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      Abbreviated rules   07/28/2017

      Underdawg did an excellent job of explaining the rules.  Here's the simplified version: Don't insinuate Pedo.  Warning and or timeout for a first offense.  PermaFlick for any subsequent offenses Don't out members.  See above for penalties.  Caveat:  if you have ever used your own real name or personal information here on the forums since, like, ever - it doesn't count and you are fair game. If you see spam posts, report it to the mods.  We do not hang out in every thread 24/7 If you see any of the above, report it to the mods by hitting the Report button in the offending post.   We do not take action for foul language, off-subject content, or abusive behavior unless it escalates to persistent stalking.  There may be times that we might warn someone or flick someone for something particularly egregious.  There is no standard, we will know it when we see it.  If you continually report things that do not fall into rules #1 or 2 above, you may very well get a timeout yourself for annoying the Mods with repeated whining.  Use your best judgement. Warnings, timeouts, suspensions and flicks are arbitrary and capricious.  Deal with it.  Welcome to anarchy.   If you are a newbie, there are unwritten rules to adhere to.  They will be explained to you soon enough.  

56 posts in this topic

Most of you SoCal racers are familiar with NOSA's Newport to Ensenada race.  The 2018 version is only 9 months away, and we are already working on the details.

I have come to Sailing Anarchy before, looking for race improvement suggestions.  A good number were implemented.  I have been a Director, but this year I am VC Race.  This year's Board has added a couple of young Directors, actually under 40. We have all new officers and some new staff.  Our new Commodore isn't even from Newport Beach, but rather Dana Point, home of the most active N2E Yacht Club, DPYC.  Things are changing.  If there are great ideas out there, this is the year to offer them for consideration.  NOSA has never been more open to new ideas.

What will get more racers off the couch and racing?

I'll start with Da Woody's perpetual  suggestion, bring back the cougar party at BCYC.  (I'm actually going to see what I can do)

What else?

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You can't go home again. The BCYC party was played out. Find another venue, just take over some place like 333, lots of cougars there, they they tend to be of decent quality, so woody will have to look elsewhere for his blown out gold diggers.

Short of significant cash prizes, I'm not sure there is much that can be done to really increase the number of competitors substantially. The pool of racing boats in SoCal that are sufficiently prepared and capable of any offshore race is a very small number these days. Are there even 500 active PHRF boats racing in SoCal these days? 

It's a cultural problem more than anything.

 

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4 hours ago, Bill Gibbs said:

Most of you SoCal racers are familiar with NOSA's Newport to Ensenada race.  The 2018 version is only 9 months away, and we are already working on the details.

I have come to Sailing Anarchy before, looking for race improvement suggestions.  A good number were implemented.  I have been a Director, but this year I am VC Race.  This year's Board has added a couple of young Directors, actually under 40. We have all new officers and some new staff.  Our new Commodore isn't even from Newport Beach, but rather Dana Point, home of the most active N2E Yacht Club, DPYC.  Things are changing.  If there are great ideas out there, this is the year to offer them for consideration.  NOSA has never been more open to new ideas.

What will get more racers off the couch and racing?

I'll start with Da Woody's perpetual  suggestion, bring back the cougar party at BCYC.  (I'm actually going to see what I can do)

What else?

good start, seems like time for some big changes, or whatever can resuscitate the race back to life.

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Bill,

One problem is that the modern flat out race boats are not comfortable for overnight races. My old IOR Catalina 38 has real bunks, an excellent nav station, enclosed head with a door and a nice galley. My off watch sailors are below in their bunks, not out on the rail. in my opinion, many modern racing 35 to 40 foot boats are really crew ballasted. It is difficult to get the off watch off the rail and below for proper rest. This makes for a really miserable race if the wind is light. Many fast racing boats took 24 hours to do 82 miles from Santa Barbara to King harbor. N2E is a longer race.

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4 hours ago, Joe Olson 30 said:

Many fast racing boats took 24 hours to do 82 miles from Santa Barbara to King harbor. N2E is a longer race.

Took us 23.7 hours to do SB-KH this year.  But it was one of the slowest.  Our sport will always suffer from the variability of wind. Is one uncomfortable night really that big a deal?  Maybe yes.

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Like any race over time the race will have it's ebbs and floods. There is no easy fix to all of a sudden having attendance increase, the race committee has done a good job by moving the event to the Coral and providing busses for the return trip.

One way to sell the event is with more media coverage. If there was a way to stream the awards and interview the participants? Interviews would included just off the boat at the dock, interviews on the way home on the buss would be interesting, have a drone boat follow the race, use yellow brick, acknowledge the participant with the best onboard video. I have had the silly idea of having the cruising class pick up balloons and plastic along the way and award them some time and acknowledgement. Focus on the smaller boat classes, thats were the numbers are.

Think of better ways of selling the race? Have a committee attend the different yacht clubs awards nights and sell the event, the race seminars have been a fantastic idea to close the deal with participants still on the fence. I would think that most people are considering participating in the months of December through February.

Stay off the S/A forums as a means to promote attendance. The trolls and the off subject matter produces nothing of any use. Ad space on S/A is effective with after race results, race summaries, videos and photos, with easy links to the NOSA web site.

Ideas are the easy part, who is going todo all the hard work is the real question?

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You have to attract the younger crowd or the race will continue to be an old fart parade that slowly fades away.
Both the Ed and Bill are old farts who probably have not visited a youth or university sailing club/team to talk about their inclusion in to local/regional racing.
These kids are sponges and do want to be on boats. Not just sitting but doing things and learning

I have taken 3 21 yr old from CSUCI along with their boss (CSUCI Boating center) on Wet Wednesdays. They were arguing for the bow spot .......They want to learn and do things. None have keel boat; kite experience but they have more enthusiasm than I have seen in a few decades and they learn quick. Unfortunately before the school semester begins, they are off on family vacation.

How about awards encouraging the younger crowd. Not pickle dishes but really good gear donated by real business?
Ogio bags are the best awards I've received in a long time.

Cougar party? Instead of older wrinkled saggy broads, how about pre-race and after-race Raffles with gift certs for everything from In-n-Out to a night stay somewhere. I'm sure corporate hotel chains would love to attract people with money. How about the Indian Casinos, The Primm or Vegas?


You guys think so small.

 

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I've been doing N2E pretty consistently since 1974. It seems to me that while the Bahia events were pretty rowdy the crews that participated were more family focused. We went through a period when the significant others did not want to make the trek down. The switch of venues to the Coral and the buses were an effort to make wives and girl friends feel safer. But, it split the fleet. The DPYC gang have been doing a great job of keeping participation up. The last couple years we've been doing a wine tasting tour which has been a big hit with the significant others. 

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Maybe it would make sense to develop an organized, professional survey of past participants who have quit doing the race. It seems like that's your most likely population to increase participation quickly. Find out their reasons for not racing N2E any more and see if there are things that NOSA can do to address them. If it's stuff like "owner died, sold boat" then maybe not, but if it's more like "too difficult to get crew" that may be something NOSA could do something about with better means to connect skippers needing crew with crew needing boats. If it's "class breaks make it hard for me to compete" NOSA can try to address that--which becomes easier the more boats you have.

Point being right now all you really know is the symptom (decreasing participation). You need to know the root causes, otherwise you're just easter-egging a solution. And given that you only get to test a solution once a year, it can take a long time to troubleshoot that way.

A formal survey, professionally conducted, would probably give you the best results but even an informal survey on SA (once you filtered out all the SA BS posts) would give you some idea of why people who have done the race before aren't doing it any more.

 

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The BCYC Party in fact had the Gold Diggers & Cougars

as a byproduct 

What was lost in the death of the BCYC Parties was the Magic of the MIX of Everyone that was The Race

The BCYC party was the Only chance to Mix it up with most everyone racing

What you have now are

Party for EXTREME  race Boats * another for smaller boats

one for crew and racer chasers

Every Club has a party for their Members

and on and on - All on the Night before the start !!

Was a time you would run into Owners of the most all the boats and crew in one place and got the feeling of the enormity of the event

now it's micro parties keeping everyone separated into Classes (in more ways than one)

the N2E is now a Lonely race

No chance to mix it up with everyone before the race

you start and head off on yer own for the most part with little interaction between unrelated fleets on the way down

for those who didn't bail into a friendly harbor in California, Many do a turn & Burn

while others hit land and head for home

not everyone in Ensenada goes to or stays in the same places

Sooo you are basically going to Newport and doing a 130mile+ race and going home Not getting to know others you don't likely race with the rest of the year

The event feeds its self when people on little boats get to know those on the BIG RIDES and are inspired to climb the ladder

But No that was KILLED 

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Here is an old survey from 2011. Bill any way you can see if any one completed it. It seems NOSA was trying to get feedback to improve the event for 2012

1. How old are you?

Under 25
25-34
35-44
45-54
55-64
65+

2. Where do you live? (City, State)

3. How many years have you sailed the Ensenada Race?

I've never sailed the race
1st time
2-5
6-10
11-20
21+

4. What type and size boat did you sail this year? If you didn't sail this year, then what type and size boat did you sail in the past?

5. Are you planning on racing the 65th Annual Race on April 27-29, 2012?

Yes
No
Maybe

6. If No or Maybe (To Question #5) please mark all of the reasons you may not enter

concerned about violence in Mexico
the Border Run
been there done that, it's the same old race
too much work to prepare and do the race
crossing the border takes too long
overall economy
difficulty in getting crew
I don't sail
Other (please specify)

7. If you were aware of the following, what activities might you attend in and around Newport Beach prior to the race?

North Sails/West Marine “Sail to Win” pre-race seminar
Weekend before the race- Feeder Race to Newport
Sunday before the race –Family Launch Fiesta at the Balboa Fun Zone
Monday before the race Golf Outing
Tuesday before the race Newport Harbor evening race and burger bash
Wednesday before the race – Yachtsman’s lunch
Wednesday before the race – VIP Boat owners party
Thursday before the race – Fiesta
All of the above
None of the above

8. Is it important for the Newport to Ensenada International Yacht Race to precede the Yachting Cup by a week?

Yes
No
Indifferent

9. Would you prefer the race to start on:

Thursday and have a Saturday regatta in Ensenada
Friday start
Saturday start
Cinco de Mayo weekend

10. What events/activities in Ensenada might you or your guest attend (check all that apply)?

Wine Country Tour
Ensenada City Guided Historic/Cultural tour
Saturday Evening Fiesta at Race Headquarters
Sunday Fiesta
Other (please specify)

11. Transportation: Which are important?

  Friday Saturday Sunday Monday
Coach down to Ensenada (from Newport)
Coach down to Ensenada (from Newport) Friday
Coach down to Ensenada (from Newport) Saturday
Coach down to Ensenada (from Newport) Sunday
Coach down to Ensenada (from Newport) Monday
Coach back to Newport
Coach back to Newport Friday
Coach back to Newport Saturday
Coach back to Newport Sunday
Coach back to Newport Monday

12. Did you visit the nosa.org website?

Yes
No

13. Was the website informative?

Yes
No

14. Did you receive the email updates?

Yes
No

15. Did you see the Ensenada Race advertised in any of the following?

SCYA Directory
The Log
Yacht Club Newsletters
Latitude 38
West Marine Flyer
Online

16. Which of the following do you interact with?

Email
You Tube
Twitter
Facebook

17. If there was a national collegiate/youth challenge would you be willing to lend your boat to University/youth sailing team (owner would be on board)?

Yes
No
Maybe
N/A

18. Would you like to see tracing transponders placed on select boats?

Yes
No
If Yes, would you want one on your boat?

19. Where did you stay this year?

Bahia Hotel
Hotel Coral
Your Boat
Other (please specify)

20. Where would you prefer to stay next year?

Bahia Hotel
Hotel Coral
Your Boat
Other (please specify)

21. Please add anything else you might think of that will make the 65th annual race the best race yet:

Thank you so much for taking the time to fill out this survey. Here's a big THANK YOU from NOSA!

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All boats should have yellow brick trackers but not have the silly 4 hour delay like transpac so the public or those on SA can follow the race.

Get some professional reporters to keep race info up to date like Fastnet race. Look into how/what the English do to attract so many boats to their races. http://www.rolexfastnetrace.com/

Yacht club board members need to get more involved in getting and helping boat participation, (what does Dana Point Yacht Club do?)

 

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Dana Point Yacht Club has rented out the Sol Mar Hotel (in town) and the majority of the club's participants stay there. We have a close relationship with the family that owns the hotel. They organize tours, parties and post trophy celebrations that are club specific. In other words they party as a club and maintain long term relationships with families in Ensenada.  They also have a relationship with the owner of one of the docks in town to berth many of the club boats.

My wife used to not like to come to Ensenada after the races. Now, she loves it.

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What about promoting more club vs. club competitions, with prizes, perpetual trophies and bragging rights attached. Club with most boats entered, club with highest overall/average places, that sort of thing. That might get yacht clubs to recruit more of their members to do the race and get boats on the line that otherwise wouldn't be.

And if clubs start getting more entries they might also follow the DPYC model of having organized family and post-race activities in Ensenada. Perhaps NOSA could work with the folks in Ensenada to set a club up with a "concierge" who would help them coordinate these activities.

A couple of other ideas:

  • Discounted entry fee for first-time boat or skipper. Maybe even a freebie for first-timers
  • Develop some "first-time Ensenada" seminars for skippers who might be considering the race. Run several of these at various yacht clubs and have the clubs promote the events to their members. These could start in the fall so skippers have plenty of time to absorb the information and decide if they want to participate
  • Set up a "buddy" program for first-time skippers--pair them up with an experienced Ensenada skipper for advice
  • To get more young folks involved, outreach to some of the local college sailing programs to help them pair their students with racing boats or perhaps charter a boat

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N2E has always been about bringing new interest to the sport. That's why it's run during late April early May. It's typically very light weather. 

The best I can come up with is:

1) working closely with the sailing schools and brokers to identify the newbies

2) work with the junior programs to get skippers who are looking for crew better access to talent.

 

 

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As I read these replies, I get a sense that something is wrong at Sailing Anarchy.  These replies are all good stuff (thanks).  But where are the profane trolls?  Where is the shit slinging?  Where are the N2E haters?

How long can my luck hold out?

Just so no one is confused, I am not complaining.  I like this just fine :D

Keep it coming.

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1 hour ago, Bill Gibbs said:

As I read these replies, I get a sense that something is wrong at Sailing Anarchy.  

Bill, you are too funny !!!!!!

Tenderpoop+rolls+55+take+my+failed+ones+

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The real question is what is the N2E race all about? Back in the thursday start days, there was lots of partying friday and saturday leaving Sunday to get the bodies and boats home.

Today, the first 10-20 boats turn and burn, and also we don't have the big number of core mid size fleets. Now, nobody wants to get stuck at the border for hours late on Sunday, pay exorbitant fees to land, and, at least in the last few years, run the risk of drug violence.

Lets face it, its not a great race (light air from Newport south, dying over night - except for the last 2 years which only means on average the next 5 will be sh#t).

So lets look at making the voyage more than a turn and burn to miss the mexican nightmare and you should be able to rebuild it.

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Don't actually recall Thursday starts.  Must have been 60's or earlier?

I find the events planned around the race in Newport seem to aim only at local folks.  There are events starting the weekend before the race, throughout the week leading up to the race.  Lunches, receptions, etc.  Are these well-attended?  Seems like they are for the NOSA and various government officials to have something to do around the race, and not aimed at the participants.  With many boats coming from out of town to do the race, it's hard to believe there are many racers at the events.  The one party when most are in town, as noted elsewhere, seems to have become lightly attended.

I like Woody's idea (did I just say that?) that we have lost much of the inter-fleet mixing that was always part of the charm of the race.

At the other end, while I understand the attraction of the Coral as the headquarters, I miss the crowds in town.  The Coral to us is one trip to check in and see results, and Sunday for trophies if we're so favored, and the bus for some.  Lunch at the Coral cost more than a great dinner and drinks in town, and the shopping is so much better.  (We still stop by the Bahia and check in with the concrete donkeys, though, so that's us.)

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Ah the good old days! Passing out on the lawn of the Bahia! Photo ops on the burros!

ensenada_party.jpg

I used to be that guy on the right. Now I'm that guy in the middle!

 

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Maybe it used to be more like Spring Break and now it's too much like another yacht race? Did anybody really give a damn who won what back in the day?

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3 hours ago, kinardly said:

Maybe it used to be more like Spring Break and now it's too much like another yacht race? Did anybody really give a damn who won what back in the day?

Hell yes they Did

And its much more like 25 very lightly attended Loooooooong races

all 25 (or so) races start close together so it looks like lots of boats

till they start

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On 8/11/2017 at 9:47 AM, Somebody Else said:

Ah the good old days! Passing out on the lawn of the Bahia! Photo ops on the burros!

ensenada_party.jpg

I used to be that guy on the right. Now I'm that guy in the middle!

 

 

Ah yes, those were the days, the Bahia rocked. I remember Hell's Angles at Husong's and the race where the Mexican Military were everywhere with M16 because El Presidente was coming thru.

From 74 to 95, I only missed a few races.
Ate too much good street food, drank too much and had a few good cigars.
Haven't been on the race since 95.

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I've always returned from Ensenada on the boat I raced down on, but I get a sense that coming back on the bus, with the long lines at the border, is a discouragement to many. It probably discourages family from coming down, and makes it harder to get race crew to commit if they need to be back at work on Monday.

I wonder if, instead of buses, you could charter something like a Catalina Express boat (or maybe an actual Catalina Express boat)? The boat could clear Customs and debark passengers in San Diego, and maybe even continue on after clearing in SD to make stops in Dana Point, Newport, Long Beach & San Pedro. If the boat operator could offer reasonable fares they'd probably make a bundle on onboard sales.

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On 8/24/2017 at 8:08 AM, DA-WOODY said:

They aren't rumors.  "Exercising caution" is good advise for them to give.  Racers have the option to stay inside the Coral Hotel resort with its great party and it's security.  Or to exercise caution at night in other places.  There are a lot of places in SoCal where I'd suggest you exercise caution at night.  Like any place with a lot of partying going on.  To the best of my knowledge, we have never had a participant killed or injured from Mexican criminal activities.  My crew and I always manage to exercise caution and have a great time.  :D

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On 8/24/2017 at 8:08 AM, DA-WOODY said:

Read the warning

For the Ensenada area the majority of the incidents are tied to turf wars amongst the criminals.  If you keep even 1/2 of your wits about you, you should be fine.  No different than living in So Cal.

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haven't done that race since 85 or 86..

 

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2 hours ago, poopie pants said:

Use a real rating system 

 

What would you suggest?

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9 minutes ago, Bill Gibbs said:

What would you suggest?

You obviously can't get rid of PHRF, you'd lose large numbers of casual racers. 

Offering some ORR classes might be interesting, although I'm not sure it would boost participation much. 

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Bill, and you might not want to do this, but would you be willing to post an outline of what NOSA feels is stopping or harming participation as well as those things that NOSA feels would likely increase participation?

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28 minutes ago, TJSoCal said:

You obviously can't get rid of PHRF, you'd lose large numbers of casual racers. 

Offering some ORR classes might be interesting, although I'm not sure it would boost participation much. 

Kinda of my thoughts also.

All single value rating systems get increasingly less accurate proportional to class boat performance dissimilarity.  So people might agree that ORR is more accurate than PHRF in general, but in the N2E race we have a lot of close, tight, PHRF classes.  Nothing is more accurate than racing against similar boats.

I am not aware of a group of ORR boats waiting to participate.  I think we would easily add an ORR start-class or an ORR sub-class if there were 5.  Have them contact me.

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22 minutes ago, Parma said:

Bill, and you might not want to do this, but would you be willing to post an outline of what NOSA feels is stopping or harming participation as well as those things that NOSA feels would likely increase participation?

I don't think this list has missed any.  I'm told a quick comparison shows N2E participation dropping proportional to PHRF membership, which represents sailing popularity locally.  This suggests that our problem is the dropping popularity of sailing, not specific things we are doing wrong.  It means we need to look at how to attract new sailors.

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agreed, I was just curious to see what NOSA perceives the "roadblocks" to be whether they be crew availability, cross-border documentation, course options or timing, etc. which outline could show what actions NOSA might take to address each issue.

On the other side of the coin would be an outline of "enhancements" designed to encourage participation.

In other words dealing with the negatives and accentuating the positives. It seems that there are a lot of good ideas designed to help participation as well as a lot of drawbacks that need to be addressed or eliminated in order to keep the focus on the fun, good and beneficial aspects of participation.

I started an outline like this realizing that what works and what the issues are for the Ensenada race would likely be widely applicable to a number of other races and could possibly be widely used as a template; just wanted to see if anybody at NOSA was engaged in a similar approach.

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11 hours ago, Bill Gibbs said:

What would you suggest?

ORC Club

Start early, work with other events that could  run under ORC Club so there is an incentive to get a ORC Club certificate  and start racing under it before your event. Start prior to 2018 so boats will get an ORC rating before getting a  2018 PHRF rating certificate.

Reduce your entry fee $50.00 so it would be cheaper to get an ORC Club certificate than a PHRF certificate.

You can be a leader or a follower. PHRF is dying a slow death 

 

http://www.orc.org/index.asp?id=22

http://store.ussailing.org/browse.cfm/orc-club-certificate-report-all-changes-boat-name-sail-in-order-notes/4,844.html

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I would suggest starting the short course guys earlier.  Like around noon.  That way it really prevents people from motoring (in the cruising fleet) and allows them a decent day of sailing.  I know that is a very small sub-set of the big race, but most of the short course guys aren't excited about the overnight portion, more about racing to Mexico.  Being able to start/finish earlier would make the class a lot more popular I think.  My 2 cents...

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Begging and pleading the existing fleet to race more is turning in low results.  Hmmmmmm, just where can more boats be found?  How about those 9 out of 10 boats that aren't racing?  Start marketing to them, set up seminars to teach them rudiments, set up sections for these newbies (do not mix them with the existing racers some who will be cut throat to assure they will never return again), and give each newbie a mentor.

A "mentor" I say?  Yes, there are tons of sailors who have either quit, sold their boats and haven't been asked to race on other boats that would love to mentor a new racer.  You just have to ask and find these people.  There are tons of them waiting for you to ask.

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On 8/27/2017 at 10:20 AM, pbd said:

Read the warning

For the Ensenada area the majority of the incidents are tied to turf wars amongst the criminals.  If you keep even 1/2 of your wits about you, you should be fine.  No different than living in So Cal.

Absolutely true... 

if you are not trying to buy/sell drugs, 

if you treat locals with respect,

if you do not assume that all local women are prostitutes,

you are going to be just fine...

 

if it was so bad, the cruise ships would not be coming here, and letting passengers off to have a 'unchaperoned' tour of Ensenada...

lovely place... lovely people...

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9 hours ago, h20man said:

Absolutely true... 

if you are not trying to buy/sell drugs, 

if you treat locals with respect,

if you do not assume that all local women are prostitutes,

you are going to be just fine...

 

if it was so bad, the cruise ships would not be coming here, and letting passengers off to have a 'unchaperoned' tour of Ensenada...

lovely place... lovely people...

well said.

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Border Run is scheduled for same date and already has entries open and 50+ entries in.  NOSA web site cannot enter yet.   Looks like the battle between events continues.  Given a choice between going to Ensenada or SD, the owners and teams will vote with their entry in either race.   This will speak volumes.

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51 minutes ago, RealEstateBroker said:

Border Run is scheduled for same date and already has entries open and 50+ entries in.  NOSA web site cannot enter yet.   Looks like the battle between events continues.  Given a choice between going to Ensenada or SD, the owners and teams will vote with their entry in either race.   This will speak volumes.

That is a shame.  I thought they had worked out the scheduling issues.  It's just dumb to have two big events competing for the boats.

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3 hours ago, condor said:

That is a shame.  I thought they had worked out the scheduling issues.  It's just dumb to have two big events competing for the boats.

Yes it is.  That is why NOSA is taking over management of the Border Run and combining it with N2E, as one event, all boats starting on the same day, same start lines, same parties, etc.  There are details being worked out, so keep this confidential, ok?   ;)

Racers will be able to choose between N2DP, N2SD, or N2E.

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11 minutes ago, Bill Gibbs said:

Yes it is.  That is why NOSA is taking over management of the Border Run and combining it with N2E, as one event, all boats starting on the same day, same start lines, same parties, etc.  There are details being worked out, so keep this confidential, ok?   ;)

Racers will be able to choose between N2DP, N2SD, or N2E.

Might be worth keeping the SD2E course in the mix as well. A bit more work to run a separate starting line, but it would keep a shorter course option for those who still want the "international" experience.

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Its a close call.   I think there were 8 boats last year that chose this course, SD-Ens.  It is a significant amount of extra work to set up a separate start, check in, etc.

For 2018 the board decided to drop it.  But this could change.

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N2E normally opens registration January first.

Is there an advantage to starting registration sooner?

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3 minutes ago, Bill Gibbs said:

Its a close call.   I think there were 8 boats last year that chose this course, SD-Ens.  It is a significant amount of extra work to set up a separate start, check in, etc.

For 2018 the board decided to drop it.  But this could change.

Yeah, true, but I think that was only the second year for SD2E course and it seemed like 2017 was a down year overall, wasn't it?

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2 minutes ago, Bill Gibbs said:

N2E normally opens registration January first.

Is there an advantage to starting registration sooner?

Might be, especially if it included a significant early-early-bird discount. Maybe combine a registration discount with some kind of racer's discount for early booking at Coral.

Historically, what does the January registration look like? If it's slow, then you probably don't have a lot of folks who would pull the trigger earlier. And what kind of spikes if any do you typically see just before discounts expire?

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On 9/13/2017 at 2:02 PM, Bill Gibbs said:

Yes it is.  That is why NOSA is taking over management of the Border Run and combining it with N2E, as one event, all boats starting on the same day, same start lines, same parties, etc.  There are details being worked out, so keep this confidential, ok?   ;)

Racers will be able to choose between N2DP, N2SD, or N2E.

if they combine another 5 race's pre-race, parties they might be Great again

I wouldn't attend another if they moved them to DAGO

Truly Sad

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13 minutes ago, DA-WOODY said:

if they combine another 5 race's pre-race, parties they might be Great again

I wouldn't attend another if they moved them to DAGO

Truly Sad

he's referring to people actually doing the race. the party is an after thought.

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4 hours ago, bigrpowr said:

he's referring to people actually doing the race. the party is an after thought.

And that's what ruined Newport to Ensenada right there ;-)

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AMERICAS

Where Tourism Thrives in Mexico, Bloodshed and Poverty Are Blocks Away

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Near the spot where a man was killed in San José del Cabo, Mexico. Homicide cases in the region, a tourism mecca, are up more than threefold this year. CreditRodrigo Cruz for The New York Times

LOS CABOS, Mexico — In recruiting foot soldiers, the drug gang did not have to look hard to find 18-year-old Edwin Alberto López Rojas. He, in fact, had been looking for them.

He admired the traffickers’ lifestyle and power. And the money he stood to make promised admission to the ranks of the international elite who cavorted in the luxury resorts mere blocks — yet a universe away — from the poor neighborhoods where he grew up in Los Cabos, a tourism mecca at the southern tip of the Baja California Peninsula.

On July 28, he told relatives, the Jalisco New Generation criminal organization gave him a car, cash and some drugs to push. Eight days later he was dead, shot by an unidentified assailant on the street.

His death is among hundreds that have bloodied this once-peaceful area — homicide cases are up more than threefold this year compared with last, a surge that has stunned residents, bedeviled officials and alarmed leaders in the booming tourism industry. A similar wave of violence has also jolted the state of Quintana Roo on the Caribbean coast, which is home to tourism hot spots like Cancún, Cozumel, Playa del Carmen and Tulum.

Continue reading the main story

The sharp rise in killings prompted the United States State Department last month to heighten its travel warnings for Quintana Roo and the state of Baja California Sur, home to Los Cabos.

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The Facebook page of Edwin Alberto López Rojas, 18, who was killed shortly after joining a criminal gang. CreditRodrigo Cruz for The New York Times

The bloodshed here has not targeted tourists and has mostly occurred out of their view, in the poorer quarters of San José del Cabo and Cabo San Lucas, the main towns in the municipality of Los Cabos. Much of it stems from a battle among criminal groups for control of trafficking routes in the Baja California Peninsula and for dominance of local criminal enterprises, particularly the drug trade servicing tourists.

But the violence, community leaders and social workers say, is also a symptom of the grave problems that afflict the region’s underclass, reflecting longstanding government neglect. While the authorities have for decades thrown their weight behind the development of the tourism sector, many of the needs of the poor and working class have languished, they say.

Los Cabos, they say, risks following the same path as Acapulco, the Pacific Coast city that was once a major vacation destination but has been devastated by drug violence.

“If they continue covering up the problems, things aren’t going to get better,” said Silvia Lupián Durán, the president of the Citizens’ Council for Security and Criminal Justice in Baja California Sur, a community group. “It’s a breeding ground for worse things.”

There is much at stake. Last year, Los Cabos had more than 2.1 million visitors, 75 percent of them international travelers and the majority of those from the United States, said Rodrigo Esponda, the managing director of the Los Cabos Tourism Board. The average cost of a hotel room is around $300 per night.

 
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CALIF.

ARIZONA

N. M.

MEXICO

Gulf of

California

Baja California

Sur

Pacific Ocean

Los Cabos

Cabo San Lucas

San José

del Cabo

200 Miles

 

By The New York Times

For most of its modern history, the region was sleepy and isolated, accessible only by boat or private plane. But with the completion of the Transpeninsular Highway in the 1970s and the expansion of the local airport, development exploded — and with it came a rise in migration as Mexicans poured in to work in construction and as chambermaids, bellhops, cooks, waiters, bartenders and landscapers.

In 1990, the municipality’s population was about 44,000. By 2015, it had climbed to about 288,000, with many people working in jobs that directly or indirectly supported tourism.

“There was no sane planning for where all the working people were going to live,” said Ramón Ojeda Mestre, the president of the Center for Integral Studies of Innovation and Territory, a consultancy in Cabo San Lucas.

Most of those working-class migrants have settled in gritty neighborhoods carved out of desert scrubland that stretches north from the narrow coastal strip where the hotels, golf courses, nightclubs and marinas are concentrated.

In many of these neighborhoods, the best homes are simple one- or two-room cinder-block structures with corrugated metal roofs. The worst, often in illegal settlements called “invasions,” are assembled from scrap building materials and tarps, tree branches, sticks and even cardboard. By the municipality’s estimates, about 25,000 people live in such settlements.

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Improvised electricity poles and unpaved streets in the Nueva Esperanza neighborhood of San José del Cabo.CreditRodrigo Cruz for The New York Times

Overcrowding is common, and public services are spotty or nonexistent.

Most of the neighborhoods have no sewer systems, and many homes are not hooked up to the municipal water supply. Even those that are connected often find their pipes empty: Demand has far outpaced supply, forcing the rationing of municipal water delivery and compelling residents to buy water at inflated prices from tanker trucks that ply the unpaved roads.

“There’s a first world, and there’s a fifth world,” said Homero González, a political organizer, during a recent visit to the Caribe neighborhood, a settlement in Cabo San Lucas. Roving packs of dogs wandered among piles of rubble, drifts of trash and the husks of stripped cars within a few miles of the manicured grounds of the resorts where many residents work.

As living standards go in these communities, Maria Salazar isn’t doing so badly. She lives with her four children and her boyfriend in a one-room, cement-block house in the Real Unidad neighborhood in Cabo San Lucas. She is a community leader and peddles homemade flavored ices and candy to help make ends meet; her boyfriend brings in $14 a day as a freelance construction worker. They don’t have plumbing of any sort, though after years of pirating electricity, they were finally connected to the regional grid.

“I heard a lot about ‘the change,’ ‘the change,’” she scoffed, referring to the last round of regional elections in 2015. “And now we’re seeing the change: all these massacres.”

Municipal officials blame past administrations. In an interview, Álvaro Javier Ramírez, the director of planning and urban development, acknowledged that over the years the authorities had put a disproportionate emphasis on supporting the tourism sector.

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Berenice Moctezuma, 23, and her daughter Alis, 2, inside a home made of scrap materials in San José del Cabo.CreditRodrigo Cruz for The New York Times

“Historically, cash is king,” Mr. Ramírez said. He added, referring to previous municipal governments: “They ignored the needs of the working-class neighborhoods. The shortfalls are many.”

The inequalities gnaw at the working-class population, though any inclination to lobby the authorities to fix the problems is undermined by a sense that the system is rigged. This is the fertile environment of discontent in which criminal gangs have seeded their operations, recruiting members, buying allegiances and cultivating markets, community leaders say.

“If the young people don’t have anything to work toward, they will look for other options,” said a close relative of Edwin López, the murdered teenager, requesting anonymity for fear of retribution by public officials and the drug gangs. “We need a government here that worries more for the urban population than for the tourist zone.”

In the first seven months of this year, the government opened 232 homicide investigations in Baja California Sur, most of them in Los Cabos, and some involving multiple victims. During the same period last year, there were 65 homicide investigations. In a nation that has seen homicides surge to record levels this year, Baja California Sur now has the fifth highest rate among Mexico’s 32 states.

The jump in killings in Los Cabos — accompanied by a rise in other crimes — has pitched residents into a state of fear they say they have never felt before.

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A hotel in Cabo San Lucas. Local officials have long thrown their weight behind the development of the tourism sector. CreditRodrigo Cruz for The New York Times

No neighborhood, it appears, has been hit as hard as El Zacatal, in San José del Cabo, where homicides have become depressingly familiar.

A recent drive through the area with Concepción Gárate, a hairdresser and longtime resident, became a guided tour of bloodshed. She pointed out the convenience store where four people were killed, the house that was strafed by gunmen, another house where gunmen murdered a family.

“A barber was cutting hair there,” she said, pointing to a barbershop. “They killed him while he was cutting hair!” The tour continued: two dead in front of a school, three in a taqueria, three others in a tire repair shop, one in a carpenter’s workshop.

“El Zacatal is hell,” Ms. Gárate said.

Leaders of the tourism industry and public officials have tried to forestall damage to the area’s appeal to visitors, particularly after the State Department advisory, pointing out that tourists have not been the target of the homicides.

But from time to time the violence has interrupted vacation idylls. In August, gunmen stormed a beach near a resort where rooms can go for thousands of dollars a night, killing three people in what the authorities said was score-settling between rival criminal groups.

The federal government has deployed hundreds of marines and federal police officers to the municipality to confront the violence, and the national tourism secretary, Enrique de la Madrid, has announced a plan to create a special police force to help patrol tourism destinations, including Los Cabos, though the plan remains on the drawing board.

But in an interview with El Universal newspaper, Mr. de la Madrid also said the nation needed to do a better job redistributing tourism profits throughout society. “The enemy of Mexico is poverty and inequality,” he said.

The precariousness of lives in Los Cabos’s poor sections was starkly illustrated this month when Tropical Storm Lidia lashed the area, flooding neighborhoods, destroying scores of poorly built homes and killing at least six people.

The killings seemed to stop for a bit after the storm, but the peace was momentary. Days later, a 22-year-old man was shot and killed in San José del Cabo, steps from an elementary school. The drumbeat of murder continued.

A version of this article appears in print on September 17, 2017, on Page A6 of the New York edition with the headline: Blocks From Mexican Resorts, Killings Surge. Order Reprints| Today's Paper|Subscribe

Continue reading the main story

FROM OUR ADVERTISERS

 
 
 

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Good thing we're not going to Cabo then.

You can find bad news closer to home

http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-crime-stats-20161227-story.html

http://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/news/public-safety/sd-me-county-homicides-20170226-story.html

Crime occurs everywhere there are people.  We have 0 violent crime against participants in 70 years going to Ensenada.

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56 minutes ago, Bill Gibbs said:

Good thing we're not going to Cabo then.

You can find bad news closer to home

http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-crime-stats-20161227-story.html

http://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/news/public-safety/sd-me-county-homicides-20170226-story.html

Crime occurs everywhere there are people.  We have 0 violent crime against participants in 70 years going to Ensenada.

Killing the BCYC Party was a Crime against All Participants 

Supprised that horse hasn't got up yet ;-)

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