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thomm124

Pearson 10 Meter

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I'm looking for any information on this boat I can get.

I've check it's PHRF and sailboatdata, but there isn't a whole lot more available.

How was it constructed?

What are the problems most folks see?

How does it sail, etc?

How about the Atomic engine?

Thanks,

Tom

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Can only speak about the engine.  Gas but newer than my Gary Marine and compared to my friend who has an Atomic-4, less trouble than mine.  He loves his. Gas is fine for shorter trips, in and out of the slip.  If you want to power up the coast, maybe not the right choice as the milage is something like half.  Dangers are exaggerated in my opinion because gas is so easy to smell and you have to have a death wish to let your boat leak gas and try and start it.

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Construction of Pearsons was textbook "normal". Single skin hull, balsa deck, pretty decent quality as attested to by their continued existence in huge numbers.

I doubt you could go far wrong with a decent one.

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16 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

Construction of Pearsons was textbook "normal". Single skin hull, balsa deck, pretty decent quality as attested to by their continued existence in huge numbers.

I doubt you could go far wrong with a decent one.

What does single skin hull mean? (not cored?) I have a Bristol 27 now so how do the hulls compare?

My 4 boats before that were all beach cats I raced on the gulf coast for many years. Hobie 16 (2), Nacra 6.0, and Nacra F-17 all cored I believe

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1 hour ago, thomm124 said:

What does single skin hull mean? (not cored?) I have a Bristol 27 now so how do the hulls compare?

My 4 boats before that were all beach cats I raced on the gulf coast for many years. Hobie 16 (2), Nacra 6.0, and Nacra F-17 all cored I believe

Single skin means that the hull is made of solid fiberglass like your boat.   Cored boats have an outer layer of fiberglass ,, a core of balsa wood or foam and a final inside skin of fiberglass.   Coring makes the panels stiffer for a given weight.  Coring also introduces some different potential problems as well. Such as water getting into the core making the boat heavy and rotting the balsa. Some foams will absorb water too.  All cored boats can also suffer delamination.  HTH

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4 minutes ago, Fleetwood said:

Sailed on one out of MDR in the 80s - solid boats.

Sailed on one out of MDR WLIS in the 80s - solid boats.                             :)

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5 hours ago, thomm124 said:

The keel is totally encapsulated right and not bolted on?

Bolt-on keel with a fiberglass fairing aft.

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12 hours ago, monsoon said:

You should go to Dan Pfeiffer's 10M page for all things 10M:

http://dan.pfeiffer.net/10m/10m.htm

They're good solid boats, pretty and sail well.  Always been a favorite of mine.

totally agree....one of my favorite Pearsons.  built like a rick shit house, beautiful and sail REAL well.

there was a real nice 10M for sale at Gateway marina in Brooklyn not too long ago

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Loved the 10M.  Sails sweetly (even in light air) and looks just as sweet.

My  buddy has owned on for 15 years and still enjoys the heck out of her.

Built like all Pearsons...solid and low-tech.

Cant go wrong with a well maintained example.

Interiors were a little sterile, but that was of the era.

Going from a Bristol 27 to this will be very satisfying.   Especially upwind.

 

 

 

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3 hours ago, sail69 said:

Loved the 10M.  Sails sweetly (even in light air) and looks just as sweet.

My  buddy has owned on for 15 years and still enjoys the heck out of her.

Built like all Pearsons...solid and low-tech.

Cant go wrong with a well maintained example.

Interiors were a little sterile, but that was of the era.

Going from a Bristol 27 to this will be very satisfying.   Especially upwind.

 

 

 

Thanks. Sounds good!

I've been trying to learn cruising with the Bristol 27, after racing Beach Cats on the Gulf Coast for 15 years,  (My boats were Hobie 16 (2), Nacra 6.0, and Nacra F-17 w/Spinnaker)

But it's a quite different brand of sailing after racing for so long

I'm hoping this boat will be the right fit.

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41 minutes ago, Kevlar Edge said:

tall rig version is where its at for phrf

And be on the PHRF comm, to get the gift

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So how about the tiller cover etc? Is it hard to hook up the tiller?

This boat has a wheel.

I've never sailed a boat with a wheel and I'm going to need to buy an autopilot ................random thoughts

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I sailed a Pearson 10 meter in a Whitney Series, back when those boats were new. Upwind in 20, on our way to round San Nicholas Island, We entertained ourselves below by inserting all the navigation pencils (remember them?) into the bulkhead caddie in the overhead. Slam! the pencils all broke when the bulkhead gap closed, like a guillotine. Ha, ha, was a lot of fun!

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Just a few thousand more gets you into this:

http://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1984/Ericson-36-3108846/Rock-Hall/MD/United-States#.WcRq8or3aJI

Diesel motor, newer, Ron Holland design, much faster, 3' longer and 9" beamier. Sweet sailing boat. 

The Pearson is a decent boat. Atomic-4 isn't a bad motor if maintained, but you're looking at poor resale value with a gas motor, and some real big bucks to repowering. 

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12 hours ago, RKoch said:

Just a few thousand more gets you into this:

http://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1984/Ericson-36-3108846/Rock-Hall/MD/United-States#.WcRq8or3aJI

Diesel motor, newer, Ron Holland design, much faster, 3' longer and 9" beamier. Sweet sailing boat. 

The Pearson is a decent boat. Atomic-4 isn't a bad motor if maintained, but you're looking at poor resale value with a gas motor, and some real big bucks to repowering. 

Very few 10Ms still have an A4.

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19 hours ago, Snaggletooth said:

The guye ist in Va Beache, chille my frend                     :)

He was a Scumbag

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A friend of mine had one years ago. The boat seemed pretty solid and sailed to its rating, excepting under about 8 TWS. He had a Volvo diesel. I had an A4 for years and found it to be a real PITA. Unless the engines been rebuilt I would expect the usual headaches from a 40 yr old raw water cooled gas engine.

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On ‎9‎/‎22‎/‎2017 at 9:04 PM, JPD said:

A friend of mine had one years ago. The boat seemed pretty solid and sailed to its rating, excepting under about 8 TWS. He had a Volvo diesel. I had an A4 for years and found it to be a real PITA. Unless the engines been rebuilt I would expect the usual headaches from a 40 yr old raw water cooled gas engine.

When I was looking the boat over, I had the owner open the engine compartment then start the engine. There was almost no gas smell which surprised me and the engine was very clean with new looking plugs. It was cold to the touch and started immediately. (the ventilation fan also worked which he turned on before starting) The young man that owns it now is military and will soon leave the area. The PO was "an old guy" that raced it in Hampton for years. The boat needs TLC but appears to be pretty solid which good sails.

 

 

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5 hours ago, slap said:

You can still get parts for an Atomic 4.  Some old diesels?  Not so much.....

Thanks for that info. That's good to know.

I'm really not used to having an engine on a sailboat having raced 15 years on Beach Cats. (4)

This includes multiple distance races of 30-100 miles.

I do like this boat though and since I'm an old guy that grew up with the old engines it should workout well!

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You can get everything for the Atomic Bomb from Moyer - even new blocks.

Way cheaper to keep one running than to swap to a diesel. If you get all the Moyer or Indigo upgrades like electronic ignition it will be damn near as reliable as a diesel too.

Someone here or on SN recently got a fresh engine from them for about $4K (probably exchange) which would be about the cost of the incidentals on a diesel swap.

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Speaking of Diesel swap...   I have 1980 Pearson 10M Hull #229.  Took out the old raw water cooled Volvo and installed a Yanmar  3GM30F with an SD20.  Everything I own is for sale!

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Yeah, looks like I'd be trading one old boat for another old boat that needs quite a few things like autopilot, a good anchor or 2, instruments repaired or upgraded, and a bottom job. Plus all the running rigging is dirty etc

The Pearson 10M would definitely be more efficient and faster but my old Bristol may be better for the sailing I do these days. Also, I single hand most of the time and the bay and it's tributaries can get quite shallow. The Bristol 27 draws 4' , the Pearson close to 6'.

On top of that, the wind can jump up quickly to 20-25 knots and the Bristol doesn't seem to mind that. I'm sure the Pearson would do fine as well but would be quite the handful for a singlehander.

I got caught in 30 mph winds a few years ago and just had to run downwind for a few hours. (one reef in the main and 100% jib or so unfurled) No way would the Bristol point into that kind of breeze in the bay with it's closely spaced and steep waves.

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Mom and Dad owned one brand new (traded in a 3 year Mighty Pearson 30 against it) - Tall Rig in EASTERN LI - Greenport.  Loved it.  Solid hull and the Atomic 4 is unbreakable and you can fix anything that breaks on it in 4 hours and for less than 100 bucks.

The boats were solid hulls, and while there was a problem with the first 100 boats with the chain plates all were retrofitted by Pearson.  It was on the short list before the B36.7.  One thing to check is the bottom of the mast and mast step.  Dan's site is still online but I don't think he is updating it, and haven't talked to him for awhile.  Keel is bolted and u have a fiberglass tail on it.

You will do well down in the Southern Ches Bay in the non-spin or B fleet with that boat.  She loves a reach too.  I talked to the guy that owned your boat, you got spinnaker gear too, draft good for around here,  just add sails, or as they ads used to say:

"Pearson Yachts - Instant fun - just add water"  look me up and tell me you own here and I buy you a drink!

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1 hour ago, thomm124 said:

Yeah, looks like I'd be trading one old boat for another old boat that needs quite a few things like autopilot, a good anchor or 2, instruments repaired or upgraded, and a bottom job. Plus all the running rigging is dirty etc

The Pearson 10M would definitely be more efficient and faster but my old Bristol may be better for the sailing I do these days. Also, I single hand most of the time and the bay and it's tributaries can get quite shallow. The Bristol 27 draws 4' , the Pearson close to 6'.

On top of that, the wind can jump up quickly to 20-25 knots and the Bristol doesn't seem to mind that. I'm sure the Pearson would do fine as well but would be quite the handful for a singlehander.

I got caught in 30 mph winds a few years ago and just had to run downwind for a few hours. (one reef in the main and 100% jib or so unfurled) No way would the Bristol point into that kind of breeze in the bay with it's closely spaced and steep waves.

I think this is better than "trading one old boat for another."

Call up your Bristol and the P-10M in your browser in sailboatdata.com in separate tabs and flip back and forth between them.

  • The P-10M has 10 *feet* more waterline. That translates to better performance.
  • The P-10M has a better SA:D ratio than the Bristol.

The 10M isn't a rocket ship but in terms of performance and comfort it looks like an upgrade. Maybe I'm wrong but I thought that shallow draft was less of a concern down in your area compared to the middle and northern bay. One feature that I don't like, is the high aspect, skinny main. That boat is headsail driven, and you'll be dragging a 155% genoa around the mast on light air days, but ces't la vie. This boat will handle a 30kt breeze and Chesapeake chop well enough. You'll at least be able to sail home without running off.

I know how you feel about moving from a boat that you've fixed up and cleaned up, to a boat where you have to start all over again. I'm doing that now. I groused about it, but the new boat has been totally worth it.

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1 hour ago, Ajax said:

I think this is better than "trading one old boat for another."

Call up your Bristol and the P-10M in your browser in sailboatdata.com in separate tabs and flip back and forth between them.

  • The P-10M has 10 *feet* more waterline. That translates to better performance.
  • The P-10M has a better SA:D ratio than the Bristol.

The 10M isn't a rocket ship but in terms of performance and comfort it looks like an upgrade. Maybe I'm wrong but I thought that shallow draft was less of a concern down in your area compared to the middle and northern bay. One feature that I don't like, is the high aspect, skinny main. That boat is headsail driven, and you'll be dragging a 155% genoa around the mast on light air days, but ces't la vie. This boat will handle a 30kt breeze and Chesapeake chop well enough. You'll at least be able to sail home without running off.

I know how you feel about moving from a boat that you've fixed up and cleaned up, to a boat where you have to start all over again. I'm doing that now. I groused about it, but the new boat has been totally worth it.

Yeah, I do the sailboatdata thing almost daily with this boat and many others.

I know how much better the Pearson could be than the Bristol as far as speed (and pointing) but I don't race much anymore. I raced for maybe 15 years on the Florida Gulf Coast with four different Beach Cats (Hobie 16 (2), Nacra 6.0, Nacra Inter/F-17) usually most every weekend for 9-10 months/year. The last one was for singlehanders and it had a spinnaker. It got quite interesting buoy racing approaching and rounding the downwind mark in traffic

As far as depth, it's fine right here where the boat is docked but I usually sail to Kiptopeke then up the bay a ways (on one side or the other) and usually sail in one creek or the other to anchor overnight. It's very shallow. I plan to sail up Occohannock Creek next trip North and I think it's 4.5' over the bar

I grew up on the Eastern Shore so I know how shallow it can be. We fished both the bayside and seaside quite extensively back in the day on old/ancient power boats with no radios and iffy engines

I've run aground quite a few times with the 4' draft on this Bristol sailing back passed where the channel markers are in a couple creeks. I even hit the shoal off Kiptopeke (Latimer Shoal) once trying to cross it on low tide. I'd hate to run aground with a bolt on keel

Also, I can usually manhandle this small Bristol if I get in trouble either in heavy weather or from running aground. And as far as running off in 30 mph winds, I was headed downwind to Kiptopeke from Onancock anyway. it's just that the wind got up a bit more that expected/forecast from the front that passed overnight, and I had to hand steer because the autopilot couldn't keep up

Then there's the wheel. I've never owner a sailboat with a wheel. All have had tillers.

I'll keep an eye on the Pearson though (it's at my marina) and continue thinking over buying it. I sort of wish it wasn't at my marina where I see it most every day

 

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3 hours ago, thomm124 said:

Then there's the wheel. I've never owner a sailboat with a wheel. All have had tillers.

I was the same way.  It's taken me most of the season to completely rid myself of the wrong reflexes.

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On ‎9‎/‎21‎/‎2017 at 10:57 AM, sail69 said:

Loved the 10M.  Sails sweetly (even in light air) and looks just as sweet.

My  buddy has owned on for 15 years and still enjoys the heck out of her.

Built like all Pearsons...solid and low-tech.

Cant go wrong with a well maintained example.

Interiors were a little sterile, but that was of the era.

Going from a Bristol 27 to this will be very satisfying.   Especially upwind.

 

 

 

You're friends with that guy? I figured everyone just pretended to like him so they could hang with his wife.

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On 9/26/2017 at 5:42 PM, slap said:

I was the same way.  It's taken me most of the season to completely rid myself of the wrong reflexes.

I was a hard-core tiller person as well. After a certain size and displacement, a wheel *may* be a more appropriate choice. Depends.

Yes, it added a layer of systems complexity with maintenance and all that, but Edson steering gear is very robust and maintenance mainly consists of inspection and lubrication. The loss of "feel" wasn't as bad as I feared. I can still tell pretty quickly when a steering correction is required and I can still feel the forces at work on the rudder.

A wheel isn't hateful.

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1 hour ago, Ajax said:

I was a hard-core tiller person as well. After a certain size and displacement, a wheel *may* be a more appropriate choice. Depends.

Yes, it added a layer of systems complexity with maintenance and all that, but Edson steering gear is very robust and maintenance mainly consists of inspection and lubrication. The loss of "feel" wasn't as bad as I feared. I can still tell pretty quickly when a steering correction is required and I can still feel the forces at work on the rudder.

A wheel isn't hateful.

The only thing I like about a wheel is that you can sit further aft in the boat.  So it is easier to be under the bimini - a big plus on hot light wind summer days on the Chesapeake.

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1 hour ago, SloopJonB said:

Apparently you have never sailed a hydraulic wheel.

+++111

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On September 24, 2017 at 8:50 AM, thomm124 said:

When I was looking the boat over, I had the owner open the engine compartment then start the engine. There was almost no gas smell which surprised me and the engine was very clean with new looking plugs. It was cold to the touch and started immediately. (the ventilation fan also worked which he turned on before starting) The young man that owns it now is military and will soon leave the area. The PO was "an old guy" that raced it in Hampton for years. The boat needs TLC but appears to be pretty solid which good sails.

 

 

Sounds good but issues like overheating which is fairly common in  A4s  wouldn't necessarily show up until the boats  pushed under load. On the plus side  A4s are easy to maintain and rebuild.

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5 hours ago, JPD said:

Sounds good but issues like overheating which is fairly common in  A4s  wouldn't necessarily show up until the boats  pushed under load. On the plus side  A4s are easy to maintain and rebuild.

Thanks, good point.

If I actually consider buying it, I'll have the owner motor us out to the bay.

 

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So does it sound totally different in reverse on most boats with the A-4 gear box?

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If you are concerned about draft you might look at the P-33. One generation older than 10M. Keel centerboard. Well built, easily handled, shoal draft, and probably less than 15G for a good one.

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2 hours ago, thomm124 said:

So does it sound totally different in reverse on most boats with the A-4 gear box?

Yes.  It uses a band brake to get things spinning the other way,  if I recall. A very unique sound,  but nothing to worry about. 

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