to make lots of changes and adjustments. (...For example, if welding interests you, begin planning now on how you might become the best welder. Don't become "a welder", become the "best welder".:) 

Stay flexible, but give some serious thought to where you are, and where you are going. Make sure that it is someplace of your own choosing.  If you have developed your own goals, you can at least use them as a basis for evaluating the many choices you have left to make as your life plays out.  Without them, you are just rolling the dice - and most dice games are seldom concluded in your favor.

Regards,

Tom Scott

Thank you for all the advice, it's much appreciated. I'll be honest, I've struggled for quite a while as to what I want to do for a career/job (hence the odd jobs and constant moving since I left High School). Is it kind of a "pick something and hope it works" deal? Or is there some point where I'll just magically figure it out?

1 hour ago, mcmurdo said:

Vaeredil:

First, I'm sorry if I dragged you through painful shit by pointing out the boat was for sale.

Many of us have been where you are now, and you're getting some good advice. I'll add some that's specific to your location.

Whenever I was in your (figurative) boat, I'd go get a job washing dishes in a good restaurant. Show up on time and do a decent job, and you have a job for a long time. Plus, they feed you, which is why you pick a good restaurant. If yo