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Proneshooter

Shipping Containers

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Irene floated and moved an empty shipping container next to my building (in Charleston, SC) and the water was only two feet deep. I though it would take deeper water to float one.

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I'm trying to do the math,  

20' container weight 2300kg  its a cube so we can calculate is volume easily. 6.05x2.44x2.59  38.23m3

so its density is 2300/38.23  or 60.16 kg/m3

density of water is 1000 kg/m3  so we know it will float.

the container will displace 2300kg of water once floating.  Metric is nice in that 1kg of water(fresh) = 1 liter.  and one cubic meter = 1000 L

surface area (assuming its floating upright and not on its side or on its end) is 14.76 m2

2300L= 2.3 m3

Volume = L x W X H

2.3= 14.76 X H

2.3/14.76 =  .15

So the depth of the water will be .155 meters  or 6 inches....

a 40' container is almost twice the mass, and twice the volume so the density is be less...so it would float slightly higher

 its seems that I'm off somewhere, or your container had water or other stuff in it causing it to sink low... or my math is off 

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On 9/13/2017 at 8:32 AM, Proneshooter said:

Irene floated and moved an empty shipping container next to my building (in Charleston, SC) and the water was only two feet deep. I though it would take deeper water to float one.

Whats it rate? 

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Got a lot of reserve buoyancy up front. Should plane in right conditions, but the rivets might interfere with flow. 

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52 minutes ago, Rasputin22 said:

You forgot all the corrugations on a containers skins but you are on the right track. 

and i did not take in account the wood floor.   the corrugations would probably add more surface area, and sea water had I higher density than fresh water....

but I would think an empty container would float on the diagonal of the long axis... and not level... but  could be wrong... I'm not a naval arch, or a scientist, just enjoy math from time to time though...

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5 minutes ago, sail(plane) said:

and that freeboard! couple that horrendous windage with the shallow draft and I bet it doesn´t go upwind at all

The rectangular shape, the sharp corners, flat bow and high freeboard are what allows it to achieve what's known as a "super-fourth-mode".

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Was that container 40' x 8'6", or was it 8'6" x 40'?  Just curious which kind of container it was. 

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1 hour ago, Marcjsmith said:

and i did not take in account the wood floor.   the corrugations would probably add more surface area, and sea water had I higher density than fresh water....

but I would think an empty container would float on the diagonal of the long axis... and not level... but  could be wrong... I'm not a naval arch, or a scientist, just enjoy math from time to time though...

If uniform and symmetrical (i.e. 8 by 8 by 40 or by 20) then not sure how it would float.

However even empty it is not uniform as the flooring weights a surprising amount so that would encourage it to float “upright”.

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1 hour ago, Marcjsmith said:

and i did not take in account the wood floor.   the corrugations would probably add more surface area, and sea water had I higher density than fresh water....

but I would think an empty container would float on the diagonal of the long axis... and not level... but  could be wrong... I'm not a naval arch, or a scientist, just enjoy math from time to time though...

Marc as you enjoy math you will enjoy this article "How Things Float" assuming uniform density (i.e. empty no flooring) then the answer will depend on density of the container - there will be multiple equilibrium orientations - one for each symetrical axis of rotation with that axis verticle...but they may or may not be stable equilibrium.

 

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On 9/16/2017 at 5:13 AM, KC375 said:

Marc as you enjoy math you will enjoy this article "How Things Float" assuming uniform density (i.e. empty no flooring) then the answer will depend on density of the container - there will be multiple equilibrium orientations - one for each symetrical axis of rotation with that axis verticle...but they may or may not be stable equilibrium.

 

Ah, the good old days - Bell Labs!

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On 9/15/2017 at 10:39 AM, the_abandoned_brane said:

The rectangular shape, the sharp corners, flat bow and high freeboard are what allows it to achieve what's known as a "super-fourth-mode".

Prismatic coefficient: 1.0 !!!

 

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On 9/15/2017 at 3:13 PM, KC375 said:

Marc as you enjoy math you will enjoy this article "How Things Float" assuming uniform density (i.e. empty no flooring) then the answer will depend on density of the container - there will be multiple equilibrium orientations - one for each symetrical axis of rotation with that axis verticle...but they may or may not be stable equilibrium.

 

Thanks for that link....

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Remember to call Geraldo before you open it up. They can hype that it is back in the environment for ratings.

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On 9/15/2017 at 1:00 PM, sousou said:

Got a lot of reserve buoyancy up front. Should plane in right conditions, but the rivets might interfere with flow. 

nah, think of the rivets as golfball dimples 

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27 minutes ago, mustang__1 said:

nah, think of the rivets as golfball dimples 

Isn't some boat doing similar, to mimic speed bumps that whales have?

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On 9/16/2017 at 6:34 PM, Godzilla said:

Perhaps it jut blew there and did not actually float at all.

Something that's on my mind.

I'm looking into buying a 20' shipping container. My thought is: they're pretty tough and if I can put it far from large trees and make it stay put, the contents should be safe inside after a hurricane.

It should be up off the ground a bit. I have old power poles sitting around from when FPL upgraded the cross-country line. Those might do.

I also have one of the giant ground anchors they used for those poles. I'm sure more are to be found on eBay. Four of those with big shipping straps over the top would probably pin it to the ground pretty well.

They are sold in "used once," "sorta beat up," and "really beat up and rusty" condition. There's also an available upgrade with double doors. But it looks to me like they all have double doors so that one confuses me.

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Density of the container has nothing to do with it, other than how it affects orientation when floating (if not evenly distributed).

  • A 20' X 8' container has a waterplane area of 160 sq. feet
  • Density of seawater is 63.93 lbs. per cubic foot, so one sq. foot by one inch deep =  5.3275 lbs. (63.93 / 12)
  • Pounds Per Inch immersion (PPI) of this container is 160 sq. ft. X 5.3275 lbs. = 852.4 PPI  (lbs. per inch)

So if the container weighs 2300 kg. (‪5070.6‬ lbs.), it will float in 5.95" of seawater, provided it remains level.

 

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On ‎9‎/‎16‎/‎2017 at 3:39 AM, the_abandoned_brane said:

The rectangular shape, the sharp corners, flat bow and high freeboard are what allows it to achieve what's known as a "super-fourth-mode".

sounds like a scaled up optimist.

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On 9/15/2017 at 0:55 PM, the_abandoned_brane said:

Still better than a MacGregor. 

I have a Macgregor Venture 21.  Want to race?  You bring your boat, and I'll bring mine.  $1,000.  Put up or shut up.  Anywhere East of the Mississippi.

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On September 15, 2017 at 1:29 PM, sail(plane) said:

and that freeboard! couple that horrendous windage with the shallow draft and I bet it doesn´t go upwind at all

Kon Tiki style. Rimas's next boat, if he was still alive.

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2 minutes ago, Moonduster said:

Yo, Keely - sure, I'll race your McGregor in my canoe, with a paddle.

You said anywhere, I pick a river 3" deep.

When will you be ready?

 

What's it rate?

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33 posts to finally get to that question, the joke is either worn out or this place is really slipping.

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