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      Abbreviated rules   07/28/2017

      Underdawg did an excellent job of explaining the rules.  Here's the simplified version: Don't insinuate Pedo.  Warning and or timeout for a first offense.  PermaFlick for any subsequent offenses Don't out members.  See above for penalties.  Caveat:  if you have ever used your own real name or personal information here on the forums since, like, ever - it doesn't count and you are fair game. If you see spam posts, report it to the mods.  We do not hang out in every thread 24/7 If you see any of the above, report it to the mods by hitting the Report button in the offending post.   We do not take action for foul language, off-subject content, or abusive behavior unless it escalates to persistent stalking.  There may be times that we might warn someone or flick someone for something particularly egregious.  There is no standard, we will know it when we see it.  If you continually report things that do not fall into rules #1 or 2 above, you may very well get a timeout yourself for annoying the Mods with repeated whining.  Use your best judgement. Warnings, timeouts, suspensions and flicks are arbitrary and capricious.  Deal with it.  Welcome to anarchy.   If you are a newbie, there are unwritten rules to adhere to.  They will be explained to you soon enough.  
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Crash

Now I know why some many of you guys live in the PNW

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We (Me, Mrs Crash, and Master Ian - 9) just spent the last week in July vacationing on Orcas Island.  Even without getting to sail, I'm gobsmacked!  Had a view to the East that ranged from Whistler to the North, down to Mount Baker to the South, and the waters and islands in between.  Sunny and pleasant during the day, cool at night.  Ian caught about a dozen fish including some keepers (he was very excited - dad is a way better sailor then fisherman) which we cooked and ate.  Saw Orcas and Eagles and lots of other abundant wildlife.  Unfortunately, a stop by to see the Carbon Cutters wasn't on the agenda this time.

Tell me it's  always that wonderful, so I can convince Mrs Crash we need to retire up there, if not move right away! :lol:

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It's always cold and rainy and I am insulted that you didn't come by for a night or two at the shack.

Do not move here., We have enough people here. Move to California. They love immigrants.

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You couldn't move up here if you wanted to, I locked the gate when I came up from California 30 years ago.

... and had you posted about your visit before you came up, I would have offered to take you and your family for a sail around the islands. Doesn't take much arm twisting to get me to hoist the rags on the ol' tub.

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So I should feel right at home huh?

And thanks Bob, but I've already moved to California, now I'm trying to figure how to escape from here!

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Winters can get a little long and dreary but we don't have hurricanes, tornadoes, blizzards  (when we do get more snow than normal, it's gone in a few days...), our cold snaps and hot spells are brief instead of interminable.  Sailing is best in the shoulder seasons, the 1000's of charter boats hog the park mooring buoys for a couple months in the summer but the rest of the time we get everything to ourselves.  Sailers fight the insidious urge to buy a  powerboat but most lose the battle.

I grew up in Maine, have lived in the PNW, Hawaii, SoCal and came back to the PNW...

 

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Orcas is a special place.  Weather is about as good as you will get up north any given time of the year.  East side gets a lot more rain in the winter.  It's still not very crowded there.  Some of the best winter cruising you could hope for. Deer Harbor is a great base we were there for several years and winters.

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I really enjoy Friday Harbor.  Yeah, living on an island can be a bit of a hassle, and I wouldn't want to be doing a daily commute to the mainland, but for me it's great.  The marina sees a lot of interesting people passing through.  A couple of days ago Jeanne Socrates ("old lady circumnavigator") sailed in, spent the night, and then left for Orcas Island.  She's on Vancouver Island now.  At the same time RIVA, my J-46 Oregon buddies from a few Pacific Cup races was also tied up a couple of slips from VALIS.  For actual sailing weather, I think San Francisco is probably better, but for just messing around and enjoying the beauty of nature, I'm glad to be up here.

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13 minutes ago, valis said:

For actual sailing weather, I think San Francisco is probably way better, but for just messing around and enjoying the beauty of nature, I'm glad to be up here.

I fixed that there for you. 

Sailing: San Francisco. Cruising: PNW, or Maine, or Georgian Bay (talking North America here). 

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in the early 1990's i spent about 5 summers in a row on the san juan's - a liitle bit on orcas and a lot on lopez

i liked lopez quite a bit - very slow though...

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Was actually thinking maybe Whidbey Island, as we are both ret Navy, so would have the advantages of a base, commissary and medical.  Plus you can drive to the mainland if you have too...

Agree San Francisco is better sailing, but I spent almost 30 years sailing the Chesapeake Bay...so light air in the summer is no surprise to me, and without the Bay's heat & humidity.  Plus seems cruising in the PNW would far surpass cruising in San Francisco Bay...

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Whidbey is a beautiful place but puts you in the wrong area for good sailing. The harbors are along the windless east side of the island. 

Anacortes is a trivially short drive to the north end of Whidbey and a quick sail into the San Juans.  It's a nice town too with lots of services and good marinas. 

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Port Townsend is a short ferry ride from Whidbey.

Langley is a neat place if you want to live on the island ....

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57 minutes ago, Alex W said:

Whidbey is a beautiful place but puts you in the wrong area for good sailing. The harbors are along the windless east side of the island. 

Anacortes is a trivially short drive to the north end of Whidbey and a quick sail into the San Juans.  It's a nice town too with lots of services and good marinas. 

I dunno about windless, VALIS and we ran into a fine patch of wind in 2015 heading for Coupeville on the way down for a Spike sailby. The guidebooks say that patch of water gets most of the wind from the west side as it flows over the low land. They were right. There was also a huge amount of debris and logs in the water that day. 

That said, I think Anacortes is a much better place to keep a boat, right on the doorstep of the San Juans and Gulf Islands.

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^^^ true enough, the area around Coupeville has good wind and that is why they Whidbey Island Race Week there.  The rest of Saratoga passage is often pretty drifty, though I did have a nice couple hours of downwind from near Cama Beach to Langley while coming home from my summer cruise this year.  This was taken there:

i-TdtWCvN-L.jpg

Whidbey is great for cycling, I actually prefer the riding there to the San Juans.  Langley is also a nice little harbor to stop at, just don't do it at low tide.

 

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Whidbey is best avoided, all the bike routes are uphill, the mid island micro climate produces 360 days of rain a year, the shelfish have a bad disposition, and I heard last week the Zika outbreak is really starting to peak. 

 

PS there are some funky old housing developments with private protected moorage on the west side and south end of the island. Shallow draft might be needed but they are on admiralty inlet with some of the best winds in the whole area. A folding tri would be a blast to sail in this area.

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23 hours ago, Bob Perry said:

It's always cold and rainy and I am insulted that you didn't come by for a night or two at the shack.

Do not move here., We have enough people here. Move to California. They love immigrants.

Funny - you sound like me....

FKT

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After a year of living on the hook in the SJI's and then sailing south, I would say SoCal is where it's at. Sure there is year round sailing up there but it's fucking freezing cold, wet, cloudy, and a lot of gales pass through for at least eight months out of the year. Not nearly the racing scene that Newport and San Diego have. A lot more bristol boats though. People love plastic of all kinds down here.

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42 minutes ago, ni·hil·ism said:

After a year of living on the hook in the SJI's and then sailing south, I would say SoCal is where it's at. Sure there is year round sailing up there but it's fucking freezing cold, wet, cloudy, and a lot of gales pass through for at least eight months out of the year. Not nearly the racing scene that Newport and San Diego have. A lot more bristol boats though. People love plastic of all kinds down here.

yes, it sucks even more, up north here, as well.... 

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Whidbey is nice but a million miles to get to your boat.  Very few spots to keep it and fewer still for a year round mooring.  Don't depend on using the ferry between Pt Townsend and Whidbey if you think you'll do it regularly.  Tide and wx 'inconveniences', not to mention long waits due to Tourons in the summer.

Have done the island living thing and if you 'need' to get out and about, the ferries will also be an 'inconvenience' in short order.

That said, and as much as I probably should take the "it always rains and is cold and windless except when it's blowing a gale' approach, I find Anacortes to be a good solution....

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 A newcomer to the PNW arrives on a rainy day. It rains the next day, and the next day, and the next. The following day, she goes out to lunch and sees a young kid and out of despair asks, "Hey, kid, does it ever stop raining around here?"

original-32627-1401477216-4.png?downsize=715:*&output-format=auto&output-quality=auto

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I've heard people don't tan. They rust. :lol:

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2 hours ago, Grey Dawn said:

I've heard people don't tan. They rust. :lol:

That's not rust, that's lichen.

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In Washington, they grow moss.  In Oregon, they rust. 

I lived there for some years, and the line of "don't come, it always rains" is a pretty standard greeting. 

Always figured I'd retire to the San Juans, but well, it's kinda like this:

 

 

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Re: wind.

I am a newcomer to the area, have spent about 4 months each year here for the last three. My impression is that there are some very local areas where there is likely to be wind. Many only a couple of miles each direction. For daysailing or setting up a buoy race course, the sailing might be pretty good in these areas. Over the broad area though, the wind is quite unreliable, variable, fluky, and non-existent. For cruising from one place to another, you cannot rely on it and will end up motoring most of the time. Combine that with currents, the need to arrive at rapids on the clock, and the lumber in the water making travel into the night inadvisable a lot of the time, a trawler makes the most sense. I owned a sailboat in SF Bay for 16 years, put 40 hours on the engine. I've been here three seasons, about 2300 miles on the trip log here now, have put something like 250 hours on the engine. That's motoring 2/3 of the time or more. Not for lack up trying - I will put the sails up at the first breath of wind. Then I motorsail rather than drift. 

Now this is mostly north or west of Anacortes and through the islands and up in the channels and around the west side. Maybe better down in Puget Sound proper - but it wasn't the time I was there. Best wind has been off the north west coast of Vancouver Island. I have learned that when Environment Canada says gale warnings, you might get 10 - 15, often less. To keep things interesting, every once in a great while you get 30. 

Contrast that with SF Bay where between about May and October by 11:00 AM you will have 17 - 25 until sunset. 95% of the days or more. It's almost like trade winds. 

I agree that Anacortes is really a pretty ideal location to keep a boat. It can be quite inexpensive as well in one of the dry storage yards, for a commuter cruiser. 

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2 hours ago, DDW said:

Re: wind.

I am a newcomer to the area, have spent about 4 months each year here for the last three. My impression is that there are some very local areas where there is likely to be wind. Many only a couple of miles each direction. For daysailing or setting up a buoy race course, the sailing might be pretty good in these areas. Over the broad area though, the wind is quite unreliable, variable, fluky, and non-existent. For cruising from one place to another, you cannot rely on it and will end up motoring most of the time. Combine that with currents, the need to arrive at rapids on the clock, and the lumber in the water making travel into the night inadvisable a lot of the time, a trawler makes the most sense. I owned a sailboat in SF Bay for 16 years, put 40 hours on the engine. I've been here three seasons, about 2300 miles on the trip log here now, have put something like 250 hours on the engine. That's motoring 2/3 of the time or more. Not for lack up trying - I will put the sails up at the first breath of wind. Then I motorsail rather than drift. 

Now this is mostly north or west of Anacortes and through the islands and up in the channels and around the west side. Maybe better down in Puget Sound proper - but it wasn't the time I was there. Best wind has been off the north west coast of Vancouver Island. I have learned that when Environment Canada says gale warnings, you might get 10 - 15, often less. To keep things interesting, every once in a great while you get 30. 

Contrast that with SF Bay where between about May and October by 11:00 AM you will have 17 - 25 until sunset. 95% of the days or more. It's almost like trade winds. 

I agree that Anacortes is really a pretty ideal location to keep a boat. It can be quite inexpensive as well in one of the dry storage yards, for a commuter cruiser. 

Agree on all the wind comments.

The PNW has also developed a wierd multi layer power boat scene, they look like wedding cakes with an oxygen tent on top.

No way you could dock these things down here, the windage would even overpower the thrusters,

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2 hours ago, DDW said:

Re: wind.

Contrast that with SF Bay where between about May and October by 11:00 AM you will have 17 - 25 until sunset. 95% of the days or more. It's almost like trade winds. 

Yes, inside the bay.  Head out to sea past Pt. Bonita and there's a good chance it's dead calm for the next 50 miles.  Unless I'n trying to go north.  Then it's blowing like stink on the nose.  But in general you are correct.

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Every time I have been outside Pt. Bonita I've had wind except one. Sailing a Pearson Electra back from Half Moon Bay, no wind. Using the British Seagull. Suddenly the engine starts revving. We tip it up and notice the whole lower unit has committed itself to the deep. Very light wind all the way back to Aquatic park very late in the evening. Most the time when I'm out there its 15 - 20, a bit less than on the bay. 

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4 hours ago, DDW said:

Re: wind.

I am a newcomer to the area, have spent about 4 months each year here for the last three. My impression is that there are some very local areas where there is likely to be wind. Many only a couple of miles each direction. For daysailing or setting up a buoy race course, the sailing might be pretty good in these areas. Over the broad area though, the wind is quite unreliable, variable, fluky, and non-existent. For cruising from one place to another, you cannot rely on it and will end up motoring most of the time. Combine that with currents, the need to arrive at rapids on the clock, and the lumber in the water making travel into the night inadvisable a lot of the time, a trawler makes the most sense. I owned a sailboat in SF Bay for 16 years, put 40 hours on the engine. I've been here three seasons, about 2300 miles on the trip log here now, have put something like 250 hours on the engine. That's motoring 2/3 of the time or more. Not for lack up trying - I will put the sails up at the first breath of wind. Then I motorsail rather than drift. 

Now this is mostly north or west of Anacortes and through the islands and up in the channels and around the west side. Maybe better down in Puget Sound proper - but it wasn't the time I was there. Best wind has been off the north west coast of Vancouver Island. I have learned that when Environment Canada says gale warnings, you might get 10 - 15, often less. To keep things interesting, every once in a great while you get 30. 

Contrast that with SF Bay where between about May and October by 11:00 AM you will have 17 - 25 until sunset. 95% of the days or more. It's almost like trade winds. 

I agree that Anacortes is really a pretty ideal location to keep a boat. It can be quite inexpensive as well in one of the dry storage yards, for a commuter cruiser. 

Your points are all valid...In the summertime. The secret to getting the most out of sailing in the PNW is to take full advantage of the Spring and Fall seasons. The winds are up, it's not too cold, and there are plenty of sunny or at least not rainy days. You need good clothing and if you've got a pilothouse or a good dodger, life is way better, especially if you've got a heater aboard. Bonus: you'll have the whole damn body of water/anchorage/marina to yourself.

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Well I've been from Anacortes up to Port McNeil in June and in the San Juans/Gulf/Desolation in September/Oct. Maybe they were the wrong June and September. There was more wind than August, but still pretty sparse sailing. In Sept it rained about 2/3 days north of Nanaimo. In June it rained 9/10 days north of Nanaimo. I've spent a fair amount of time here in April/May getting the boat maintained and launched, and in October getting it hauled. Now I'm here in August it has not rained much but more than a few days are reminiscent of Florida in summer. It's just possible that I hit it all wrong - but in that span of time over three years, I think I got the gist. 

It is what it is. A very large, beautiful, wet, not very windy cruising area, with a 6 week season of warm weather. 

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I've been here 26 years and may be in denial so I sought out some historical data for both Seattle and San Francisco (where I grew up):

https://weatherspark.com/y/913/Average-Weather-in-Seattle-Washington-United-States

https://weatherspark.com/y/557/Average-Weather-in-San-Francisco-California-United-States

SF has more than twice the average wind of Seattle year-round but like SF, Seattle's wind has a 350-400% variation between the 90th percentile limits outside of Summer. That makes for a lot of nice 15kt TWS days in the shoulder seasons. For me anyway, that's the sweet spot.  

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11 hours ago, DDW said:

It is what it is. A very large, beautiful, wet, not very windy cruising area, with a 6 week season of warm weather. 

?? It's over 50 degrees pretty well all year.

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1 hour ago, IStream said:

I've been here 26 years and may be in denial so I sought out some historical data for both Seattle and San Francisco (where I grew up):

https://weatherspark.com/y/913/Average-Weather-in-Seattle-Washington-United-States

https://weatherspark.com/y/557/Average-Weather-in-San-Francisco-California-United-States

SF has more than twice the average wind of Seattle year-round but like SF, Seattle's wind has a 350-400% variation between the 90th percentile limits outside of Summer. That makes for a lot of nice 15kt TWS days in the shoulder seasons. For me anyway, that's the sweet spot.  

The one time I was near Seattle, we had a useable breeze one of three days (in September). Off Seattle may be the one of those local areas that gets some wind. You could argue that SF Bay is only a local area, fair enough. A couple of boats ago I had a small sloop with an outboard. We never took the outboard out of its locker. It sat so long it froze up. We sailed in and out of the slip every time we went sailing for years. This was up in Vallejo, usually sailing out into San Pablo Bay and to SF Bay. There is dependable wind throughout the summer over the greater SF Bay area. 

Again, I found some areas with seemly more dependable wind. Gomes Channel, East Sound on Orcas, etc. But as an example I have made the trip from Anacortes to Sidney 10 times now. Many of the times I have been able to sail for a few minutes or up to a couple of hours. Never have I been able to make the trip under sail. That is very different than most places in SF, where in the extended summer you would EXPECT to sail. If you get out of the local areas with wind in the PNW, you better have an engine. Not knocking it, a much better and more extensive cruising area than SF Bay. But not nearly as good sailing. I've been around a bit in the three years and that's my experience:

59985f39d8954_ScreenShot2017-08-19at8_35_29AM.thumb.jpg.f0128bc801d023f97e0a03fe87e68787.jpg

 

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I think we're in violent agreement. I believe I remember that particular day in September, it was when we all met up at Kim's place with Alex, Steve, Dave, and Bob.

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I was complaining to an experienced PNW sailor, about the penalty (to sailing performance my) my oversized, fixed, three blade propeller causes.

 

He agreed that the prop will be a penalty. 12% of the time.

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That was a fun day and nice to meet so much of the cruising group. I did see DDW's boat sail both Saturday and Sunday.  We sailed to the party on his boat, and on Sunday I caught up with him on the water and took photos or Anamoly sailing. 

Having a racing boat has made cruising here easier. I think we were under way for about 70 or 75 hours of cruising in July and motored under 30 hours (I know that from the hour counter). That isn't an awesome ratio, but it's a pretty good one for July in the Salish Sea.  We rarely saw other boats sailing, even in perfect downwind conditions.  Even racier boats like a C&C 115 would motor near us with their sail cover still on while there was a 15 knot breeze. I'm not sure why they bother with a sailboat vs a trawler. 

 

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5 hours ago, Panope said:

I was complaining to an experienced PNW sailor, about the penalty (to sailing performance my) my oversized, fixed, three blade propeller causes.

That's why I fitted an oversized 3 blade Autostream prop.....

FKT

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Well when the sailing gets too cold and rainy the skiing gets epic.  Coming from growing up sailing and windsurfing on the bay and mostly the ocean the sailing is much better up here in terms of racing and cruising.  I mean you can go to desolation sound and swim and sail to and through Alaska.  The bay has wind and better weather but how many times can you go to angel island before you pull your teeth out.

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1 hour ago, Rainy Day Sailor said:

Well when the sailing gets too cold and rainy the skiing gets epic.  Coming from growing up sailing and windsurfing on the bay and mostly the ocean the sailing is much better up here in terms of racing and cruising.  I mean you can go to desolation sound and swim and sail to and through Alaska.  The bay has wind and better weather but how many times can you go to angel island before you pull your teeth out.

Not San Francisco...

vm744Ma.jpg

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5 hours ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

That's why I fitted an oversized 3 blade Autostream prop.....

FKT

The best of both worlds.

I'm up here in Max prop country, so that's what I'm aiming for.

Steve

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1 hour ago, Rainy Day Sailor said:

Well when the sailing gets too cold and rainy the skiing gets epic.  Coming from growing up sailing and windsurfing on the bay and mostly the ocean the sailing is much better up here in terms of racing and cruising.  I mean you can go to desolation sound and swim and sail to and through Alaska.  The bay has wind and better weather but how many times can you go to angel island before you pull your teeth out.

Sailing on Saturday and skiing on Sunday.  Not many places where you can do that and less than two hours driving to get there.

Oh, about the rain.  It really only rains once a year.  From October to June.

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1 hour ago, Panope said:

The best of both worlds.

I'm up here in Max prop country, so that's what I'm aiming for.

Steve

I fluked mine at a bargain price on eBay. Just about sprained my finger hitting the 'Buy It Now' button. It may well be bigger than my engine can drive but what the hell. I can always reduce the blade area some.

FKT

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On 8/19/2017 at 9:28 PM, Rainy Day Sailor said:

Well when the sailing gets too cold and rainy the skiing gets epic.  Coming from growing up sailing and windsurfing on the bay and mostly the ocean the sailing is much better up here in terms of racing and cruising.  I mean you can go to desolation sound and swim and sail to and through Alaska.  The bay has wind and better weather but how many times can you go to angel island before you pull your teeth out.

Depends on your definition of epic "skiing". I grew up on the East coast, skied nearly everywhere, and aside from Jay Peak (northern VT with its own microclimate) I'd have given up by now. Whistler's similar - if cement's your thing, go for it. Hell, we (not us, but Vail Resorts) own it now ;-) - A little powder at the top doth not a run make. My one trip to the W reminded me a little of Iceface (Whiteface near Lake Placid, NY) where they issued garbage bags to the lift riders to either protect against howling windchill or "moist" conditions. But if you head east into Bugaboo/Monashee/Revelstoke heli or cat ski territory, now you're talking great Canoodian skiing!

Thread drift.

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Well I did have a pretty good sail from Lund to Lasqueti a couple days ago. Only had to motor through a few flat patches and saw 5 blackfish on the way. Yesterday Lasqueti to Nanaimo is was flat and oily the whole way, today Nanaimo to Bowen Island flat and oily until the last 5 miles or so. 

So far the only port - port sail has been from Gorge Harbor to Prideaux Haven in 0 - 7 knots, and we undertook it because of an impromptu race: a boat we had seen in Blind Channel and again in Gorge expressed an interest in our boat and wanted to know how it sailed. As it happened we left Gorge together and met 4 or 5 knots on the nose so I put my sails up. He put his sails up. It was a pitched tacking duel for awhile, wind up to 8 and then down to 3 and back. On one tack he crossed ahead of me but we got it back and then pretty much got away. A 52' custom Laurie Davidson design. 

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I agree with all the above regarding the flukey winds up here. But ... for the past 6 or so years I've done a week long sail in June, and typically been blessed with consistent wind, decent temperatures, and lack of crowds. This last June was absolutely amazing. Wind in the teens on the stern quarter all the way from Anacortes to Desolation sound, perfect calm while I was up there, then the wind clocked 180 degrees and I had teens on the stern quarter all the way back. I did several 70+ mile days. Kind of makes up for the wind frustration the rest of the summer.

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Well when the sailing gets too cold and rainy the skiing gets epic.  Coming from growing up sailing and windsurfing on the bay and mostly the ocean the sailing is much better up here in terms of racing and cruising.  I mean you can go to desolation sound and swim and sail to and through Alaska.  The bay has wind and better weather but how many times can you go to angel island before you pull your teeth out.

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Yes the wind is not the bat and can be fickle but there is wind some of the time.  A boat that can go 4 knots and 35 knots helps.  As far as skiing goes yep it's terrible, you probably shouldn't ski here and stick to Colorado.  We do have garbage bag ski days and yes going on a ski vacation to Washington doesn't make sense.  But for those who live here we know the weather and how good it gets.  Oh and Whistler, I have skied many places but there is few better it's incredible.  Yes it does get garbage bag days but powder there is unbelievable.

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On 2017-08-18 at 3:40 PM, DDW said:

Re: wind.

I am a newcomer to the area, have spent about 4 months each year here for the last three. My impression is that there are some very local areas where there is likely to be wind. Many only a couple of miles each direction. For daysailing or setting up a buoy race course, the sailing might be pretty good in these areas. Over the broad area though, the wind is quite unreliable, variable, fluky, and non-existent. For cruising from one place to another, you cannot rely on it and will end up motoring most of the time. Combine that with currents, the need to arrive at rapids on the clock, and the lumber in the water making travel into the night inadvisable a lot of the time, a trawler makes the most sense. I owned a sailboat in SF Bay for 16 years, put 40 hours on the engine. I've been here three seasons, about 2300 miles on the trip log here now, have put something like 250 hours on the engine. That's motoring 2/3 of the time or more. Not for lack up trying - I will put the sails up at the first breath of wind. Then I motorsail rather than drift. 

Now this is mostly north or west of Anacortes and through the islands and up in the channels and around the west side. Maybe better down in Puget Sound proper - but it wasn't the time I was there. Best wind has been off the north west coast of Vancouver Island. I have learned that when Environment Canada says gale warnings, you might get 10 - 15, often less. To keep things interesting, every once in a great while you get 30. 

Contrast that with SF Bay where between about May and October by 11:00 AM you will have 17 - 25 until sunset. 95% of the days or more. It's almost like trade winds. 

I agree that Anacortes is really a pretty ideal location to keep a boat. It can be quite inexpensive as well in one of the dry storage yards, for a commuter cruiser. 

Agreed on the wind.

We owned a Landfall 38 for three seasons, and each year spent most of the time motoring.

Since I sail 50 to 60 days a year on a race boat, I get plenty of sailing in.  So we traded the sailboat for a powerboat for cruising.  I figure, if you are going to motor, you might as well be comfortable, and be able to go a decent pace.  We can motor at 10 to 12 knots, which is handy when heading to make noon slack at a pass 40 miles away.  It's the difference between leaving the anchorage at 6am vs 8am.  Plus, with the powerboat, we can be more protected from the weather, which extends the cruising season for us.  Last year we were the only boat out at the bay we went to over Halloween.

I know most will think it's heresy to promote cruising in a powerboat, and I am sure I am going to take flack for it.  But the fact is that in this area, the best weather for cruising typically has the least wind.  On our latest trip, there was only one day out of 8 when we would have been sailing had we still been on the Landfall.  The rest of the time, there was zero wind, or it was on the nose (in a pass only a mile wide).

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10 minutes ago, Expat Canuck said:

Agreed on the wind. ...........On our latest trip, there was only one day out of 8 when we would have been sailing had we still been on the Landfall........

Just as predicted. 

1/8 = 12.5% 

I actually beat the odds coming home from the Perry Rendezvous.  I used Dacron/Nylon propulsion for 10 of my 30 mile trip. (Lets not talk about how the sailing caused the trip to take TWICE as long). 

Steve

 

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Heck, I'm not sure it's even fair to compare it to your "normal" Perry Custom! Not that they aren't a wide ranging and diverse bunch.  But Frankie is extremely well suited to her environment, and her owners ethos (keep it light and simple) sure helps too!

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6 hours ago, Expat Canuck said:

Agreed on the wind.

We owned a Landfall 38 for three seasons, and each year spent most of the time motoring.

Since I sail 50 to 60 days a year on a race boat, I get plenty of sailing in.  So we traded the sailboat for a powerboat for cruising.  I figure, if you are going to motor, you might as well be comfortable, and be able to go a decent pace.  We can motor at 10 to 12 knots, which is handy when heading to make noon slack at a pass 40 miles away.  It's the difference between leaving the anchorage at 6am vs 8am.  Plus, with the powerboat, we can be more protected from the weather, which extends the cruising season for us.  Last year we were the only boat out at the bay we went to over Halloween.

I know most will think it's heresy to promote cruising in a powerboat, and I am sure I am going to take flack for it.  But the fact is that in this area, the best weather for cruising typically has the least wind.  On our latest trip, there was only one day out of 8 when we would have been sailing had we still been on the Landfall.  The rest of the time, there was zero wind, or it was on the nose (in a pass only a mile wide).

If you want to explore around here there's no question a powerboat makes more sense than sail.

For all the reasons you stated.

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  • You got it, IStream, and DDW nails it, too.
  • Alex W: We know where the good sailing is, but we keep it under wraps being the ocean racers that we are. We absolutely lust for wind.
  • And sam_crocker tells it like we tell all wannabe PNWers: It’s always rainy, always too windy. Keeps ‘em south of the 49th.
  • Thanks for the check mark for Whistler, Rainy Day Sailor. Vail Resorts knew it was a great steal from the Canadians for $1.4billion this year < https://www.bcbusiness.ca/Whistlers-new-owners >.
  • Shh, cje, don’t spill the beans.
  • Depends on how old you are, SloopJonB. As you age, it becomes a real chore to haul sail all the time. We’ve bought into a power cruising lifestyle, too, but we stay clear of the San Juans now that the Trumper spouts scariness. The BC coastline and the Southern Gulf Islands are just fine for us.

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I don't regard hauling sail as a chore but I also recognize that if you want to explore rather than play sail then power is better.

Me? I play sail.

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