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      Abbreviated rules   07/28/2017

      Underdawg did an excellent job of explaining the rules.  Here's the simplified version: Don't insinuate Pedo.  Warning and or timeout for a first offense.  PermaFlick for any subsequent offenses Don't out members.  See above for penalties.  Caveat:  if you have ever used your own real name or personal information here on the forums since, like, ever - it doesn't count and you are fair game. If you see spam posts, report it to the mods.  We do not hang out in every thread 24/7 If you see any of the above, report it to the mods by hitting the Report button in the offending post.   We do not take action for foul language, off-subject content, or abusive behavior unless it escalates to persistent stalking.  There may be times that we might warn someone or flick someone for something particularly egregious.  There is no standard, we will know it when we see it.  If you continually report things that do not fall into rules #1 or 2 above, you may very well get a timeout yourself for annoying the Mods with repeated whining.  Use your best judgement. Warnings, timeouts, suspensions and flicks are arbitrary and capricious.  Deal with it.  Welcome to anarchy.   If you are a newbie, there are unwritten rules to adhere to.  They will be explained to you soon enough.  
my36

East Coast version of a Moore 24

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I follow Webb Chiles Moore 24 adventures and am inspired to try sailing something more exciting than the larger cruising boats I'm used to.  

I'd like to find something:

  • about 20 to 26 feet (flexible here)
  • not too expensive ($10k +/-)
  • sails well in all conditions, especially upwind
  • will keep me safe as possible (despite my incompetence) 
  • available on the east coast

I'm probably not going to race it much and interior accommodations are not important to me.  I Moore 24 seems to fit the bill on most of my requirements except east coast availability (and price?).  I also realize I'll probably have to compromise on the requirements.

Suggestions?

 

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my36,

There's a well prepped Evelyn 26 in Raritan Bay that is looking for a new owner.  Did very well and collected a lot of silverware.  PM me for details.

--Matt

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There's a perfect Moore 24sc  here for sale, on a trailer - shipped to the West Coast you'd be looking at $ 25 k-ish,  but it's got a new rig, winches, sails, perfect Gel-coat bottom and deck, all update mods done at the factory.  You could drive it cross-country with just about anything bigger than a Vespa.  Might be more than you'd like to spend but you wouldn't have to re-do fucking ANYTHING.  So ask yerself - do you want to sail or do boat work.   Just sayin' - if that's what you want,  and I could certainly see why. That boat is a bit magic.

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I would go with Egon's Ev 26, If I were you 

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7 hours ago, my36 said:

I follow Webb Chiles Moore 24 adventures and am inspired to try sailing something more exciting than the larger cruising boats I'm used to.  

I'd like to find something:

  • about 20 to 26 feet (flexible here)
  • not too expensive ($10k +/-)
  • sails well in all conditions, especially upwind
  • will keep me safe as possible (despite my incompetence) 
  • available on the east coast

I'm probably not going to race it much and interior accommodations are not important to me.  I Moore 24 seems to fit the bill on most of my requirements except east coast availability (and price?).  I also realize I'll probably have to compromise on the requirements.

Suggestions?

 

Well, you can just get a Moore 24. They are not all that rare on the East Coast. However I think you are a bit mistaking the nature of the beast.........

The Moore 24 is not a boat to keep one "safe as possible regardless of skill/attention level." It's a mini-sled, a boat designed to go fast downwind and to race in light/flat(ish) water. It would be exciting to cruise in, and pretty damn uncomfortable. The cockpit is a masterpiece of 1970s ergonomics ie a torture box.

Here's how to find what you want- go to a club of PHRF racers and get yourself a spot crewing on a 25ish footer. Sail with them a few times, get to know the work invovled and help enough to get hands-on familiarity; then move to a different boat. This might take a year or two but you would end up know what the fuck you're doing and knowing you're getting a boat that will do what you want, instead of farting around asking strangers on the internet.

BTW if you had posted a nice traditional offering (tit pics) you'd get much better answers

FB- Doug

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15 minutes ago, Steam Flyer said:

Well, you can just get a Moore 24. They are not all that rare on the East Coast. However I think you are a bit mistaking the nature of the beast.........

The Moore 24 is not a boat to keep one "safe as possible regardless of skill/attention level." It's a mini-sled, a boat designed to go fast downwind and to race in light/flat(ish) water. It would be exciting to cruise in, and pretty damn uncomfortable. The cockpit is a masterpiece of 1970s ergonomics ie a torture box.

Here's how to find what you want- go to a club of PHRF racers and get yourself a spot crewing on a 25ish footer. Sail with them a few times, get to know the work invovled and help enough to get hands-on familiarity; then move to a different boat. This might take a year or two but you would end up know what the fuck you're doing and knowing you're getting a boat that will do what you want, instead of farting around asking strangers on the internet.

BTW if you had posted a nice traditional offering (tit pics) you'd get much better answers

FB- Doug

Good comments regarding the Moore 24. Regarding Webb Chiles sailing one around the world, you have to remember this is a guy who attempted a circumnavigation back in the 80's(90s?) in a Drascombe Lugger, which is an 18 foot open boat.(he got most of the way around the globe IIRC)

A Moore 24 is an absolute palace compared to that boat.

They are a rare beast on the right coast though. I've only seen one in person in over 40 years of racing and cruising.(and my eyes are still hurting from the sighting! LOL)

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6 minutes ago, Squalamax said:

Good comments regarding the Moore 24. Regarding Webb Chiles sailing one around the world, you have to remember this is a guy who attempted a circumnavigation back in the 80's(90s?) in a Drascombe Lugger, which is an 18 foot open boat.(he got most of the way around the globe IIRC)

A Moore 24 is an absolute palace compared to that boat.

They are a rare beast on the right coast though. I've only seen one in person in over 40 years of racing and cruising.(and my eyes are still hurting from the sighting! LOL)

I know of more than a couple so I didn't think they were rare. FWIW I also think they're good looking boats.

A J27 would not be a bad pick (suggested byKraftwerk, above). Going by D/L ratio, the Moore is about 90 (I think that's without crew) and the J-27 is about 140. Wavelength is a bit lighter, again I suspect that's bare boat weight not sailing displacement. The Wavelength would also be relatively inexpensive to put together. How about an Olson 25? Pocket Rocket? Wylie Wabbit (ok that one might be a little scary)?

What I hear the OP really saying is, he wants a smaller, more fun boat, that won't make him feel like death is imminent if he takes it out in rough conditions, that won't cost over $10k. Not a bad request at all. I think there are probably a bunch of racy racer-cruisers that would suit. Going a little bigger ups the capacity for supplies but makes it cost more especially to equip properly. Impulse 26? Soverel 26? Kirby 25?

FB- Doug

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26 minutes ago, Steam Flyer said:

Impulse 26?

IIRC, the Impulse had a pretty spindly rig with runners?  Not a boat I would want to single hand in rough conditions.

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2 hours ago, Steam Flyer said:

The Moore 24 is not a boat to keep one "safe as possible regardless of skill/attention level." It's a mini-sled, a boat designed to go fast downwind and to race in light/flat(ish) water. It would be exciting to cruise in, and pretty damn uncomfortable. The cockpit is a masterpiece of 1970s ergonomics ie a torture box.

FB- Doug

the moore was designed and built in santa cruz, light/flat water was definitely not a design emphasis. uphill the boat loses about 3/4 of a kt in steep, short period chop but still tracks at 5+ kts without issue. as for the cockpit, it's a huge improvement ergonomically over others of it's pedigree (think coamings and moulded benches/seats). sleeps the entire family but consecutive days will take a toll with any time spent "downstairs"

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3 hours ago, Steam Flyer said:

The Moore 24 is ... designed to go fast downwind and to race in light/flat(ish) water.

Wait - what? Here's a Moore in its element, typical NorCal ocean conditions.
Sorry about the photo quality - I took it, but I couldn't find the original so I snipped it from Latitude 38 on line.

barbaloot.JPG

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Light air east coast a Wavelength 24 is a good all around performer, used to be a PHRF killer around Tampa Bay. Has decent volume also that a Moore does not have.

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Light air flat water boat - that is good stuff!  That's why you don't see them much on the east coast - too much light air & flat water for em....:P

I've personally brought 3 Moore 24's back from the East coast to our light air & flat waters....any more left I can bring back?

9311-x3.jpg

https://ballardsailor.wordpress.com/2016/10/10/moore-fun-pssc/

If you can't find a Moore - get a J/27 or an Olson 25 if you want an interior.  When Webb asked me if I thought a Moore 24 would be a good boat to sail around the world, I laughed a little to myself and then said Webb, if you can hang on the Moore will get you there, you sail on a Moore, not in a Moore.

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More like you WEAR the Moore.

To the OP - if you haven't logged a bunch of hours in a variety of small keel boats,  do yourself a BIG favor and duct tape your wallet shut for a while.   You don't know what you don't know.

 

 

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1 hour ago, Ballard Sailor said:

Light air flat water boat - that is good stuff!  That's why you don't see them much on the east coast - too much light air & flat water for em....:P

I've personally brought 3 Moore 24's back from the East coast to our light air & flat waters....any more left I can bring back?

9311-x3.jpg

https://ballardsailor.wordpress.com/2016/10/10/moore-fun-pssc/

If you can't find a Moore - get a J/27 or an Olson 25 if you want an interior.  When Webb asked me if I thought a Moore 24 would be a good boat to sail around the world, I laughed a little to myself and then said Webb, if you can hang on the Moore will get you there, you sail on a Moore, not in a Moore.

Right... it's an awesome heavy air boat.... that's why it's flogging the main and obviously pounding like a dwarf with a new hammer. Didn't mean to hurt your feelings.

The Moore is quite a good boat in many ways, perhaps I didn't start out by saying that loudly and repeatedly before making my little comment? They sail best to their rating in either 1- long downwind or 2- light air and non-choppy water. It's a light boat. Getting hurt by chop goes with the territory. BTW I've sailed out of Santa Cruz, what they have there is swells not chop. Other West Coast places, sure.

BTW I like the updated cockpit and would like to try that one. Personally, if the proportions are done right, I find a boat with coamings and bench seats to be nice in a keelboat. But then I don't like having water rush over my butt, if I wanted to do that I'd sail a dinghy. As you said, "on" rather than "in." Although having chunks taken out of your shins lessens the motivation IMHO.

FB- Doug

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7 hours ago, Steam Flyer said:

Well, you can just get a Moore 24. They are not all that rare on the East Coast. However I think you are a bit mistaking the nature of the beast.........

The Moore 24 is not a boat to keep one "safe as possible regardless of skill/attention level." It's a mini-sled, a boat designed to go fast downwind and to race in light/flat(ish) water. It would be exciting to cruise in, and pretty damn uncomfortable. The cockpit is a masterpiece of 1970s ergonomics ie a torture box.

Here's how to find what you want- go to a club of PHRF racers and get yourself a spot crewing on a 25ish footer. Sail with them a few times, get to know the work invovled and help enough to get hands-on familiarity; then move to a different boat. This might take a year or two but you would end up know what the fuck you're doing and knowing you're getting a boat that will do what you want, instead of farting around asking strangers on the internet.

BTW if you had posted a nice traditional offering (tit pics) you'd get much better answers

FB- Doug

+1, but silly to consider a moore in Hawaii.

PS--

someone suggested J/24.  Doesnt sail well in any condition and is not safe, so i dont understand this suggestion.

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I've sailed the Moore 24 in light and heavy air.

There is nothing on the east coast that is an equal to the Moore 24.

Maybe that is why an old Moore 24 that should be trashed is still worth more than most boats it's size with new sails are worth.

I'd trade my boat that has almost everything new on it for a decent Moore 24.

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I just bought a Moore last week have to fix up the deck first before using it. I also own a Santa Cruz 27 #43 that is a awesome boat PHRF is 144 for where I live thinking of selling it if the Moore lives up to its name. If you are interested give me a text 8077081506 I can send pictures 

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9 hours ago, Steam Flyer said:

Well, you can just get a Moore 24. They are not all that rare on the East Coast. However I think you are a bit mistaking the nature of the beast.........

The Moore 24 is not a boat to keep one "safe as possible regardless of skill/attention level." It's a mini-sled, a boat designed to go fast downwind and to race in light/flat(ish) water. It would be exciting to cruise in, and pretty damn uncomfortable. The cockpit is a masterpiece of 1970s ergonomics ie a torture box.

Here's how to find what you want- go to a club of PHRF racers and get yourself a spot crewing on a 25ish footer. Sail with them a few times, get to know the work invovled and help enough to get hands-on familiarity; then move to a different boat. This might take a year or two but you would end up know what the fuck you're doing and knowing you're getting a boat that will do what you want, instead of farting around asking strangers on the internet.

BTW if you had posted a nice traditional offering (tit pics) you'd get much better answers

FB- Doug

Obviously, you don't follow the double dammed. 

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4 hours ago, Steam Flyer said:

Right... it's an awesome heavy air boat.... that's why it's flogging the main and obviously pounding like a dwarf with a new hammer. Didn't mean to hurt your feelings.

The Moore is quite a good boat in many ways, perhaps I didn't start out by saying that loudly and repeatedly before making my little comment? They sail best to their rating in either 1- long downwind or 2- light air and non-choppy water. It's a light boat. Getting hurt by chop goes with the territory. BTW I've sailed out of Santa Cruz, what they have there is swells not chop. Other West Coast places, sure.

BTW I like the updated cockpit and would like to try that one. Personally, if the proportions are done right, I find a boat with coamings and bench seats to be nice in a keelboat. But then I don't like having water rush over my butt, if I wanted to do that I'd sail a dinghy. As you said, "on" rather than "in." Although having chunks taken out of your shins lessens the motivation IMHO.

FB- Doug

It's blowing 35 knots in this picture, and we just rounded the leeward mark - you'll notice the chute still being stored.

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15 minutes ago, Ballard Sailor said:

It's blowing 35 knots in this picture, and we just rounded the leeward mark - you'll notice the chute still being stored.

Yeah, 

Moore 24's are no fun to sail when it's over 30 and choppy... :D

9367-X3.jpg

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Simply put there is no substitute for a Moore, if you want one buy one. If you don't you will regret. 

Re: Moore being a light air upwind boat that's total bs. We have held our own double handed on upwind races, granted downwind is a lot more fun. 

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I have a J/27. If you find one that isn't water logged or completely rotted out down below, you will have yourself an excellent little boat that sails well in most conditions.  It's not hard to get up to speed, easy to maintain and sails are "reasonable".   They are fairly sturdy in terms of build and love big breeze.  The deep, stern hung rudder will get you out of most operator induced driving errors and the boat really has no bad habits other than it's a little sticky in the real light stuff.

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Well, I've owned 2 Moore 24's, an Express 27, a Santa Cruz 27, 2 Olson 30's, a Capo 26, and a Merit 25- oh yeah, 2 J24's also.  If you're cruising round, if you can find a Capo 26 they go upwind really well in any condition, and they were usually really well made and don't cost a lot.( they weigh quite a bit like many MORC boats did)  A Moore 24 is the easiest to sail to 100% without a big crew, an Olson can be a handful but will survive anything except a dock in a hurricane and are fun when their bow is underwater downwind, a Santa Cruz 27 is pretty tough, but doesn't do as well with its bow underwater, and has a fairly large safe cockpit, an Express  27 has a bit more room and is easy to sail, I wouldn't like sailing a J24 well offshore due to occasional sinking, Since you don't have a ton of money, that pretty well excludes a Moore and an Express.  A J27 would be a nice boat too.  I'd read up on people's adventures in long ocean races on small boats- and go with boats that are proven to last.  I'd also read up on boat build quality!!!  Also, are you keeping the boat in the water?  I'd also consider a boat that's not near you, as small boats are easily delivered.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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7 minutes ago, DRDNA said:

Well, I've owned 2 Moore 24's, an Express 27, a Santa Cruz 27, 2 Olson 30's, a Capo 26, and a Merit 25- oh yeah, 2 J24's also.

How many wives?

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i forgot the 2 Zap 26 boats on the list, then there's the dingy collection.  As far as wives?? ONE was more than enough!    Good question Cal20sailor.

 

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12 hours ago, LALUCHAMOORE said:

Yeah, 

Moore 24's are no fun to sail when it's over 30 and choppy... :D

9367-X3.jpg

Hey! It's the Schwenkmeister!

Hi Andy!

Carries grill on stern pulpit. Podiums. banana.gif

 

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Goes well up wind? I don't know if the Holland 25 was ever popular over there, but there are plenty kicking about down here in Aus. I learned to sail crewing one of these as a kid, and she'd power upwind in 30-40 knots (so long as the owner didn't try to carry too much sail - #4 and 2 reefs, and she'd keep up with many many bigger, supposedly faster boats).... Downwind was ok up to hull speed, after that she'd just dig a huge hole in the water - not to mention roll!

http://www.boatpoint.com.au/boats/holland/25/

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ixVgHz6zSGM

Pretty good headroom for a 25'er too.

2.jpg

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Express 27, Olson 30 and R Holland 30 if it’s available or, Cal 9.2(Holland désigne.)

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12 minutes ago, cpt_757 said:

Express 27, Olson 30 and R Holland 30 if it’s available or, Cal 9.2(Holland désigne.)

All great boats but the Express and Olson need rail meat in a big way.  Was on a winning boat on an Olson 30 and we had 8 guys on the rail.  The express does well with 5.  The lighter boats (as someone previously mentioned) need the power to punch through chop but without folks on the rail, you can't get there.  I'd up my budget by a few K and get an S2 7.9.  Great all around boat, easily trailerable, biggest cabin of a 26' that I have seen.  

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22 hours ago, DRDNA said:

Well, I've owned 2 Moore 24's, an Express 27, a Santa Cruz 27, 2 Olson 30's, a Capo 26, and a Merit 25- oh yeah, 2 J24's also.  If you're cruising round, if you can find a Capo 26 they go upwind really well in any condition, and they were usually really well made and don't cost a lot.( they weigh quite a bit like many MORC boats did)  A Moore 24 is the easiest to sail to 100% without a big crew, an Olson can be a handful but will survive anything except a dock in a hurricane and are fun when their bow is underwater downwind, a Santa Cruz 27 is pretty tough, but doesn't do as well with its bow underwater, and has a fairly large safe cockpit, an Express  27 has a bit more room and is easy to sail, I wouldn't like sailing a J24 well offshore due to occasional sinking, Since you don't have a ton of money, that pretty well excludes a Moore and an Express.  A J27 would be a nice boat too.  I'd read up on people's adventures in long ocean races on small boats- and go with boats that are proven to last.  I'd also read up on boat build quality!!!  Also, are you keeping the boat in the water?  I'd also consider a boat that's not near you, as small boats are easily delivered.

 

Great perspective, I have not sailed all these different boats.

OTOH my perspective is that -any- boat can go thru gales, upwind etc, with the right outfitting and the right skill set. I've sailed boats like 470s in 35+ so have seen a bit of this in practice. The Olson 30 for example can fly downwind but is best handled by a large muscular crew and tends to nosedive. I like frac rigs

Lots of small-ish racing-type keelboats available for small coin but outfitting them is going to push the cost up to the top of the OP's price range IMHO. The best ones aren't going to be available for small coin anyway.

FB- Doug

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In addition to the above suggestions, there are a few old Farr 727s around here and there. Olson 25 would be palatial vs Moore. Slower, but likely less expensive. I would think Wavelength a bit over canvassed for single handing. Lots of old MORC boats rotting here & there. Lindenburg 26, Capo 26, Wavelength 30 jump to mind. Sov 26 is a good design if not too soggy. I would also consider Laser 28.

As mentioned above, tape yer wallet shut and go crew on boats like this. Then pull the trigger if you are still dreaming of Webb's adventures. Webb Chiles is not a typical person, and what he does is certainly not for everyone.

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Ya, Soverel 26, does this light boat require rail meat, too?

Express and Olson were doing well by singlehnders.

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So, tell me how can we solve those issues of lighter boats with short handed.

is there any way to cover this disadvantage of light displacement boats. Please.

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38 minutes ago, cpt_757 said:

So, tell me how can we solve those issues of lighter boats with short handed.

is there any way to cover this disadvantage of light displacement boats. Please.

Get a bigger boat

Change keel configuration to deep carbon or alum fin and big-ass bulb (ie lower VCG by enough to make a difference)

Water ballast tanks & hi-capacity pump system

Make rig efficient to depower and learn to sail the boat to best effect

You will need to do this last anyway so it's the best place to start. You may decide, after some experience, that it's enough and the other "solutions" (which of course bring other problems) are too much $$ and trouble.

FB- Doug

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8 minutes ago, Steam Flyer said:

lower VCG by enough to make a difference)

That’s I was thinking about, maybe in future. For now I am still in my envelop on handling.

water ballast may good idea but requires expense more..

thank you so much,

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I had a Morgan 27 that was a good forgiving boat.  They can be had for your price range, although you will have to deal with a masthead rig.  If you want performance, something like this will probably go both ways pretty well.  But it will cost you (not $10k :) ).  Oh, and I also let Paul know that I think his rig dimensions are off.  17 meter I dimension on a 25 footer seems a little oversexed.

Edited by sam_crocker

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On 9/22/2017 at 6:40 PM, Ballard Sailor said:

Light air flat water boat - that is good stuff!  That's why you don't see them much on the east coast - too much light air & flat water for em....:P

I've personally brought 3 Moore 24's back from the East coast to our light air & flat waters....any more left I can bring back?

 

https://ballardsailor.wordpress.com/2016/10/10/moore-fun-pssc/

If you can't find a Moore - get a J/27 or an Olson 25 if you want an interior.  When Webb asked me if I thought a Moore 24 would be a good boat to sail around the world, I laughed a little to myself and then said Webb, if you can hang on the Moore will get you there, you sail on a Moore, not in a Moore.

 

that's pretty funny...  you must have sailed on some pretty spartan boats if you think an Olson 25 has an interior..

back to OP,  with some of the boats listed, cruising around with a porta potty is going to get old fast...  just sayin...

 

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On 9/24/2017 at 9:25 AM, cpt_757 said:

So, tell me how can we solve those issues of lighter boats with short handed.

is there any way to cover this disadvantage of light displacement boats. Please.

You use efficient, and tiny, headsails. Almost always one reef in the main. Be smart: do whatever it takes to get the job done. ULDBs are indeed different boats without weight on the rail. They sail just fine shorthanded. When the wind does lighten go full hoist and be glad you don't have a thousand pounds of railmeat to drag around. And feed.

I love that racing grill on the Moore. That there is 100% Moore attitude.

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On 9/22/2017 at 4:53 PM, Schnappi said:

Merit 25? 

There's a Merit 25 in/near Hampton, VA for around $2.,000 that I think may still be for sail. It was on craigslist (may be off now) but I have the phone number of the owner if you want it.

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24 minutes ago, daddle said:

I love that racing grill on the Moore. That there is 100% Moore attitude.

it sucks when they don't fly the daily menu flag and you have to guess what the smells coming from the grill are....

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Compared to a Moore 24 the Olson 25 is a palace inside!  The Moore interior was designed by the same guy who did the interior design of the phone booth.

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1 hour ago, daddle said:

You use efficient, and tiny, headsails. Almost always one reef in the main. Be smart: do whatever it takes to get the job done. ULDBs are indeed different boats without weight on the rail. They sail just fine shorthanded. When the wind does lighten go full hoist and be glad you don't have a thousand pounds of railmeat to drag around. And feed.

I love that racing grill on the Moore. That there is 100% Moore attitude.

Thanks!

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43 minutes ago, sailronin said:

Compared to a Moore 24 the Olson 25 is a palace inside!  The Moore interior was designed by the same guy who did the interior design of the phone booth.

You only go below on a Moore 24 to:

Grab a new sail and stow the old sail

Bring more beer up to the cockpit

Bring sandwiches up to the cockpit (or something to put on the grill...love that Moore with the bbq)

Find duct tape and band-aids

Smoke dope after the racing is done (how many times have I seen the billows rising from the foredeck hatch in SC harbor? Too many to count)

 

And for those among us below the age of 30, a phone booth is a contraption that existed in the previous century to allow people to make phone calls with some protection from the elements and a modicum of privacy. Oh, and so Superman could strip down (he's so modest)

 

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Just to reinforce this point - thinking that YOU can sail a Moore 24 offshore because Webb Chiles sailed one around the world is akin to buying the same bike Chris Froome has and expecting to place well in the tour.

It's the singer,  not the song.

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15 hours ago, Great Red Shark said:

Just to reinforce this point - thinking that YOU can sail a Moore 24 offshore because Webb Chiles sailed one around the world is akin to buying the same bike Chris Froome has and expecting to place well in the tour.

It's the singer,  not the song.

I like to Point out that a Moore 24 won the Pacific Cup overall last summer. Did the trip in a shade over 10 days! They had a 24 hr Average one day of only 10 miles less than a SC 70 in the same water. Bottom line is, the Moore 24 is one of the best small offshore boats ever built. Like Ballard Sailor said, you sail on a Moore not in one.

I dont think i would want to sail around the world in one, but I would not feel unsafe.

As far as an Evelyn 26 goes....With the poor build quality of my 32, I would want to make sure the 26 was up to snuff.

 

 

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J-24 is a great little boat. Sure, if you sail around on an early one with the cockpit lockers unsecured, the main companionway open, the hatch boards out, in big air, and carry a chute, and broach, and fail to run a sheet or guy, then there's a chance you might sink one.  Plus there is more than enough unused volume in one to put float bags or foam in to keep it afloat if you insist on doing all the poor seamanship items mentioned above. You hear more about J-24's sinking than most other boats just do to the sheer numbers of them out getting raced hard.

Nothing against Moore 24s, also a great little boat, esp if your racing to Hawaii

Olson 25 is a great all-rounder too...

 

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On 9/24/2017 at 8:59 AM, Cal20sailor said:

To Hawaii, sure.  Up and down, no way.

You do know that "Idefix" an Olson 30 won the 2010 SHTP, sailed back to Seattle then sailed the 2012 SHTP and from there on to Australia. 

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10 hours ago, tendegreealex said:

I like to Point out that a Moore 24 won the Pacific Cup overall last summer. Did the trip in a shade over 10 days! They had a 24 hr Average one day of only 10 miles less than a SC 70 in the same water. Bottom line is, the Moore 24 is one of the best small offshore boats ever built. Like Ballard Sailor said, you sail on a Moore not in one.

I dont think i would want to sail around the world in one, but I would not feel unsafe.

As far as an Evelyn 26 goes....With the poor build quality of my 32, I would want to make sure the 26 was up to snuff.

 

 

I don't remember us having a 24 hour run within 10 miles of a sc70, but we were sending it. We did have a 240 mile day. 

I rember Mark and I guessing at our daily 8am runs. On the 240 mile day we both were way off, I guessed 213 and mark 208. I our defense we had been running without instruments 18 hours during the day and had rounded down so hard at 2 am that we tacked.  I love the moore offshore!! 

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19 hours ago, Ian Rogers said:

I don't remember us having a 24 hour run within 10 miles of a sc70, but we were sending it. We did have a 240 mile day. 

I rember Mark and I guessing at our daily 8am runs. On the 240 mile day we both were way off, I guessed 213 and mark 208. I our defense we had been running without instruments 18 hours during the day and had rounded down so hard at 2 am that we tacked.  I love the moore offshore!! 

Ian,

When I was watching the tracker, you an Bueno Sera were in the same water one day. you only sailed like 15 less miles!

Maybe the tracker was doing weird things, but it was close.

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I owned a Moore 24 and like all the people above there is nothing bad you can say about the boat. Maybe the interior but you do not buy this boat for interior comfort. There is no comfort below on a Moore. I regret selling her and may go back some day. I bought a J27 after the Moore. Great boat also and much greater availablity in your area. Still camping down below but a huge step up in the amount of room. A Moore has great value on the west coast. But not so much if you took one east. Someday you will sell her and the value will not be there in your location. I would look for boats more common to your area . Maybe a J27?

I have not heard anything about Webb's Moore since the hurricane.  Did she survive down in the Keys?

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