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blackjenner

1180 nm of Lessons in 14 weeks

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  • It's 1180 nm from Port Townsend to Port Angeles, Washington as long as you go via, Hunter Bay, Blind Bay, Deer Harbor, Jones Island, Sucia Island, Port Browning, Ganges Harbor, North Cove, Herring Bay, Dodd Narrows, Naniano, across Queen Charlotte Strait, Bedwell Harbor, Melanie Cove, Grace Harbor, Owen Bay, Otter Bay, Johnstone Strait, Pt. Neville, Port McNeil, Namu, Shearwater, the Price Island reefs in some real weather, Aristizabal Island and the Beaver Family, Winter Harbor on Northwest Van Isle, and a long straight shot (55 hours and 256 NM) into the Straits of Juan de Fuca) at midnight and zero fog visibility that did not let up until Port Angeles.
  • Bringing on extra crew doesn't necessarily make things easier.
  • Our Hydrovane is a game changer. It rocked, especially when combined with our $400.00 tiller pilot.
  • The Rainman portable water maker is well worth having, even if the only storage spot I have for it causes a serious list to port.
  • The remoteness of the various bays and harbors we visited cannot be overstated. Namu was rocky, remote and in a radio hole. We could not hear weather forecasts.
  • Our ground tackle performed superbly, in a wide variety of conditions. The combination of a 46lb Untra backed up by as much as 175' of 3/8 BBB chain was highly effective. We slept well. We trust this combination for Brigadoon. 
  • Anchor buoys rock. We always know exactly where our anchor is. We call ours "Wilson". 
  • Our IridiumGo Predict Wind combination made for effective weather decisions. We were 10 our of 10 on our decisions. We never sailed into a known storm and we planned ahead for things like waiting out a gale for a day or so. It all worked.
  • Brigadoon is stout and strong. We can trust her.
  • Brigadoon does not like sailing DDW in two meter, slightly confused seas. It's very unpleasant if she starts to roll and the sails aren't adjusted right. Once they are adjusted, it's just unpleasant. It can't be made much better. Slightly off the wind is better.
  • Brigadoon loves, loves 120 deg and 15-20. We saw speeds in the sevens.
  • We are stronger than we thought and can do more than we expected.
  • The sea, at 0100 hours, a half hour after moonset is a sooty black, seething, foam breathing beast that kept me company on one of my first offshore watches.
  • The stars...the sky is full of stars.
  • Warm food would have been smarter but not so safe in the rollers we experienced.
  • 1180 nautical miles, offshore, in intl waters at times, 55 hours straight, sailing in 20-25 kts in two meter swell -- all things that taught us much.

Now we sit for a week or so and figure out the next steps in The Freedom Project.

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And good old BRIGADOON who took really good care of you two gets a breather in Blakely Harbor with her Perry designed pal, FRANCIS LEE.

She is awfully cute, maybe I won't give her back!

IMG_9207.JPG

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Blackjenner and Mrs.Black arriving Blakely Harbor yesterday, now much more experience sailors than 14 weeks ago.

BRIGADOON however is still the well founded solid offshore boat she has always been.

IMG_9206.JPG

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Thank you, my friend, for the hospitality and the pics.

 

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If I can help keep Donn and Keri happy then I think I have done a good job.

It still pisses me off that he could draw that bow with ease and I could not.

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I've heard about taking the long way home but you carry it to extremes. :D

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One of my favorite Supertramp songs is "Take the Long Way Home." It suited me when I was motorcycle adventuring and it just may suit me now.

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I was on Blakey harbor a few weeks ago - never knew I was snoozing next to a Perry design. I should have introduced myself (or at the least rowed over in the night and furtively petted her hull)

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Blakely Harbor is going to get more visitors in the future...Pacific Yachting just ran an article on 6 good anchorages in Puget Sound and that was one of them.

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10 hours ago, GunkHoler said:

I was on Blakey harbor a few weeks ago - never knew I was snoozing next to a Perry design. I should have introduced myself (or at the least rowed over in the night and furtively petted her hull)

I generally welcome visits by most CA members. I even lend my mooring buoys to them if they ask nicely, as long as I haven't promised them to someone else or are using them myself.

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On 8/12/2017 at 1:08 AM, blackjenner said:
  • It's 1180 nm from Port Townsend to Port Angeles, Washington as long as you go via, Hunter Bay, Blind Bay, Deer Harbor, Jones Island, Sucia Island, Port Browning, Ganges Harbor, North Cove, Herring Bay, Dodd Narrows, Naniano, across Queen Charlotte Strait, Bedwell Harbor, Melanie Cove, Grace Harbor, Owen Bay, Otter Bay, Johnstone Strait, Pt. Neville, Port McNeil, Namu, Shearwater, the Price Island reefs in some real weather, Aristizabal Island and the Beaver Family, Winter Harbor on Northwest Van Isle, and a long straight shot (55 hours and 256 NM) into the Straits of Juan de Fuca) at midnight and zero fog visibility that did not let up until Port Angeles.
  • Bringing on extra crew doesn't necessarily make things easier.
  • Our Hydrovane is a game changer. It rocked, especially when combined with our $400.00 tiller pilot.
  • The Rainman portable water maker is well worth having, even if the only storage spot I have for it causes a serious list to port.
  • The remoteness of the various bays and harbors we visited cannot be overstated. Namu was rocky, remote and in a radio hole. We could not hear weather forecasts.
  • Our ground tackle performed superbly, in a wide variety of conditions. The combination of a 46lb Untra backed up by as much as 175' of 3/8 BBB chain was highly effective. We slept well. We trust this combination for Brigadoon. 
  • Anchor buoys rock. We always know exactly where our anchor is. We call ours "Wilson". 
  • Our IridiumGo Predict Wind combination made for effective weather decisions. We were 10 our of 10 on our decisions. We never sailed into a known storm and we planned ahead for things like waiting out a gale for a day or so. It all worked.
  • Brigadoon is stout and strong. We can trust her.
  • Brigadoon does not like sailing DDW in two meter, slightly confused seas. It's very unpleasant if she starts to roll and the sails aren't adjusted right. Once they are adjusted, it's just unpleasant. It can't be made much better. Slightly off the wind is better.
  • Brigadoon loves, loves 120 deg and 15-20. We saw speeds in the sevens.
  • We are stronger than we thought and can do more than we expected.
  • The sea, at 0100 hours, a half hour after moonset is a sooty black, seething, foam breathing beast that kept me company on one of my first offshore watches.
  • The stars...the sky is full of stars.
  • Warm food would have been smarter but not so safe in the rollers we experienced.
  • 1180 nautical miles, offshore, in intl waters at times, 55 hours straight, sailing in 20-25 kts in two meter swell -- all things that taught us much.

Now we sit for a week or so and figure out the next steps in The Freedom Project.

Careful with anchor bouys. They make a mess.  Avoid at all costs

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On 8/11/2017 at 4:08 PM, blackjenner said:
  • It's 1180 nm from Port Townsend to Port Angeles, Washington as long as you go via, Hunter Bay, Blind Bay, Deer Harbor, Jones Island, Sucia Island, Port Browning, Ganges Harbor, North Cove, Herring Bay, Dodd Narrows, Naniano, across Queen Charlotte Strait, Bedwell Harbor, Melanie Cove, Grace Harbor, Owen Bay, Otter Bay, Johnstone Strait, Pt. Neville, Port McNeil, Namu, Shearwater, the Price Island reefs in some real weather, Aristizabal Island and the Beaver Family, Winter Harbor on Northwest Van Isle, and a long straight shot (55 hours and 256 NM) into the Straits of Juan de Fuca) at midnight and zero fog visibility that did not let up until Port Angeles.
  • Bringing on extra crew doesn't necessarily make things easier.
  • Our Hydrovane is a game changer. It rocked, especially when combined with our $400.00 tiller pilot.
  • The Rainman portable water maker is well worth having, even if the only storage spot I have for it causes a serious list to port.
  • The remoteness of the various bays and harbors we visited cannot be overstated. Namu was rocky, remote and in a radio hole. We could not hear weather forecasts.
  • Our ground tackle performed superbly, in a wide variety of conditions. The combination of a 46lb Untra backed up by as much as 175' of 3/8 BBB chain was highly effective. We slept well. We trust this combination for Brigadoon. 
  • Anchor buoys rock. We always know exactly where our anchor is. We call ours "Wilson". 
  • Our IridiumGo Predict Wind combination made for effective weather decisions. We were 10 our of 10 on our decisions. We never sailed into a known storm and we planned ahead for things like waiting out a gale for a day or so. It all worked.
  • Brigadoon is stout and strong. We can trust her.
  • Brigadoon does not like sailing DDW in two meter, slightly confused seas. It's very unpleasant if she starts to roll and the sails aren't adjusted right. Once they are adjusted, it's just unpleasant. It can't be made much better. Slightly off the wind is better.
  • Brigadoon loves, loves 120 deg and 15-20. We saw speeds in the sevens.
  • We are stronger than we thought and can do more than we expected.
  • The sea, at 0100 hours, a half hour after moonset is a sooty black, seething, foam breathing beast that kept me company on one of my first offshore watches.
  • The stars...the sky is full of stars.
  • Warm food would have been smarter but not so safe in the rollers we experienced.
  • 1180 nautical miles, offshore, in intl waters at times, 55 hours straight, sailing in 20-25 kts in two meter swell -- all things that taught us much.

Now we sit for a week or so and figure out the next steps in The Freedom Project.

This is why we sail...

Well done Black and Mrs Black....

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15 minutes ago, slug zitski said:

Careful with anchor bouys. They make a mess.  Avoid at all costs

Not only do they not show up on time, they make dirty on the foredeck.

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18 minutes ago, slug zitski said:

Careful with anchor bouys. They make a mess.  Avoid at all costs

We had an issue or two but they were minor and well worth the advantages.

Thanks.

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If the weather goes bad at night, of if other boats are in the harbour , anchor bouys are treacherous.

I ruined the propellor on my tender last year...night, picked up an anchor ball pennant...detroyed the rubber prop clutch....took two weeks to order and replace.

very difficult to justify an anchor bouy.  If the bottom is foul i avoid the anchorage.

if I have no choice I rig a breakout anchor 

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9 hours ago, slug zitski said:

If the weather goes bad at night, of if other boats are in the harbour , anchor bouys are treacherous.

I ruined the propellor on my tender last year...night, picked up an anchor ball pennant...detroyed the rubber prop clutch....took two weeks to order and replace.

very difficult to justify an anchor bouy.  If the bottom is foul i avoid the anchorage.

if I have no choice I rig a breakout anchor 

We had an issue or two but they were minor and well worth the advantages.

Thank you.

 

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What ever you say.

im most upset when at night the wind shifts , the boats clock around  , and somones anchor bouy ends up under my hull 

when a boat with an anchor bouy drags and fouls my anchor at night , dealing with his  anchor bouy and its 50 feet of rope  , as I attempt to get him off my chain , is big trouble 

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On 8/11/2017 at 7:08 PM, blackjenner said:
  •  
  • Bringing on extra crew doesn't necessarily rarely make(s) things easier.

This

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8 minutes ago, Not Nice said:

This

Crew...people with spare time...a few weeks empty in lifes schedule ...are hard to find 

im always short crew

the most availble are the young folks who need sea time, mile builders for gaining a license

normally they are no nonsense and keen to learn how to operate yacht equipment  

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Yup.  You've gotta feed 'em.  Someone has to wash more dishes.  Water tanks deplete faster.  Holding tank pompout frequency increases.  Tolerance for weather conditions changes plans, increased 'issues' with privacy and menu 'needs'....    I much prefer just cruising with the Admiral.  I can usually deal with extra bodies for a daysail under 6 hours as I have lower expectations and can endure most anything for a known period of time.

(I guess I sound a bit curmudgeonly but, well, ok, I'll own that)

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If you have a good gang its fun.  One of the reasons you take the mile builder types is that they must keep a proper DR logbook and practice with the sextant ..

seems  that these days  many  of the  other. free time To go sailing folks ,  arrive on board with 50 hours worth of movies and video games 

not much fun..

 

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36 minutes ago, slug zitski said:

What ever you say.

im most upset when at night the wind shifts , the boats clock around  , and somones anchor bouy ends up under my hull 

when a boat with an anchor bouy drags and fouls my anchor at night , dealing with his  anchor bouy and its 50 feet of rope  , as I attempt to get him off my chain , is big trouble 

Yes, you're absolutely right.

It's whatever I say aboard Brigadoon.

Thanks again.

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People should learn how to rig a breakout anchor.

practice a few times to get the breakout load correct for your boat 

i

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51 minutes ago, slug zitski said:

People should learn how to rig a breakout anchor.

practice a few times to get the breakout load correct for your boat 

i

You obviously feel very passionate about this issue.

Perhaps you could write an article and post it here so we can learn from your experience.

 

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A breakout...the reason an anchor has the extra hole

for breakout or inline tandem anchoring 

 

IMG_8029.JPG

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So what to you put in the little hole in the front?

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4 minutes ago, blackjenner said:

So what to you put in the little hole in the front?

A shackle. Usual routine is to run a trip line from the shackle along the anchor rode back to the boat or to a buoy. If the anchor hooks and you can't disengage, you pull in the trip line and it drags the anchor out backwards. Lotsa string to care for.

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2 hours ago, slug zitski said:

What ever you say.

im most upset when at night the wind shifts , the boats clock around  , and somones anchor bouy ends up under my hull 

when a boat with an anchor bouy drags and fouls my anchor at night , dealing with his  anchor bouy and its 50 feet of rope  , as I attempt to get him off my chain , is big trouble 

That just means that you had too much scope or were too close. If there is an anchor buoy, it just means "that is where my anchor is please keep your circle just outside of it...."

If somebody drags on top of your chain, it is "something that just happens from time to time", it is going to be a mess anyway and the anchor buoy actually might help you to retrieve his anchor or alternatively you can drop your chain in the bottom and come later retrieve it with the buoy.

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No more than 50' in my case. :)

 

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On 8/12/2017 at 12:08 AM, blackjenner said:
  • Brigadoon does not like sailing DDW in two meter, slightly confused seas. It's very unpleasant if she starts to roll and the sails aren't adjusted right. Once they are adjusted, it's just unpleasant. It can't be made much better. Slightly off the wind is better.

Sorry to "cherry-pick" just one of your cogent observations, but it struck a chord with me: We sailed across Bass Straight from Wineglass Bay to Eden and the rhumb line was pretty much DDW for about 325 Nm, with around 30 knots and a pretty confused sea. It took so long for the penny to drop that I felt such a fool afterwards... we were far better sailing 20-25 degrees off DDW and putting in a couple of jibes (or, indeed granny-tacks) and the extra distance sailed was relatively tiny compared to the extra comfort because Insatiable was no longer rolling like a pig, and the autopilot was working a lot less hard. Its a lesson I will never forget.

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3 hours ago, Weyalan said:

Sorry to "cherry-pick" just one of your cogent observations, but it struck a chord with me: We sailed across Bass Straight from Wineglass Bay to Eden and the rhumb line was pretty much DDW for about 325 Nm, with around 30 knots and a pretty confused sea. It took so long for the penny to drop that I felt such a fool afterwards... we were far better sailing 20-25 degrees off DDW and putting in a couple of jibes (or, indeed granny-tacks) and the extra distance sailed was relatively tiny compared to the extra comfort because Insatiable was no longer rolling like a pig, and the autopilot was working a lot less hard. Its a lesson I will never forget.

I believe you. I believed what others have said about DDW sailing in some boats. I wanted to see how she sailed. Brigadoon told me. I believe her too.

Next time, I think we will bear "up" a little and sail the course you suggested. Brigadoon really seems to like 120-150 degrees.
 

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I've seen breakouts rigged by shackling the rode to the back hole and using zip ties around the rode to the front hole.  If it fouls, the zip tie breaks and you can back it out.  No extra lines in the water.  But a big wind shift might break the zip tie I suppose.  On larger boats a stronger "zip tie", like 1/4 inch nylon maybe?  Anybody try this?

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3 hours ago, blackjenner said:

I believe you. I believed what others have said about DDW sailing in some boats. I wanted to see how she sailed. Brigadoon told me. I believe her too.

Next time, I think we will bear "up" a little and sail the course you suggested. Brigadoon really seems to like 120-150 degrees.
 

For me it wasn't about finding out about the boat, it was my inability to lose the racer's mentality of sailing the shortest distance... which, with the benefit of hindsight, was ridiculous. Sailing a 40' (ex) race boat for about 50 hours with a crew of 2 (she was designed for 10) has to be about looking after the crew, not about getting there 15 minutes faster... I blush to even say it now, heh

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1 minute ago, Weyalan said:

For me it wasn't about finding out about the boat, it was my inability to lose the racer's mentality of sailing the shortest distance... which, with the benefit of hindsight, was ridiculous. Sailing a 40' (ex) race boat for about 50 hours with a crew of 2 (she was designed for 10) has to be about looking after the crew, not about getting there 15 minutes faster... I blush to even say it now, heh

I too was a little stuck on my course and sailing worse for it. It was a good lesson. Thanks for the reminder.

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3 hours ago, Kenny Dumas said:

I've seen breakouts rigged by shackling the rode to the back hole and using zip ties around the rode to the front hole.  If it fouls, the zip tie breaks and you can back it out.  No extra lines in the water.  But a big wind shift might break the zip tie I suppose.  On larger boats a stronger "zip tie", like 1/4 inch nylon maybe?  Anybody try this?

mere thought is scary enough

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5 hours ago, Kenny Dumas said:

I've seen breakouts rigged by shackling the rode to the back hole and using zip ties around the rode to the front hole.  If it fouls, the zip tie breaks and you can back it out.  No extra lines in the water.  But a big wind shift might break the zip tie I suppose.  On larger boats a stronger "zip tie", like 1/4 inch nylon maybe?  Anybody try this?

Yikes. Wind shifts, or surges, or even backdown setting etc shouldn’t be a reason to deliberately de-anchor your boat! Do you really want to risk boat sacrifice with such a fuse to maybe save an anchor every few years?

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That's the technique the salmon fishermen use for "Columbia River Anchors" in the hog lines.  They don't sleep on em.  

Messing around with a stuck anchor in current is a good way to sink those boats.  

 

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16 hours ago, Kenny Dumas said:

I've seen breakouts rigged by shackling the rode to the back hole and using zip ties around the rode to the front hole.  If it fouls, the zip tie breaks and you can back it out.  No extra lines in the water.  But a big wind shift might break the zip tie I suppose.  On larger boats a stronger "zip tie", like 1/4 inch nylon maybe?  Anybody try this?

Zip ties are a bit light......how strong the breakout  is related to how hard you can pull on the chain.

perhaps half the breaking strength of the chain...perhaps much less if youre a small craft 

String...lashing is best...more layers...stronger.

practice is the only way to understand your requirements

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11 hours ago, HFC Hunter said:

Yikes. Wind shifts, or surges, or even backdown setting etc shouldn’t be a reason to deliberately de-anchor your boat! Do you really want to risk boat sacrifice with such a fuse to maybe save an anchor every few years?

If you must rig a breakout every time you anchor then you are choosing very bad places.

i seldom use them.  Bottom conditions are known and charted...

typically its when the bottom has islotate patches of broken coral, or a thin layer of sand over a rocky base

you know its there.

neither are good places to anchor

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On 2/2/2018 at 3:50 PM, HFC Hunter said:

Yikes. Wind shifts, or surges, or even backdown setting etc shouldn’t be a reason to deliberately de-anchor your boat! Do you really want to risk boat sacrifice with such a fuse to maybe save an anchor every few years?

I just got an anchor that stays set in most wind shifts or surges. 

 

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On 8/11/2017 at 7:08 PM, blackjenner said:
  • It's 1180 nm from Port Townsend to Port Angeles, Washington as long as you go via, Hunter Bay, Blind Bay, Deer Harbor, Jones Island, Sucia Island, Port Browning, Ganges Harbor, North Cove, Herring Bay, Dodd Narrows, Naniano, across Queen Charlotte Strait, Bedwell Harbor, Melanie Cove, Grace Harbor, Owen Bay, Otter Bay, Johnstone Strait, Pt. Neville, Port McNeil, Namu, Shearwater, the Price Island reefs in some real weather, Aristizabal Island and the Beaver Family, Winter Harbor on Northwest Van Isle, and a long straight shot (55 hours and 256 NM) into the Straits of Juan de Fuca) at midnight and zero fog visibility that did not let up until Port Angeles.
  • Bringing on extra crew doesn't necessarily make things easier.
  • Our Hydrovane is a game changer. It rocked, especially when combined with our $400.00 tiller pilot.
  • The Rainman portable water maker is well worth having, even if the only storage spot I have for it causes a serious list to port.
  • The remoteness of the various bays and harbors we visited cannot be overstated. Namu was rocky, remote and in a radio hole. We could not hear weather forecasts.
  • Our ground tackle performed superbly, in a wide variety of conditions. The combination of a 46lb Untra backed up by as much as 175' of 3/8 BBB chain was highly effective. We slept well. We trust this combination for Brigadoon. 
  • Anchor buoys rock. We always know exactly where our anchor is. We call ours "Wilson". 
  • Our IridiumGo Predict Wind combination made for effective weather decisions. We were 10 our of 10 on our decisions. We never sailed into a known storm and we planned ahead for things like waiting out a gale for a day or so. It all worked.
  • Brigadoon is stout and strong. We can trust her.
  • Brigadoon does not like sailing DDW in two meter, slightly confused seas. It's very unpleasant if she starts to roll and the sails aren't adjusted right. Once they are adjusted, it's just unpleasant. It can't be made much better. Slightly off the wind is better.
  • Brigadoon loves, loves 120 deg and 15-20. We saw speeds in the sevens.
  • We are stronger than we thought and can do more than we expected.
  • The sea, at 0100 hours, a half hour after moonset is a sooty black, seething, foam breathing beast that kept me company on one of my first offshore watches.
  • The stars...the sky is full of stars.
  • Warm food would have been smarter but not so safe in the rollers we experienced.
  • 1180 nautical miles, offshore, in intl waters at times, 55 hours straight, sailing in 20-25 kts in two meter swell -- all things that taught us much.

Now we sit for a week or so and figure out the next steps in The Freedom Project.

Like and follow your blog.  All our cruising is east coast and across the pond to Europe.  PNW is high on our bucket list if we can ever get back to cruising.  Made me laugh at about the speed in the sevens... not busting your chops or your boat... just a different perspective as we "multihull."

On 2/2/2018 at 4:37 PM, Weyalan said:

For me it wasn't about finding out about the boat, it was my inability to lose the racer's mentality of sailing the shortest distance... which, with the benefit of hindsight, was ridiculous. Sailing a 40' (ex) race boat for about 50 hours with a crew of 2 (she was designed for 10) has to be about looking after the crew, not about getting there 15 minutes faster... I blush to even say it now, heh

+1 Well said; I gotta borrow this line!

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West Indian fishermen make themselves grappel like anchors by poking 5 or 6 lengths of rebar through a piece of 2" galv pipe or even sch 80 PVC. They put a 270 deg bend in a couple of the rebars for an eye to tie onto and then pour concrete into the big pipe locking the rebar inplace. Then they bend the long ends of the rebar back into a J shape arranged radially around the central pipe so it looks like a grappling hook. If it gets snagged in the reef, they just pull really hard and the snagged prong straightens out and they retrieve the anchor 'No Problem Mon!' Then they rebend the hook that was straightened out again in no time.

Sort of like this

Image result for west indian fishing anchor grapple

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On 2/1/2018 at 9:56 AM, slug zitski said:

im always short crew

 

What? With your stellar personality? No way!

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On 2/4/2018 at 8:12 PM, Rasputin22 said:

If it gets snagged in the reef, they just pull really hard and the snagged prong straightens out and they retrieve the anchor 'No Problem Mon!' Then they rebend the hook that was straightened out again in no time.

That "releases if pulled hard enough" thing is great for a lunch hook, which probably fits many fishermen uses.

But in a overnight storm in a rocky cove, it'd be deeply scary.

"C'mon honey, I know that the boat is matchwood and our bones are pulped and the kids drowned ... but cheer up! The anchor can be reused"

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