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Lightning 11873

Lightning 19 shroud adjuster

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   So I'm wondering what other people are upgrading to on there Lightning 19 Rigs for shroud adjusters,what has worked and hasn't worked out. My lower Roledge shroud adjuster fell off on the highway, the keeper nut ended up in the back of my truck, luckily. eBay is out of them as of it's inception. I'm looking for new ones all around something that's easy fast repeatable I'm dry sailing this old Clark Lightning right now and was thinking about pin adjusters for set up time but I don't think that I'll get the tension I want. And I'd have to re-swage my shrouds if not replace them out right. (Why they don't make a Clevis pin with a hole or threads in it so as to act like an adjustable toggle is beyond me.)  Then there is a non-pin adjuster that has a knurled knob for adjustment, I'm just not sure about getting 250 pounds out of a knurled knob smaller than your thumb. What are you using pro/con?

I've had to listen to a lot of people give me a lot of good advice that is not applicable to lightnings. I don't mean to sound like a snob but if you're not sailing a Lightning of any age now or haven't tuned one in a couple of years don't reply, please.

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31 minutes ago, Lightning 11873 said:

   So I'm wondering what other people are upgrading to on there Lightning 19 Rigs for shroud adjusters,what has worked and hasn't worked out. My lower Roledge shroud adjuster fell off on the highway, the keeper nut ended up in the back of my truck, luckily. eBay is out of them as of it's inception. I'm looking for new ones all around something that's easy fast repeatable I'm dry sailing this old Clark Lightning right now and was thinking about pin adjusters for set up time but I don't think that I'll get the tension I want. And I'd have to re-swage my shrouds if not replace them out right. (Why they don't make a Clevis pin with a hole or threads in it so as to act like an adjustable toggle is beyond me.)  Then there is a non-pin adjuster that has a knurled knob for adjustment, I'm just not sure about getting 250 pounds out of a knurled knob smaller than your thumb. What are you using pro/con?

I've had to listen to a lot of people give me a lot of good advice that is not applicable to lightnings. I don't mean to sound like a snob but if you're not sailing a Lightning of any age now or haven't tuned one in a couple of years don't reply, please.

 Hmmph. I haven't tuned a Lightning in a few years, so maybe I should keep out of it. OTOH I sailed (and raced fairly competitively) a Lightning the same vintage as yours. Mine was an Allen, the chainplate dimension might be a little different on a Clark.

However, the basics of Lightning tuning haven't changed. Set the mast butt as far forward as is legal (this measurement is taken from the centerboard pivot pin IIRC), and make sure it is SOLIDLY blocked in place from wiggling in any direction especially forward. Nothing in the partners, mast should be free at the partners.

With the forestay set at max length, the lowers off, adjust the uppers to get the mast centered above the hull. I measured from the jib halyard to the pins of the upper shrouds chainplates to get this, but most boats are slightly asymmetric. You might want to measure to the chines.

Now get your sailmakers recommendation for rake, this can be measured several ways. Set that by the forestay, and connect the lowers with no tension. Adjust the lowers so that they barely have minimum tension and the mast is completely straight. Re-check that it's centered. Sometimes this takes some fiddling. Block your partners and note this as "neutral" generally you will block the mast forward at the partners for pre-bend, check what your sailmaker recommends.

Now, upper tension, the real meat of the matter. You don't need turnbuckles; although I think pin adjusters will not get you any great precision they should get close enough. Swing your crew from the jib halyard to one side (boat should be strapped to the trailer). You might need both crew if they're skinny. Remember class rules say max shroud tension is 250# (double check this number in the class rules, I strongly doubt it's changed but C-Y-A) so that is your target. Pin the shroud at that tension and do the same on the other side.

Go back and make sure the mast is straight. You might have to fiddle with the lowers again.

Block the mast as recommended. I had blocks & shims to adjust by 1/8" and this affected how the boat responded to vang tension and certainly affected pointing. You also need an adjustable jib halyard, I didn't have one for the first few years and struggled to get above the mid-fleet level when everyone else could change gears for footing or pointing.

Ignore this if you prefer.

FB- Doug

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