tom.185528

Laser class rules regarding Cunningham

Recommended Posts

Hello, 

I was wondering about a part of the Laser class rules, regarding the Cunningham. When I bought my boat from the Previous Owner, it did not come with a full Cunningham, just a single long piece of line, and the double block with becket that attaches to the vang assembly for a Cunningham. Since I already have a full Outhaul, I don't want to buy a Cunningham/Outhaul kit, so I was thinking I would just buy some of the blocks and lines that are needed. 

In the Laser Class Rules, (found here: http://laserinternational.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/2017-Laser-Class-Rules.pdf) in Rule 3 e) i), it says : 'The cunningham system shall consist of a maximum three control lines, “Optional” blocks or loops for purchase with a maximum of 5 “Turning Points”' 

Because it says 'a maximum of three control lines', I was thinking that I would rig a cascade system as seen in the picture, with one line going from the becket block attached to the vang assembly, up through the eye in the tack of the sail for the Cunningham to a block, with a line coming up through the block, attached to another block, with the cleated line coming up through that block and down to the cleat.

Because I haven't seen any other people at my club or any other do this, I'm not sure if it's legal, and just something nobody ever realized was legal, or if it is illegal and I'm just missing something.

Thanks, 

Tom

image.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't think this system will not work for a radial rig. You need to pull the cunningham past the boom in heavy air and I'm pretty sure there isn't enough room with cascading blocks.

E

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

experience has shown me you don't actually need a Cunningham for a radial rig and for what you do need ie pull out the creases a 2/1 works just fine

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rules? The Laser class has rules?

Don't worry about it. For 99% of racing at the grass-roots level nobody will care whether your cunningham is legal or not.

Just make sure that it's legal before you go to a world championship. Then the measurer will ding you for something else entirely like telling you that the battens that came with the boat are 1mm too long. Have fun!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I found the cascade style always ran out of travel before I ran out of pull.

A fair few people have put a block with a becket at the top (with the primary going through the cringle and terminating at the vang attachment. the secondary then gets tied to the beckett, down to a block attached to the kicker fitting, back up through the block at the cringle before going off to the deck fitting.

Gives the same purchase IIRC but a lot more travel.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks everyone for the input, I think I'll try the cascade style and see how it is, or maybe take out one of the blocks, for a 4:1 system. 

Anyway, thanks for all your advice!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can run the cascade entirely on one side of the boom and therefore pull it past the boom. 

All lines must pass on the sane side of the boom. 

 

Not sure if it makes sense in reality but as we such it would work. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, High Flow said:

All lines must pass on the sane side of the boom. 

That's insane!
 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

that's a good one. I always preferred the sane side of the boom. it simply makes more sense...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, Eddie_E said:

If only we had Fonzie on here. He always knew how to deal with Cunningham.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When sailing laser radial in the youth fleet we have a simple system made of two blocks and a loop. The loop is placed around the bottom of the mast when rigging. This system by far provides the most over all tension. When in medium to heavy airs the secondary line (red in your case) passes on the same side of the rope as radials require an enormous amount of downhaul upwind in heavy air. In light the secondary line passes down the other side of the boom. This method is also entirely race legal.

Hope this helps

20170822_165920_HDR.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now