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lewashby

Getting Started with my daughter

15 posts in this topic

Hi, I'm a 31 year old single dad of a twelve year old daughter and I'd love to add sailing to our lives. It looks fun and I think I'd really enjoy it plus it would get my child off the phone and away from her tablet. What I'm looking for is advice on what to get. I live in the Chattanooga, TN area less than an hour away from the Soddy Daisy Lakes which is part of the Tennessee river which is where most of our sailing would more than likely be. I'm currently debating on getting an overnight sail boat with a cabin or just getting a day sailor at first to learn on and decide if it's something I want to pursue. Though I would love a bigger sale boat I would probably have to get one that can be pulled on a trailer because I don't think I'm okay with paying a slip fee, I can pay a boat off but a sip fee never ends. One question I have about getting a cabined sailboat that can be trailored is what's the bathroom situation, can any cabined sailboats small enough to be trailored have a head? If not what would be the alternative.

Or am I better off sticking with a day sailor and if so what are your recommendations.

For a day sailor I wouldn't pay more than $1,200, for a cabin boat I might go as high was 5 or 6 tops.

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What is your sailing experience? 

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   I would look for a sailing school so she can sail with similar aged kids....way more cool than trailer with dad 1 hour plus both ways...

   here in canada we recommend    this program...   find something local that is comparable     Then after she is hooked on sailing pick a boat..but now is too soon.

 

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7 minutes ago, Kingstonsail said:

 

   I would look for a sailing school so she can sail with similar aged kids....way more cool than trailer with dad 1 hour plus both ways...

...    ...    ...

Kids generally do respond better to sailing with other kids; OTOH this may be a different kind of case. I can certainly see going sailing as a sort of quality time. The problem is 1- she is likely to be bored and 2- she is likely on the threshold of that age where being in the presence of a parent ins unspeakably uncool.

Go to a sailing class together? Cure for boredom, takes away the aspect of "dad in charge" making it uncool.

Join a club that's got a good youth program and welcomes parents as volunteers? Unfortunately there is not one of those on every corner, but it's worth looking at.

I see buying a boat as not the best option right now.

FB- Doug

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59 minutes ago, Steam Flyer said:

Kids generally do respond better to sailing with other kids; OTOH this may be a different kind of case. I can certainly see going sailing as a sort of quality time. The problem is 1- she is likely to be bored and 2- she is likely on the threshold of that age where being in the presence of a parent ins unspeakably uncool.

Go to a sailing class together? Cure for boredom, takes away the aspect of "dad in charge" making it uncool.

 

It also gives you a venue where you're both kinda equals (students).  My daughter & I did this to get keel boat certified, and I discovered that she has an uncanny knack for executing a perfect MOB drill from the helm.

Makes me rest a little easier, when we're on the boat.  Now I only have to worry about if I'm on her good side that day, as to whether she'd come back to get me as an MOB or not. . .

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Do you know anyone who sails and has a boat to try this out on? Or possible a place to rent a boat first before buying? I would suggest something like a Lightning, Flying Scot, etc. that has the one design following, many old boats available for the right price, has good sailing characteristics, and used sails/parts, etc. are available to keep things in a good cost range. Also if things do not pan out after a while it will be easier to re-sell.

Definitely try the friend/borrowing deal first.

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2 hours ago, ~HHN92~ said:

Definitely try the friend/borrowing deal first.

This! ^^^^^^^^^

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18 hours ago, vjm said:

What is your sailing experience? 

I've had one tree hour lesson an a small day sailor.

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7 hours ago, ~HHN92~ said:

Do you know anyone who sails and has a boat to try this out on? Or possible a place to rent a boat first before buying? I would suggest something like a Lightning, Flying Scot, etc. that has the one design following, many old boats available for the right price, has good sailing characteristics, and used sails/parts, etc. are available to keep things in a good cost range. Also if things do not pan out after a while it will be easier to re-sell.

Definitely try the friend/borrowing deal first.

Unfortunately I have no sailing friends.

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2 hours ago, lewashby said:

Unfortunately I have no sailing friends.

Go find the Lightning/Flying Scott fleet, walk the docks and tell them your story. Presto-sailing friends. 

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Some people like to figure things out on their own. It's not impossible to do, but of course, a buddy, or better a sailing acquaintance can flatten some of the learning curve.

The key to going it on your own: get a forgiving boat for your first steps and know your limits (wind speed and conditions).

A used O'Day DaySailer, for example, should be obtainable in your price range (including trailer). That would be a reasonably stable boat to get you on the water. Stable doesn't mean that it can't capsize, but it's pretty forgiving. You can walk anywhere on it when at the dock, even onto the foredeck without tipping it over. On the water, it reacts just a bit more slowly, and if pushed, in many instances, it may round up into the wind instead of capsizing.

Cockpit is generous, your daughter can bring a friend, or two. There's a small cuddy to stow gear or allow kids to "hide" when bored of sailing.

These boats are pretty indestructible and have an active class association and forum where you can get hints on maintenance and sailing them.

I'm sure there are some other boats that have similar parameters. I'd stay away from higher performing dinghies; you can always trade up later. They demand too much of a novice.

Around 10-12 knots of wind speed you start getting into the intermediate skill area, so I'd make sure to stay below that. 6-8 is a good range to learn. If your sailing area is routinely above that, you need to either have someone put a reef in your sails (and teach you how to rig your boat for it) or go to some boat that's underpowered for its size to learn.

Read anything (everything) that you can get your hand on online and in print. I know people who have successfully bootstrapped themselves pretty much along those lines. Still, the advice to look for sailors to befriend is useful, if you can manage it.

 

 

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Lessons together is a great way to get started. I don't know what's in Chattanooga,  but Atlanta Yacht club just south of you in Acworth has lessons and several strong one design fleets.

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Take some lessons together.  You should make sure she likes what she is doing before investing in a boat.

By the way, proofread your posts.  Spell check does not always work out right.

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On 8/18/2017 at 7:39 PM, lewashby said:

Hi, I'm a 31 year old single dad of a twelve year old daughter and I'd love to add sailing to our lives. It looks fun and I think I'd really enjoy it plus it would get my child off the phone and away from her tablet. What I'm looking for is advice on what to get. I live in the Chattanooga, TN area less than an hour away from the Soddy Daisy Lakes which is part of the Tennessee river which is where most of our sailing would more than likely be. I'm currently debating on getting an overnight sail boat with a cabin or just getting a day sailor at first to learn on and decide if it's something I want to pursue. Though I would love a bigger sale boat I would probably have to get one that can be pulled on a trailer because I don't think I'm okay with paying a slip fee, I can pay a boat off but a sip fee never ends. One question I have about getting a cabined sailboat that can be trailored is what's the bathroom situation, can any cabined sailboats small enough to be trailored have a head? If not what would be the alternative.

Or am I better off sticking with a day sailor and if so what are your recommendations.

For a day sailor I wouldn't pay more than $1,200, for a cabin boat I might go as high was 5 or 6 tops.

it's too late, your daughter will hate you... i'd ask her first if she wants to learn to sail... if no, find something else to do with her and then go take sailing lessons and go enjoy yourself..  i have a fleet mate who took his young kids sailing, all they would do is fight like cats and dogs..  years later , I haven't seen the daughter down at the lake, his son crews for him, but the look on his face is he wants to be elsewhere..  the point is, you can't force kids to love something that you do..

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