Halcyon Yachts

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This guy is either insane or has been hired by someone who is insane.  You have to be insane to own a wooden boat.  Actually, you have to be either insane or in love and it helps to be both.

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54 minutes ago, allene222 said:

This guy is either insane or has been hired by someone who is insane.  You have to be insane to own a wooden boat.  Actually, you have to be either insane or in love and it helps to be both.

There is a reason God made fiberglass.

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1 hour ago, allene222 said:

Actually, you have to be either insane or in love

What's the difference?

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Geez, the dedication is real. Not only to the project but the damn documentation of it as well.

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I sure hope he is successful.  I just wonder what the deal is.  He certainly is not making money off those videos.  I make nothing off mine even with 50,000 views.  Well, I think I made thirteen cents or something.

I should mention for anyone who doesn't know, I have a wood boat,  Some of what he was doing looked all too familiar although mine never got quite to that condition.

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Don't know what his plan is, but there certainly is a market for classic wooden yachts.

Two rules though to attract wealthy buyers.

1- Have a strong pedigree and the "stories" to go with it

2- Be restored to "Bristol fashion"

Tally Ho certainly fully fulfill "rule 1"

 

Good luck to him.

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Jesus, I thought my timber boat project was big, good luck dude, and I mean it, I hope you get a great deal of fulfilment out of the work you are doing.

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It took us five years to rebuild the Vets For Peace Golden Rule, and that was only 30 feet on deck. 

After that, I told my wife to shoot me if I ever bought my own wooden boat. 

Still . . . helping with the Golden Rule was just about the best time and money I ever spent. 

http://www.vfpgoldenruleproject.org/history/

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Thanks for posting this, it looks like it will be a really good series. For being so young he seems to have a good amount of experience. He also has tons of energy, but I cant see how one person could hope to finish this project in any amount of time less than a decade. It also reminds me of my great grandfathers axe. The handle has been replaced 5 times and the head three. But it is still his axe.

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I hope this works out and they can sustain making the videos. It would be the all time most epic wooden boat restoration series. At least he has a really good site and a good shop and he knows what he's doing. Assuming he has continued funding it will be interesting to see how fast he can go. The are huge projects but how many people can really work on them full time either. Maybe this will happen.

Does anyone remember Captain Zanatta doing a rebuild in Nicaragua a few years ago. He was posting regularly on the wooden boat forum. It ended really badly with loss of the boat due to government matters and other issues and what made it doubly tragic was how the great the story was going as he was doing it and writing about it really well.

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On 30/09/2017 at 6:44 AM, Rum Runner said:

There is a reason God made fiberglass.

Spa pools.

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On 2017-09-29 at 4:44 PM, Rum Runner said:

There is a reason God made fiberglass frozen snot.

Fixed for you.

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Massive undertaking in Tally Ho.  Seems a very talented kid, sure hope his funds hold out for the project.

 

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I wouldn't be surprised if he's doing it off his own bat and will be joining Ashley Butler in the boatbuilders-who-have-built/restored-their-liveaboard club. In that vein, I wouldn't be surprised if he gets the hull, deck and rig done (only!), and then puts her back in the water a very rudimentary interior. He does mention some funding from the Albert Strange Society, IIRC.

I do just wonder about the workshop - whether it's lent or what. But anybody who can basically live for nothing, eating out of supermarket rubbish bins, in the pursuit of a dream/plan is a pretty determined guy.

http://www.bristolpost.co.uk/news/bristol-news/man-went-bin-diving-bristol-21465

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Just chipped in $40.

Paging Roger Ball, your countryman needs you!

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On 9/29/2017 at 10:25 PM, casc27 said:

What's the difference?

You know you're in love when she slaps you on the arse and says"You're in, Love."

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Bloody neighbors reported him to the Building Inspector's office.  Seems no matter where you live there's always a prick for a neighbor close by.

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Ehh, Sequim's got some passive/aggressive types out there....

 

Comedy Neighbor.jpg

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4 hours ago, SampsonBoatCo said:

Thanks for all your interest and support, all!

Noble, worthy project.  Excellent coverage as well.  Keep it coming.  

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An extra pair of hands would make a huge difference to this guy. I recall the aluminum dude in Scandanavia getting lots of help, plus SV Seeker is over-subscribed with assistance. And those lovely gals who visited in past videos, where the hell are they? He reminds me of Nike and her boat Karl, determined to do it on his own.

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On 10/17/2017 at 8:03 AM, SampsonBoatCo said:

Thanks for all your interest and support, all!

awesome project man, keep the videos coming, and tell the inspector to fuck off !!

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On 10/17/2017 at 8:03 AM, SampsonBoatCo said:

Thanks for all your interest and support, all!

Great story, great boat! Very best of luck to you.

Tim

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Thanks for all your support and encouragement, all! Much appreciated..

Here is my latest video, as I take a few days away from Tally Ho to deliver the three-masted Schooner Adix... Its a bit of a diversion, I'm afraid, but gives an interesting insight into what it's like to sail a unique boat, and it's all in the name of gathering funds to restore Tally Ho.

Thanks for watching!

http://sampsonboat.co.uk/removing-her-keel/

E
dit; I can't work out how to embed youtube videos on this forum. I'm being dumb (impatient), but if someone wants to do it (& explain), that'd be cool :) 

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11 minutes ago, SampsonBoatCo said:

Edit; I can't work out how to embed youtube videos on this forum. I'm being dumb (impatient), but if someone wants to do it (& explain), that'd be cool

In Youtube, select the share button.  Copy and paste here.  It will load automatically.

Screen Shot 2017-11-09 at 5.37.17 PM.png

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On 11/9/2017 at 7:24 AM, SampsonBoatCo said:

Thanks for all your support and encouragement, all! Much appreciated..

Here is my latest video, as I take a few days away from Tally Ho to deliver the three-masted Schooner Adix... Its a bit of a diversion, I'm afraid, but gives an interesting insight into what it's like to sail a unique boat, and it's all in the name of gathering funds to restore Tally Ho.

Thanks for watching!

http://sampsonboat.co.uk/removing-her-keel/

E
dit; I can't work out how to embed youtube videos on this forum. I'm being dumb (impatient), but if someone wants to do it (& explain), that'd be cool :) 

Madd respect!   Good luck.   Have subscribed and will be following.

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Happy Thanksgiving, Leo. Glad you've got some pleasant company and were able to get some momentum back on the project.

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@SampsonBoatCo    Im curious about your background.  How did you learn all these skills to restore this yacht.  Did you apprentice as wood boat shops?  Go to IYRS? Very impressive.

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Really enjoying these videos and following along. Keep up the good work!!

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I hope he is just taking a seasons holiday break. He's got it pretty torn apart, hope he can get it back together, otherwise it is major firewood time.

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Two things coming from someone who has really only sailed in small boats who are not wood.

1.  Some of that construction is just massive

2.  It is a work of art. 

 

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I have seen several projects this ambitious.  I just have never seen one finish.  People work for years and then just disappear.

There was one old wood boat rebuilt around here.  It was Freda, an 1885 32 foot yacht.  The rebuild took 8 years and cost $500,000.  It is the oldest sailing boat on the West Coast.

One of the unfinished projects was a boat like mine, an L-36.  The plan was to replace all the floors and frames, then replace the planks.  At that point it would be hard to call it a restoration.  He did replace at least some of the floors and frames and then I never heard from him again.

I will be amazed and in awe of this kid if this boat is finished.

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I'd say he's probably heading for the nadir of the project in the next few months. Keel timber's gotta go, which is both a big unbudgeted expense and a psychological blow, with a few more months of shitty weather just to add insult to injury. If he can overcome this and is still at it this summer, he'll gain a lot of momentum and I'd give him good odds of finishing 12-18 months thereafter.

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I like the Japanese scarf joint technique using a block at the center to tighten the fit.

 

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Leo blew his budget on $6K worth of purpleheart. I just chipped in $40 as a bit of cold comfort. If you appreciate projects like this and old school craftsmanship, now would be a good time to act on it.

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Greenheart would have been just as good as Purpleheart at a fraction of the cost but I have no idea of the availability of either in the PNW. If you can get one, you can probably get the other from the same source.

     I knew a guy in the VI who wanted to build a replica of a 'revenue schooner'' and had the project done on the beach in Nevis. He sailed his boat down to Guiana and bought a suitable 45' long greenheart log and TOWED it back to the little native boatyard on the beach in Nevis. Greenheart barely floats.

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My mast step and the floors under it are purple heart.  Really good strong rot resistant wood. I see it is more stable than greenheart.  That might be important for a keel.

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Not sure where you get the 'more stable than greenheart' Allene. I have used both woods for a wide variety of projects from boat keels to furniture and doors and I have never seen anything check as bad as purpleheart in some raised panels for a batch of fancy entry doors for custom homes in the VI. Similar gates to the pool areas that weren't subjected to the uneven heating from tropic sun on one side and airconditioning on the other fared better. I ended up having to make separate inner and outer panels in the Purpleheart and assemble the panels floating in their frames with a layer of that Mylar/Aluminum bubble pack between the two layers to allow them to shrink and contract independently. The Lignum Vitae wood had long been harvested on St John, but you could occasionally find old fence posts from colonial days that were great for steps and gaff throats. Lignum is about as stable as Delrin, maybe more so! 

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Rot Resistance: Purpleheart is rated as being very durable, and resists both decay and most insect attacks, though it has been reported to be susceptible to attack from marine borers.

 

Rot Resistance: Greenheart is rated as very durable, and is also resistant to most insect attacks. It’s also considered to be one of the best-suited woods for use in marine environments, and has good weathering characteristics.

What do you look at when you rate a wood as 'stable'?

I see the Greenheart shows more tangential shrinkage that Purpleheart but when you look at the T/R ratio the 1.1 of Greenheart would seem to me to be more stable overall than the Greenheart with a T/R ratio of 1.7. 

I'll take Greenheart for my keel or wormshoe anyday over Purpleheart despite the published values. 

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I really have no opinion on this. I know Steve used Purple heart for my boat and I read the quote below from the link I sent.  No opinion other than that. I did see the note about bores.  I had some bores on my boat once.  Cost me $100 to get rid of them. One of the least expensive haulouts I ever had.

 

Comments: Greenheart is perhaps the stiffest wood in the world, with an average modulus of elasticity of an astounding 3,716,000 lbf/in2! However, the wood also has a fairly high movement in service, and should not be used in situations where stability is critical.

Greenheart logs are reported to occasionally violently split apart upon sawing—sending pieces of the wood flying. As a result of this unusual characteristic, sawyers wrap chain around the sections of the log that have already been sawn.

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But think about it. It's not how MUCH the wood shrinks - it's how symetric it shrinks. It's the RATIO of Tangential over Radial that'll tell you how symetric your wet turning will dry. All other things being equal, the wood with a T/R Ratio closest to 1 (Tangential and Radial equal) is less likely to crack when dry than a wood with a T/R Ratio of 2.7. It's good to try and work with the wood - but why try and work with wood that, by its nature, must work against you?

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On 1/6/2018 at 7:39 PM, allene222 said:

I have seen several projects this ambitious.  I just have never seen one finish.  People work for years and then just disappear.

There was one old wood boat rebuilt around here.  It was Freda, an 1885 32 foot yacht.  The rebuild took 8 years and cost $500,000.  It is the oldest sailing boat on the West Coast.

One of the unfinished projects was a boat like mine, an L-36.  The plan was to replace all the floors and frames, then replace the planks.  At that point it would be hard to call it a restoration.  He did replace at least some of the floors and frames and then I never heard from him again.

I will be amazed and in awe of this kid if this boat is finished.

 

Does this guy have a source of income, or is he being paid to do this, for someone else?  In the early '70's Mom and her partner in their yacht brokerage business hired a local shipwright to do a similar rebuild on a 45 foot Nova Scotian fishing schooner hull that was in similar condition.  Took years, but when complete, "Alicia", was a fine yacht and we took her to St. Margarets Bay in Nova Scotia and raced against the stripped out schooners up there.  Most of the competition had slim to no interiors, where as we had full on buildout with cabins and bunks, galley, tiny wood stove, head and foc'sl, and the rig was l modeled after the gaff rigged, topsail schooners of the period from Massachusetts.  It was a real treat to be involved with that in my teenaged years. 

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I really question his decision to replace the teak keel. But he would really need to set the boat back in the water to see if it would close up. And easy to second guess him from here. I will say he does seem to know what he is doing.  That joint work was impressive.

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7 minutes ago, allene222 said:

That joint work was impressive.

+1.

I'm in awe of the energy and talent of the kid. Was I like that when I was his age? I doubt it.

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I'm starting to believe he can do it. He's clearly willing to work hard, and clearly knows what he is doing.

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sent in 100 bucks -- good to fund about 20 min of wooden boat restoration (or 10 min of big boat racing)

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relative to the budget, it's concerning that he's cringing over the cost of the first piece of new wood.

  There's a lot more to buy...

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Was trying to figure out the total time from start to finish for that scarf, but it had to be a good 60-100 hours of work from chainsaw to fit.

Such a cool project to follow along with. Reminds me a bit of this kid who built a roundhouse out of logs and cob. Similarly gigantic project for what is essentially one person. He actually finished it, too! I've been following along since the beginning and Leo's videos have me just as excited to watch. He's building a hydro generator right now which is also a really cool project. All very well documented.

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1 hour ago, Raked Aft\\ said:

relative to the budget, it's concerning that he's cringing over the cost of the first piece of new wood.

  There's a lot more to buy...

That major piece was not in the original budget.

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9 minutes ago, Blitz said:

That major piece was not in the original budget.

Granted,  just that a $6k bump to the budget shouldn't be surprise to the project.

 there are going to be many more unexpected expenses down the road.

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I think Leo's plan and budget are open ended. He's already paused the project once to help with a delivery and augment his funds. Sounds like a reasonable plan for a guy facing a very large but unknown level of expenditure and no fixed project timeline.

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I'm surprised he's not getting more volunteer help. Given the number of sailors in the NW and the interest in wooden boats, there should be people clamoring to help, especially in the winter when they can't do much sailing. Then again, I tried to interest my stepson who lives in Seattle to go over and help, but not so far. Sadly I live in the midwest, so I'll send along $100 instead, making my viewing of his videos worth $7 each so far, with viewing prices decreasing until I ante up again.

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In Leo's shoes I'd be a little hesitant to accept "help" from unknown folks unless it's just for jobs that require muscle and no skill. Even then, unless someone knows how to take direction, they can do damage.

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This reminds me of another great project. You guys seen any of Acorn to Arabella?

Couple of guys building a Ingrid 38...and actually starting from the point of cutting down trees and milling their own lumber. They just poured a 4.5 ton lead ballast keel the other day...

 

 

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On 1/29/2018 at 1:00 PM, Aaron vs Sailing said:

This reminds me of another great project. You guys seen any of Acorn to Arabella?

Couple of guys building a Ingrid 38...and actually starting from the point of cutting down trees and milling their own lumber. They just poured a 4.5 ton lead ballast keel the other day...

 

 

 

9,000 pound keel on a 38 footer?  Talk about a freakin' Lead Mine!!

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Who thought molten lead into a plywood case was a good idea?

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On 03/02/2018 at 6:52 AM, billy backstay said:

 

9,000 pound keel on a 38 footer?  Talk about a freakin' Lead Mine!!

Will it even float?

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Will they survive the lead poisoning?

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On 1/29/2018 at 9:40 AM, TheDragon said:

I'm surprised he's not getting more volunteer help. Given the number of sailors in the NW and the interest in wooden boats, there should be people clamoring to help, especially in the winter when they can't do much sailing. Then again, I tried to interest my stepson who lives in Seattle to go over and help, but not so far. Sadly I live in the midwest, so I'll send along $100 instead, making my viewing of his videos worth $7 each so far, with viewing prices decreasing until I ante up again.

Sequim Wa. (where the boat and shop are located) is not very conveniently/centrally located.

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Wow. Have to see the latest video.  Leo travels back to Cornwall to work on a traditional build and tours a previous build that he contributed to. Absolutely gorgeous.  This guy is one hard working MF.  I have no doubt he will complete Tally Ho and enjoy the journey along the way.

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As much as i respect what Leo is doing, i have concerns for this project...

  So far he has acquired some tools,  a nice piece of keel lumber and done a fair amount of demo.

  He is now back  home doing basically odd boat working jobs for some addl cash to keep his project going.

  If you've done boat restoration work for a yard,  I have, you know the pay is paltry at best.

 

  i think he needs to do a reality check on the finish cost of this project and make some hard decisions.  Demolition is cheap.

It's when  you start putting things back together that things get more expensive than you think.

 

  I somehow thought this kid was a trustafarian when i first saw his vids... 

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28 minutes ago, Raked Aft\\ said:

  I somehow thought this kid was a trustafarian when i first saw his vids... 

His accent is straight out of Trustafaria

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This is his third restoration.  I'd wager he will get it done.

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On 30/09/2017 at 6:26 AM, allene222 said:

I sure hope he is successful.  I just wonder what the deal is.  He certainly is not making money off those videos.  I make nothing off mine even with 50,000 views.  Well, I think I made thirteen cents or something.

I should mention for anyone who doesn't know, I have a wood boat,  Some of what he was doing looked all too familiar although mine never got quite to that condition.

He has 460 "Patrons"

Support him with time, tools or money if you think it's worth it, guys like him deserve some support

http://sampsonboat.co.uk/how-to-support-tally-ho/

https://www.patreon.com/sampsonboatco

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On 25/2/2018 at 9:59 AM, southerncross said:

 

Was wood for the floors bent with steam?

 

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11 minutes ago, plenamar said:

Was wood for the floors bent with steam?

 

Didn't look like it, I think he just cut the strips thin enough to bend them with bending. 

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+1.  I have had both steam bent and laminated frames fit in Papoose.  The steam bent ones were not all epoxied up, they were just steam bent and installed.  Either way works but I think what he did is better.  Epoxy is really strong.

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Found this today on Youtube:
 

 

 

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Based on the rapidly growing list of Patreons at the end of his films, I'd say his financial situation has stabilized, if not gotten downright cushy. And I'm glad!

Sounds like he's getting a shit ton of oak milled in GA for the project, the next film should be interesting...

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This is a massive - and in my opinion fascinating - project.

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10 hours ago, IStream said:

Based on the rapidly growing list of Patreons at the end of his films, I'd say his financial situation has stabilized, if not gotten downright cushy. And I'm glad!

Sounds like he's getting a shit ton of oak milled in GA for the project, the next film should be interesting...

I had offered to him to drive the pickup truck somebody donated/loaned to him across from Boston to Seattle and he mentioned that mill in Georgia.  I'm glad he's getting the supplies he needs.  Now that he doesn't need my driving skills (he's going to drive the truck from Boston to the mill in GA), I need to throw some money at him.

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It's a fantastic project but it was a little unnerving in Episode 17 having Luke Powell telling Leo in no uncertain terms that rebuilding rather than building from scratch was going to be a really tough and financially challenging road. Now that Tally Ho's keel timber has been replaced one wonders, restoration philosophy notwithstanding, whether it would be better just to build essentially a new boat by closely copying the old boat and reusing the odd timber here and there. I say that because having watched all the videos in this great series I cannot imagine there is very much salvageable lumber in Tally Ho. Unless I suppose one is willing to spend vast amounts of time scarfing replacement pieces into old ribs. Which might not be so bad but you're essentially rebuilding the boat from the keel up so it's more like a new build. Leo clearly knows his trade, and I'm sure he will come to some practical decision on this matter. It is a wonderful series.

Hey Leo if you're reading this let me know if you need help grant writing. I'd love to come volunteer but I don't have time to get down there. But I'm good at hustling institutional funders....

 

 

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On 3/9/2018 at 11:41 PM, MauiPunter said:

Found this today on Youtube:
 

 

 

 

Class act

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